Jones, Charles Bradlaugh. Died 9th Oct 1917

Charles Bradlaugh JONES’s place of birth was recorded variously as being in Leyton, Poplar or Stratford, London. He was born some while after the April 1881 census. His father Frederick was a cooper.

In 1891 he was enumerated as aged eight and was living with his widowed father and four siblings at 285 High Street, Stratford, London.

By 1901 his father had also died and Charles and his younger siblings were living at 11 Durham Row, Ratcliffe, London, the home of their married elder brother Henry and his wife Elizabeth and baby daughter Lillian. Two of Elizabeth’s younger siblings were there also.   Charles and his elder brother were both working as hairdressers.

By 1911, Charles was now ‘30’ and boarding with the Hessian family at 65 Grosvenor Road, Rugby, and that was no doubt where he met his wife to be, Ellen Daisy Hessian, one of the daughters of the house. Her father was an engine driver.   Charles was then still working as a hairdresser.

Some time before the war Charles seems to have had a change of occupation, going to work at British Thompson Houston (BTH) in their Lamp Factory. Then in 1914, when he was about 33, he married Ellen, now 29; the marriage was registered in Rugby [Rugby, Q3, 1914, 6d, 1551].

It is uncertain exactly when Charles ‘joined up’.   There are no surviving Service Records, but as he did not win the 1915 Star, it was probably after late 1915.   Various men from BTH with the name Jones joined up and served in 1914,[1] however an item in the Rugby Advertiser[2] stated, ‘Jones, Charles, 36 Sandown Road, Rugby’ ‘… enlisted at the Rugby Drill Hall under the Group system’, in late 1915, and this confirms the approximate date when he joined up.

As noted, Charles was living in Rugby, but records also suggest that he enlisted initially in Warwick, as Private, No.32852, in the 1st Battalion (Bn.) of the Gloucestershire Regiment. The 1st Bn. had been at Bordon in August 1914, as part of the 3rd Brigade in the 1st Division, and landed in France at Le Havre on 13 August 1914, well before Charles joined up. The 1st Battalion probably continued to act as a recruiting, training and reinforcement centre in UK.

Charles would later be posted to the 1st/6th Bn. of the Gloucestershire Regiment. The 1st/6th Bn. had been at St Michael’s Hill, Bristol, in August 1914 as part of the Gloucester and Worcester Brigade of the South Midland Division. On mobilisation they moved to Swindon and very soon after to Maldon in Essex. On 30 March 1915 the Battalion landed at Boulogne, and on 15 May 1915 became part of the 144th Brigade in the 48th (South Midland) Division.

It seems likely that Charles was posted to the Battalion as part of the reinforcements at some date in 1916 and may soon have been involved on Western Front, possibly in the Somme offensive of July 1916, and then may have taken part in the pursuit of the German Army in their retreat [or ‘tactical withdrawal’] to the Hindenburg Line in March 1917.

Later in 1917, the 1st/6th Battalion was involved several of the actions making up the Third Battle of Ypres from 31 July to mid-November including: the Battle of Langemarck; the Battle of Polygon Wood; the Battle of Broodseinde and the Battle of Poelcapelle (9 October 1917).

The Battalion War Diary[3] gives details of their later movements and actions. From the beginning of September 1917, they had been at School Camp, in St Jan Ter Bizen, to the west of Poperinge, Belgium, not far west of Ypres. Then on 18 September the Battalion travelled west to Zutkerque, France – suffering various delayed trains – to take part in Divisional and Brigade training until the end of the month. At the end of September 1917, the Battalion’s ration strength was 802 men.   The diary continued:

1 October – ‘Battn. … moved by Rail to Brake Camp.   Entraining Staion Audricq.   Detraining Station Vlamertinghe … ‘C’ Company working party buried cable …’.
‘C’ Company continued burying cable for the next two days.

4 October – ‘Battn. Moved to Canal Bank …’

5 October – ‘ Battn. moved to Dambre Camp in the morning.’

6 October – ‘In Camp.’

7 October – ‘Battn. Moved to Irish Farm 8.30am.   Heavy rain afternoon and evening.   Battn. Moved back to Dambre Camp 4.30pm.’

8 October – ‘Battn. Moved to Front Line and relieved 1/1 Bucks …’

This was in all in preparation for the Battle of Poelcapelle (9 October 1917) one of the actions of the Third Battle of Ypres.

9 October – ‘Battn. Attacked 5.20am. See Appendix ….’

The Appendix gives copies of both the Orders and a Report on the attack on the morning of 9 October 1917. Brief extracts from the Report are given below:

First Wave – ‘A’ Company on the Right, ‘B’ Company on the Left. Second Wave – ‘C’ Company on the Right, ‘D’ Company on the Left. … two platoons of each Company being in each line.

Objectives – First Wave … gun pit … special parties to capture 2 Mebus … and redoubt, … special parties to capture Vacher House and gun pit … Second Wave … Berks Houses … assist 7th Worcesters in capture of Mebus … assist 4th Gloucesters in capture of Berks Houses.

Three hours before Zero, the whole Battalion was in position … about half an hour before Zero, enemy shelled Winchester line fairly heavily but this fell just behind second wave and only four casualties occurred.

Zero – 5.20am First wave got away well with the barrage, followed at about 300 yards by second wave. Enemy at once opened M.G. fire all along the line, …

Considerable detail followed, and the assault appears to have been comparatively successful with considerable numbers of the enemy and their equipment captured, however the Report also noted:

Estimated casualties of ‘B’ Company … 1 officer … 45 other ranks … Estimated loss of ‘A’ Company … 2 Officers … 50 other ranks … Estimated losses of ‘C’ Company … 2 Officers … 55 other ranks …

The War Diary noted on the next day:

10 October – ‘Battn. Relieved by 26 Brigade … Returned to Siege Camp via temporary shelter at Irish Farm.’

Overall during October the Battalion had lost 56 men killed or died of wounds and 153 were wounded and 42 missing. Despite the Battalion receiving a ‘draft’ of 79 new men during the month, by the end of the month the Battalion ration strength had dropped from 802 to 633.

Charles Bradlaugh Jones was one of 141 men from the Gloucestershire Regiment who died on 9 October 1917, most of them from 1st/6th Bn. during the attack, and the fighting of the Battle of Poelcapelle. Like so many others, his body was either never found, or was not identified.

He is remembered with his comrades on one of the Panels 72 to 75 of the Tyne Cot Memorial. The Tyne Cot Memorial is one of four memorials to the missing in Belgian Flanders which cover the area known as the Ypres Salient. Whereas those who died before 16 August 1917 are remembered on the Menin Gate, the United Kingdom servicemen who died after that date are named on the memorial at Tyne Cot. Charles is also commemorated on the Rugby Memorial Gates in Hillmorton Road, Rugby, on the BTH List of ‘Employees Who Served’ and on the BTH War Memorial.[4]

On 7 February 1918, Charles’s Widow, Ellen, received £1-7-9d owing to her husband, and then a War Gratuity of £3-0-0d on 9 December 1919.

Charles’s Medal Card showed that he was awarded the British War Medal and the Victory Medal.

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

– – – – – –

 

This article on Charles Bradlaugh JONES was researched and written for the Rugby Family History Group [RFHG] project, by John P H Frearson and is © John P H Frearson and the RFHG, June 2017.

[1]       Men named ‘Jones’ were listed in Rugby Advertiser, 5 and 26 September 1914 – probably others of the same name.

[2]       This was under the Lord Derby’s Recruiting Scheme, he is listed in Rugby Advertiser, 27 November 1915.

[3]       The National Archives, WWI War Diaries (France, Belgium and Germany), 1914-1920, Gloucestershire Regiment 48th Division, Piece 2758/2: 1/6 Battalion Gloucestershire Regiment (1915 Apr – 1917 Oct).

[4]       The List is that published in the Rugby Advertiser, 4 November 1921.

Advertisements

2nd Jun 1917. Cooking Demonstration at Rugby

COOKING DEMONSTRATIONS AT RUGBY.

In connection with the local Food Economy Campaign, cooking demonstration rooms have been opened at a shop in High Street, where many valuable culinary hints are being imparted to visitors by Miss Foster and Mrs Yeomans, the instructors attached to the local cookery centre.

The opening ceremony was performed by Mrs A A David on Monday afternoon, when, despite the glorious weather which have tempted people to spend their time out-of-doors, there was a good attendance of ladies.

Before calling upon Mrs David to open the rooms, Dr David said the time had not yet come for them to express their thanks ; but he could not help recommending to their gratitude Mr J T Clarke and his committee, who had made the arrangements, and whose energy had been quite splendid in brining the scheme to what, at any rate, was a successful beginning. In the second place, he wanted to thank the cookery staff teachers, who were giving up their holidays in such glorious weather to take part in that work. He knew that they had quite sufficient reward in being aware that they were helping on a great, good and urgent cause ; lest they ought to feel particularly grateful to them this week. He was sure there were hundreds of good cooks in Rugby, but he hoped none of them were too proud to take a hint in such matters, especially now, when new, sudden and extra demands were made upon their skill. He hoped the ladies of Rugby would show their gratitude to the staff teachers by coming to learn what they could.

