21st Dec 1918. Polling for the New Parliament

POLLING FOR THE NEW PARLIAMENT.
QUIET DAY THROUGHOUT THE COUNTRY.

Voting for the election of a new Parliament took place throughout the United Kingdom on Saturday last, and, considering the important issues at stake, was singularly devoid of excitement or incident. Polling took place for the election of 584 Members of Parliament. The votes will be counted on Saturday, December 28th, and the results will be announced the same day. The new House of Commons will consist of 707 Members, or 37 more than the old. As 107 Members were returned unopposed on December 4th, and two have since been elected for Oxford University there remain 14 seats to be filled. Thirteen of these are university seats, for which the poll opened on Monday and the 14th is the Kennington Division, in which, because of the death of a candidate after nomination, the poll had to be postponed.

THE FINAL MEETINGS.
On Friday evening last week three mass meetings were held in Rugby (Co-operative Hall, Eastlands School, and the Church House) in support of the candidature of Major J L Baird. All of the meetings were well attended, and the utmost enthusiasm prevailed, especially at the Co-operative Hall, where the large audience cheered again and again as the telling points in favour of the Coalition were driven home by the speakers, viz, Major J L Baird, Sir Ernest Pollock, K.C, M.P, Earl of Denbigh, Rev Ronald Irwin, D.S.O, M.C, &c.

Mr Maclagan addressed meetings at the Eastlands School.

A QUIET DAY IN THE RUGBY DIVISION.
Polling took place on Saturday last, when, for the first time in the history of the Country, all the elections were held on the same day. In the reports from nil quarters reference is made to the apathy of the electors, and this state of affairs was faithfully reflected in Rugby.

In fact, it is no exaggeration to say that never in the memory of the oldest elector has polling day passed off so quietly and uneventfully. None but the really ardent partisans appeared to take any real interest in the contest, and but for the unusual number of motor-cars dashing about—and the number of these was remarkably small compared with past occasions—a visitor to the town would scarcely have realised a Parliamentary election was in progress. The poll in the town was very light one; but the ladies, who were able to vote for the first time at a Parliamentary election, turned up in much larger numbers than did the men. Many married couples walked to the polling stations together and one enthusiastic lady was overheard to remark to her husband on emerging from the booth, “Now you don’t know who I have voted for.” The polling stations were open from 7 a.m to 9 p.m, but at no time was there any real rush of voters. Visits to a number of the stations in the centre of the town at all hours of the day revealed very little activity, and there was an utter absence of the outbursts of party enthusiasm which have characterised elections in the past.

Reports from the country districts indicate that the polling was somewhat heavier than in the town.

The election will remain open until December 28th to enable soldiers to register their votes, and for that reason it is impossible to forecast the result. As usually happens, both parties claim to have secured a majority ; but the general opinion seemed to be that Major Baird has retained the seat.

Major Baird toured the Division in his car, and everywhere he was enthusiastically received. Mr Maclagan also visited most of the polling stations during the day.

Forty-six special constables, in addition to the Regular Force, were on duty throughout the day at the various polling stations in the Division.

The votes of the absent electors engaged on military or naval service in England, France, Belgium, and with the Army of Occupation in Germany, whose ballot papers are received by the Returning Officer before December 28th, will have to be added to those recorded on Saturday. In the Rugby Division there absent voters number no fewer than 5,754. As the votes are received they are sorted into their proper divisions, and are then placed in large boxes. The papers will be opened in the presence of the candidates with one representative if they choose, and they will then be thoroughly mixed with the votes recorded at home as the latter are removed from the boxes. All papers received on Saturday morning before the counting begins will be included.

In all cases where a ballot paper has been sent to an absent voter no second paper can be issued, even though the soldier or sailor is on leave, or has been discharged. The Record Office for the particular unit to which the men belonged will return the papers to them at their then present addresses, so that all they need do is to fill up the papers according to the instructions and post them or deliver them in the proper envelopes to the Returning Officer. No doubt at the present time a number of soldiers and sailors on leave have not yet received their ballot papers, but the assumption is that the papers will follow them, and it is partly to ensure that they shall reach the men that the time for counting has been extended.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

The latest casualty lists contain the names of the following Rugby men killed :— Pte W Williams, King’s Liverpool Regt, Sergt J Carter, R.W.R ; wounded, Pte L C Bovell, R.W.R.

