24th Jan 1919. Generous Gift to Rugby.

GENEROUS GIFT TO RUGBY.
PUBLIC HALL TO RE ERECTED BY MRS. ARTHUR JAMES.
EXTENSIVE SCHEME OUTLINED.
SITE ALREADY SELECTED.
“ The Arthur James Memorial Hall.”

An announcement was made by the Chairman (Mr J J McKinnell) at the monthly meeting of the Rugby Urban District Council on Tuesday evening. About fifteen months ago, he said, Mrs Arthur James informed him that she wished to make a gift to Rugby in memory of her late husband, and after a certain amount of consideration she finally decided to erect a new Public Hall, and to present it to the town. A site in Albert Street, at the corner of James Street, has been purchased by Mrs James for this purpose. At a special meeting of the Council held in private, he announced Mrs James’s intention to the members, and they at once passed a resolution thanking her for her great generosity. When among other suggested War Memorials a new Public Hall was mentioned, he felt it was his duty to consult Mrs James and to ask if he might make public her intentions. Then, too, as there was a suggestion of providing a Sailors’ and Soldiers’ Institute he mentioned this matter to Mrs James and asked her if a part of the site could be utilised for this purpose. Mrs James kindly replied that if this was the desire of the town she would be quite a willing to fall in with it and to allow a part of her site to be used. But she said quite clearly that she would prefer to erect a memorial to her husband by itself. However, if the town thought the scheme a good one she was quite willing to put her own feelings on one side and join in a general scheme. He thought they would all agree that this was a very kind and public-spirited attitude on the part of Mrs James. This plan also had been put before the Council and after some deliberation they came to the conclusion that the advantages of building on one site were so numerous that they desired to call a public meeting of townspeople and to suggest that the Rugby memorial should consist of (1) An Obelisk, and (2) of a Sailors and Soldiers’ Institute on the site in Albert Street. Mm James made one stipulation in regard to the Public Hall, and that was that it should be called the Arthur James Memorial Hall. In any case she will pay for the Hall and if the two buildings adjoin the cost of the Hall as apart from the Institute will be ascertained as nearly as possible.

RUGBY URBAN DISTRICT COUNCIL
MAJOR BAIRD AND THE WAR MEMORIAL.

The following letter was received from Major J L Baird, M.P. :—“ I should like to confirm my telegram supporting the proposal that the Rugby War Memorial should take the form of a soldiers’ institute and hostel. I feel very strongly that a war armorial should fulfil the following conditions, (1) Be of use to the men who have fought for us ; (2) Afford citizens an opportunity of showing their gratitude to these men by contributing towards their comfort and welfare ; (3) Embody the traditions of the British Army, which have been so superbly upheld during the past four years. The regimental tradition is one of our most treasured national assets. It should be maintained and fostered. It is a truly British tradition and has nothing what-ever to do with militarism. Indeed it is the spirit which has enabled us to defeat Prussian militarism. For these reasons I most earnestly hope that the scheme will be adopted and I will support it to the utmost of my ability.”

RETURNED PRISONERS.—The latest list of repatriated prisoners of war contains the names of four Rugby men—Acting Sergt R A Rogers, R.F.A, Corpl G Jones, D.C.M, Rifle Brigade, Sergt E Watts, Oxon & Bucks L.I, and Pte A C Williams, R.W.R.

Dr H J Beddow, who has been on active service at the 72nd General Hospital in France, has this week returned to Rugby to resume his practice.

SERGT O H WOOTTON, Oxford * Bucks Light Infantry, whose home is at 74 York Street, Rugby, has been awarded the Meritorious Service Medal. Sergt Wootton is an old St Matthew’s boy, and when at school played in the Rugby Football Schoolboys’ International Match of 1908 for England against Wales.

SERGT ARTHUR W HUGHES, Royal Engineers (late B.T.H), has been awarded the Meritorious Service Medal in recognition of valuable service rendered in France. He has also been decorated with the Croix de Guerre by the President of the French Republic, and some time ago was mentioned in despatches.

