12th May 1917. Food Economy Campaign

FOOD ECONOMY CAMPAIGN.—In connection with the Food Economy Campaign in Rugby a series of cookery demonstrations has been arranged. A central establishment will be opened very shortly in High Street, where demonstrations will be given during the afternoons and evenings. This will probably be followed by local demonstrations in other parts of the town. A scheme for the establishment of communal kitchens for Rugby is also well in hand.

AN ALLOTMENT HOLDERS’ ASSOCIATION for Rugby is in course of formation (see advt).

THE KING’S PROCLAMATION urging the necessity of economising in food consumption was read at various places of worship at Rugby on Sunday last.

NEW BILTON.

A COMMUNAL KITCHEN.—The War Economy Food Committee having applied for the use of the Wesleyan. Schoolroom at New Bilton as a communal kitchen, the trustees met on Monday night to consider the matter, and unanimously decided to place the school at the disposal of the committee, subject to certain details to be arranged by the stewards.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Second-Lieut E Wilson, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, son of Mrs Wilson, of Bridget Street, is in hospital at Rouen suffering from a broken leg.

Second-Lieut H H H Lister, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, only son of Mr and Mrs H L Lister, Clifton Road, Rugby, is reported missing on May 4, 1917.

Pte Longney, writing from France, says :—“ By a curious coincidence, it was my pleasure, when passing down the street of the town where I am stationed, to see the Red Cross ambulance car presented by the Rugby and District Farmers’ Association. It is doing a splendid did work, and looks in good condition.”

Mr R George Hudson, son of Mr R S Hudson, York Street, who has been with the Artists’ Rifles in France for the past twelve months, has been given commission, and posted to a Battalion of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment. News has since been received that Second-Lieut. Hudson, who is an old St Matthew’s boy, has been severely wounded.

Rifleman J C Smith, K.R.R, the eldest son of Mr J C Smith, has been admitted to hospital with gun-shot wounds in the right shoulder.

Capt T Marriott, son of the late Mr J Marriott, of Stanford-on-Avon, who was recently awarded the Military Cross, has been promoted to the rank of Major. He is an “ old boy ” and former member of the staff of St Matthew’s Boys’ School.

The relatives of Pte F H Watts, of 21 Cross Street, Rugby, have received intimation that he was wounded on April 25th for the third time. On this occasion he received injuries in the thigh, arm, and chest through an accident. He is now in the General Hospital, Birmingham, and is making favourable progress.

Official news has been received by Mr T H Cleaver, late of the Horse and Jockey Inn that his son Joseph V Cleaver has been killed in action in France on April 11th. Before the war he was employed by the Leamington Brewery Company. He was one of the first to join up under Lord Derby’s Group System. This is the second son Mr Cleaver has lost in action, and two more, George and Austin, were wounded earlier in the War.

Evan P Biddles, gunner in the R.F.A, youngest son of the late Mrs John Biddles, Newton, Rugby, and of Estancia Loma-Pora, Villa Concepeion, Republic del Paraguay, South America, has died from wounds in France. Less than a year ago he returned to England to enlist after giving up an important post as Majordomo for the Paraguay Land and Cattle Company, and in December last crossed to France, and has practically been in action ever since. His age was 22.

News has just been received by Mr and Mrs Bull, 49 Manor Road, Rugby (late of Lower Shuckburgh, near Daventry), that their only son, Bombardier Bull, was killed in action on the night of May 3rd. At the age of 16 he joined the Warwickshire R.H.A in November, 1915, and went to France in the following May, where he has been in the fighting line ever since. A letter was received on Wednesday morning from his Officer, who writes :-“ Your son, Bombardier Bull, was gallantly doing his duty under heavy shell-fire, and a 4.2 shell just caught him and another man, Fitzgerald. You can be perfectly certain that his death was quite instantaneous and completely without pain. I have known your son since he was under me in the 3rd Warwick Battery, nearly two years ago. He showed signs of being a very fine soldier then, and has since very fully redeemed that early promise. I cannot say how deeply your son is regretted both by officers and men.”

NEWS FROM A RUGBY OFFICER REPORTED KILLED.

Capt S E Jones, of the 10th Yorkshire Regiment, formerly a bank manager at Rugby, who was officially reported killed on February 27th, is evidently a prisoner of war in Saxony. Mr Mason, his successor at Rugby, has just received a card from him stating that his eyes are getting better (so that he was apparently wounded in the face), and adding: “ Do send us food and clothing.”

RUGBY & DISTRICT WAR PRISONERS’ DAY, Saturday, June 2nd.

There are sixty-seven men from Rugby and district who have fallen into the hands of the Enemy, and they are still calling for food.

For nearly two years the Rugby Committee have organised funds by means of which beyond any shadow of doubt many of these men have been saved from starvation.

To ensure they do not lack the food necessary to keep them in health and strength, further funds must be raised at once.

THE RUGBY PRISONERS OF WAR HELP COMMITTEE therefore appeal to you to assist their efforts by sending a Donation now to the Hon. Organising Secretary,
Mr. J. REGINALD BARKER,
9 Regent Street, Rugby,
who will gratefully acknowledge same.

NEWBOLD-ON-AVON.

WOUNDED.—Mrs Parr at the Three Horse Shoes, Newbold, has received official information that her husband, Private F Parr, Oxford & Bucks Light Infantry, has been wounded in France, and is in hospital at Rouen.—Mrs T Harris of Newbold learns that her husband, Pte Thos Harris, belonging to a Northampton Regiment, had been wounded in the head and right arm on April 23rd in Egypt, and was lying in hospital seriously ill.—Mr and Mrs West of Rugby (late of Newbold) have also received intimation that their son, Pte C West, Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, has been wounded in France.

LONG LAWFORD.

Mr and Mrs Elkington, Long Lawford have received the following official note concerting their son :- “ The Major-General, 20th (Light) Division, has received a report of the gallant conduct of R G Elkington, K.R.R.C, on April 4, 1917, in courage and personal bravery in the storming of the village of Métz, and he wishes to congratulate him on his fine behaviour.” This is the second occasion that Sergt Elkington has been mentioned for his conduct in the field, the last time during a night attack, on August 23, 1916, at Guillemont. His parents have been pleaded to learn that he has received the ribbon for the Military Medal from the General Commanding.

BRANDON.

MAJOR D C M BEECH.—The many friends of Mr Douglas Beech, the only surviving son of Colonel R J Beech, J.P, D.L, will be pleased to hear that he has been acting as Brigadier Major and is on Foreign Service.

RUSSIAN FLAG DAY AT RUGBY.
A SPLENDID RESULT.