Pte A Woodward, Devonshire Regt, son of Mr T Woodward, 39 Stephen Street, was killed in action on October 28th. He was an old St Matthew’s boy, and before enlisting he was employed by Messrs Parnell & Son.

Amongst the latest returned prisoners from Germany were Act Corpl J N Atkinson, M.G.C, and Acting Sergt R E Lewin, R.W.R, both of Rugby.

MR J E SMITH, hon sec of the B.T.H employees’ Christmas party to wounded soldiers and released prisoners of war, writes—“ In your report of Rugby Food Control meeting of last week that the B.T.H Company were entertaining the wounded soldiers and released prisoners of war on Saturday, December 28th, I should be pleased if you would correct that error, as it is the B.T.H employees who will entertain them,”

ABSENTEES.—At Rugby Police Court on Saturday, before Mr J J McKinnell, Pte Edwin Jones, King’s Shropshire Light Infantry, and Rifleman John Donnelly, Royal Irish Rifles, were charged with being absentees from the 1st Southern General Hospital, Edgbaston, Birmingham. The men, who admitted the offence, and were arrested by P.S Tromans, were remanded to await an escort.

HILLMORTON.
Mrs Fenwick’s Red Cross working party, which has done such excellent work during the war, has this year sent in to B.R.C.S in London 94 shirts and 30 pairs of socks. Mrs Rich organised and arranged, with the help of Mr Warren and a small committee, the “ Our Day ” collections, the result being most gratifying. The collection realised £20 2s 1d, the whist drive £10 0s 4d, and the schoolchildren collected the splendid amount of £1 11s 11½.

HARBOROUGH MAGNA.
TO PROVIDE a Christmas present for each of the 45 soldiers from Harborough Magna a house-to-house collection was made by Mr H Neal and Mr E Gamble. Upwards of £19 was raised by this means, and a draw brought in £13 16s, making a total of £32 19s. This enabled the secretary, Miss F Craven, to send 14s 3d to each soldier.

WOLSTON.
WAR MEMORIAL.—A parish meeting was convened by the Vicar, the Rev J O Gooch, at Messrs Bluemel’s dining room, on Tuesday evening. Mr W Snell, chairman of the Wolston Parish Council, was voted to the chair. A suggestion from the Rev J O Gooch to the effect that the south transept chapel at St Margaret’s Church should be repaired and re-furnished and made a war memorial chapel was well received. The undertaking would cost about £350 to £400. The Vicar’s suggestion was approved. One gentleman thought a clock tower in Wolston village would be more suitable, but his proposal found no seconder. The Vicar undertook to find out the feeling of the Nonconformists and other residents who were absent.

RUGBY URBAN DISTRICT COUNCIL. . . .

R.W.R V.C.
A postcard was read from Mr G W Blythe, secretary of the Vickers’ Testimonial Fund, announcing that Lance-Corpl Vickers, V.C, R.W.R, would visit Rugby the following day (Wednesday), and would be pleased to meet the Chairman of the Council.—It was decided that owing to the shortness of the notice, nothing could be done in the way of a civic or public welcome, but the Chairman agreed, on behalf of the town, to interview the gallant soldier.

It was also announced that a motor lorry, with two captured German guns, which were touring the county for the inspection of the inhabitants, would arrive at Rugby at about 3 p.m on Friday, and would remain in the town until the following day.

RUGBY’S WAR TROPHY.
With reference to the captured German gun, which has been allotted to Rugby, the Chairman mentioned that on November 5th he received a letter from Major J L Baird to the effect that, seeing a row of German guns in the Mall, it occurred to him that some of them would look very well at Rugby. He accordingly approached the Under-Secretary for War on the matter, and was advised by him to apply to the O.C of the R.W.R for some guns captured by that regiment. He had done this, and he hoped his action would meet with the approval of the Council. Major Baird added that he could not say what views the R.W.R had on the subject, but he felt that Rugby should have some guns, preferably some captured by the R.W.R.—The Chairman said as the outcome of this letter he also wrote to the O.C at Warwick, and the result was that they were allotted the gun which they received last week. He believed it was the biggest of the guns which came into Warwickshire.