Mrs David then declared the demonstration open, and said she hoped all would try to make it a success by getting their friends to attend.

The instructors afterwards gave demonstrations in making barley bread, oatcakes, maize meal scones, buns without flour, and oatmeal pudding.

MAGISTERIAL.
—At Rugby Police Court on Thursday (before A E Donkin, Esq), Fredk Blythman, no fixed abode, was charged with stealing 12 eggs, the property of some person unknown.—P.C Anderton stated that, in consequence of prisoner’s suspicious behaviour in the Market Place the previous evening, he followed him to Smith’s lodging-house in Gas Street, and heard him offer some eggs for sale. Witness enquired where he got the eggs from, and he replied that he bought them ten miles the other side of Coventry, but he subsequently admitted that he stole them from a nest between Coventry and Birmingham. Prisoner was wearing two gold stripes similar to those issued to wounded soldiers, but he had no discharge papers and no documents to connect him with the Army.—Prisoner now stated that he took the eggs from a hedge near the roadside at Yardley. He was 23 years of age, and had lost several fingers as the result of a wound. He was also wounded in the head and leg, and was consequently discharged. His pension paper had been worn out by constant examination by the police, and his discharge paper was torn up by a lunatic at the London County Asylum, where he was for a time employed as attendant.—As the owner of the eggs could not be traced, prisoner was discharged.-A corporal from the Drill Hall attended the Court, and asked prisoner questions bearing on his military history. He said he was discharged through a nervous breakdown, and was awarded a pension of 5s 3d week. He was at present walking to London to get another “ ring paper.”—He was ordered to be detained pending enquiries.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Lieut H N Salter, 4th Leicestershire Regiment, was one of those mentioned in a list of despatches published on Tuesday.

Sergt George Pegg, Oxford and Bucks L.I, son of Mr C Pegg, New Bilton, has been mentioned by Sir Douglas Haig in one of his recent despatches.

Mr & Mrs Read, of 46 Rokeby Street, Rugby, have received intimation that their eldest son, Rifleman C G Read, of the King’s Royal Rifles, was killed in action on December 15, 1916. Deceased, who was an old Murray School boy, was a member of the Church Troop of Boy Scouts, and before joining the Army in January, 1915, was working at the B.T.H Works, and previous to that he was in an office on the L & N-W Railway.

News has been received by Mrs Reeve, of Bourton, near Rugby, that her son, Pte John Vincent Reeve, of the Worcestershire Regiment, was wounded by shrapnel in the wrist and hand on April 30th, and is now in a hospital in France.

Corpl J Hirons, R.F.A, son of Mr James Hirons, 14 Duke Street, Rugby, has been wounded a second time, and on this occasion severely. He was formerly employed at the B.T.H. After fighting at Sulva Bay in 1915, he went to France, where he received his first wound. He is now in hospital at Crediton, Devon.

Pte E H Peddlesden, 1st Battalion East Surrey Regiment, who for ten years was an assistant of Mr G A Dean, High Street, has been unofficially reported a prisoner of war in Germany. These facts have been communicated to Mr J Reginald Barker, hon secretary of the Rugby Prisoners of War Help Committee, and he has instituted enquiries into Peddlesden’s whereabouts.

Rifleman J Humphries, Rifle Brigade, in a letter to Mr W T Coles Hodges, described some of the outrages perpetuated by the Germans during their retreat, and says : “ I don’t know what we should do if England was served like this . . . and yet we get men who shield themselves behind religion. It is my firm opinion that they are nothing more than a lot of cowards, and if Germany ever won and forced their militarism upon us they would be among the very first to knuckle down to them.”

HOWITZER BATTERY MAN HONOURED.

Bombardier F Bosworth, the R.F.A, has written to his old schoolmaster, Mr W T Coles Hodges, informing him that he has been awarded a bar to his Military Medal for bravery on the night of April 16th. Another bombardier was awarded the Military Medal for the same deed. He adds that, having been mentioned in despatches and awarded the Military Medal and a bar to same, he so far carries the honours of the Battery.

DR POPE REPORTED MISSING.

Capt Charles Alfred Whiting Pope, Royal Army Medical Corps (officially reported missing, believed drowned, on May 4th), son of Mr Alfred Pope, of Dorchester. For a time he practised in Rugby, his residence being on Clifton Road, and he left the town a year or two ago. He was educated at Charterhouse School, and was a graduate of Trinity College, Cambridge. He took the M.B degree at Cambridge in 1907, and he was an M.R.C.S England and L.R.C.P London, 1903. After graduating at Cambridge, he studied at St Bartholomew’s Hospital, and before practising at St Leonards-on-Sea he held appointments in South Africa and at Plymouth. Capt Pope, who was 39 years of age, married Marion Ruth, daughter of the late Capt J J A Gravener, R.N.

MOTOR ACCIDENT.-Late on Thursday night last week, as a party of Royal Flying   Corps officers were proceeding from Rugby to Lilbourne by motor-car, the car skidded near the Watling Street Road and collided with a tree. The occupants—Capt Foster, Lieut Daniels, and Lieut Campbell—sustained severe bruises and cuts on the head and body. The car was also badly damaged.

SHUCKBURGH.

THE LATE CORPL JONES.—Mr J Jones has received a letter from the Captain of the Company of the Essex Regiment, in which his son, Corpl Jones, was serving when he was killed. He says it is impossible to speak too highly of the deceased, and he was absolutely all that one could wish for and expect from the soldier and brave man that he was. He was always cheerful, smart, and thoroughly reliable. The platoon officer was proceeding to make a reconnaissance, and Corpl Jones volunteered to accompany him. They had competed their work, and were returning across a road in full view of the enemy, when Corpl Jones was hit on the arm. Subsequently, when trying to reach the trench from which they started, and when they had almost accomplished this, he was shot through the heart, and died instantly. He had already been recommended for promotion, and if he had lived would have been farther recommended for gallantry and devotion to duty on the field.

Army Service Corps.
URGENTLY WANTED.
MEN Between the ages of 41 and 60 with experience of Horses are required for Enlistment into Army Service Corps for duty with Remount Depots.
Jockeys, Hunt Servants, Coachmen, Grooms, Strappers & Carters are specially suitable.
For full particulars apply:
Recruiting Office, RUGBY.
F. F. Johnstone, Lt.-Colonel, Sub-Area Commander.
May 25th, 1917.

DEATHS.

BROMWICH.-Killed in action May 8th, somewhere in France, PTE. FREDERICK BROMWICH, aged 37 years.—From his sorrowing wife and children. “ Till the day breaks.”

LINE.—Killed in France May 20th, SIGNALLER ROBERT L. LINE, beloved eldest son of James B. and Lelia H. Line, of Goulbourne, Canada, and grandson of the late William Robert Line, Ivy House, Bilton.

IN MEMORIAM.

CONOPO.-In affectionate remembrance of W. CONOPO, of Kilsby, who lost his life on H.M.S. Queen Mary on May 11, 1916.
“ No anthem-peal flows sweet and loud,
No tablet marks his grave ;
But he soundly sleeps in a coral shroud
To the dirge of the rolling wave.”—R.I.P.
—From his ever-loving FATHER and MOTHER, BROTHER and SISTERS.

GODDARD.—In loving memory of our dear son, CEPHAS GODDARD, of H.M.S. Fortune, killed in battle of Jutland, May 31st, 1916, and beloved husband of Jesse Goddard, of Southsea.-“ Until the day breaks.”—From FATHER, MOTHER, and JESSE.

GOUGH.—In loving memory of JAMES CLEETON GOUGH, killed in action on June 2, 1916.

MASKELL.—In loving memory of our dear son, Pte. A. G. Maskell, who was killed in France May 30th, 1916, age 20.
Where is our soldier boy to-night
Laid in a soldier’s grave ;
Far, far away in a foreign land,
He died like a soldier brave.
Oh, may we meet our boy again,
Far up in that Home above,
Where war and strife will be no more,
But all will be peace and love. R.I.P.

READ.—Sacred to the memory of CHARLES GEORGE READ, the beloved son of Charles John and Minnie Read, who was killed in action in France on Dec. 15, 1916, aged 22 years.
We miss the hand-clasp, miss the loving smile.
Our hearts are broken, but a little smile.
And we shall pass within the golden gate.
God will comfort us, God will help us while we wait.

12th May 1917. Food Economy Campaign

FOOD ECONOMY CAMPAIGN.—In connection with the Food Economy Campaign in Rugby a series of cookery demonstrations has been arranged. A central establishment will be opened very shortly in High Street, where demonstrations will be given during the afternoons and evenings. This will probably be followed by local demonstrations in other parts of the town. A scheme for the establishment of communal kitchens for Rugby is also well in hand.

AN ALLOTMENT HOLDERS’ ASSOCIATION for Rugby is in course of formation (see advt).