Rugby’s effort on behalf of the Russian wounded on Saturday last was crowned with success ; and, despite the fact that this time the appeal was made only in Rugby and New Bilton, upwards of 25,000 flags were sold, realising £110 16s 6d—the highest sum ever obtained by a flag day restricted to the town. The effort was held under the auspices of the Rugby Urban District Council, and the organisation was again ably carried out by Mr J R Barker, who, at the special request of the Chairman of the Council, has consented to organise all official flag days in Rugby. He was assisted by a willing band of 150 fair vendors, and by means of a system of relays sellers were to be found in the streets all day. The Council placed the Benn Buildings at the disposal of Mr Barker for a depot ; and here Mrs B B Dickinson and Mrs J R Barker rendered yeoman service in handing out fresh supplies and receiving the collecting tins as they were retained. Mr R P Mason, manager of the London City and Midland Bank, again undertook the duties of treasurer, and supervised the counting of the money, in which he was assisted by Mr J Ferry and the Hon Organiser. The £110.16s 6d was made up as under :- Coppers, £76 19s (the largest sum, received in coppers on a flag day) ; silver, £32 17s 6d ; and one Treasury note for £1, .which was placed in the box of Mr Barker’s daughter. The highest amount (£2 15s) was collected by Miss G Woods in the B.T.H district, and she was closely followed by Miss Sparkes (£2 14s 2d), of the same district.

DEATHS.

BIDDLES.—Died of gas poisoning just behind the lines in France, April 22nd, from wounds received in action same day, EVAN P. BIDDLES, gunner in the R.F.A., youngest son of the late Mrs. John Biddles, Newton, Rugby, and Estancia Lomapora, Villa Concepcion, Republic del Paraguay, S. America ; aged 22 years.

BULL.—Killed in action, on May 3rd, in France, THOMAS HENRY BULL, late of Shuckburgh ; aged 18.
“ Sleep on, dear brother, in a far-off grave ;
A grave we may never see ;
But as long as life and memory lasts
We will remember thee.
—From FATHER, MOTHER, and SISTERS.

HINCKS.—Lance-Corpl. E. W. HINCKS, Middlesex Regiment, youngest son of Mr and Mrs. Marlow Hincks, Southam Holts, officially reported killed in action in France on 12th April ; aged 20.—Deeply mourned.

ROBINSON.—In loving memory of OWEN, the dearly beloved son of Mr. and Mrs. C. Robinson, Catthorpe, who died from wounds received in action on March 28th. Laid to rest in the British Military Cemetery, near Arras,-“ Loyal to duty even onto death.”

IN MEMORIAM.

MASON.—In loving remembrance of ARTHUR ALEC MASON, of Long Buckby, who was lost on H.M.S. Goliath in the Dardanelles on May 13, 1915.—“ Till the day breaks and the shadows flee away.”

SMITH.—In loving memory of Trooper WILLIAM SMITH, son of James and Elizabeth Smith, of Lutterworth, reported missing May 13, 1915,—“ Greater love hath no man than this.”

Advertisements

9th Dec 1916. An Urban Council Employee’s Wages

AN URBAN COUNCIL EMPLOYEE’S WAGES.

Leave to appeal for a further extension was asked for Mr M J H Sharp, surveyor under the Rugby Urban District Council, in respect of Arthur Williams (35, married), chargehand at the refuse destructor, living at 58 Bennett Street.—In a letter Mr Sharp said he had advertised the post six times, and had not received a single application. The Military Authorities had supplied substitutes, who had refused to take on the work after visiting the destructor and seeing what was required of them. If the man joined up before a suitable substitute was obtained, the Council would be left in an awkward position, and no doubt the destructor would have to be closed down, as neither of the three men left was fit to take charge. Seeing the man was passed for garrison duty only, the Surveyor considered he would be doing good service by remaining in his present employment.

The Chairman : What wages are you offering ?-Mr Sharp : Thirty shillings.—The Chairman : I think you ought to be ashamed of yourself to offer a wage like that. Do you know what the ordinary labourer gets at the Coventry destructor works ?—Mr Sharp : Ninepence an hour.—The Chairman : He gets £2 3s per week.-Mr Sharp : How many hours do they work ?—The Chairman : Fifty-four.—Mr Sharp said the average of the men at the Rugby destructor was less than that.

The Chairman asked if it was true that the Military sent a man who would have gone for £2 a week, and they would not have him ?—Mr Sharp : Not that I am aware of.-Mr Wratislaw : It is true.

Mr Sharp enquired who the man referred to was ?—The Chairman read a statement by the Military to the effect that Mr Sharp asked them to send the man up, and on his return he informed them he would have taken the place, only 30s a week was offered, and he would not agree to take it under £2.—The Chairman (to Mr Sharp : Did you offer him £2 a week ?—Mr Sharp : I said, “ Come down to the destructor and see what work you have got to do.” He went down, and he would not take the job.

The Chairman : The chargehands at our destructor are earning £3 10s a week. Leave to appeal refused. It is a disgraceful thing. You say the man is absolutely indispensible to Rugby. You say if he goes you will have to shut down, and the health of Rugby will be jeopardised, and yet you offer 30s a week. Leave to appeal is not allowed in this case. I do not think the Urban District Council of Rugby can really understand it.

Mr Sharp : I am placed in an awkward position. One of the men is away from work, and if Williams has to go I shall have to close down to-night.—The Chairman : Well, you will have to close down. You thoroughly deserve it. You have asked for it.—Mr Sharp : Thank you, Sir.

RUGBY VOLUNTEER CORPS.

The entertainments at the Co-operative Hall on Thursday and Friday last week were of a highly enjoyable character, and must have entailed a large amount of time and trouble on the part of the organisers. The colour scheme adopted for the costumes and stage (black and scarlet) was striking and pleasing to the eye. The members of the party are local ladies and gentlemen, who, however, prefer to remain anonymous.

“ Jacques ” with his patter was a source of mirth, and “ Coquette ” for her song “ Come and cuddle me,” was quite successful. The rich baritone voice of “ Pierre ” was heard to advantage in “ Sailor’s Paradise.” “ Babette ” was at her best in “ Whoops 1 lets do it again,” and Paulette” captivated the audience with her songs, “ Plumstones ” and “ God send you back to me,” which were rendered with ability. The concarted pieces were pleasingly rendered. “ Jeau ” was quite at home with “ Every morn you’ll hear him say Good-night,” and made a good hit. “ Little Reggie,” the pet of the party, caused roars of laughter on Friday, evening in a Charlie Chaplin make-up, and also did useful work as a programme seller.

The financial result was satisfactory ; it is expected, to clear about £30.

A collection was made each evening to provide, tea for the wounded soldiers, who were entertained at a special matinee on Saturday. The whole of the sum realised—vis, £3 7s 9d—will be given to the Rugby Infirmary V.A.D Hospital Fund.

The secretarial work was successfully carried out by Mr G O Watson, the hon secretary of the Corps.

The thanks of the Corps to the members of the party were expressed by Mr C H Fuller, Commandant, in a short speech at the performance on Thursday. Mr Fuller also urged on the public the usefulness of the Corps, as evidenced by Lord French’s interest and support. More men are urgently needed to bring the Corps up to Company strength. At present the Corps has Atherstone attached to it to form the “ B ” Company of the 2nd (County) Battalion.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

News has come to hand that Second-Lieut E F Lawlor, of the Monmouthshire, grandson of Mr John Lawlor, of 7 Charlotte Street (a member of the Rugby Board of Guardians), has been killed in action. He was with other soldiers killed by a shell on the parapet of a trench. Lieut Lawlor was well known in Marton and the vicinity.