EXHIBITION OF WAR TROPHIES.
SIR,—The Committee of the Public library have arranged to hold an exhibition of war trophies in the Museum from January 8th to 11th next, when it is hoped that an interesting and comprehensive collection will be on view. A number of exhibits will be lent by the Imperial War Museum Committee, and I venture to appeal through your columns to any local residents who have souvenirs or curios connected with the great War to place them at our disposal during the exhibition. I shall be grateful to any who can help in this way if they will kindly notify the Curator of the Museum, Mr R Fenley, Public Library, St Matthew’s Street, as soon as possible, in order that final arrangements may be made for the exhibition. Admission to the exhibition will be free, but all visitors will be invited to make a contribution to the funds of the Disabled Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Association.—Yours, &c,
R H MYERS, Chairman,
Rugby Public Library and Museum.

COUPONS FOR CHRISTMAS RATIONS.
TO BE USED IN ADVANCE.

In view of the fact that many shops throughout England and Wales may be closed during the greater part of Christmas week, the Food Controller has decided, except in the case of meat, that the coupons numbered 8 in the current ration book shall be available for use throughout England and Wales during the week beginning December 15th, as well as in the normal period of their currency (i.e, the week beginning December 22nd). This arrangement does not apply to Scotland.

During the period December 16th to January 4th catering establishments exempted from keeping a register of consumption will be permitted to serve meat meals at a price not exceeding 2s (exclusive of the usual charge for beverages). The maximum price for any meal at which meat is not served will remain at 1s 4d.

BORN IN THE TRAIN.—On Sunday night a middle-aged woman, accompanied by a female friend, was travelling on the L & N-W railway from Easton to attend a funeral in Wales. When the train was a few miles south of Rugby number of passengers was suddenly increased by one, a fine young gentleman making his appearance in the world about a fortnight before he was expected. The mother and child were taken out of the train, placed in the waiting room, and Dr Hoskyn was sent for. After resting a few hours the mother and son were sent back to London, the former having so far recovered as to wish to walk to the train, which of course, she was not allowed to do.

DEATHS.

IZZARD.—In loving memory of Pte. THOMAS IZZARD, R.M.L.I, who died December 12, 1918, aged 29 years of pneumonia, at Hasler Hospital, Portsmouth, son of the late Thomas and E. Izzard, late of Brickhill Cottages, Cawston.—“ In the midst of life we are in death,”—Deeply mourned by his sorrowing Mother, Sister and Brother.

Woodward, Arthur. Died 27th Oct 1918

Arthur WOODWARD was born on 13 December 1899 in Rugby.  He was the son of Thomas Woodward, who was a ‘carpenter and joiner’ born at Stretton-under Fosse on 4 February 1869, and Agnes Lillian, née Roden, born in Rugby on 12 December 1869.  They were married on 5 September 1893 at St Andrew’s church, Rugby.

By 1891 the family had moved to Rugby, and living at 25 Stephen Street.  Arthur’s father was then a ‘carpenter and joiner’, and he married two years later.    By 1901, their first son, Arthur Woodward, was two years old, and his brother, Bernard, was one.  Their father was still a ‘joiner – carp’ and the family was now living at 39 Stephen Street, Rugby.

In 1911, they were still at the same address, a five roomed house.  The brothers were at school; Arthur was 12 and Bernard, now more fully named Alfred Bernard, was 11.  Arthur’s parents had been married 16 years, and it seems that they had had three children, one of whom had died.  Arthur’s father was still a ‘joiner’ and was a ‘worker’ for a ‘builder’, quite possibly he was already working for J Parnell and Son of Rugby.

A later report[1] stated that Arthur Woodward attended St. Matthews School and after leaving school and before the war and joining up, it seems that he also worked for J Parnell and Son of Rugby.

