18th May 1918. Fatal Flying Accidents near Rugby

FATAL FLYING ACCIDENTS NEAR RUGBY.
TWO YOUNG PILOTS KILLED.

On Monday two inquests were held by Mr E F Hadow at Rugby on the bodies of Second-Lieut James Donald McRae Reid (21) and Second-Lieut Roderick Oliver Sherar, who were killed in aeroplane accident during the latter end of last week.

With regard to Lieut Reid, of Vancouver, a member of the Canadian R.F.C, it was stated that on Thursday morning last week he started on a flight in a machine, the rigging and engine of which were in good order. An eye-witness, Second-Lieut Gerald Gold, stated that when he was about 2,000ft up Lieut Reid started a vertical dive, and while he was trying to straighten out again the aeroplane collapsed. Deceased dived from 1,200ft to 1,500ft, and he believed that the accident was due to deceased trying to straighten out too quickly. He was apparently diving without the engine going.

Capt Henry Pick Dean thought that the aeroplane fell about 800ft out of control. Deceased was diving at a rate of 180 or 200 miles an hour, and tried to straighten out too quickly, and witness believed this caused the aeroplane to crock up. It was not common for ‘planes to break in the middle as this did unless subjected to very great strain.

Surgeon-Major Chester Collins deposed that death was instantaneous, deceased’s head being smashed in and a large number of bones broken.

In the case of Second-Lieut Sherar, it was stated that he was an Australian, and had served in France with the Infantry. He was gazetted from a cadetship a fortnight ago. On Saturday, at 12 o’clock, deceased was ordered by Capt Pick Dean to take up the machine, the engine and rigging of which had been certified previously as in good order. Deceased was a very fine flyer, and Capt Dean watched him looping and ” rolling ” —a corkscrew evolution which all pilots were taught—for about ten minutes. He then flew out of sight, and the accident occurred shortly afterwards. Capt Dean’s opinion was that Lieut Sherar, who was 2,000ft up when he began his evolutions, was losing height without realising it. Probably when at a height of 1,500ft, but thinking it was higher up, the officer began a spin without sufficient depth to save himself. Had there been another 50ft below him he could have got out all right. It was clearly a case of misjudging the altitude.—This was confirmed by Second-Lieut Charles T Robinson, who witnessed the accident, and who said the machine struck the ground after coming out of a voluntary spin.—The injuries were described by Surgeon-Major Chester Collins, who said death must have been instantaneous, as deceased’s neck was broken.

A verdict of “ Accidental death ” was returned in each case.

RUGBY’S PATRIOTISM IMPUGNED.
Capt King, the officer commanding, mentioned that he had wished to give one of the officers a military funeral at Rugby ; but as he was not a Rugby man, the local authorities wished to charge £11 for the ground alone. He did not consider it very patriotic of Rugby people when a young man gave his life for his country, to refuse him a decent burial in their town.

The jury endorsed Capt King’s remarks and expressed the hope that the question would be brought to the notice of the Council.—The Foreman : They would not treat you like that at Clifton.—Capt King: No we are going to have him buried there.—The jury asked the Coroner to write to the Clerk to the Council on the matter, and the Foreman also promised to approach a member of the Council.

The attention of Mr Arthur Morson, the clerk to the Urban District Council, having been drawn to this question, he informs us that the regulations governing internments in the cemetery were very explicit on this point, and the Council have no power to allow a stranger to Rugby to be interred in the cemetery without the payment of double fees. This rule is necessary for the preservation of the burial ground for Rugbeians, and if it was not strictly observed there is a possibility that the cemetery would soon be filled with people from outside.

FUNERALS OF THE VICTIMS.
It was hoped to have given both of the deceased an imposing military funeral at Rugby ; but as the price of the ground space in Rugby Cemetery was too prohibitive, the funerals took place at Clifton with full military honours, whilst the villagers showed their respect by attending in large numbers.