Pte George H Dunstone, of the R.A.M.C, who at the time he enlisted was a clerk in the Traffic Department at Rugby under Mr Bolton, has won the Military Medal for his bravery in rescuing wounded soldiers when under fire. He has recently had ten days’ leave, and on visiting his friends at Rugby was heartily congratulated by them on the honour conferred upon him.

Captain E W E Kempson, commander of the unit of the Army Troops Corps, R.E, which was raised in Rugby, and originally known as the “ Rugby Fortress Company,” has been mentioned in despatches.

The parcels sent this week on behalf of the Rugby Prisoners of War Help Committee to the Rugby and District men in prison camps in Germany, contained the following :— ½lb biscuits, 1 tin herrings, 1 tin Oxo cubes, ¼ tin cocoa, ½lb cooked ham in tin, 2oz tobacco. ½lb sugar, ½lb milk, pepper, salt, and mustard, 1 tin sausages, ½lb dripping in tin.

ANOTHER LONG LAWFORD SOLDIER KILLED.

Official information has been received by Mr and Mrs Elkington, of Long Lawford, that their son, Rifleman J Elkington, of the Rifle Brigade, was killed in action November 10th. Previous to the war, Rifleman Elkington was employed at the Carpenter’s Shop at the B.T.H, and had been in France for the past eighteen months.

PRESENTATION OF D.C.M.

At Bilton Hall Red Cross Hospital on Thursday, Colonel Johnstone presented to Gunner Roberts, R.G.A, the Distinguished Conduct Medal, won in Gallipoli in January, 1915, for carrying a wounded comrade to safety under very heavy fire. Col Johnstone, who was accompanied by Major Neilson, made a very appropriate speech, and pinned on the medal in the presence of the Commandant, the Quartermaster, the in-patients, and Staff.

LANCE-CORPL BOB MAYS AWARDED THE MILITARY MEDAL.

Mr J Mays, of 17 South Street, Rugby, has received a letter from his son, Lance-Corpl Bob Mays, of the Royal Berkshire Regiment, describing how he won the Military Medal. He says : “ We endeavoured three times, Corpl Hester, Pte Sullivan, and myself, to obtain a sample of the German barbed wire. It was during the third attempt that Corpl Hester was shot through both thighs, and his cry of pain brought very heavy rifle and machine-gun fire from the enemy’s line. After dressing Corpl Hester’s wounds, I left Pte Sullivan with him, whilst I tried to find my way back to our trenches—a very difficult task in the black darkness. Three times I found myself in the German line, and eventually I managed to find our line, and returned to Corpl Hester and Pte Sullivan, and we managed to drag him along on his back whilst we crawled on our stomachs, for to kneel or stand meant certain death. Corpl Hester being 6ft in height, and Pte Sullivan and myself only 5ft 4in, he was a good load to carry ; but at last we managed to get him in, after being in “ No Man’s Land ” for over five hours. Pte Sullivan and myself were recommended for the Military Medal, and have both received our reward. Lance-Corpl Mays was formerly a Staff-Sergeant in the Boy’s Life Brigade and had previously been wounded.

BRINKLOW.

SOLDIER’S DEATH AND MILITARY FUNERAL.—The death of Lance-Corpl William Robert Everton, aged 27, of the Military Foot Police, occurred at Brinklow on November 27th. The deceased, who was a native of Tottenham, came from France on special leave on November 11th to stay at the home of Mr S Heath, to whose daughter he was engaged. He caught a cold, which developed into pneumonia. He was originally in the King’s Own Scottish Borderers, and had served five years in India. His regiment took part in the disastrous Gallipoli campaign, where he was wounded. He was afterwards drafted into the Military Police. The deceased was accorded a military funeral, which took place at the cemetery on November 30th. A special firing party came from Rugby for the purpose. The Rev G A Dawson was the officiating clergyman. In addition to the family mourners, a large number of the villagers and the school children gathered round the graveside, when the “ Last Post ” was sounded, many floral tributes were afterwards placed upon his grave.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR.
SOLDIERS’ GRAVES IN FRANCE.

To the Editor of the Advertiser.

DEAR SIR,—In my conversations with friends whilst on a few days’ leave from France I find out how very few people know of the Graves Registration Units of the British Army.

I am often asked the question : “ How are our soldiers buried and graves attended to ? ” I think the following information will put any uneasy mind at rest if you will be kind enough to insert it in your paper :—

The work of the Graves Registration Units is carried on by officers, N.C.O’s, and men who are otherwise unfit for fighting. Land is bought at various spots along our line, is surveyed and marked out for cemeteries. Hedges, trees, shrubs, &c, are being planted, so that the cemeteries are permanent resting-places for our dead soldiers. The bodies are laid in separate graves, or side by side, one foot apart. The graves are carefully tended, and flowers planted, &c. The grave is registered, and the records filed for enquiries. A cross is erected over every grave with the man s number, name, regiment, &c, inscribed upon it. Photographs are taken of any grave when applied for, providing the grave can be reached without undue exposure to the enemy.

Any enquiries or applications should be addressed to : THE DIRECTOR, G.R Units, G.H.Q, B.E.F,

I am, sir, yours truly,
A E AINSWORTH,
Attached G.R Units, France.
84 Manor Road, Rugby.

DEATHS.

ELKINGTON.—In ever-loving and affectionate remembrance of our dear son, John Thomas Elkington, who was killed in action on November 10, 1916 ; aged 27 years.—“ God’s will be done.”—From his sorrowing MOTHER and FATHER, SISTERS and BROTHERS.

21st Oct 1916. Conscientious Objectors in Warwick Prison

WARWICKSHIRE STANDING JOINT COMMITTEE.
CONSCIENTIOUS OBJECTORS IN WARWICK PRISON.

The conditions under which conscientious objectors are accommodated at Warwick Prison were described in a report presented to the Warwickshire Standing Joint Committee at their meeting at Warwick on Monday. The report stated that the men “ will live in the prison, and for the most part work on the premises, though some of them may at a later date be sent to such work as may be arranged outside. They will not be subject in any way to penal discipline ; they will be allowed to leave the prison premises when their work is done, and at other times, with the permission of the agent in charge. If a man absconds, he will not be liable to arrest, but will be reported, with a view to his being recalled to the Army, or, if his prison sentence is unexpired, to be sent back to prison.”

RUGBY BOARD OF GUARDIANS.
MORE ACCOMMODATION NEEDED FOR WOUNDED SOLDIERS.