Because of his age, Arthur should probably not joined up until about 1917 and he probably should not have gone abroad until at least the end on 1918.  However, his family relate that ‘he served in action in France and Flanders’ which suggests he went abroad before his Battalion went to Italy in later 1917 – so it seems almost certain that he lied about his age!

For some reason, possibly so he would not be recognised to be under age, he joined up in Taunton, and thus, perhaps unsurprisingly, he joined the Devonshire Regiment.  Arthur served, at least latterly, as a Private, No: 31616 in the 8th (Service) Battalion of the Devonshire Regiment

The 8th (Service) Battalion was formed at Exeter on 19 August 1914 as part of K1 and from a nucleus of officers and NCOs from the 1st Battalion, and were attached as Divisional Troops to 14th (Light) Division.  In May 1915 they left the Division and landed at Le Havre on 26 July 1915.  On 4 August 1915 they came under orders of the 20th Brigade, 7th Division.

If Arthur did serve in France and Flanders, in early 1917, then he may have been with the 8th Bn. in April 1917 during the Battle of Arras, when the Battalion attacked Ecoust with great success and light casualties, or a month later, when they captured part of Bullecourt at a very much higher cost.    In early October 1917 the 8th Battalion was near Passchendaele in the worst of the Third Battle of Ypres and on 26 October, an unsuccessful attack on Gheluvelt again led to heavy casualties.  Arthur could perhaps have been in a draft of reinforcements after any of these actions.

In May 1915, the Italians had entered the war on the Allied side, declaring war on Austria.  Commonwealth forces were later transferred to the Italian front between November 1917 and November 1918.   In March 1918, XIV Corps (the 7th, 23rd and 48th Divisions) relieved Italian troops on the front line between Asiago and Canove, the front being held by two Divisions, with one Division in reserve on the plain.[2]

It is quite possible that Arthur only joined the 8th Battalion in France, just in time for them to be transferred to Legnano, Italy, as part of the 7th Division in November 1917.  They were to strengthen the Italian resistance against the Austria/Hungary forces.  By the end of January 1918 the 8th Battalion was in Northern Italy on the Piave front.  Later, on 21 October 1918, the 7th and 23rd Divisions were sent to the Treviso area of the River Piave front, taking over the section of the front from Salletuol to Palazzon, and serving as part of the Italian Tenth Army.

On the night of 23 October, the 8th Bn. captured Papadopoli Island.  The main channel of the river Piave was crossed using small boats and the northern half of the island was occupied, this being completed two nights later by a combined Commonwealth and Italian force.  This was the start of the decisive Battle of Vittoria Veneto ‎[24 October – 4 November 1918] which resulted in the Austrians being forced back and an Armistice coming into effect on 4 November 1918.

After the capture of the island, the Allied attack east of the Piave began early in the morning of 27 October 1918.  The bridging of the river Piave proceeded rapidly, however the strength of the current meant that the two bridges built for the crossing were frequently broken and many men were drowned.  It seems most likely that Arthur Woodward was one of those men tragically drowned when a bridge broke – his family related that he drowned when in Italy.[3]

Arthur died, ‘aged 20’, on Sunday, 27 October 1918.  He was then in fact only some 18 years and 10 months old – and was still under the official age of 19 for service ‘abroad’.[4]  He was buried at the Tezze British Cemetery in Plot 6. Row B. Grave 4. Tezze Provincia di Treviso – Veneto Italy.

Tezze is a village in the Province of Treviso, a large town north of Venice.  The Italians entered the war on the Allied side, declaring war on Austria, in May 1915.  Commonwealth forces were at the Italian front between November 1917 and November 1918.  The village of Tezze was captured by the Austrians in the advance in the autumn of 1917 and remained in their hands until the Allied forces crossed the River Piave at the end of October 1918.  Many of those who died on the north-east side of the river during the Passage of the Piave are buried in Tezze British Cemetery.  It now contains 356 Commonwealth burials of the First World War.

Arthur’s grave stone had the following inscription added by his family, ‘Until the Day Breaks & the Shadows Flee Away from Father, Mother & Bernard, Rugby’.  The contact for the next of kin was his mother, Mrs L Woodward, 39 Stephen Street, Rugby.