THE KING’S PROCLAMATION urging the necessity of economising in food consumption was read at various places of worship at Rugby on Sunday last.

NEW BILTON.

A COMMUNAL KITCHEN.—The War Economy Food Committee having applied for the use of the Wesleyan. Schoolroom at New Bilton as a communal kitchen, the trustees met on Monday night to consider the matter, and unanimously decided to place the school at the disposal of the committee, subject to certain details to be arranged by the stewards.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Second-Lieut E Wilson, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, son of Mrs Wilson, of Bridget Street, is in hospital at Rouen suffering from a broken leg.

Second-Lieut H H H Lister, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, only son of Mr and Mrs H L Lister, Clifton Road, Rugby, is reported missing on May 4, 1917.

Pte Longney, writing from France, says :—“ By a curious coincidence, it was my pleasure, when passing down the street of the town where I am stationed, to see the Red Cross ambulance car presented by the Rugby and District Farmers’ Association. It is doing a splendid did work, and looks in good condition.”

Mr R George Hudson, son of Mr R S Hudson, York Street, who has been with the Artists’ Rifles in France for the past twelve months, has been given commission, and posted to a Battalion of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment. News has since been received that Second-Lieut. Hudson, who is an old St Matthew’s boy, has been severely wounded.

Rifleman J C Smith, K.R.R, the eldest son of Mr J C Smith, has been admitted to hospital with gun-shot wounds in the right shoulder.

Capt T Marriott, son of the late Mr J Marriott, of Stanford-on-Avon, who was recently awarded the Military Cross, has been promoted to the rank of Major. He is an “ old boy ” and former member of the staff of St Matthew’s Boys’ School.

The relatives of Pte F H Watts, of 21 Cross Street, Rugby, have received intimation that he was wounded on April 25th for the third time. On this occasion he received injuries in the thigh, arm, and chest through an accident. He is now in the General Hospital, Birmingham, and is making favourable progress.

Official news has been received by Mr T H Cleaver, late of the Horse and Jockey Inn that his son Joseph V Cleaver has been killed in action in France on April 11th. Before the war he was employed by the Leamington Brewery Company. He was one of the first to join up under Lord Derby’s Group System. This is the second son Mr Cleaver has lost in action, and two more, George and Austin, were wounded earlier in the War.

Evan P Biddles, gunner in the R.F.A, youngest son of the late Mrs John Biddles, Newton, Rugby, and of Estancia Loma-Pora, Villa Concepeion, Republic del Paraguay, South America, has died from wounds in France. Less than a year ago he returned to England to enlist after giving up an important post as Majordomo for the Paraguay Land and Cattle Company, and in December last crossed to France, and has practically been in action ever since. His age was 22.

News has just been received by Mr and Mrs Bull, 49 Manor Road, Rugby (late of Lower Shuckburgh, near Daventry), that their only son, Bombardier Bull, was killed in action on the night of May 3rd. At the age of 16 he joined the Warwickshire R.H.A in November, 1915, and went to France in the following May, where he has been in the fighting line ever since. A letter was received on Wednesday morning from his Officer, who writes :-“ Your son, Bombardier Bull, was gallantly doing his duty under heavy shell-fire, and a 4.2 shell just caught him and another man, Fitzgerald. You can be perfectly certain that his death was quite instantaneous and completely without pain. I have known your son since he was under me in the 3rd Warwick Battery, nearly two years ago. He showed signs of being a very fine soldier then, and has since very fully redeemed that early promise. I cannot say how deeply your son is regretted both by officers and men.”

NEWS FROM A RUGBY OFFICER REPORTED KILLED.

Capt S E Jones, of the 10th Yorkshire Regiment, formerly a bank manager at Rugby, who was officially reported killed on February 27th, is evidently a prisoner of war in Saxony. Mr Mason, his successor at Rugby, has just received a card from him stating that his eyes are getting better (so that he was apparently wounded in the face), and adding: “ Do send us food and clothing.”

RUGBY & DISTRICT WAR PRISONERS’ DAY, Saturday, June 2nd.

There are sixty-seven men from Rugby and district who have fallen into the hands of the Enemy, and they are still calling for food.

For nearly two years the Rugby Committee have organised funds by means of which beyond any shadow of doubt many of these men have been saved from starvation.

To ensure they do not lack the food necessary to keep them in health and strength, further funds must be raised at once.

THE RUGBY PRISONERS OF WAR HELP COMMITTEE therefore appeal to you to assist their efforts by sending a Donation now to the Hon. Organising Secretary,
Mr. J. REGINALD BARKER,
9 Regent Street, Rugby,
who will gratefully acknowledge same.

NEWBOLD-ON-AVON.

WOUNDED.—Mrs Parr at the Three Horse Shoes, Newbold, has received official information that her husband, Private F Parr, Oxford & Bucks Light Infantry, has been wounded in France, and is in hospital at Rouen.—Mrs T Harris of Newbold learns that her husband, Pte Thos Harris, belonging to a Northampton Regiment, had been wounded in the head and right arm on April 23rd in Egypt, and was lying in hospital seriously ill.—Mr and Mrs West of Rugby (late of Newbold) have also received intimation that their son, Pte C West, Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, has been wounded in France.

LONG LAWFORD.

Mr and Mrs Elkington, Long Lawford have received the following official note concerting their son :- “ The Major-General, 20th (Light) Division, has received a report of the gallant conduct of R G Elkington, K.R.R.C, on April 4, 1917, in courage and personal bravery in the storming of the village of Métz, and he wishes to congratulate him on his fine behaviour.” This is the second occasion that Sergt Elkington has been mentioned for his conduct in the field, the last time during a night attack, on August 23, 1916, at Guillemont. His parents have been pleaded to learn that he has received the ribbon for the Military Medal from the General Commanding.

BRANDON.

MAJOR D C M BEECH.—The many friends of Mr Douglas Beech, the only surviving son of Colonel R J Beech, J.P, D.L, will be pleased to hear that he has been acting as Brigadier Major and is on Foreign Service.

RUSSIAN FLAG DAY AT RUGBY.
A SPLENDID RESULT.

Rugby’s effort on behalf of the Russian wounded on Saturday last was crowned with success ; and, despite the fact that this time the appeal was made only in Rugby and New Bilton, upwards of 25,000 flags were sold, realising £110 16s 6d—the highest sum ever obtained by a flag day restricted to the town. The effort was held under the auspices of the Rugby Urban District Council, and the organisation was again ably carried out by Mr J R Barker, who, at the special request of the Chairman of the Council, has consented to organise all official flag days in Rugby. He was assisted by a willing band of 150 fair vendors, and by means of a system of relays sellers were to be found in the streets all day. The Council placed the Benn Buildings at the disposal of Mr Barker for a depot ; and here Mrs B B Dickinson and Mrs J R Barker rendered yeoman service in handing out fresh supplies and receiving the collecting tins as they were retained. Mr R P Mason, manager of the London City and Midland Bank, again undertook the duties of treasurer, and supervised the counting of the money, in which he was assisted by Mr J Ferry and the Hon Organiser. The £110.16s 6d was made up as under :- Coppers, £76 19s (the largest sum, received in coppers on a flag day) ; silver, £32 17s 6d ; and one Treasury note for £1, .which was placed in the box of Mr Barker’s daughter. The highest amount (£2 15s) was collected by Miss G Woods in the B.T.H district, and she was closely followed by Miss Sparkes (£2 14s 2d), of the same district.

DEATHS.

BIDDLES.—Died of gas poisoning just behind the lines in France, April 22nd, from wounds received in action same day, EVAN P. BIDDLES, gunner in the R.F.A., youngest son of the late Mrs. John Biddles, Newton, Rugby, and Estancia Lomapora, Villa Concepcion, Republic del Paraguay, S. America ; aged 22 years.

BULL.—Killed in action, on May 3rd, in France, THOMAS HENRY BULL, late of Shuckburgh ; aged 18.
“ Sleep on, dear brother, in a far-off grave ;
A grave we may never see ;
But as long as life and memory lasts
We will remember thee.
—From FATHER, MOTHER, and SISTERS.

HINCKS.—Lance-Corpl. E. W. HINCKS, Middlesex Regiment, youngest son of Mr and Mrs. Marlow Hincks, Southam Holts, officially reported killed in action in France on 12th April ; aged 20.—Deeply mourned.

ROBINSON.—In loving memory of OWEN, the dearly beloved son of Mr. and Mrs. C. Robinson, Catthorpe, who died from wounds received in action on March 28th. Laid to rest in the British Military Cemetery, near Arras,-“ Loyal to duty even onto death.”

IN MEMORIAM.

MASON.—In loving remembrance of ARTHUR ALEC MASON, of Long Buckby, who was lost on H.M.S. Goliath in the Dardanelles on May 13, 1915.—“ Till the day breaks and the shadows flee away.”

SMITH.—In loving memory of Trooper WILLIAM SMITH, son of James and Elizabeth Smith, of Lutterworth, reported missing May 13, 1915,—“ Greater love hath no man than this.”