The Chairman informed the Board that he had that day received a telephone message from Mr Michell, stating that the War Office had applied for further accommodation for wounded soldiers to be made in Rugby ; and Mr Steel, in conjunction with Mr Michell, wondered if provision could be made for any accommodation in the Workhouse Infirmary. A small committee had been appointed, consisting of the Chairman of the Board, the Vice-Chairman, Mrs Dewar, Miss McClure, Messrs Steel, C H Rowbottom, F M Burton, Garratt, and Salter ; and they had decided to get on with the work of the Board as quickly as possible, and meet that afternoon with the Guardians approval. The Local Government Board Inspector (Mr Nesbit) would have to be consulted before any arrangement could be made, and the question was whether the committee should have power to act. Personally, he thought, to the point of self-sacrifice, they ought to do everything they could ; and if it was possible, without undue strain upon the officers, he thought they should place the whole of the infirmary at the disposal of the Military Authorities (hear, hear).

It was decided to adopt the committee’s suggestion, and to give them power to act.

Mr Hicken asked if they had one of the Children’s Homes to spare ?- The Chairman said that was a most important suggestion, and it would be considered by the committee.—Mr T Mitchell mentioned that the Small-pox Hospital at Lawford Heath was vacant ; but the Chairman said that was not under the control of the Guardians.

DISTRICT APPEALS TRIBUNAL.

DEBADGING OF MARRIED MEN AT THE B.T.H WORKS.

Letters from Mr H N Sporborg, of the B.T.H Co, were read by Mr Wratislaw in answer to the statements made at a previous sitting of the Tribunal that married men were debadged while single employees were retained, and that the debadging was done by the foreman. Mr Sporborg said there was no truth whatever in the statement made by Walter Alderman, a joiner, of 85 Wood Street (whose case had been adjourned), that he was being taken in preference to single men in the building department whose work he could do. In proof of that a list of the single men retained and their occupations was given. That the question of debadging was left to the foreman of the shop was incorrect as regarded Alderman’s case, because he was debadged by the Inspector of the Ministry of Munitions.—Mr Wale : Don’t say any more. The Inspector might have been a tailor.—The Chairman pointed out to Alderman that the letters did not bear out his statement that a lot of single men were kept back. Evidently they were not.—The Military appeal against an exemption was upheld.

WAGES OF CHARGE HAND AT THE REFUSE DESTRUCTOR.

Mr John H Sharp, Surveyor to the Rugby Urban Council, appeared in support of an appeal for a further exemption for Arthur Williams, 15 Bennett Street, in charge at the Refuse Destructor. He said he had advertised, but had not been able to replace the man. Mr Wratislaw’s statement that a substitute sent by the Military was told he would be offered 30s a week was declared by Mr Sharp to be absolutely wrong.—Mr Wratislaw produced a postcard as evidence.—Mr Sharp said he saw the man, and made an appointment to meet him at the Destructor, but the man never went near the place.—The Chairman said if a man was so vital they ought to offer more than 30s.

Mr Wale thought such a man should be worth 9d an hour, which was a lot more than 30s a week. It was not a question of wages, but a question of getting a man.—Mr Wratislaw said if a man could get better wages he was not going to work for 30s.—Mr Sharp replied that if a man was satisfied with his wages, that had nothing to do with the case.—Mr Wale was quite certain there were attested men, unfit for military service, who could do this work, and Mr Wratislaw said the Military could send a suitable man.—The Surveyor : Suited to this work ?—Mr Wale : I have to take what the Military send me. I take the goods the gods provide, and don’t grumble.—Final exemption till November 30th was granted.

WORK OR WAGES ?

John Shanks farmer, Cawston, again appealed for his son George (33, single), who had been exempted till August 31st.-Mr Eaden asked for the case to be adjourned sine die, but the Tribunal refused nor would they grant an exemption till January 1st.-Mr Wratislaw : You should have taken the man we sent last August.-Mr Eadon : You sent two or three, but they didn’t like the work.-Mr Wale : Perhaps they didn’t like the wages.—Mr Eaden : The wages were all right.—Mr Eaden informed appellant that under the new Army Order his son would get till 1st of January.—The Chairman : We don’t make it the 1st of January.

Mr Channing associated himself with the appeal of Mrs Colledge, baker and corn dealer, Brandon, on behalf of her son, Sydney George Colledge, 27, single.—The Chairman : We have put him back once.—Mr Channing : If you do to again, I think that will meet the case.—Appeal dismissed, but allowed 28 days.——Francis Buckingham, carter, Combe Fields, asked for further exemption on domestic grounds, and offered to undertake farm work.—Appeal dismissed, but given 14 days.

MILITARY APPEALS.

The Military appealed against the exemption to January 1st granted to Thos Scrawley, fitter, 15 James Street, Rugby, employed by Messrs Foster & Dicksee, for whom Mr Herbert Watson, secretary to the firm, appeared. It was stated that this was the only fitter left.—Mr Wratislaw said Mr J Darby, sen, did nearly all the repairs to the Rugby Fire Brigade appliances, and a blacksmith was also employed by the firm.-Appellant said he did three parts of the Fire Brigade work, but if the Tribunal would give him the chance he would go into munition works.—The Chairman : You have spoilt your own case ; that settles it.—Final exemption till December 31st.

An appeal by the Military against temporary exemption to December 31st granted to Richard Edward Williams (37, married), proprietor of a laundry business in Stephen Street, was dismissed.-Ernest Manners, general dealer, 4 Windmill Lane, agreed to accept December 31st as final, and an order for this date was made.——Thos Arthur Stephenson (29), woollen and rag merchant, Newbold Road, placed in Class C (3), claimed that his work was of national importance, but the Tribunal considered he should do something different, and adjourned the case for 14 days to see what could be arranged.-Exception was taken by the Military to the temporary exemption till January 1st granted to Thos Hubbard Deacon (18), plumber’s apprentice, Newbold-on-Avon, but the Tribunal dismissed the Military appeal.-The appeal of the Military was upheld in the case of George Mascord White (22, single), shoeing and general smith, Dunchurch, to whom temporary exemption was granted till January 1st.-Walter Wm Heap (37, married), builder, Dunchurch, was also given to January 1st, .whilst Chas Wells, School Street, Wolston, a haulier in the employ of Kirby Bros, was allowed till December 1st, with leave to appeal again.—Alfred Webster, farm labourer, Woolscott, was given till January 1st.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Lady members of Albert Street Bible Class and a few friends gave a tea and concert to 44 wounded soldiers at “ Te Hira ” on the 11th inst. It was greatly enjoyed.

Lieut Stanley Hidden, previously of the Warwickshire Yeomanry, has been gazetted Adjutant of the Army Service Corps of the 1st Mounted Division at the Headquarters of the Division.

As a result of the horticultural exhibition held at the Conservative Club recently, the sum of £30 was raised after paying all expenses, and this was equally divided between the Rugby Prisoners of War Fund and Rugby Soldiers Comforts Fund.

Drummer W Newman, of the Rugby Territorials, younger son of Mr C J Newman, Benn Street, has just been invalided to England from France, suffering from a severe attack of rheumatism. He is now in hospital at University College, London.