The Rugby Advertiser reported,
‘Pte A Woodward, Devonshire Regiment, son of Mr T Woodward, 39 Stephen Street, was killed in action on October 28th.  He was an old St Matthew’s boy, and before enlisting he was employed by Messrs Parnell & Son,[5]

His death was also announced in the following January in the Coventry Evening Telegraph,
‘The Roll of Honour – Coventry and District Casualties.  The following are included in the latest casualty lists:- Killed – Woodward, 31616. A. (Rugby) Devon Regt. …’.[6]

The Register of Effects suggests that his father received Arthur’s back pay of £4.16.11d on 29 March 1918, and his War Gratuity of £7 on 27 January 1920.  The official had given his date of death as 87.10.18, whilst the transcription read 8 October 1918!

Arthur WOODWARD was awarded the British War and Victory Medals.  He is also commemorated on the Rugby Memorial Gates in Hillmorton Road, Rugby.

His mother, Agnes Lillian, died in 1946.  His father, Thomas Woodward, was one of the joiners who worked for J Parnell and Son of Rugby and who, in the early 1920s, helped to build Queen Mary’s Doll’s House at Windsor Castle.[7]  He died two years after his wife on 25 March 1948.

Arthur’s brother, Bernard Alfred Woodward, also served in WWI, joining up as a ‘young soldier’ at Budbrook on 17 January 1918.  His somewhat confused Service Record, which may include references to another soldier, has him posted as No:57031 to the 3rd Battalion, the Hampshire Regiment and then as No:45669 in the Princess Charlotte of Wales’s (Royal Berkshire) Regiment and latterly as No:44808 in the 2nd/7th Bn. Royal Warwickshire Regiment and attached to the 9th Worcesters.  It seems that he did go to France, and then from April to June 1918, he had 50 days in hospital with an injured left index finger at ‘Fargo SP’[8] at Larkhill, Wiltshire and this may have been the occasion when the Rugby Advertiser later in November 1918, advised that he had been wounded.[9]  He was not discharged until later in 1919.

 

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

– – – – – –

 

This article on Arthur WOODWARD was initiated by Janet Potter, a relative by marriage, and was further researched, with military additions, by John P H Frearson for the Rugby Family History Group [RFHG] project.  It is © John P H Frearson and the RFHG, September 2018.

 

[1]      Rugby Advertiser, Saturday, 21 December 1918.

[2]      Edited from: https://www.cwgc.org/find-a-cemetery/cemetery/69804/cavalletto-british-cemetery/.

[3]      Information from Janet Potter, a member of the Rugby Family History Group, who relates that her husband, Tony Potter, also a member, was told that the Battalion were crossing a bridge which collapsed and Arthur was drowned.  Arthur’s younger brother Bernard was married to Maida, the sister of Lily Sarah (née Lowe), Tony Potter’s mother.  [ref: Emails: Janet Potter, 11 & 12 September 2018].

[4]      Official government policy was that you had to be 18 to sign up and 19 to fight overseas. In the early twentieth century most people didn’t have birth certificates, so it was easy to lie about your age.

[5]      Rugby Advertiser, Saturday, 21 December 1918.

[6]      Coventry Evening Telegraph, Wednesday, 8 January 1919.

[7]      Queen Mary’s Dolls’ House was built in the early 1920s, completed in 1924, for Queen Mary, the wife of King George V.

[8]      Fargo Camp (Larkhill) was a hospital established at the army base in Wiltshire.  It had 1037 beds.

[9]      Rugby Advertiser, Saturday, 9 November 1918.

18th Sep 1915. Warwickshire Yeomanry at the Dardanelles.

WARWICKSHIRE YEOMANRY AT THE DARDANELLES.