Jones, Hubert Joseph. Died 9th Apr 1917

Hubert Joseph Jones was born in Rugby in 1888, and his birth was registered in Q3, 1888 in Rugby. He was the son of Albert (b.c.1849) and Elizabeth Jones (b.c.1854). Albert was an ‘Engineman Ry Driver’ and did not know where he was born! Elizabeth was born in Marton. In 1901 the family lived at 190 Oxford Street, Rugby with three children: Hubert Jones was then 12; Maud Jones was 16; and Beatrice [Elizabeth] Jones was 9.

The family hasn’t been found in the 1911 census. However, the records show that later, until just before the war, Hubert was working in the British Thompson Houston Machine Shop in Rugby.[1]

He enlisted ‘at the commencement of the war’[2] in Rugby[3] as a Private No.13581, in the 7th Battalion of the Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry [Ox and Bucks or Oxf & B.L.I.] early in the war. He was then promoted to Corporal in the 3rd Reserve Bn. and was later moved to the 6th Bn. Oxf & B.L.I. and was finally in the 5th Battalion.

The 5th (Service) Battalion of the Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry was formed at Oxford in August 1914 as part of the First New Army (K1) and then moved to Cranleigh, Guildford and then moved to Salamanca Barracks, Aldershot in February 1915 to be placed under orders of 42nd Brigade in 14th (Light) Division. They mobilised for war and landed at Boulogne on 21 May 1915.

Huberts’s Medal Card shows he went to France some months later on 21 September 1915 and he would have missed the actions on the Western Front in 1915. However he would have been involved in the Battle of Delville Wood, and the Battle of Flers-Courcelette in 1916. Then in 1917 with the German retreat to the Hindenburg Line, the so called Battle of Arras and particularly, the First Battle of the Scarpe (9–14 April 1917) which was conducted in parallel with the attack by the mainly Canadian Divisions on Vimy ridge, slightly to the north. Both these being in part diversions for a major French attack to the south, which in the event was unsuccessful.

The 14th Light) Division were part of the VII Corps (under Snow) within the Third Army (under Allenby). The Battalion diary[4] summarised the events in Early 1917 …

The Battalion had its full share in the fighting of the first half of this year, suffering the inevitable heavy casualties, but adding still further to its splendid reputation. It took part in the great British offensive which opened on the 9th April, on a ten-mile front, from the south of Arras to the south of Lens; and it was engaged again in the next great offensive on the 3rd May in the same area, losing no fewer than 185 of all ranks in the former and 300 in the latter.

March 1st-15thThe Battalion had one tour of the trenches, losing 1 man killed and 5 men wounded. On the 15th marched to Sombrin, and went into training for the coming offensive.

March 11th – 31stThis period was devoted to strenuous training, including a rehearsal of an attack on the Harp, the German trench system east of Arras at the junction of the front-line system and the Cojeul Switch.

April 4th – The Battalion moved to Dunedin Caves (Made by quarrying chalk for the building of Arras. For our purposes they were now connected by tunnels and lighted by electricity.) One of the six large caves accommodating some 5,000 men. Three officers’ patrols were sent out at night …

April 5th -7th

At Christchurch Cave supplying working parties.

Attack on the Harp. – The operations now in course of preparation were to take the form of a combined attack to the south of Lens. Elaborate Secret Orders were issued between the 3rd and 7th April, and from the 3rd to the 5th a heavy bombardment was carried out. At 7 a.m. on the 7th the following Operation Orders were issued by the 42nd Infantry Brigade:

  1. The units of the 42nd Infantry Brigade will be distributed as follows at zero on “Z” day:

5th Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry:
In Sardine Trench (300 yards). In Roach Trench (260 yards). In Trout Trench (250 yards).
In Salmon Trench (150 yards) from its right flank (western end) to M.6.C.61.51, where old
German cable trench cuts it at right angles. Total: 960 yards.

  1. Units will reach their assembly positions as follows … 5th Oxford and Bucks L.I – from Christchurch Cave by Exit No. 14.F. (G.34.d.02.60).

Leading troops to start from Cave at 9p.m., and be clear of the Cave by 10p.m.
Route to Assembly Trenches – Rue de Temple – Hatter’s Lane and Halifax to Old German
Front Line – Halifax and Arras Way to Assembly Trenches; 200 yards distance to be
maintained between platoons. Battalion to be in Assembly Trenches by a.m. on 9th inst.

As detailed by O.C. Battalion, 200 yards distance to be maintained between platoons. Battalion to be in Assembly Trenches by 2 a.m. on 9th inst.

REPORT OF ATTACK ON THE HARP ON 9th APRIL 1917.

The Battalion left the caves at 9 p.m., and was in position in the Assembly Trenches by 12 midnight. No casualties occurred on the way up. There was practically no shelling of the Assembly Trenches till 5.30 a.m. Between 5.30 and 7.30 a.m. the Assembly Trenches were slightly shelled with whizz-bangs and an occasional 4.2-in. chiefly from direction of Tilloy. During this time one officer and one man were hit. At 7.34 a.m. the advance began. There was a good deal of crowding on the right owing to the Battalion on our right losing direction. This was rectified as much as possible by the company officers on the spot. During the initial stages of the advance there was practically no enemy artillery fire, but there was a certain amount of machine-gun fire from Tilloy; this, however, was mostly high and caused very few casualties. As soon as the leading line came in view of the Harp three machine-guns opened fire from behind Telegraph Work and the string of the Harp. Lewis-guns and rifle-grenades were immediately turned on to them, and their fire slackened sufficiently to enable the infantry to go forward. On reaching the front line about 50 of the enemy gave themselves up without fighting, and were passed back to the rear. There was a certain amount of resistance from the back of Telegraph Work and the string of the Harp, but the Germans gave themselves up as soon as our men reached them. About 50 Germans were captured here. As soon as both objectives had been reached consolidation was at once commenced as follows:

C Company and a part of D Company from N.7.a.6.6 to N.7.a.5.3.
A Company thence along back line of Telegraph Work to N.7.a.4.1.
Remainder of D Company from N.7.a.2.8 to about N.7.a.2.6.
B Company thence to N.7.a.2.0.

During the consolidation a machine-gun opened fire from about N.7.a.6.9, which caused a certain number of casualties. This gun was knocked out by a rifle-grenade, and was captured in conjunction with a bombing-party of the 9th K.R.R.C. About 20 minutes after reaching the objective the captured position was heavily shelled with 77-mm. and 4.2-in. for about half an hour, and a strong barrage of 5.9 in. put along the bank in M.12.b.l.9 for about one and a half hours. There were no troops advancing over this ground at that time. It only caused a certain amount of inconvenience to communications and very few casualties. About 10 a.m. all hostile artillery fire ceased, and consolidation was completed without further molestation. About this time another machine-gun and its crew were found in a dug-out. They gave themselves up without any trouble. It is impossible to state accurately the number of prisoners taken by us, but it is estimated there were about 100. Three machine-guns were also captured. Our casualties were roughly 5 officers killed, 7 wounded, and about 180 other ranks. The battlefield was cleared of all casualties by 5 p.m., with the assistance of the prisoners.
H. L. Wood, Lieut.-Colonel, Comdg. 5th Bn. Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry

April 10th

The following was issued today: “complimentary order.”

“The Commander-in-Chief has personally requested me to convey to all ranks of the 14th (Light) Division his high opinion of the excellent fighting qualities shown by the Division. The commencement of the great offensive of 1917 has been marked by an initial success in which more than 11,000 prisoners and 100 guns have been taken on the first day alone. The Division has taken a prominent part in achieving this success and maintained the reputation gained last year on the Somme, and added to the laurels of the gallant regiments of which it is composed.

  1. Couper, Major-General, Comdg. 14th (Light) Division.  10th April 1917.

Hubert Jones on was originally buried in the ‘Telegraph Hill British Cemetery, Neuville-Vitasse, on the South-Western slopes of the hill between Tilloy and Neuville-Vitasse, captured by the 14th Division on the 9 April 1917. The cemetery contained the graves of 147 soldiers from the United Kingdom, almost all of whom belonged to the 14th Division and fell in April 1917.’[5]

The bodies in that cemetery were later moved as part of the ‘concentration’ of smaller cemeteries and one Report noted that a new road was being built through part of the cemetery. Hubert Jones and many of his colleagues were exhumed and reburied in various sections of the Tilloy British Cemetery, with Hubert being reburied in Plot III. J. 16.

Tilloy-les-Mofflaines is a village 3 kilometres south-east of Arras, on the south side of the main road to Cambrai. The village of Tilloy-Les-Mofflaines was taken by Commonwealth troops on 9 April 1917, but it was partly in German hands again from March to August 1918.

The cemetery was begun in April 1917 by fighting units and burial officers, and Rows A to H in Plot I largely represent burials from the battlefield. The remaining graves in Plot I, and others in the first three rows of Plot II, represent later fighting in 1917 and the first three months of 1918, and the clearing of the village in August 1918. These 390 original burials were increased after the Armistice when graves were brought in from a wide area east of Arras and many smaller burial grounds including the Telegraph Hill British Cemetery, Neuville-Vitasse. The cemetery now contains 1,642 Commonwealth burials and commemorations of the First World War. 611 of the burials are unidentified, but there are special memorials to 14 casualties known or believed to be buried among them. The cemetery was designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens.