The parcels sent by the Rugby Prisoners of War Help Committee to local men in German prison camps this week contained : ¼-lb tea, 1lb sugar, tin Nestles milk, half-cheese, tin sardines, tin rabbit and onions, a blackberry and apple pudding, and 2lbs biscuits. In addition, a warm woollen undervest and pants have been sent to each man.

ANOTHER MILITARY MEDAL.

The Military Medal has been awarded to Rifleman H E Lister, of the Rifle Brigade. The Major-General commanding the Division notifies that he has received a report of the gallant conduct of Rifleman H E Lister on September 4 and 5, 1916, for continuously carrying messages under heavy rifle and shell fire near Guillemont, and he wishes to congratulate him on his fine behaviour. Rifleman Lister is a grandson of Mr H Lister, 105 Clifton Road, Rugby. He was formerly an apprentice in the pattern shop at the B.T.H. He joined up in September, 1914, and was wounded once in the following year.

CAWSTON HOUSE HOSPITAL RE-OPENED.

After being closed for about eight months, Cawston House has been re-opened by Mr C E and Mrs Blyth for the reception of wounded soldiers. An urgent request was received from the authorities on Thursday week, and by Monday everything in the way of equipment and staff was ready, and ten wounded soldiers were brought in during the day.

A GOODS GUARD KILLED.

Mr and Mrs Edwards, of 42 Windsor Street, have received news that their oldest son, Lance-Corpl Edwards, of the London Regiment, was killed in the great fight on September 15th. The first intimation came from a sergeant of another regiment, who, when making a short cut to new lines of trench, came across the body of a young man, who, in company with some others, had been caught by machine gun fire. In the man’s pockets were two photographs of a wife and two children, which had apparently been pierced by a bullet ; also a wallet, &c, all of which the sergeant was able to send to the address written on the photos—that of the deceased’s wife at Rowington, near Warwick, together with a letter full of comfort and sympathy. Lance-Corpl Edwards, who enlisted at the outbreak was a goods guard on the L & N-W Railway, and was 26 years of age. He was discharged on account of physical defects soon afterwards, but was recalled in 1915, and transferred from the K.R.R to a London regiment. He usually carried the photographic in the left pocket of his tunic.

LONG LAWFORD.

MR & MRS ELKINGTON have received news that their youngest son, Ronald, has been promoted to be sergt in the King’s Royal Rifles. He has also been a recipient of congratulations from Major-General Douglas Smith for gallant conduct and fine behaviour on the night of August 23rd and 24th during the attack on Guillemont. Sergt Elkington, is only 20 years of age, and he has three brothers and two brothers-in-law on active service.

STRETTON-ON-DUNSMORE.

MISSING.—Pte F Linnett, Royal Warwickshire Regt, whose home is at Stretton, is reported as having been missing since September 3rd. He is 26 years of age, unmarried, and has served nine years with the colours. He has not been home on leave for seven years.

BRETFORD.

Pte Arthur Wilson, of the Royal Inniskillings, has received his discharge, owing to ill-health. He was at the Dardanelles and in Serbia, where last winter he was severely frost bitten. From this he has suffered severely, and it is feared that it will be years before his strength returns.

AN ABSENTEE.—At the Rugby Police Court, on Thursday (before T Hunter, Esq), Pte Arthur Collins, of the R.W.R, 45 New Street, New Bilton, pleaded guilty to being an absentee from his Battalion since October 14th, and was remanded to await an escort.

MURRAY SCHOOL BOYS’ INGENIOUS DEVICE.—Two boys attending the Murray School—Frank James Clarke (13) and Thomas George Mann (12)—have been working on a design for an aircraft shell, and have submitted the drawings to the Coventry Ordnance Company. The officials of the Company have expressed themselves as very interested in the idea, and are considering the details.

DEATHS.

EDWARDS.—On September 15th, in France, Albert Victor, the dearly loved eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. J. Edwards, of 42 Windsor Street, Rugby.

EDWARDS.—Killed in action in France on September 15, 1916, Lance-Corpl. A. V. EDWARDS, London Regiment, the dearly loved husband of Bessie R. Edwards.

THORNE.—Officially reported missing since October 13, 1915, now concluded killed, Lance-Corpl. CHARLES THORNE, Leicester Regiment, elder son of George and Kate Thorne, of Lutterworth ; aged 22.

1st Jul 1916. Charge Against an “Enemy Alien” Dismissed

CHARGE AGAINST AN “ ENEMY ALIEN ” DISMISSED.— Arthur E A Bierderman, canvasser, was charged with that he, being an alien enemy, did furnish false particulars for the purposes of registration in contravention of the Aliens’ Restriction (Consolidation) Order, 1916, at Rugby, on June 23rd.—Mr Eaden appeared, for the defendant, and pleaded not guilty.—P.S Ghent stated that on June 22nd defendant registered himself at the Police Station as a German, and signed the register produced, and gave an address in Bath Street. He returned later, and said he was staying at 138 Bath Street. On June 24th he called again, and was granted a travelling permit. Subsequently witness received from Mrs Smith, 138 Bath Street, the registration form produced. On that form defendant had written “ Australia,” and there was no mention of the fact that he was a German. Defendant was subsequently arrested at Banbury. He was charged with giving false information; and, in reply, he said, “ I feel relieved that that is all.”—By Mr Baden : In his identity book defendant had entered his nationality as “ Australia ” ; but someone had crossed that out, and substituted the word “ German.”—Mr Eaden asked what the nationality was of a man born in a British colony of a German parent naturalised in that colony ?—Witness said he thought he would be British, but defendant had to prove this.—Mr Wise pointed out that defendant’s father was naturalised after defendant was born.—P.S Ghent said the man was a “ German under protest,” and he did not like being called one. He added that when he asked defendant what has nationality was he said, the police said he was a German, but he believed he was an Australian. The man said unfortunately he had nothing to prove that he was born in Australia.—Supt Clarke said the man always travelled as a German, and he called at the Police Station and informed them that he was a German. He afterwards deceived his landlady by saying that he was an Australian.—Mr Baden pointed out that the defendant’s father and mother were unquestionably German, and had lived there. Defendant’s elder brother was born while they lived in Germany, and after this they went to Australia, where defendant was born. He was brought up at an English school, and was afterwards employed by a Mining Company in Australia. He lived in Australia 36 years, and during that time his father became naturalised, and his mother also became English automatically. Defendant and his brother, subsequently came to England, and as there was no question that the latter was a German, he became naturalised. There was no necessity for this in defendant’s case, because, as he was born in a British colony, he had the opportunity of adopting which country he would become a citizen of when he came of age, and he then chose to become an Australian. He had lost his birth certificate, and when he was before the Wandsworth police they insisted upon registering him as a German. He had never been to Germany, nor had he any German connections. He submitted that the man had only committed a technical offence, and if the Bench wished to adjourn the case defendant’s brother, who was the secretary of a large Insurance Company in London, could attend and give evidence to the effect that he was born in Australia.—The Chairman said defendant had committed a technical offence. He was in his present unfortunate position because he had lost his birth certificate, but they believed that he was an Australian, and they would dismiss the case. They thought the police did quite right in bringing the case forward.