In a recent account of the fighting at the Dardenelles, when the new landing was effected at Sulva Bay, and an attack was made on Hill 70, Mr Ashmead Bartlett gave a vivid description of the valiant work of the Yeomanry. There was nothing in it, however, to connect any particular regiment with it ; but news of some of the casualties which came to hand private seemed to indicate that the Warwickshire Yeomanry, which includes the Rugby troop, took part in the attack. It is now known that they were in the splendid charge which took place on August 21st—only one day after their arrival at Gallipoli from Egypt. This being so, it may be interesting to repeat Mr Ashmead Bartlett’s,description :-

“ For about an hour there was no change in the situation, and then the Yeomanry again moved forward in a solid mass, forming up under the lower western and northern slopes.

“ It was now almost dark, and the attack seemed to hang fire, when suddenly the Yeomanry leapt to their feet, and, as a single men, charged right up the hill. They were met by a withering fire, which rose to a crescendo as they neared the northern crest, but nothing could stop them.

“ They charged at amazing speed, without a single halt, from the bottom to the top, losing many men, and many of their chosen leaders, including gallant Sir John Milbanke.

“ It was a stirring sight, watched by thousands in the over-gathering gloom. At one moment they were below the crest ; the next on top. A moment afterwards many had disappeared inside the Turkish trenches, bayoneting all the defenders who had not fled in time, whilst others never stopped at the trench line, but dashed in pursuit down the reverse slopes.

“ From a thousand lips a shout went up that Hill 70 was won. But night was now rapidly falling, the figures became blurred, then lost all shape, and finally disappeared from view. The battlefield had vanished completely, and as one left Chocolate Hill one looked back on a vista of rolling clouds of smoke and huge fires, from the midst of which the incessant roar of the rifle fire never for a moment ceased.

“ This was ominous, for, although Hill 70 was in our hands, the question arose : Could we hold it throughout the night in the face of determined counter-attacks ? In fact, all through the night the battle raged incessantly, and when morning broke Hill 70 was no longer in our possession. Apparently the Turks, were never driven off a knoll on the northern crest, from which they enfiladed us with machine-guns and artillery fire, whilst those of the Yeomanry who had dashed down the reverse slopes in pursuit were counter-attacked and lost heavily, and were obliged to retire.

“ During the night it was decided that it would be impossible to hold the hill in daylight, and the order was given for the troops to withdraw to their original positions. Nothing, however, will lessen the glory of that final charge of England’s Yeomen. Thus ended this great fight.”

OLD ST. MATTHEW’S BOYS WITH THE FORCES.

A large number of old scholars of St Matthew’s Boys’ School are serving with the Forces, and Mr R H Myers, the popular headmaster, has received many letters from the firing line, all breathing the same optimistic, quietly determined spirit which characterises the British Jack and Tommy. Two letters which Mr Myers has received lately are typical specimens, and give interesting details of use in both the Grand Fleet and the trenches of Flanders, and a few extracts may be welcomed.

ANXIOUS FOR THE DAY.

Petty Officer Telegraphist E W Penney, H.M.S Lion, in a letter says :—“ Unfortunately we in the Grand Fleet are not in the limelight like some of our more fortunate brothers, in the Dardanelles ; but although we envy them, we are proud to think that they are upholding the traditions of the Navy. We in the battle, cruisers, under Sir David Beatty, himself an Old Rugby man, have had two brushes with the Huns, at Heligoland and last January at the Dogger Bank ; but what we are all looking forward to is the glorious day (Der Tag) when we meet the High Sea Fleet for the first and last time. Many old scores will be paid on that day, and the murderers of the Lusitania, Scarboro’, and later the E 15, will get the punishment they so richly deserve. Although we have been engaged on the most dreary and monotonous work that a fleet is called upon to perform, i.e, a blockade, it has not damped the spirits of the men in the least. On the contrary, we have no pessimists, and everyone is as keen as mustard. I won’t describe a modern naval engagement, but it is exciting, especially during the chase which one always gets on meeting the Huns, as they are past-masters at running. Referring to one of the engagements, the writer says: ‘ We had several large shells aboard, and they wrecked everything near, but we got off very lightly, and only the Lion and Tiger were hit, and neither seriously damaged. I had a rather nasty cut an the head, caused by a bursting shell, but I made a speedy recovery, and am now anxious to get my own back. Of course, unlike the Huns, we have no ‘ Hymn of Hate’ ; but, to tell the truth, I don’t think the man is born who could put ours on paper. Unlike Dr Lyttleton, we do not love the Huns. Oh I dear no ; nor would he if he had witnessed a Zeppelin dropping bombs on our destroyers while they were trying to pick up survivors from the Bluecher. I hope before long we shall have come to grips with them again, and you can rely on the Grand Fleet winning the Modern Trafalgar, and I hope I am privileged to be present on Der Tag.”