Lieut Reid was buried on Monday, and in attendance were six officers, who acted as bearers,and 30 men, the whole being under the charge of Capt King. A sister of the deceased, who is serving with the Canadian Red Cross, attended. A firing party fired volleys, and the ” Last Post” was sounded. The school children, it might be added, lined the churchyard path, and a hymn was sung, accompanied on the organ. The Rev Cyril Morton (Vicar) officiated, and was assisted by Captain McGuinness (Presbyterian Chaplain).

The funeral of Second-Lieut Sherar took place at Clifton on Tuesday. Thirty officers (six of whom acted as bearers), thirty N.C.O’s and men, and a firing party attended, under Major Forbes. In church the hymn, ” On the Resurrection Morning,” was sung, and appropriate organ music was rendered. Cousins of the deceased were present as chief mourners. A representative was present from the Strand headquarters. Lieut Wood was in charge of the arrangements.

In both cases wreaths were sent by brother officers.

To the Editor of the Advertiser.

SIR,—I can hardly believe that the loyalty of Rugby— which is proverbial—should have failed on such an occasion in the provision of some 6ft. of ground (except at the cost of £11) to be the last resting-place of one of our youngest and bravest Allies.

Lieut Reid was a magnificent flyer, and his machine— OUR manufacture—literally broke in two with him when in mid-air, and if any man gave his life for our country he did.

I can only say we here at Clifton were proud to have him, as well as a young Australian, at rest in our little village burial ground.

T S TOWNSEND. May 16, 1918.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Pte F Rouse, A.S.C, of 8 Stephen Street, Rugby, has been wounded. He had an operation in France, and is now in Newcastle-on-Tyne.

Mrs Webb, of Dunchurch Road, Rugby, has received from her husband. Sergt J Webb, 1st Warwicks, a letter from the Major-General of the 4th Division,stating that Sergt Webb’s gallant conduct had been reported to him, and congratulating him on his fine behaviour. Sergt Webb enlisted in September, 1914.

New has been received by Mrs McKie, 33 Albert Street, Rugby, that her son, Pte Horace Horsley, of the Manchesters, has been missing since March 21st. He was formerly employed at the B.T.H, and is 21 years of age. He joined up in May last year, and went out in November and took part in the big battle.

Lieut A J Dukes, 15th Battalion the Welsh Regiment, son of Mr A J Dukes, Rugby, has been wounded in action, and is now in hospital in Birmingham.

Lance-Corpl A Blundy, 2nd Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, was killed in action on April 28, 1918. Prior to joining up he was employed in the B.T.H Generator Department. He was an old St Matthew’s boy.

Information has been received that R.S.M W J Barford, 4th Lincolnshire Regiment, died on April 30, 1918, from wounds received in action. Prior to joining his Majesty’s Forces, Pte Barford was a member of the Supply Department staff of the BTH.

Mrs F C Worrall has received news that her husband, Sergt F C Worrall, has been wounded. He is the eldest son of Mr C Worrall, Farm Cottage, Albert Street, and has been in France two years.

Lieut Evan Harries Jones, M.C, 87th Brigade, R.F.A, second son of Mr & Mrs J Jones, of Cosford, who was killed in action on April 25, 1918, was 22 years of age, and educated at the Rugby Lower School. In a letter received by his parents from the Commanding Officer of the Brigade, the latter states that he had known the late Lieut Jones for many months, and that they had had many hard and trying times together. His example was always a keen stimulant to those under his command, For gallantry and conduct he received the M.C some time ago. The writer adds:—“ On the date on which he lost his life we were together in a very hot and extremely difficult position ; his conduct then, as it had been at all times, was cool and beyond praise. He was killed by a German bullet, and his death was instantaneous. In the great loss to you, so it is to us, his brother officers and his battery. He will always be remembered as one of the finest officers who have laid down their lives for their King and country. I have the pleasure to state that he has again been mentioned for gallantry and splendid conduct to the proper quarter, and I feel sure that a bar to his M.C will be awarded. I wish you to know how much his brother officers sympathise with you in your great loss.”