PROGRESS OF THE WAR.

A message from the British Headquarters, sent on Thursday night, states that activity continues to increase along the whole of the British front.

The Russians have had another victory in the south. On a front of about 25 miles, east of Kolomea, they have defeated the Austrians, taking prisoners 221 officers and 10,285 men.

Sir Roger Casement was found guilty of high treason on Thursday, and the Lord Chief Justice pronounced upon him sentence of death by hanging.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Official intimation has been received by Mr and Mrs D Conopo, of Kilsby, that their son, Stoker Conopo, went down with H.M.S Queen Mary in the Battle of Jutland on May 31st. Stoker Conopo, who was 26 years of age, joined the Navy four years ago, and visited his parents on leave in March last.

Gunner F Bosworth, D Battery, 241st (S.M Brigade) R.F.A, an Old Murrayian, was mentioned in Sir Douglas Haig’s last despatch. In a letter to his old schoolmaster, Mr W T Coles Hodges, he says :— “ I am a telephonist in our Battery, and in this work we have many opportunities of taking part in some of the exciting incidents of this War, and it is in these little stunts that they have evidently thought me worth mentioning.”

Miss F E Knight, who was trained at the Hospital of St Cross, Rugby, was mentioned in the list of the King’s Birthday Honours, and has been awarded the decoration of the Royal Red Cross. Miss Knight joined the Territorial Nursing Force in 1914, and is at present working in Brighton.

Lance-Corpl J Jordan, R.F.A, son of Mr H J Jordan, railway inspector, of 84 Abbey Street, who has been missing for some time, is now reported to have been taken prisoner at Kut. He was an old 1st Rugby Co Boys’ Brigade member.

Mr W Seaton, of 134 Grosvenor Road, has received news that his son, Gunner Harry Seaton, of the Rugby Howitzer Battery, has been severely wounded in the head. Gunner Seaton is the secretary of the Old Murrayians’ F.C, and is well known in local football circles.

RUGBY FOOTBALLER WOUNDED.

The list of casualties published on Wednesday includes the following men from this district who have been wounded :—Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry : Lance-Sergt F.G Judge and Sergt E Watts, Rugby. F G Judge played for Rugby F.C. He was a very useful forward, and showed great promise. Formerly he was vice-captain of the Junior XV. His home is at the Old Station.

Other local casualties reported in recent lists are :—

Wounded: Lance-Corpl J Faichnie, Oxon and Bucks L.I (B.T.H Foundry) ; Rifleman B Banbrook, Rifle Brigade ; Trooper R Goodfellow, Hussars. Taken prisoner at Kut : Corpl F C Jordan, R.F.A.

ANOTHER PRISONER OF WAR.

Mr W C Hitchcox, of 96 Abbey Street, has received a postcard from his son, Sergt Bernard Geo Hitchcox, stating that he is a prisoner of war in Germany. The postcard is dated June 10th, and as a field card was received from him dated June 6th, he must have fallen into the hands of the enemy between those dates. Sergt Hitchcox belongs to the 2nd Canadian Contingent. A younger brother (Pte Clifford Hitchcox, of the same contingent) was killed in action in August last. Both were Old Murrayians.

OLD MURRAYIAN AWARDED THE D.C.M.

Rugbeians in general, and Old Murrayians in particular, will be interested to hear that Bomb W K Freeman, 73rd Battery, 5th Brigade R.F.A, son of Mrs Freeman, 6 Lancaster Road, has been awarded the D.C.M for “ Conspicuous gallantry. When some men were wounded in the town by the enemy’s fire, he took the medical haversack, although telegraphist, and rendered every assistance under heavy fire. Later, when himself wounded, he went to two dressing stations to get stretchers. He had previously displayed great bravery.” Bomb Freeman has also been awarded a French Military decoration.

THE LATE MR. JIM HOWKINS.

At Monday’s meeting of the Rugby Board of Guardians touching reference was made to the loss sustained by Mr G F Howkins, of Crick (a member of the Board), in the sad death of one of his soldier sons, reported in the Advertiser last week.

At Rugby Cattle Market (where Mr Jim Howkins for several years sold the sheep for Messrs Howkins & Sons) the buyers, after hearing of the sad news, proceeded to bid for the next few lots with their hats off to his memory. They also sent Mr and Mrs Howkins a letter of sympathy, which about 40 or more signed.

A memorial service was conducted by the Rev W C Roberts at Crick Parish Church on Sunday afternoon. A good number of Lance-Corpl Howkins’s friends from Rugby, Long Buckby, Murcott, West Haddon, and Crick attended. Suitable hymns were used, and the service was of a solemn and impressive character.

ANOTHER BARBY MAN GIVES HIS LIFE FOR HIS COUNTRY.

William Elkington, a driver in the R.H.A, was killed in action on June 17th. Mr Elkington received the following letter :-

“ I regret to say-your son Will has passed away to-day. We have had a terrible day to-day ; we have got four or five wounded. Poor little Will was one of the unlucky ones, and got a fatal hit with a bursting shell. He was riding his horse at the time ; his horse was killed outright. We (his comrades) had the care of burying him, and I can assure you he was buried in the very best way. He is lying in a soldier’s grave behind the firing lines. We shall all miss him very much ; he was such a jolly fellow. He died doing his duty for his King and country; he was a thorough soldier all through.”

On Sunday a memorial service was held in St Mary’s Church, Barby. There was, of course, a large congregation, including eight soldiers, who came over from the Daventry Hospital. Special hymns and psalms were sung, and the lesson from the Burial Service was read. The Rector (Rev R S Mitchison) preached from Rev iv 1, “ Behold a door was open in heaven.” He said they must look on all the pain, sorrow, and anxiety which came to us through this terrible War as warnings from God to make us think less of this world and more of the Heavenly Father. Another of our brave man had gone. Before he left,.after his last leave, he attended many of the services in the church ; he returned thanks to God for his life. He attended the Intercession service ; he partook of the Holy Communion ; he received the Church’s Blessing before he went in the little service all take part in before they go to the Front. Now they would see him no more on this earth, but he left behind him a good example.

WOMEN FARM WORKERS.

In many parts of the country there appears to exist a suspicion that, if women register their names for farm work, they may be subjected to some form of compulsory service.

The War Office and the Board of Agriculture and Fisheries desire to assure all women who are engaged in work on the land, or who may be willing to undertake such work, that the registration of their names for that purpose will in no way be used to compel them to undertake either agricultural or any other form of work. Such work is entirely voluntary. In no case will they be asked or expected to work on farms outside their own neighbourhood unless they are willing to do so. But it is necessary, in order that the most efficient use may be made of their services, to have a list of the names and addresses of women who are prepared in the emergency to undertake work in the place of the men who are fighting in the trenches. As there is a great need for the services of patriotic women who are willing to assist in the home production of food, it is hoped that all women who can see their way to offer their services, either whole or part time, will at once have their names registered at the local Labour Exchange or by the village Registrar.