His ‘widow and sole executer’ Ellen, received £1-19-7d owing to him on 15 June 1917 and she received a further £6-0-0 gratuity on 29 October 1919.[6]

Hubert J Jones was awarded the Victory and British medals and the 1915 Star.   He is also remembered on the Rugby Memorial Gate and on the BTH War Memorial[7] and the listing of ‘BTH Employees Who Served in the War 1914 – 1918’.

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

– – – – – –

 

This article on Hubert Joseph Jones was researched and written for a Rugby Family History Group [RFHG] project, by John P H Frearson and is © John P H Frearson and the Rugby Family History Group, December 2016.

[1]       Rugby Advertiser, 5 May 1917.

[2]       Rugby Advertiser, 5 May 1917.

[3]       Soldiers Died in the Great War, 1914-1919.

[4]       Record of the 5th (Service) Battalion, Oxford and Bucks L.I., 1st July 1916 to 30th June 1917, Compiled by Steve Berridge, http://www.lightbobs.com.

[5]         http://www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/casualty/566279/SCOTTON,%20F

[6]       Army Registers of Soldiers’ Effects, available on Ancestry.co.uk.

[7]       From the list of names on the BTH War Memorial when it was unveiled, taken from the list published in the Rugby Advertiser, 4 November 1921. See: Rugby Family History Group website, http://www.rugbyfhg.co.uk/bth-war-memorial .

 

23rd Dec 1916. The New Food Regulations

THE NEW FOOD REGULATIONS.

The regulations limiting the number of courses to be served in hotels and restaurants came into force on Monday. Under the regulations breakfast and luncheon are limited to two courses, and dinner in the evening to three courses. Everywhere caterers and consumers showed themselves ready to make the best of the new system, although in some quarters doubts were expressed as to its value from the point of view of economy. Under the new regulations hors d’oeuvre containing no fish or meat is a half course, but if it contains fish or meat it counts as a whole course, as does also soup containing meat in solid form ; fish, meat, poultry, game, and sweet ; soup without solid meat and dessert are half courses. Plain cheese does not count as a course.

At the Grand Hotel, Rugby, the regulations have made very little difference, because, owing to the threatened shortage of food the dinner menu was reduced from five to three courses several weeks ago, when the entrees and savoury were discontinued. Although only three courses are served, the guests have a varied choice for dinner each evening, and no complaint has been received regarding the reduced menu.

At the Royal George, where a 6 or 7 course dinner was the rule, the management have also welcomed the change, and the bill of fare at all meals is as varied as the permit will allow.

THE CHRISTMAS TRAIN SERVICE.

There are very few alterations in the local train service during the Christmas festival this year, and the ordinary trains will be run on Saturday and Sunday on the L & N-W Railway. On Christmas Day the service will be the same as Sunday, and on Boxing Day the ordinary week-day trains, with the exception of the 7.30 to Coventry. There are several alterations on the Great Central line. On Saturday there will be a relief train for Leicester, Loughborough, Nottingham, Sheffield, and Manchester, leaving Rugby at 1.54. On Christmas Day the usual Sunday trains will be run, except that the 11.16 to the South and the 4.39 to Sheffield will be cancelled. On Boxing Day the following trains will be cancelled :—1.35 a.m and the 11.23 a.m to Bristol. The 1.55 to London and the Great Western will only run as far as Woodford, and there will be no G.W connection there. A train will leave Rugby for Leicester at 11.15. In place of the ordinary train due at Rugby at 7.2, a special train will leave Oxford on Tuesday at 5.55, Banbury at 6.30, and reach Rugby at the usual time.

The new railway rules were announced on Wednesday. On and after January 1 the passenger services are to be restricted. Passenger fares will be increased by 50 per cent, but this will not affect workmen’s fares or season tickets for distances not exceeding 40 miles.

NOTICE !

Tuesday next being Boxing-Day, the Mid-week Edition of the Advertiser will be published on WEDNESDAY Afternoon at the usual time.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

The number of Old Rugbeians known to be serving with the forces is now 2,661. The total casualties to December 14th are : 361 killed, 544 wounded, 14 prisoners wounded, 17 prisoners unwounded, and 21 missing, making a total of 957. The honours number 692, including two V.C’s, 48 D.S.O, 120 Military Cross, and 444 mentioned in despatches.

The parcels sent to the local men who are prisoners of war in Germany, on behalf of the Rugby Prisoners of War Committee, this week contained :— 1 tin marmalade, ½ lb lunch tongue, 1 tin paste, 1 tin baked beans, ¼ lb ham in tin, ¼ lb tea, ½ lb sugar, 3 soup squares, ½ lb biscuits, ½ lb dripping in tin, 50 cigarettes, 1 lb Quaker oats.

Captain Brinkley, Chief Constable of Warwickshire, has issued notices to several men in the county forces, calling them to hold themselves in readiness to go to France for duty in the mounted military police force.

Major and Adjutant L St Cheape, Dragoon Guards, the famous polo player, one of the team who won the International Cup for England in 1914, who was killed in Egypt on April 23rd, left property of the value of £10,608.

THE ROLL OF HONOUR.

Another employee of the Rugby Advertiser, Mr F J Jones, who attested on December 10, 1915, has now been called up, and joined the Colours on Thursday. Mr Jones, who is 38 years of age and has a wife and three children, has been a compositor and machineman at the Advertiser Office about 26½ years, and the firm, and also his fellow-workman, naturally regret his departure and hope for his speedy and safe return. This feeling will be shared by his fellow-craftsmen in the town, Mr Jones having been vice-president of the Rugby branch of the Typographical Society for two years. Ninety per cent. of the eligible men at the Advertiser Office have now been called up.

LOCAL CASUALTIES.

LANCE-CORPL H MAYES DIES OF WOUNDS.

Lance-Corpl Horace Mayes, elder son of Mr D Mayes, of 28 Abbey Street, died from wounds in a hospital at Bristol on December 6th. The unfortunate young man—he was only 20 years of age—enlisted in the Oxford and Bucks L.I. at the commencement of the War, and was seriously wounded in France on September 15th, and remained in hospital there for two months, when he was brought to England. Before the War, Lance-Corpl Mayes was an apprentice at the B.T.H. The body was brought to Rugby, and the funeral took place at the Cemetery last week. A firing party attended from Warwick, and the coffin was draped with the Union Jack. The Rev T J Simcox conducted the service.

RUGBY MAGISTERIAL.

MONDAY.—Before J E Cox, Esq.

NEATLY CAUGHT BY BILTON CONSTABLE.—Fred Pratt pleaded guilty to a charge of being absent without leave from the Royal Warwickshire Regiment.—P.C Day, stationed at Bilton, said from prisoner’s appearance he suspected him, and asked him to explain how it was he was absent from his regiment. He said he had been temporarily released from the Army to work under the agricultural scheme. Prisoner added that he had been working for a farmer at Knowle. Witness arrested him on suspicion, and on the way to the Police Station he admitted having left his regiment, stationed at Cheltenham, a month ago.—He was remanded in custody to await escort.—The Magistrate said it was an exceptional case. The constable acted very wisely, and he would be rewarded for it.

 

EMPLOYMENT OF GERMAN PRISONERS.—Warwickshire War Agricultural Committee met on Saturday at Warwick, when the question of the employment of German prisoners on the land was under consideration. Captain Fellows explained the Government proposals. One speaker offered the suggestion that threshing machines should be manned by German labour, and a resolution was passed calling upon the Government to provide gangs of German labourers for every threshing machine in the country. A committee was appointed to prepare for the employment of German labour, and it was stated that Messrs Greaves, Bull, and Lakin were prepared to employ about 30 men at their cement works at Harbury.

PAILTON.

CHRISTMAS PARCELS FOR SOLDIERS.—A parcel, containing cigarettes, cafe au lait or cocoa, oxo, socks, sweets, stationery, &c, has been sent to the men from Pailton both at the front and at home. Judging by the letters of thanks received, the parcels are much appreciated.

THURLASTON.

A VERY successful sale in aid of funds for the new Recreation Room for the soldiers at Bilton Hall Hospital was held on Friday last week at the Mill House, kindly lent by Mr Stanley. The stalls were laden with provisions, rabbits, poultry, new goods and rummage, and in a short time nearly everything was sold. The sale was organised by Miss Hackforth and Miss Johnson, assisted by Mrs Appleby, Mrs Hopps, Miss Stanley, the Misses Hopps, Miss Roberts, Mrs Pickering, Miss Prestige, Mrs J Shaw, and Miss Burns. The receipts amounted to £27 7s 4d.

WOLSTON.