MARRIED A GERMAN.—The plight of a young Englishwoman married to a German was described at Hull on Saturday, when her husband, Rudolph Koepp, was summoned for maintenance. She said she was 21, and had never been out of England. She had maintained herself and four children by working in a munitions factory. Then she had to get relief from the Guardians. The husband has been interned in the Isle of Man, but subsequently was released, and earned £2 12s weekly at cement works at Rugby. Prior to August he sent his wife 5s weekly, but since then he had sent nothing. Defendant, in sobs, complained that he was not allowed to go near the coast to visit his wife, and the case was adjourned to enable him to provide a home for her and the children.

CHESTER STREET CANTEEN.—As will be seen from an announcement in another column, the Chester Street Canteen will be closed as from to-morrow. The canteen was opened by Lady Ethel Baird in June, 1917, with the idea of economising fuel and food, and that it met an urgent need is proved by fact that, during the busiest period of its existence as many as 400 dinners were served daily in the two departments. The success of the scheme was made possible by an efficient staff in the kitchen. The canteen has proved a great boon to many of the workers employed by the large firms in this part of the town, but now that the food supply has become easier, the demands upon the canteen have become substantially less, and for this reason the decision to close down was made. It is interesting and gratifying to note that the project has paid its way.

WAR TROPHIES.
The Clerk announce that the War Office had allocated two German machine guns, two machine gun ammunition boxes and two machine gun ammunition belts to Rugby, and these would be placed in the museum.

BRANDON & WOLSTON.
PRISONER’S RETURN.—Pte Leonard Lixenfield, of 6th Royal Berks, has returned home. He has been in the hands of the Germans since November 30, 1917. He was taken behind the lines and placed in a cage in a field. It was too cold to sleep. Although quite exhausted, the prisoners were only given a drink of cold water. Next morning they had a loaf of black bread between 8. They were then marched to the station, where they were placed in cattle trucks, the bottom of which were covered with manure, and he could not sleep. They were without food for two days until they reached Munster in Westphalia. He was kept in Germany six weeks, and then sent in cattle trucks to France, where he was made to work behind the lines. Many of the parcels were pilfered, but had it not been for them he would have died of starvation. Last winter out of 200 in his lot quite 100 died of starvation. He escaped three times. He was recaptured twice, but his third escape was from Gemapp[?] the day before the armistice was declared. He then reached Cambrai, where he was first captured.

LONG ITCHINGTON.
WAR MEMORIAL.—Collections have recently been made in church and by means of envelopes for the purpose of erecting in the south aisle of the Church a side altar in memory of the Long Itchington men who have fallen in the war. Altogether some £15 is in hand for this object. The Vicar now, however, proposes, with the consent of the contributors, that the memorial should take the form of an oak reredos to the altar in the chancel with a brass plate containing the names of the fallen soldiers. He estimates that about £30 will be required. A meeting of the subscribers will shortly be called to deliberate.

DEATHS.

CLEMENTS.—On October 24, at Prison Hospital, Zebest, Germany, Corpl. FRED CLEMENTS, second son of Mr. and Mrs. Clements, 33 Winfield Street, aged 21.—At Rest.

IN MEMORIAM.

JESSON.—In ever affectionate remembrance of my dear chum, Corporal “ BOB ” JESSON, D.C.M., killed in action at Hebuterne, January 20th, 1916. R.I.P..—B.Q.M.S. W Heath, R.F.A.

WALDUCK.—In loving memory of ERN, who died of wounds Jan. 28, 1916.
—From his loving Father, Mother, Sisters, & Brothers.

21st Sep 1918. Suggested Memorial to Rugby Men

RUGBY URBAN DISTRICT COUNCIL.

Several matters of more than ordinary intent, including a suggestion for Rugby a memorial to local soldiers killed and maimed in the War, was discussed at the monthly meeting of the Urban Council on Tuesday, when there were present : Messrs J J McKinnell (chairman), W Flint (vice-chairman), T A Wise, W H Linnell, R Walker, W A Stevenson, R S Hudson, T Ringrose, C J Newman, F E Hands, S Robbins, and H Yates.

WELCOME TO LIEUT NEWMAN.