RUGBY CASES AT COVENTRY MUNITIONS COURT.

The following cases were dealt with on Friday last week by Coventry Munitions Tribunal

Annie and Mary Sleath, Clifton, v Rugby Lamp Co, Ltd.—This was a complaint in each case of withholding certificate.—Certificates were refused.

W W Wilson. 94 Holyhead Road, v Willans & Robinson, Ltd.—Similar complaint.-The case was struck out.

The cases heard at Coventry Munitions Tribunal on Tuesday included the following :—

Joseph Thomas Lindsell, Rugby, v Willans & Robinson, Rugby.—This was a complaint of withholding certificate. He said he wished to go back to his home at Stoke, where his mother lived, she being a widow and he being an only child. He said he was told there was plenty of work in the Stoke district.—The Chairman suggested that a man at Stoke who wanted to come to Rugby might be exchanged for Lindsell. The case was adjourned for four weeks to see if an exchange could be effected.

James Henry Ball, Rugby, v B.T.H, Rugby.—This was a complaint of withholding certificate. He said he was doing the work of a millwright, though engaged as an assistant millwright, but was refused the district rate. The firm said he was a skilled labourer. It was stated that the man had been offered a fully qualified situation, and that the A.S.E was supporting him. The certificate was granted. It was intimated that an appeal might be lodged.

B.T.H Co, Rugby, v F Dexter, Rugby.—This was a complaint of time losing. He said he was ill, but did not inform the firm.—He was fined 40s.

B.T.H Co v W J Price, Rugby.—Complaint of being absent without leave. He pleaded illness.—Fined 25s.

B.T.H Co v D Conopo, Kilsby.—Similar complaint. He said he walked six miles to his work every morning, and sometimes walked back to his home. It transpired that the man lost his son, who was on the Queen Mary, and the firm said they did not know that, and would not press the case under the circumstances.—The case was withdrawn.

Two other employees of the same firm, J A Grimes, 18 Hunter Street, Rugby, and Alfred Day, 3 Bridge Street, Rugby, were also before the Court for breach of rules.—Day was fined 10s, and the case against Grimes dismissed with a caution.

ABSENTEES.—At- Rugby Police Court on Thursday, before T A Wise, Esq, two young Hillmorton soldiers, Alfred Giddings (3rd Royal Berks) and John Saddler (Durham Light Infantry), pleaded guilty to being absentees from their units, and were remanded to await an escort.

IN MEMORIAM.

ASTILL.—In loving remembrance of Pte. Herbert Wm. Astill, 10744, Oxon and Bucks L.I., stretcher bearer, who died of wounds, June 29, 1915.—Deeply mourned by his widowed MOTHER.

COOMBES.—In loving memory of my dear husband, Pte. Arthur Coombes, who died of wounds in King George’s Hospital, London, June 30, 1915.
“ Farewell, dear wife, my life is past ;
You loved me dearly to the last.
Grieve not for me, but to prepare
For heaven be your greatest care.”
Also my dear son Arthur, who died February 26,1915.
—From loving WIFE and MOTHER.

LEESON.—Previously reported missing, now killed in action on the 25th of September, 1915, Sergt Fred Leeson (Bob), Oxford and Bucks L.I., dearly loved second son of Mr. and Mrs. Leeson, 70 Hartington Road, Leicester (late of Hunter Street, Rugby), aged 23 years.—“ O for the touch of a vanished hand and the sound of a voice that is still.”

 

6th Nov 1915. The Munitions Tribunal

THE MUNITIONS TRIBUNAL

There was a further sitting of the Coventry Munitions Tribunal on Monday, thirteen cases being down for hearing, twelve informations being laid by employers for breach of regulations under the munitions Act. Mr F Tillyard presided, and the assessors present were Messrs A Lord for the employers and G Wainwright for the men.

WORKERS’ WASTE OF TIME.

Found smoking in the lavatory at the B.T.H Works (Coventry), H Clarke (18), of 110 Kingsway, Coventry, was summoned and fined 10s. He explained to the Court that he had no work to do, but the Foreman stated that there was work if he wanted it.

Against F J Moran, 55a Lower Ford Street, and Wm James Bolton, 68 East Street, Coventry, both capstan hands at the B.T.H, the information was that they wasted time in the lavatories and were found gambling. The youths, who were before the Tribunal a month ago, were each fined 15s for the present offence.

ABSENCE FROM WORK.

Alleging three days’ absence without reasonable excuse, Willans and Robinson’s, Rugby, brought proceedings against Robert Toothhill, a tool-fitter, of Rugby, who explained that he lost two days in paying a visit to his father, who was ill. Toothill, who was stated to have lost over 60 hours in the last six weeks, was fined £1.

DUNCHURCH ARTILLERYMEN HOME FROM THE FRONT.

Two Dunchurch artillerymen, Driver R Elkington, 117th Battery R.F.A, and Bombadier C Carter, 127th Battery R.F.A, who have been at the front since the commencement of the war, are at present on short leave of absence, which, after their arduous life during the past fifteen months, is proving very welcome. The two young men were schoolboys together, and have been friends all their lives, and, by a strange coincidence, their respective batteries were located in the same field for three months, during which time they were unaware of each other’s presence, and never met until they did so in Dunchurch. They both went through the retreat from Mons, La Gateau, Ligny, and the Battles of the Marne and the Aisne. Driver Elkington’s battery afterwards moved off to Ypres, and he took part in the first great fight for that much-contested town. In this battle—which was one of the hottest in which he was engaged—he was twice wounded (once in the head), and one of the other drivers was killed and one wounded, while two of the horses attached to the gun were killed. After a spell in hospital he was transferred to La Bassee, and afterwards to Ypres, where he participated in the severe fighting and the gas attack near there on Whit Monday. In this battle he experienced a very narrow escape. While near the famous Cloth Hall a shell burst in front of his gun, killing his horse, and he himself sustained injuries that necessitated his spending nine weeks in hospital. Driver Elkington feelingly added that he was one of the few men who were left in his battery of those who went out in August, 1914.

Bombardier Carter, who has two brothers (one of whom has been wounded) at the front with the Royal Warwicks, also went through the whole of the earlier fighting, and has had many thrilling and exciting experiences. He has brought home a number of interesting souvenirs picked up on the battlefield, including a great grey coat belonging to a dead Uhlan of the 9th Regiment.

Both men are agreed that the morale at the Allied troops is superior to that of the Germans, and that the British artillery has now secured a definite superiority. The British shells, too, are more effective than those fired by the Germans. The munitions were now coming up well, but they wanted still more and more men. Bombardier Carter is of opinion that, given the necessary amount of ammunition and a good supply of reserves, the Allies will soon be able to smash through the German defences and bring the war to a satisfactory conclusion, but to do this more men and munitions are required. He added that the British anti-aircraft guns are very effective in bringing down German aeroplanes. He had met the “ E ” Company and Rugby Howitzers while at the front, and they both seemed to be doing well.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

News has been received that Rifleman Lionel T Smith, K.R.R, known as “Tiger” Smith, of Rugby, who was posted as missing after the great British advance in September, is wounded and a prisoner in Germany.