AWAY BUT NOT FORGOTTEN.—The Directors and employees of Messrs Bluemel Bros, Ltd, have again this year dispatched Christmas presents to the men who have joined the colours from the Wolston Works, numbering about 90. To those in France, Salonica, Egypt, and India useful boxes have been sent ; and those who are at present in this country in hospital or training have received a postal order for 5s. Besides this, a specially designed Christmas greeting card has been sent to each one, at home or abroad. This design was the work of the Works Manager, Mr W R Glare, and was bountifully done. Its jovial side and the good wishes thereon would undoubtedly cheer the recipients. The _____ lied what should be sent, and the committee carried out their wishes admirably.

STRETTON-ON-DUNSMORE.

ON SATURDAY morning last Mrs S Wells received news that her husband, Pte S Wells, of the 1st Royal Warwicks, had been dangerously wounded in the head, and is now lying in a critical condition in hospital in France. This is the second time he has been wounded, having only recently gone back to the trenches. It is now two years since his brother, Corpl Walter Wells, died from wounds in Ipswich Hospital. Pte S Wells had only recently been transferred to the Royal Warwicks.

NAPTON.

At the Warwickshire Appeal Tribunal on Thursday last week, Mr C Badger, Napton, sought the further exemption of his son, F E Badger (21, single), cowman and wagoner, and said he would be compelled to give up the farm if his son joined the army. Appellant said he was a canal foreman, and therefore could not see to the farm. He had another son, aged 39, who was exempt.—The appeal was dismissed.

CHRISTMAS PARCELS.—Since the War commenced over 100 men have answered their country’s call from the parish of Napton—five of whom have given up their lives, one is a prisoner of war, and one has died. As Christmas approaches the thoughts of those left behind go out to the men who have gone, and the necessary preparations were made for Tommy’s and Jack’s Christmas parcels. The whole parish has subscribed in one way or another generously for this end, and already about 90 parcels have been despatched. The ladies engaged in packing the parcels feel very proud of the parishioners’ gifts. Each parcel cost 6s, and contained a cake, salmon or sardines, tobacco, pipe, cigarettes, oxo, and concentrated tea or coffee. Already several answers have been received from the recipients.

NEWBOLD-ON-AVON.

CHRISTMAS PUDDINGS FOR SOLDIERS.—The members (together with a few friends) of the Heart and Hand Lodge of Oddfellows (M.U) have collected and forwarded through their Secretary, Mr G Leeson, the sum of £1 2s 6d towards a Daily Paper Fund for supplying Christmas plum puddings to the soldiers at the Front.

DEATHS.

EVERTON.—Lance-Corpl. WILLIAM ROBERT EVERTON, who died at Brinklow on November 27, 1916, while home on leave from France ; aged 27 years.—“ Thy will be done.”

LOMAS.—In loving memory of Pte. GEORGE LOMAS, who was killed in action in France on November 22nd, 1916 ; only son of Thomas Lomas, Pailton ; aged 39.
“ Somewhere in France there is a nameless grave,
Where sleeps our loved one amid the brave ;
One of the rank and file, he heard the call.
And for the land he loved he gave his all.”

IN MEMORIAM.

BROWN.—PERCY EDWIN BROWN, 11 York Terrace, Dunchurch Road, killed in action on Sept. 25, 1915.

 

11th Nov 1916. Inspection of Warwickshire Volunteers by Lord French

INSPECTION OF WARWICKSHIRE VOLUNTEERS BY LORD FRENCH.

At 8.45 on Sunday last the members of the Rugby Volunteer Corps fell in at the Drill Hall under Mr C H Fuller, the Commanding Officer of No 2 Company (comprising Rugby, Nuneaton, and Atherstone) of the 2nd Battalion of the Warwickshire Volunteer Regiment, to take their part in the inspection of the Warwickshire Regiment by the Field-Marshal, Lord French, at Calthorpe Park, Birmingham.

In due course the Battalion reached their allotted position, forming, together with the 1st, 3rd, 4th, and 5th Battalions, and a Company of Engineers, a Regiment some 3,000 in strength, under command of Col D F Lewis, C.B, Lieut-Col F F Johnstone (Commander of the 2nd Battalion) acting as Parade Commander.

Shortly after the Lord-Lieutenant of the County—the Earl of Craven—had arrived, Lord French, who had been met at the Station and accompanied by the Lord Mayor of Birmingham, entered the Park with his Staff, and was received with a General Salute. Without loss of time Lord French proceeded to inspect thoroughly each Battalion and Company of the Regiment, and afterwards in a clear strong voice addressed the Volunteers in terms which left no shadow of doubt in the minds of his hearers that they had won the appreciation of that gallant soldier and of the Authorities, and that they would be called upon to fill a role in the national defence which would release the more active soldier for services abroad. The discomforts of the pouring rain and the depressing weather were forgotten when words of praise for the soldierly bearing of the whole Regiment fell from the Field-Marshal’s lips ; words backed by his very emphatic statement, “ I mean what I say.”

Immediately after the inspection, and before addressing the Regiment, Lord French sent a special message to the 2nd Battalion, saying how pleased he was with them, and that from the way they stood they might have been soldiers all their lives. To the Rugby men this message was particularly gratifying, for they formed almost one complete Company of the Battalion to whom that message was sent.

The Rugby Corps arrived back in Rugby about 6.31 p.m, every man feeling that he had taken part in an historic event, marking one of the milestones on the road which Volunteers have set out to traverse- the road which shall lead them to be of service to their country whenever she may require it.

Notwithstanding the extremely bad weather, the conduct and general bearing of the men throughout the day was splendid.

The success of the inspection, and the keenness shown by the Rugby men, ought to have the effect of bringing new recruits, and enable the Rugby Corps to form itself into a complete Company.

THE POSSIBILITY OF AN INVASION.

On the same day Lord French inspected Volunteer at Bletchley, Oxford, and Wolverhampton.

In his address following the inspection at Birmingham, Lord French said the more men be saw of the Volunteer regiments the more he realised their enormous value to the country. Unless he had seen it himself, he never would have believed of the existence in this country to-day of such an extraordinary residue of latent military strength.

At Wolverhampton he said that whenever they heard of naval engagements near our coasts, and there was one in the Channel only the other day-it was always possible that behind the enemy ships of war transports might be bringing troops to land in this country at some unoccupied point. The whole history of war taught us that what happened was something that we did not expect. Therefore he wanted them to remember that invasion was possible. He did not say it was probable or imminent, or menacing ; but it was possible. Hence the great importance of the Volunteer movement.

“ OUR OWN DAY.”

£150 RAISED FOR RED CROSS.

All previous Flag Day records in Rugby were eclipsed on Saturday, when £150 8s 8d was collected on behalf of the new auxiliary hospital for wounded soldiers, which is to consist of eighty beds, and is to be located at the Institution Infirmary. About 130 ladies, including 30 Red Cross Nurses, sold flags in the streets, and upwards of 20,000 of these small tokens were disposed of. The arrangements, as usual, were entrusted to Mr J R Barker, and although he had only ten days in which to carry through the effort, his organisation was so complete that everything passed off smoothly, and a good deal of the credit for the success of the effort was due to his experience in these matters. He received valuable assistance from Miss D E Wood, who acted as Hon Secretary, and from members of the Boys’ Brigade, who delivered supplies of flags, etc, to the various sellers, all of whom received their flags on Friday evening. Mr R P Mason, London City and Midland Bank, was the Hon Treasurer, and he was assisted in the counting of the money, which took place at the supply depot, the Benn Buildings (kindly lent by the Urban District Council), by Messrs J Ferry, W G Mitchell, J R Barker, and Miss Dickinson. Throughout the morning Mr Barker visited the various districts, and so complete were the arrangements that it was almost impossible for anyone to escape buying a flag. The efforts organised by Mr Barker during the past sixteen months have produced over £2,000, and we believe few towns of the size of Rugby can show such a result.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Captain Thomas Ainsworth Townsend, R.A.M.C, of Clifton, has been awarded the Military Cross.

There are 200 conscientious objectors in Warwick prison.

Pte A Godwin (South Staffordshires), who, when in Rugby, was engaged at Mr A Dicken’s, hairdresser, Clifton Road, is now a prisoner of war at Dülmen, Germany. He was a member of the Conservative Club.

THE RUGBY FARMERS’ MOTOR AMBULANCE.

An officer belonging to Rugby, now at the front, was recently returning from the firing line when he met a motor ambulance, and on it he saw with pleasurable surprise the inscription, “ Presented by the Rugby and District Farmers’ Association.” The officer is probably the only Rugby man in that locality.

LOCAL CASUALTIES.

MR G F HOWKINS LOSES ANOTHER SON.

Sincere sympathy will be felt with Mr G F Howkins, of Crick, in the fact that his youngest son, Mr Sidney Howkins, has been killed in France. The young soldier, who was about 25 years of age, was formerly employed in the Northamptonshire Union Bank, and when war broke out he joined the Northamptonshire Yeomanry, Going with them to the front in the following November, he was killed on October 30. This is the second son Mr Howkins has lost owing to the war.