Before proceeding to the formal business, the Chairman, on behalf of the Council, welcomed Lieut C J Newman on his return from active service, and also conveyed to him the sympathy of the Council in the death of his wife. The circumstances were peculiarly sad, and he wished Lieut Newman to realise how deeply his colleagues felt for him in his deep sorrow.—Mr Newman said he was pleased to be back again to do his duty for the public of Rugby, and especially the electors of the Central Ward.

SUGGESTED MEMORIAL TO RUGBY MEN.

An interesting discussion took place on the consideration of a letter from the Rugby Branch of the National Association of Discharged Sailors and Soldiers, asking the Council to assist them in providing an institute (where they could hold their meetings), a library, &c, for men discharged from the various forces.—The Chairman suggested that the letter be referred to the Estates Committee.—Mr Newman said he desired to raise the question of a war memorial to their local men. So far nothing had been done, except to arrange for a collection of photographs to be placed in the Library.—The Clerk (Mr A Morson, M.B.E) explained that other steps had been taken. Some time ago, at the suggestion of the Council, he invited the relatives of soldiers killed in the War to forward the names to him, and he now had a very long list.—Mr Newman contended that this was not going far enough. They should now consider the question of providing a fitting memorial to those who had been killed or maimed in the War, and a list of their names should be suitably preserved. Rugby did not lend itself to statuary ; and, after all, a statue was only a nine days’ wonder after it was unveiled. He therefore suggested that they should go further than this, and erect some houses, with all the modem conveniences and improvements for discharged soldiers who had been maimed in the War. In connection with this it might also be possible to erect an institute for the discharged soldiers.—The Chairman : It is a huge job.—Mr Robbins supported Mr Newman’s suggestion, and said if they did not aim at something big they would not get anything. Houses for discharged soldiers would be much more useful than a monument.—The Chairman suggested that they should deal with the subject matter of the letter first. If these discharged men had to wait until the Council had raised the money for providing an institute they would have to wait a long time. He proposed that the letter be referred to the Estates committee to see if that body could find suitable premises for them.—Mr Yates said he would like to have more information from the association as to what they had in mind. He had considered the question very carefully, and he was not in favour of providing any institute for setting these men apart from the rest of the civilian population. They wanted these men, when they returned to civil life, to take their part in the reconstruction of society with the rest of the community as far as possible, and they did not wish to set up any class feeling between those men who had been away and those who had not. If they only wanted a place to hold their meetings in it was the duty of the Council to find them one ; but he believed they were well provided for in that respect at present.—Mr Newman said he did not agree with these remarks. A discharged soldier had the right to ask for anything he liked, and why should he not be allowed to do as he liked ? When the War was over the discharged sailors and soldiers would be a force to be reckoned with, and they must do all they could to entertain them and provide them with decent surroundings, and not leave them in the streets to die like dogs, as they had done in the past. This was his sole idea in suggesting the provision of houses and an institute for these men.—The letter was referred to the Estates Committee.

The question of a war memorial was then considered, and the Chairman said he took it that they would desire it to be a Memorial to all who went out to fight for them, whether they came back from the War or not. He thought they would have to set up a special committee to deal with the matter, The first thing, however, was to get the money, and then they could decide what to do with it. He agreed with Mr Newman that Rugby did not lend itself to statuary, and he thought the suggestion that an institute should be provided was a very good one. However, if they had the money now they would not be able to spend it.—Mr Newman : There are ways and means for everything in this world.—The question was referred to the General Purposes Committee.

JAM MAKERS THANKED.

The Chairman said it would be within the knowledge of the members that since their last meeting a committee of local ladies had been very energetic in making jam for the military and the civil population. They had made 7,350lbs. and he believed that, with one exception, the whole of the work had been done voluntarily. He especially mentioned Mr W Barnett (chairman of the committee), Lady Rowena Patterson, and Mrs Nickalls in connection with this work, and a hearty vote of thanks was accorded to the committee ; also to the gas Company for lending the premises for making the jam, and Mr Alfred Over for providing storage facilities.

FRANCE’S DAY.

The following message was read from the President of the French Republic in reply to the congratulatory telegram sent to him on the occasion of the celebration of France’s Day, July 14th :—

“ The President of the French Republic is very much affected by the congratulations and good wishes which you have sent on the occasion of France’s Day, and thanks you warmly in the name of the French people, who are closely united to the British people in the defence of right and liberty.—R POINCARE.”