The death has occurred in London of Lieut Robert Emmet, Life Guards, elder son of Major Robert Emmet, Warwickshire Yeomanry, whose home is at Moreton Paddox, Warwick. Lieut Emmet was formerly an officer of the Yeomanry, and was only recently transferred to the Life Guards. He had been ill for some weeks.

After a stay of some 14 months in Towcester, the 2nd/1st Northants Yeomanry left on Monday morning. The men during their stay in Towcester have behaved in an exemplary manner, and had become universally liked. The town generally has greatly benefited by having the troops billeted there, and they will be very much missed. The 3rd/1st Regiment is for the time being still at Towcester.

The Territorial Forces’ Record Office have communicated with the Coventry City Police, as they are anxious to trace the next-of-kin of Private E. J Barker, No 1557 Warwickshire Yeomanry. A letter concerning him, addressed to “Mrs G Barker, Buckland House, Coventry,” has been returned through the Post Office marked “ Not to be found ” The police will be glad if Mrs Barker would communicate with them.

AN OLD “ E ” COMPANY MAN KILLED.

To the list of local heroes who fell in the gallant charge by the Territorials on the German lines has to be added the name of Pte William Baines Harris (27), nephew of Mr and Mrs James Capell, of Featherbed Lane Farm, Bilton. Pte Harris came to Rugby in 1900, and worked on Mr J H Loverock’s farm for eight years, and afterwards for Mr J E Cox. When war broke out he was working as a shunter on the railway at Bescot, and joined the North Midland Territorial Division some six weeks after. He was a member of “ E ” Company (Rugby) for some years.

PROMOTION OF A RUGBY TERRITORIAL.

Farrier Quartermaster sergeant R C Snewing, elder son of Mr and Mrs Snewing, of Bath Street, Rugby, has been appointed to a second-lientenancy in his regiment the 2nd County of London Yeomanry (Westminster Dragoons), Second Lieut Snewing enlisted as a trooper in September, 1914, and subsequently received promotion to Lance-corporal in November. Lance-sergeant in March, Sergeant in April, and Farrier-major in August last. He served in the last year of the Volunteer Form with the old F Company of the 2nd V.B Royal Warwickshire Regt, and on the inauguration of the Territorial Force, entered the Rugby Howitzer Battery, attaining the rank of Corporal. On leaving Rugby, he transferred to the 4th Kent (Howitzer) Battery, with whom he served as Sergeant during the remainder of his term.

OLD MURRAYIAN GASSED.

Rifleman Chas Read, 2nd K.R.R, an old Murrayian, in a letter to Mr W T Coles Hodges, says : “ I have been out at the front twelve months, and have been in every action of any consequence, but I came to a full stop on September 25th, the day we started the big advance. I was gassed with poisonous gas, but I am almost well now. My word, what a time it was a couple of days before the attack ! The shelling was terrible, but it gave me great pleasure to think that at last we were going to get them going, and so we did ; but I suppose this is stale news now. I am pleased to see that so many of the old Murray boys have answered the call. Many have paid the great sacrifice, but it cheers one up very much to know that the old boys of the Murray School have not been found wanting when our country’s call to arms sounded.

PTE MACE OF HILLMORTON A PRISONER.

Pte P Mace, 2nd Oxon and Bucks L.I, a son of Mr S Mace, Lower Street, Hillmorton, who was reported last week to be missing, has written to his sister, stating that he is a prisoner in Prussia, and adding, “ I am sorry to say I was wounded, and could not get back to our lines. I think they have got me now for the duration of the war, and I shall be glad of anything you can I send me, especially cigarettes, as I am spun right out. I must thank God that I am alive, as I had a very narrow escape. I was wounded in the legs and face, and they very nearly cut my nose off.” In a postcard to his parents, Pte Mace states that he would be thankful for gifts of food or cigarettes. He adds that he is now doing well.

WITH THE RUGBY HOWITZER BATTERY.

Driver Clifford Tomes of the Rugby Howitzer Battery, writes from somewhere in France” to his parents, who reside at 177 Cambridge Street :- “ There was an attack on our front yesterday, but it was repulsed by us. The 7th Warwicks are catching it pretty well. It amuses us chaps when a fellow comes back off leave and he says that people ask him if we have had any fighting yet ! I should not think they ever read the papers. It is because they never see any casualties mentioned, but that is because we have such extraordinary good luck. The gunners of our battery are everlastingly under fire, but my being a driver, I only get into it occasionally, and many a time when I have been up with the rations, the rifle and maxim fire has been terrific. We start the old rum issue next Sunday, and we are having sheep skins to keep us warm. We look like a lot of bears.; but I regard myself as a wolf in sheep’s clothing. Still I may have altered, for I think this life breaks anybody. We shall want plenty more men. Please post me an Advertiser every Friday night.

GRAMOPHONE FOR THE 1/7th WARWICKS

Miss Evans, of 13 James Street, who has a brother serving in the Rugby Company of the 1/7th Warwicks at the front, has recently collected between £5 and £6 with which she procured a gramophone and set of records, etc., from Mr J T E Brown. Albert Street, Rugby. The instrument was sent out to the C Company on the 3rd of October, and Miss Evans has received the following letter in acknowledgment :-

“ DEAR MISS EVANS,—I hardly know how to adequately thank you and all the people of Rugby for the handsome way in which you all think of us all out here. I need hardly say we all greatly appreciate your kindnesses which you are always showing to the Rugby contingent of the 1/7th Royal Warwickshire Regiment. The latest contribution, the gramophone, will greatly cheer our periods of rest, and will always be a welcome and practically indispensable part of our sing-songs, which we hold whenever opportunity offers. I am requested to thank you for this trouble and time taken up in collecting for us, and also the subscribers for the generous way in which they responded.—Assuring you of our best thanks, yours sincerely, H. B. MASON, Capt.
1/7th R. War. R.”
October 90, 1915.

RECRUITING AT RUGBY.

Recruiting has been less brisk at Rugby Drill Hall this week, but the recruiting authorities are anticipating a busy time next week, when the canvassing returns come in. The following have been accepted :—J W Oliver and P G Burton, R.W.R ; F F Walter and A Commons, Royal Flying Corps ; J V Sanders, C H Meacham, and A E V Meacham, R.G.A ; A C Lamb, Middlesex Regt ; T A White, H Cutler, J R Wildman, and G W C Pargetter, R.A.M.C ; W T Bridgman, A H Meadows, W O Watts, A H EASON, A W Isham, J W Gray, M J B Amey, R.F.A ; W T Hinks and R Herring, 220th Co R.E ; W H Hammond and L Sheasby, R.E (drivers); R E Clements and H Essex, A.S.C ; and C Prestidge, A.O.C.

A number of other men offered themselves, but were rejected. Recruits are still urgently required for the Infantry, and all regiments of this branch of the service are open.