WOUNDED.—Pte H Lee, R.W.R, Clarence Road, New Bilton, gun shot in left leg ; Pte A Parkinson, Worcesters, Ringrose Court, gun shot wound and severe fracture of right leg.

PTE W STRATFORD, OF HARBOROUGH MAGNA.

Mrs Davenport, of Harborough Magna, has received official news that her brother, Pte W Stratford, of the R.W.R, died of wounds on October 29th. Pte Stratford, who was a native of Badby, and about 32 years of age, enlisted at the commencement of the war, and had been in France eighteen months.

SUDDEN DEATH OF AN OLD SOLDIER.

An inquest was held by the Deputy Coroner, Dr Day, at the Rugby Police Court on Monday, touching the death of Q.M.S William Henry Jones, Observer Co, which took place suddenly at his lodgings, 4 Frederick Street, on Friday morning. The deceased, who was 45 years of age, was, before he enlisted in September, 1914, a schoolmaster at Birkenhead. He was married shortly afterwards. For some years he had suffered very badly from rheumatism, but had not had rheumatic fever, although on one occasion he kept his bed for two months. He was not allowed to proceed to the front on account of his heart being weak. Since he had been at Rugby he had suffered a good deal from indigestion. His wife stated that at eight o’clock on Friday morning he went to the bathroom and locked the door. She afterwards heard him groaning, and called the landlady, Mrs Louch. A man was also summoned, a panel of the door was smashed, and they found deceased lying on the ground with his head towards the door.

Dr Patrick, who made a post-mortem examination, said the heart was very much enlarged, and one of the valves was diseased. In his opinion death was due to syncope.—Lieut Fergusson, of the Observer Co, said deceased was an old soldier, and went through the South Afrian War. His work was only of a sedentary nature.—A verdict was returned in accordance with the medical testimony, and the jury expressed sympathy with the widow.

The funeral took place on Tuesday afternoon, when, despite a heavy downpour of rain, there was a large number of spectators. The coffin was preceded by a firing party from Budbrooke Barracks, and the deceased’s comrades, of the Observer Company, under Lieut Fergusson, followed after the mourners. The first part of the service was conducted by the Rev C M, Blagden, Rector, and was held in the Parish Church. The coffin, which was covered with the Union Jack, and deceased’s belt and hat, was borne to the grave by his fellow N.C.O’s. After the service three volleys were fired, and the “ Last Post ” was sounded. Beautiful floral tributes were sent by his wife, his mother, and sister; Major B D Corbet and Lieut Fergusson ; from the headquarter staff, No 6 Observer Company, with a card attached, “ Mourning deeply a true and faithful comrade ” ; Mr and Mrs C F Louch ; Howard W Clayton, 11th King’s Regiment ; Harold and Tom ; Sergt-Major Rowland, R.F.C ; a few civilian friends ; Mrs D Barnwell ; J H Lane, Miss Bull, and Mrs F Solomon; and Mrs A Thomas.

RUGBY SOLDIER HONOURED.-Pte J Enticott, Oxford and Bucks L.I, has been awarded the military Medal for bravery shown on September 15th by attending wounded single handed under heavy shell fire. He is the youngest son of Mr A Enticott, of Union Street, and was formerly employed at the B.T.H. Works.

ABSENTEE.—At the Rugby Police Court on Friday morning, before T Hunter, Esq, George Henry Smith, of Rugby, was charged with being an absentee from the R.W.R, and was remanded to await an escort

THE PARCELS sent by the Rugby Prisoners of War Committee to local men who are prisoners of war in Germany this week contained : tea, condensed milk, baked beans, 1lb sugar, grape nuts, fish paste, herrings in tomato sauce, margarine, cocoa, and 2lbs biscuits.

THE BATTLE OF THE SOMME. — A SPECIAL ATTRACTION AT THE EMPIRE.—For six days commencing November 20th, a film giving pictures of the Battle of the Somme — Official War Pictures of the British Army in France, taken by permission of the War Office, 5,000 feet in five reels to be shown at The Empire, Rugby.

EPIDEMIC OF BIGAMY IN WARWICKSHIRE. — At the Warwickshire Assizes on Monday, Mr Justice Bailhache commented on the fact that four out of the seven prisoners for trial were charged with bigamy. He said there seemed to be an epidemic of bigamy in Warwickshire.

IN MEMORIAM

CLARKE.—In ever loving memory of Walter, younger son of the late E. T. Clarke, and of Mrs. Clarke, 19 Temple Street, Rugby, who was killed in action. November 15th, 1915.
“ Greater love hath no man than this, that he lay down his life for his friends.”
—Never forgotten by his Mother, Brother, and Sisters

10th Jun 1916. The Great Naval Battle

THE GREAT NAVAL BATTLE.

MORE THAN THREE HUNDRED OFFICERS KILLED.

The Admiralty issued on Sunday night a detailed list of the casualties among the officers serving in the ship which took part in the great fight in the North Sea last week. All those on board the Indefatigable, the Defence, and the Black Prince were lost ; only four of the Queen Mary and two of the Invincible were saved. The list of killed numbers 333 and includes Rear-Admirals Hood and Arbuthnot, whose flags were carried on the Invincible and the Defence respectively. Many representatives of well-known families are to be found in the list, including the Earl of Denbigh’s second son, Lieut-Commander the Hon Hugh R C Feilding, and Sub-Lieut the Hon Algernon W Percy, only son of Lord Algernon Percy, of Guys Cliff, Warwick.

The first official notification of the battle, published in Saturday morning’s papers, caused a feeling of uneasiness throughout the country, especially when read in connection with the German claims of a great victory. But a further statement, issued by the Admiralty on Sunday night, disposed finally of the impudent German pretence. It was made plain that when, after a vigorous engagement between the leading ships of the two fleets, the main body of the British Fleet came up, the German High Seas Fleet turned tail, and ran for home. In this encounter they were severely punished. The pursuit was maintained until the light failed, and after nightfall British destroyers made a further successful attack on the enemy. Having driven the enemy into port, Sir John Jellicoe cruised about the main scene of action in search of disabled vessels until noon next day, when he returned to his bases, and by the evening of June 2nd his fleet was again ready to put to sea. While the enemy’s losses are not exactly determinable, it is certain that the accounts which they have given to the world are false, and that their losses are not only relatively but absolutely heavier than ours.

The enterprise towards the north on which the German ships set out, whatever may have been its immediate object, was a challenge to the British Fleet, Admiral Sir David Beatty (whom Rugby is proud to claim as an erstwhile townsman) deliberately took up the challenge, though he had at his command only a portion, and that not the strongest, of our forces to pit against the whole navy of Germany. With wonderful gallantry and tenacity he fought, and held the enemy until our Grand Fleet could join in the conflict. The German Fleet had their chance to consider conclusions with our main sea forces, and they declined it. Some of the splendid ships and brave men in whom the nation placed a proud trust kept that trust at the last cost, and the enemy slunk away to their ports, leaving at the bottom of the sea at least four of their largest ships. In short, the German Fleet is to-day as tightly bottled up as it was before.

Lieut-Commander the Hon Hugh Cecil Robert Feilding, his Majesty’s ship Defence (killed in the North Sea battle), was the second son of the Earl and Countess of Denbigh. He was torpedo officer of this ship for three and a-half years, and for the last few months had been first lieutenant. Born in December, 1886, he was educated at the Oratory School Edgbaston, and his Majesty’s ship Britannia, whence he passed as midshipman, and obtained the prize for the highest aggregate of marks. He served as midshipman on the Mediterranean and South African Stations in his Majesty’s ships Bacchante and Crescent respectively. He gained the coveted “ Six ones ” in his examinations for lieutenant, as well as the special promotion marks for “ meritorious examination,” which caused him later on to be antedated considerably, his rank as lieutenant dating from within a few days of his twentieth birthday. Commander Feilding was awarded the Beaufort testimonial and the Whartop testimonial with gold medal for highest marks in navigation and pilotage, and also the Ronald Megaw prize and sword for those obtaining highest marks in the examinations for lieutenant. He specialised for torpedo after serving at sea in his Majesty’s ship Queen, and also in his Majesty’s ship Cornwall, when she made an interesting cruise in the Baltic. After passing very high in the advanced course at Greenwich, he served for a time on the Vernon, and was then appointed to the Defence. Commander Feilding was an officer of brilliant abilities and high promise.

Lieut Feilding was very popular with the tenants of the Newnham Paddox Estate, although he did not take any active part in public life there. Before joining the Navy he frequently shot over the farms with much success.

The Earl and Countess of Denbigh will naturally feel deeply grieved by the loss of their gallant son, and sincere sympathy will be extended to them by all ; but they will, no doubt, find comfort and consolation in the fact that he gave his life fighting gloriously in a battle which one may expect will be recorded in history as one of the decisive battles of the world, and perhaps the greatest.

Sub-Lieutenant the Hon Algernon William Percy was the only son of Lord Algernon Malcolm Arthur Percy, of Guys Cliffe, Warwick, and Lady Victoria, eldest daughter of the fourth Earl of Mount Edgcombe, and grandson of the sixth Duke of Northumberland, Lieut Percy held a lieutenant’s commission in the 3rd Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers for seven years. His joined the Royal Naval Reserve in 1914. He was a Magistrate and a member of the County Council for Warwickshire.