It was decided to have this letter, together with several others, including one from Admiral Beatty, framed and hung in the Council Chamber.

SUGGESTED COLD STORAGE.

A letter was read from the Rugby Food Control Committee, asking the Council to take immediate steps to provide a cold storage for Rugby District—Mr Robbins : Who has got to pay for it ?—Mr Wise pointed out that at present they had nothing of this kind in the town. He thought such a building would be very useful, and it might even be a paying investment. It was a question as to whether they would get permission to erect such a building, even if they decided to do so ; but he thought at present it was important that perishable foods should be stored in the localities where they were needed, and it would be a great boon to the community at large if such a building could be erected.—Mr Yates moved that the letter be referred to the Markets Committee. He believed it was necessary that they should have a cold storage in the town, because one thing they had learned from the shortage of commodities was the sinfulness of waste : and even when they did get more food it would be necessary to have somewhere to store that portion which was not required for immediate consumption.—Mr Wise promised that the Food Committee would assist the Council with any figures they could obtain from traders likely to use the storage.—The Chairman : If the town grows, as it will do sooner or later, we are bound to have a cold storage.—Mr Stevenson suggested that the letter should be referred to a Joint Markets and Plans Committee, and this was agreed to.

THE BATHS.

The Baths Committee reported that in view of the great need for economy in coal and light during the winter, the committee propose to further consider the re-opening of the slipper baths at their next meeting, but their present proposal is to open the baths on Wednesdays, Thursdays, Fridays, and Saturdays only, instead of the whole week.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Sergt T C Vickers, Yeomanry, Rugby, has been officially reported drowned ; and Pte W Everton, Tank Corps, Rugby, has died of wounds.

Rifleman A V Pitham, Rifle Brigade, Rugby has been wounded and captured by the Germans ; and Pte H Lawley, RW.R, has also been reported a prisoner of war.

Capt J Oscar Muntz, youngest son of Mr F E Muntz, of Umberslade, died of wounds on September 4th at the age of 42.

W F W Satchell, son of Mr & Mrs W F J Satchell, 94 Park Road, Rugby, has been granted a commission as Second-Lieutenant in the Royal Warwickshire Regt.

Pte Lewis Lewis, City of London Regiment, son of ex-P.C Lewis, 35 King Edward Road, was killed in France on August 8th. He was nearly 19 years of age, an old St Matthew’s boy, and an employee at Rugby Post Office. He joined the Army in October, 1917, and was drafted to France in April.

Mrs Hutt, 15 Bridget Street, New Bilton, has received news that her son, Pte J H Lines, Royal Berkshire Regiment, was killed in action on August 27th. He of was 19 years of age, and before joining the Army in July 1917, he was employed at the L & N-W Railway Loco Sheds. Another son of Mrs Hutt was killed in France last year.

Mr & Mrs N Austin, 3 Oliver Street, Rugby, have received official notice that their youngest son, Pte Cecil Austin, 1st R.W.R, was killed in action in France on August 30th. Pte Austin was only 19 years of age. He joined up on February 14, 1916, and went to France the following year. When he had only been there a few weeks he was invalided back with dysentery, and was in hospital five months. He only re-joined his regiment in July, and was sent to France for the second time the following week. His eldest brother, Wilfred Austin, has been serving in Egypt since January, 1915.

Intimation has been received by Mr H C Samson, Hillmorton Road, Rugby, that his son, Second Lieut O M Samson, died of wounds on the 17th inst. Lieut Samson was an assistant master at Rugby School (Army Class). He was an 0 for Blue at cricket, and also played for Somersetshire. At Rugby he was of great assistance to the Rugby Club, with which he frequently played. He also made one of a very successful Rugby hockey team captained by Mr F J Kittermaster for several years.

Corpl H Rogers, M.M, 1st Royal Warwickshire Regt., has recently been awarded the bar to the Military Medal for gallantry. The Major-General of his Division has also written congratulating him on his fine behaviour. Corpl Rogers, who is a native of Flore, Northants, and nephew of Mrs H Miller, 10 Alfred St, Rugby, has been twice wounded, and before the War was employed at Rugby L & N-W Railway Station.