GERMANS USE LIQUID FIRE.

Pte F J Summers, of the 5th Oxon and Bucks Light Infantry, in a letter to his old schoolmaster says :- “ We have had some very hard and exciting times lately. Our last turn in the trenches was one of eleven days in the firing line and three in support. All the time we were in we were subjected to very severe artillery bombardments, being the recipients of some very heavy shells. Our artillery near us proved superior in the exchanges, blowing the German trenches flat. The part of the ground that we held was protected somewhat from their smaller guns, as it was just behind the rise of a hill. The Germans send over a shell which we have nick-named ‘ whizz-bang ’; but so far they have gone over our parapet. Rather lucky for us. You will have read in the newspapers that the advance which followed the bombardment was entirely successful. The part we have been holding has always been one of the hottest in the line, and the enemy has tried every dirty method of attack there. Thanks to a kindly Providence, the direction of the wind protected us from gas during our time in. They tried gas shells though, but they were not very effective. An attack was made on our right with their liquid fire, but our counter-attack regained the small portion of line evacuated, and soon after our regular troops pushed them back farther still. The prisoners taken did not seem very keen : they were completely cowed by our shells, and in some cases gave themselves up. We find it rather trying in the trenches with so many alarms, often having to stand to arms just as we have got down to rest. I have often thought of the old school motto, ‘ Think of rest, but work on.’ I little thought when sitting beneath it that it would be recalled to my mind under such out of the usual circumstances.”

TWO HEROIC BRITISH SOLDIERS.

ONE OF THEM A RUGBEIAN.

Pte Swainsford, of the 1st Royal Warwickshire Regiment, writing to a Birmingham contemporary, says :—

Sir,—I have read in your paper on several occasions accounts of doings and happenings from the front, and so I am writing this to bring to your notice one of the most courageous acts during this campaign—at least it is so in my estimation. It was at the second battle at Ypres. We had just come out of the trenches for a short rest when we received the information that the Rifle Brigade ware to make an attack end that we should be in support. Well, the attack was successful, and two lines of trenches were taken. After the attack the Germ-Huns bombarded us terribly, thousands of shells being fired during the three days following. While the bombardment was at its hottest, our C.O sent an order that a machine-gun was to attempt to get up into the line. This seemed an almost impossible feat, considering the shells that were falling about ; but for all that, and despite all the advice received on the way up that it was impossible (I was in the reserve trench and heard the remarks), the officer, sergeant, and a private succeeded in reaching their goal. But no sooner did they get there than the officer was wounded, leaving the sergeant to take charge.

New follows information received from some of the Rifle Brigade who were there :

The Warwick machine-gun section succeeded in getting up to our position—in itself a most wonderful piece of work. They right away got their gun in action. After 15 minutes’ continual firing they had the misfortune to be buried, also the gun. Another 15 minutes and they were in action again. They had been in action, as near as I can say, about 2½ hours when the sergeant, looking through his glasses, spotted the place where the German reinforcements, gathered together, were waiting to advance to what was now their firing line ; but, unfortunately, owing to an advanced trench of ours, he was unable to fire on them. As soon as he realised this he explained the position to the private who was with him, and then, without the least sign of fear, they both caught up the gun and, despite a terrible fire, ran forward to the right flank, put the gun in position, and opened fire. The enemy dropped just as though they had been struck from above, very few escaping. They then picked up their gun and dashed back to their lines without injury ; but for all that it was the bravest thing I have seen in this war. The same night I was relieved, and so had to part from them, but in my opinion no praise is too good for those two heroes. Their names were Sergeant J Cresswell and Private King, Machine Gun Section, 1st Royal Warwickshire Regiment, 4th Division, 10th Brigade, British Expeditionary Force.—Yours, etc,

PRIVATE SWAIWSFORD.