STRETTON-ON-DUNSMORE.
SOLDIER MISSING.—News has been received by Mrs Hancox that her son, Pte J F Hancox, has been missing since April 14th. The War Office states that he may not be killed ; he may have been taken prisoner or temporarily separated from his regiment.

BRANDON.
PTE HORACE WATTS.—Mr & Mrs G Watts, who had not received news of their son, Pte Horace Watts, since March 21st, have just heard from him that he is a prisoner of war in Germany. He was wounded in two places in the leg in 1916 and invalided home. He joined up in August, 1914, and has been on the Western front for upwards of three years, during which time he has seen much fighting with his regiment, the West Kents. He was one of the number who, in Trones Wood, was surrounded by the Germans, and successfully held them at bay for two days, eventually being successful in withdrawing from the difficult situation. He is again wounded. Before answering his country’s call he was a footman to the Earl of Amherst, and previous to that he held a similar position to Col R J Beech at Brandon Hall. His father, Mr G Watts, has been head gamekeeper for Col Beech for 26 years.

DUNCHURCH.
MRS P GRANT, Mill Street, Dunchurch, received the news from her husband on Tuesday morning that he has been wounded in the right leg, and has undergone an operation, which was successful.

LONG ITCHINGTON.
CASUALTIES.—Mrs Edwd Ayres has now received through the Red Cross evidence that her eldest son, Pte Edwd Ayres, R.W.R, previously reported missing, was seen lying dead in a disused trench on October 9th last. Much sympathy is felt with Mrs Ayres, whose only other son has just been called up. She is a widow, and works hard for her living at Messrs Kaye’s Lime and Cement Works.—News is also to hand that Pte Sidney Linnett, Army Cyclist Corps, is missing. The chaplain writes that he went into action on April 18th last, and has not since been heard of. He was one of our early enlistments into the Royal Warwicks. Pte Linnett is the adopted son of Mr and the late Mrs W Gaskins, of the Model Village.—Pte George Hart, R.W.R, has been wounded in the face and thigh, and though at first blinded, has now recovered his sight. He writes that he expects soon to be convalescent and again in the fighting line. He has three other brothers in the Army, all of whom have seen considerable service. They are the gallant sons of Mr & Mrs Wm Hart.—Gunner Arthur J Worrall, R.F.A, who for the past six months has been an inmate of the Middlesex War Hospital at Maksbury, is now convalescent.—Sapper J Gamage, R.E, eldest son of Mr & Mrs W Gamage, has met with a serious injury to his hand while on duty in France.

NAPTON.
ROLL OF HONOUR.—The parishioners regret to hear of the loss of two Napton lads—Pte Clement Fell Batchelor and Pte Sidney Lines. Mr & Mrs James Hands have also had official notification that their second son, Pte Frank Hands, was missing from April 1st. Mr & Mrs Hands’ eldest son was killed in action in June, 1916.

AN APPEAL TO RUGBY YOUNG MEN.

From one of the propaganda vans war pictures were exhibited on Thursday evening to a large crowd gathered near the Clock Tower. Speeches were delivered by Mr McKinnell, two representatives with the van, and Colonel Johnstone. In a stirring appeal, Col Johnstone said : “ Young men of Rugby, I have appealed to you before, and I appeal to you again with greater force, because the necessity for men is very much greater. Do you want to see your country devastated and your homes ruined ? If not, follow the example of those noble and brave men whom you see walking about the town in blue. Those fellows have done their duty. They had fought for their country and for you and me. Come forward and follow their example. I know some of you are working in munitions, and I also know that you have only to hand in your certificate, and then you can voluntarily enlist. Do not make a mistake about that. Other men will be found to do your work. I think it is a shame, and to me it is very degrading, that older men of 45 or so should be called out to the Colours when there are so many young men quite able to join the Colours who ought to do so, instead of letting their fathers do so. Col Johnstone concluded by an appeal to the men who could not join the Army to join the Volunteers. That would be helping their country. The Rugby Company had got a very good name. Col Johnstone referred to the test mobilisation at Warwick Park, when 886 men were on parade. These men could render a very good account of themselves in the case of emergency, and they did not know how soon this emergency would arise. At present there was a need for boys of 17 years to 17 years 9 months to come forward as carpenters.”