Driver Jack Hillyard, A.S.C, son of Mr Charles Hillyard, 20 Frederick Street, Rugby, was killed on August 22nd. He was 24 years of age, and before joining up in October, 1914, he was employed as a vanman by Mr J J McKinnell. He served three years and three months in France, and only returned to the front a few weeks prior to his death. He was educated at New Bilton Council School. At one time Mr Hillyard had six sons in the Army ; two have been discharged, and three are still serving.

Mr and Mrs Southern, of 77 Windsor Street, have received a letter from the Commanding Officer of the Regiment notifying the death of their youngest son, Pte S Southern, in action on September 4th. His platoon went forward in the attack over a difficult piece of ground, and when it became inevitable that a message must be sent back he volunteered to carry it. He had very nearly got into safety when a bullet hit him in the head, causing instantaneous death. His loss to the Company (the officer adds) is a very real one. He was doing excellent work, was very popular, and they could ill spare him. Pte Southern was awarded the Military Medal on May 30, 1917. He joined up at the commencement of the War, previously being employed at the B.T.H Works. This is the second son of Mr & Mrs Southern who has fallen in the War.

Pte John James Brookes, R.W.R, eldest son of Mr John Brookes, 41 Lawford Road, New Bilton, was killed in action on August 30th. He was 22 years of age, and was a member of “ E ” Company when war broke out, and was mobilised with them. He had seen a good deal of heavy fighting, and had been wounded three times. Before the War he was a cleaner in the L & N-W Railway Loco Sheds.

Mr William Fleet, 98 Lawford Road, Rugby, has received news that has youngest son, Pte Cyril William Fleet, 6th Dorsets, died of wounds on September 10th. He was 32 years of age, and before joining the Army at the commencement of the War he worked at the Cement Works. He was gassed a short time ago, and only returned to France a fortnight before his death.

Pte Albert Thomas Gibbs, London-Irish Rifles, eldest son of Mr & Mrs A B Gibbs, 14 Kimberley Road, Rugby, has died while a prisoner of war in Germany. Pte Gibbs was employed on the L & N-W Railway. He enlisted about twelve months ago, and had only been in France a short time when he was taken prisoner. He was 35 years of age, and leaves a widow and two children. His younger brother, Flight Cadet David Gibbs, was recently killed in an aeroplane accident.

News has been received at Coombe Abbey that Lord Uffington, the Earl of Craven’s heir, is lying seriously wounded in France, and has had a leg amputated above the knee.

NEWBOLD-ON-AVON.
NEWS has been received that Corpl J Seymour, who in last week’s issue was reported wounded and suffering from enteric, has since died. He belonged to the Rugby Howitzer Battery at the outbreak of war, and has served with them since in France and Italy. He leaves a widow and two children, for whom much sympathy is felt.

WOLSTON.

LIEUT WILFRED COLEMAN WINS THE MILITARY CROSS.—News has just reached Wolston that Lieut Wilfred Coleman has been awarded the Military Cross for gallantry on the banks of the Marne, He is the only son of Mr & Mrs T P Coleman, of Marston Hall. When war was declared he was a member of the 1st, Troop of the Warwickshire Yeomanry. In April, 1916, he went out to Egypt, and from there to Gallipoli where he was wounded. He was afterwards among the Yeomanry in Egypt when so many of them were killed or taken prisoners. He was subsequently sent into training at Cairo for a commission, and was then attached to the 5th Devons with whom he has gamed his present honour. He has now been transferred to the Royal Air Force.

DEATH OF TWO SONS.—Deep sympathy is felt for Mr & Mrs Robert Clarke, who heard in two days of the death of two of their sons. Pte William Clarke, of the Oxon and Bucks L.I, had been missing since March 21st ; but a friend—Pte Harrison—has written to say that he saw him killed. On the next day a notification was received from the War Office that their youngest son—Pte Joseph Clarke, of the Coldstream Guards—was killed on August 22nd. Both sons were respected employees of Messrs Bluemel, and were well known in the district They had been in France for a long time.