1st Royal Warwickshire Regiment,

British Expeditionary Force, France.

The Private King referred to is the son of Mr and Mrs G King, 46 Pinfold Street, New Bilton. He resided with his parents till the outbreak of the war ; and he went to France on August 22nd, 1914.

GAVE HIS LIFE FOR A WOUNDED COMRADE.

A SPLENDID N.C.O.

Captain Conway, commanding B Company of the 7th South Staffordshire Regiment, has written to Mrs Woodward, now residing at Daventry Road, Kilsby, describing the noble way in which her husband, Lce-Corpl A Woodward, sacrificed himself for the sake of a wounded comrade. The writer says :-” I am forwarding you a bundle of letters and photo found in the Turkish trenches after our occupation of Chocolate Hill, on the Sunday after landing at Suvla Bay. I also thought perhaps you would be pleased to know what a noble death your husband died. The morning (Saturday, 7th August) alter landing, your husband was one of a patrol sent out to reconnoitre the hill now known as Chocolate Hill, about 1,500 yards to our front. About 200 yards from the hill the Turks opened a heavy fire on them, wounding several. The patrol than fell back on our lines, leaving one man (Pte Butler) badly wounded behind. It was not till later in the day that I learned that your husband had volunteered to stay with the wounded man where he fell. Sergt Evans, of my Company, volunteered to go out with a party and bring them in, but as it would have been certain death to anyone attempting this during the day-time, I had it postponed till darkness set in.

“ Unfortunately, during the afternoon, it was reported to me that your husband and Butler had been brought in by the R.N.D stretcher party. This report I afterwards found out to be untrue, as when we advanced on to Chocolate Hill on Sunday morning we passed the bodies of both, and I had them buried where they fell.

“ I am sure, dear Mrs Woodward, it will be some little satisfaction to you to know that he could not have died a more noble death, for he gave his life trying to save his wounded comrade. He was a splendid N.C.O, always ready and willing to do anything he was called upon to do.

“ Unfortunately, I was wounded the same evening, and was taken on board the hospital ship, but I took the first opportunity of bringing his gallant conduct to the notice of his Commanding Officer.—With deepest sympathy from Yours,

W I COWAP, Captain.

“ It would appear that the Turks had rifled your husband’s pockets and dropped the letters on retreating from Chocolate Hill.”

Lce-Corpl A Woodward was a nephew of Mrs Woodward, 73 Jubilee Street, New Bilton, with whom he and his wife resided at the time of joining the forces in September, 1914. He was 23 years of age, and had only been married two months before he joined to Miss E Worcester, of Kilsby. He was employed at the B.T.H Works.

RECRUITING AT RUGBY.

There has been a slight falling off in the number of recruits at the Rugby Drill Hall this week. The following have been accepted :—S Butler, R.F.A ; T Kirby, R.A.M.C ; H Brookes and A H Lorriman, A.S.C ; J H Hall, A S Smith, F Kirby, G H Chapman, and W Skeet, 220th Fortress Company, R.E ; W G Chater, R.W.R ; T Kenny, Leicester Regiment.

TALE OF DISASTER TO THE WARWICKSHIRE YEOMANRY.

CONVICTED FOR SPREADING FALSE NEWS.

At Stratford-on-Avon, on Wednesday, Albert Henry Brooks, chauffeur in the employ of Lieutenant Tate, Billesley Manor, was charged under the Defence of the Realm Act with spreading false reports as to disaster to the Warwickshire Yeomanry in the Dardanelles.

It was stated that defendant, on August 30th, came into Stratford and told several persons that Mrs Tate had that morning received a cablegram from her husband stating that the Warwickshire Yeomanry had been in action, that all the officers had been killed or wounded, and about 200 men put out of action.—Police-Sergeant Lee Instituted enquiries and found that the report was false. He was directed by the military authorities to prosecute. No cablegram had been received. The report had caused much distress, as a number of Stratford men are serving in the Warwickshire Yeomanry.

Defendant was fined £5, with the alternative of one month’s imprisonment.