MEDICAL EXAMINATION OF EXEMPTED MEN.
APPEAL TRIBUNAL CHAIRMAN’S WARNING.

A warning as to the probable fate of applicants for exemption, or exempted men called up for review, who postpone their application for medical examination until they appear before the Tribunal, was given by the Chairman (Mr H W Wale) at the Coventry Appeal Tribunal on Friday in last week.—The question arose, on the application of George Evelyn Clarke, sub-postmaster and carrier, Newbold-on-Avon, for a fresh examination.—In support of the application, Mr H W Worthington said the man had been down to the Drill Hall to try to get re-examined, but had been told that it could not be got through in time. He had a medical certificate showing the state of the man’s health, and he did not think he would now be placed in the same category as before, viz, B1.—The Chairman pointed out that the Tribunal had sat three times that week ; they were busy men, and did not want repetition. One day one of these appeals would be dismissed as a warning to other people of what would happen if they did not take advantage of their rights. Every man now had the right to a re-examination, and every man should exercise that right, and not put people who were doing a tremendous amount of public work to unnecessary trouble.— Applicant: I tried to get re-graded as soon as I received my papers.—Mr Meredith (National Service representative): You were passed Grade 2 in August last.—The Chairman : We might say that you are satisfied with your grading by the mere fact that you have let things go on so long, but we will grant the application in this case, and adjourn the matter till next Wednesday.

AGRICULTURE AND RECRUITING : IMPORTANT DECISION.

The Board of Agriculture announce that an arrangement has been made with the Ministry of National Service and the War Office for a definite number of 30,000 Grade 1 men to be made available from agriculture for military service not later than June 30th.

It is hoped that the large majority of these men will be recruited under the Proclamation of April 19, 1918, calling up men born in the years 1895-99, but if the full number of men born is not obtained under this Proclamation it will be necessary to obtain the remainder from men up to 31 years of age.

It is expected that additional labour, including a large number of prisoners of war, will be made available for agriculture to take the place of the men urgently required for immediate military service.

ENCOURAGING PIG-KEEPING.

A new regulation under the Defence of the Realm Act permits the keeping of pigs in any locality, premises, or place where they do not cause nuisance or injury to health. The restriction limiting pig-keeping within a specified distance of any street or public place is removed, providing permission is given by the local authority. Local authorities are also permitted to erect or provide and maintain piggeries and to purchase, keep, or sell pigs. This regulation is extended to Scotland and Ireland.

MEAT COUPONS TO HAVE NEW VALUES.

The Food Ministry has issued an order amending coupon values and dealing with the exemption of certain classes of offal from the necessity for the surrender of coupons.

The following kinds of edible offal, whether cooked or uncooked, may be purchased without coupons:—Tripe, chitterlings, lights, sheeps’ heads, calves’ heads and feet, ox heels, cow heels, and pigs’ and sheep’s trotters, as well as the following articles if containing no meat except edible offal of the kinds mentioned:—Cooked or prepared sausages, polonies, brawn, canned or potted goods, horseflesh (thin flank and forequarters except foreribs), meat of goats and kids, white pudding and meat pastes, containing not more than 33% per cent. of meat.

Food Control Committees are empowered under the Order to authorise the sale without coupons of meat pies not exceeding 6ozs in weight, cooked, of a kind usually sold in their districts, provided the total weight of cooked meat in the pie does not exceed 20 per cent. of the whole. Such authority will only be given to retailers who have customarily sold meat pies of this class.