Among local men who perished in the battle were the following :-

Harry Cooper, son of Mr John Cooper, and grandson of Mr A Finch, both of 12 Queen Street, was serving as a boy on the Defence, and as no news has been received by them it is presumed that he has been drowned. He was only 17 years of age, and joined the Navy about twelve months ago, previous to which time he was employed at the International Stores. He was an Old Elborow boy.

Gunner W H Brain, nephew of Mrs B King, Old Bilton, and of Mr F Brain, formerly of Birdingbury, and now of Houston road, Brownsover. He was 17 years of age, and joined the Navy on Christmas Day, 1914. After being trained on the Powerful, he was drafted to the Indefatigable at the beginning of the present year.

Amongst those who went down with the Indefatigable was Chief Stoker Walter Wreford, brother of Mr W J Wreford, 18 Wood Street, Rugby. Although he was not a native of Rugby, Stoker Wreford spent most of his long leave in the town, and was well known to a circle of Rugbeians. He completed his 22 years’ service at Christmas, 1913, but volunteered for service in the following August, on the outbreak of War. He was one of the crew of the Camperdown when she collided with and sank the Victoria in the Mediterranean.

NEW BILTON SAILOR KILLED ON H.M.S. “ INVINCIBLE.”

Amongst those lost on H.M.S Invincible was Chief First-Class Petty Officer Mechanician William Josiah Badger, of New Bilton. Mr Badger, who had been in the Royal Navy for thirteen years, and had made remarkably good progress in his profession, was a native of Princethorpe, but went to reside at New Bilton with his parents 17 or 18 years ago. He was 33 years of age and married. His brother, Mr H Badger, lives in Bridle Road, New Bilton.

LORD KITCHENER DROWNED.

THE NATION’S GREAT LOSS.

The whole Empire was shocked on Tuesday at the news that Field-Marshal Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, and one of the foremost military organisers in the world, had lost his life by drowning. On the invitation of the Czar, Lord Kitchener had undertaken a visit to Russia in order to discuss important military and financial questions, when the vessel on which he was travelling, the armoured cruiser Hampshire, was sunk west of the Orkneys, either by a mine or a torpedo. Four boats were seen to leave the sinking ship, but heavy seas were running, and up to Wednesday no news had been received of any survivors, only some bodies and a capsized boat having been found by the search parties which were sent out by sea and land.

Accompanying Lord Kitchener were Brig-Gen W Ellershaw and Mr H J O’Beirne, of the Foreign Office, Sir H F Donaldson, K.C.B, and Mr L S Robertson, of the Ministry of Munitions.

A summary of Admiral Jellicoe’s message conveying the fateful information to the Admiralty appeared in our mid-week edition on Tuesday afternoon, and the distressing news was received with the profoundest regret and dismay. People after eagerly scanning the telegram would ask whether it could possibly be true, and it was with difficulty they could bring themselves to believe that it was. The depressing effect caused in the first instance soon passed away, and gave place to the feeling that the work so well begun by Lord Kitchener would be carried on with still greater determination to a victorious issue.

In a message to the army, the King says :

Lord Kitchener will be mourned by the army as a great soldier who, under conditions of unexampled difficulty, rendered supreme and devoted service both to the Army and the State.

The Admiralty announces that 12 survivors from the crew of the Hampshire have been washed ashore on a raft. So far 75 bodies have been recovered, and there is believed to be a possibility that Lord Kitchener’s body may yet be found.

AN EX-DIRECTOR OF WILLANS & ROBINSON ON THE HAMPSHIRE.

Mr Leslie Robertson, who with Sir Frederick Donaldson was representing the Ministry of Munitions on Lord Kitchener’s Staff, was for many years a Director of Willans & Robinson, Ltd., Rugby, and his death is severely felt by many of the Staff with whom he came in contact. He invariably took a warm interact in the Company’s affairs, and also in the welfare and happiness of those working in the Company’s service.

RUGBY MAN DROWNED WITH LORD KITCHENER.

Walter Gurney, younger son of Mr and Mrs J Gurney, of 67 Cambridge Street, Rugby, was included in Lord Kitchener’s party, which was lost on H.M.S Hampshire. Mr Gurney, who was 26 years of age, and was a native of Catthorpe, was valet to Mr J O’Beirne, C.V.O, C.B, of the Foreign Office, in whose service he had been about five months, during which time he had visited Rome and Paris in connection with the Allies’ Conferences. The death of Mr Gurney, who had been four times rejected for the Army, is rendered the more sad as his parents heard a few weeks ago that his only brother, who had been missing for 13 months, must be presumed to have been killed in action.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Major Darnley has just arrived in Salonika, and has also been made second in command of his battalion.

Harry Hollowell, an Old Laurentain and youngest son of Mr H Hollowell, 11 Victoria Street, Rugby, has joined the Infantry Division of the H.A.C.

Second-Lieut Eric Pearman, younger son of Mr T Pearman, Manor House, Ryton-on-Dunsmore, has been gazetted lieutenant in the 16th Service Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment.

Surgeon Probationer J. C. Brown, third son of Mr J Brown of North Street, Rugby, was on the leader of the 12th Destroyer Flotilla, which was in action in the naval battle off Jutland from 6 p.m till 5 a.m on June 1st. This flotilla is credited with having sunk, among other vessels, a German Dreadnought.

Capt G H Neville, 1st Somerset Light Infantry (of Dunchurch), came to England on May 26th, and after being invested by the King at Buckingham Palace with the Military Cross for valour in the field returned to duty.

Captain the Rev V F Mason, former curate at St Marie’s, has just completed one year as Chaplain to the Forces. He has been in Belgium, Egypt, and France, and was recently on short leave in England.-Captain the Rev Frederick O’Connor, also formerly of St Marie’s, and at present Chaplain to the Forces, has been twice in Egypt, was the last chaplain to leave the Gallipoli Peninsula, and is now stationed at Salonika.

LIEUT H DUNCAN AWARDED THE MILITARY CROSS.

The many friends of Lieut H Duncan, of the Royal Flying Corps, will be gratified to hear that he has received the Military Cross at the hands of H.M the King. Lieut Duncan was formerly employed in the B.T.H Test Department, and was a prominent member of the Test Rugby XV.

STREET ASHTON.

DRIVER TOM WARD, of the Royal Engineers, has been sent home suffering badly from shell shock and neurasthenia, and is now in hospital for special treatment. He was a reserve man, and was amongst the first troops to go out to France at the beginning of the war in August, 1914. He has been at the front a year and eight months, and fought in numerous battles, in which he has had many narrow escapes. He was in the retreat from Mons, the battles of the Aisne, and seven other places, as well as the first, second, and third engagements at Ypres, and it was in the latter he was finally compelled to give way from shell shock.

CHURCHOVER.

HOME ON FURLOUGH.—First Class Stoker Fred Jones has been home on a three weeks’ furlough. His visit was a great surprise to his wife. He has served over 13 years in the service, and has been on a torpedo boat since the outbreak of the war. He had not been home for three years, and had some thrilling stories to tell of life at sea, and also of a narrow escape he had after being washed overboard, when he managed to cling to the sides of the boat.

MUNITIONS TRIBUNAL.—Several cases from the B.T.H. Rugby, came before the Coventry Munitions Tribunal at Coventry on Friday last week.—Alonza Fothergill, 17 Newland Street, New Bilton, was charged with neglecting his work. It was proved that he was refused admittance to the works because he was intoxicated and a fine of £3 was imposed.—Charges of neglecting their work were also preferred against William Hayes painter, of Grosvenor Road, and W Ashton, foundry hand, Cambridge Street, and fines of £1 were inflicted in each case.

BOOKS & MAGAZINES FOR THE TROOPS.

Since last July, by the generosity of the public, the Post Office has maintained an average supply of about 1,000 bags, containing books and magazines, per week ; but the numbers have recently fallen to about 800 per week, though our Army has greatly increased.

The people of Rugby have done well up to the present. Until about the end of last November only about three sacks a week were being sent. A special appeal was made in the columns of the Advertiser early in December, which resulted in a despatch of 18 or 20 sacks weekly. For months the size of the weekly despatches was fairly well maintained at that level ; but there has recently been a great falling off, not only from this office, but from the country generally—so much so that a special general appeal is being made to every single person to assist, if only by the giving as often as possible of a magazine or illustrated weekly paper, for which he or she has no further use.

The books and magazines should be merely handed in over the counter at any post office, unwrapped and unaddressed. They will be forwarded to the depot in London in due course in separate receptacles.

IN MEMORIAM.

JONES.—In loving Memory of Private Arthur Jones, 10822, 6th Leicestershire Regiment. Died June 6, 1915.
“ He is gone from this world
To the home of the blest,
Released from all sorrow and freed from all pain,
Triumphant for ever with Jesus to reign.”
-From his loving Wife and Daughter.