Any coupon attached to an ordinary or supplementary ration card will be available during the period of its validity for the purchase of suet, edible offal, bones, and sausages. While a general butcher may sell suet, tongue, kidneys, and skirt to his registered customers only, he may sell other edible offal, hones, and sausages to any purchaser, detaching coupons in all cases where this is required.

PRESERVING BUTTER.

With the object of encouraging conservation for winter use, the Food Controller has issued an authorisation permitting the acquisition of farmers’ butter for home preservation under the following conditions:—The amount obtained by any person must not exceed the quantity authorised by the Food Control Committee of his district. The conditions mentioned in the authority must be complied with. A certificate in a form prescribed by the Food Controller must be given by the purchaser to the supplier. The butter must be properly salted or preserved, and it must be consumed only at such time and subject to such conditions as may be authorised by the Food Controller. Farmers’ butter may be supplied up to the amount permitted on the production of the necessary authority and of the certificate mentioned when required by a Food Committee.

STATE ROAD TRANSPORT.
POWER TO SEIZE HORSES AND VEHICLES.

New powers for “ maintaining an efficient system for the transport of goods by road ” are conferred on the Board of Trade by a Defence of the Realm Regulation which is published in the “ London Gazette ” of Tuesday night.

The Board may regulate the use of horses and vehicles, and may place restrictions on the sale of them. It may take possession of any horse or vehicle “ either absolutely or by way of hire,” but compensation will be paid. If the amount of compensation is not agreed upon between the Board and the owner, then it is to be determined by a single arbitrator, who “ shall not be bound to have regard to the market price . . . .or to the rate of hire prevailing in the district.”

An order may be made by the Board requiring owners to give notice to it before they dispose of their horses and vehicles. The carriage of “ goods of any class ” by road may be prohibited, and the Board may prescribe the radius or distance within which goods may be carried.

It may also “ regulate the priority in which goods are to be carried by road,” and may lay down the rates at which horses and vehicles may be hired and goods carried.

The powers conferred by the regulation are not to be exercised in the case of horses and vehicles which are used wholly or mainly in agriculture, “ except in connection with a preconcerted scheme to be put in operation in case of invasion or special military emergency.

 

DRASTIC TRAIN CHANGES.— Sir Albert Stanley, president of the Board of Trade, announced in the House of Commons that it had been decided to reduce steam train passenger traffic by 40 per cent. This will entail drastic changes.

SUGAR AT WHITSUNTIDE.—Persons who intend spending Whitsuntide in holiday resorts are advised by the Ministry of Food to take their sugar supplies with them. All visitors should take their butter and meat cards with them when on a holiday. The Ministry of Food cannot, however, guarantee that extra supplies will be available to provide for visitors to any particular district.

DEATHS.

JONES.—In loving memory of my dear husband, Pte. F. J. JONES, 1/9th London Regiment, who was killed in action on April 25, 1918, “ somewhere in France ” ; aged 40 years.
“ He sleeps besides his comrades,
In a hallowed grave unknown ;
But his name is written in letters of love
On the hearts he left at home.”
—From his sorrowing Wife and Children.

IN MEMORIAM.

PERRY.—In ever-loving memory of Pte. ALFRED JOHN PERRY, Royal Marine L.I., who died of wounds in France on May 22, 1917.
“ Sleep on, dear son, in thy foreign grave ;
Your life for your country you so nobly grave.
No friends stood near to say ‘ Good-bye,’
Safe in God’s keeping now you lie.”
— From Mother, Brother and Sister (Kilsby).

MASON.—In loving remembrance of ARTHUR ALEC MASON, of Long Buckby and Braunston, who was lost in the Dardanelles on H.M.S. Goliath, May 13, 1915.
— “ Until the day breaks.”

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