LEAMINGTON HASTINGS.
KILLED.—Sergt J Major, son of Mr H Major, of Station Cottages, has been killed in action. He joined up at the outbreak of war, being the first recruit from the parish. A memorial service was held in the church on Sunday evening.

DUNCHURCH.
MR & MRS H PEARCE, Coventry Road, learn that their son, Pte W Pearce, K.R.R, who was badly wounded and was a prisoner of war, has been repatriated, and is in London, where he has undergone an operation to his head.

ITCHINGTON.

HARRY COCKERELL KILLED.—On Saturday official intimation was received by Mr & Mrs H W Cockerell that their only son, Pte Harry Richard Cockerell, R.W.R, was killed in action on the 1st inst.  A sympathetic letter from the chaplain attached to the regiment states that Pte Cockerell fell fighting gallantly in one of the most important engagements of the War, and was killed instantaneously by a shell. The rev gentleman adds: “ He will be much mused.” Before he was called up Pte Cockerell had joined his father in his business as plumber and decorator. He had gained the respect of all, and was greatly beloved by many friends. Sincere sympathy is accorded to Mr & Mrs Cockerell and family in their sad loss.

HARRY COOKE GASSED.—Mr & Mrs John Cooke have been informed that their eldest son, Rifleman Harry Cooke, Rifle Brigade, is in hospital in France suffering, from gas poisoning. He was quite blind for three days after the occurrence, but is progressing favourably. His younger brother, Rifleman Reg Cooke, K.R.R, reported missing last May, has not since been heard of.

DR CLAGUE TO REMAIN.—When Dr Clague was medically examined at Coventry in June last he was passed for service in Grade 1. At the end of August he received his orders to join the Army in October. On the 3rd inst. Long Itchington people solemnly protested against being left without a resident doctor. On the 11th inst. Dr Clague underwent a second medical examination at Birmingham, and has now been totally rejected as unfit for military service. His services as a medical man will, therefore, be retained in the village.

STOCKTON.
OUR MEN.—Cecil Wall has been wounded in the thigh, and is making satisfactory progress ; and Ernest Hall has been gassed, fortunately without very serious effects.

THURLASTON.
ON TUESDAY morning, Mr & Mrs W Hirons, Coventry Road, were notified that their fourth son, Pte G Hirons, R.W.R, had been killed. He was formerly in the employ of Mr J Johnson, J.P, Thurlaston, and was the finest young man in the village. He was 6ft in height and well-built, although only 19 years of age, and he was much respected by everybody in the parish. Mr & Mrs Hirons have another son—J Hirons—badly wounded in France. They had four sons in the Army till two of them were killed. The two remaining in the Army are members of the Warwickshire Police Force, one having been stationed at Sutton Coldfield, and the other at Shipston-on-Stour.

RUGBY & DISTRICT FOOD CONTROL COMMITTEE.

THE SHORTAGE OF MILK.
A letter was read from a milk retailer complaining that she was unable to get a proper supply of milk, and pointing out that unless the committee could help her she would be unable to allow her customers the quantity to which they were entitled.—Mrs Shelley said this was a very hard case. The woman was a widow and an invalid, and was dependent upon her business for a livelihood ; whereas some of the other retailers were employed at the works, and were still keeping their businesses going.—Mr Cooke moved that the whole milk question be re-considered by the Rationing Committee. He believed that the town was threatened with a milk Monopoly, and that the situation was very serious.—Mr Humphrey drew attention to the fact that large quantities of milk were used daily in the canteens at the B.T.H and Willans & Robinson’s, and he suggested that they should use instead either dry milk or condensed milk in barrels. The fresh milk could then be distributed amongst the public.—In reply to Mr Gay, the Executive Officer said the committee had no power to commandeer milk ; but. if necessary, they could take over the whole milk supply of the town.—Mr Gay supported Mr Humphrey’s suggestion, and proposed that the two firms be approached on the matter. The Chairman : We do not want to be trouble with the workmen if we do this ?—Messrs Gay and Cooke replied in the negative.—The Chairman : We do not want it to be said that we wish to rob the workman of his milk.—Mr Gay : With the average workman his wife and children come first. They will be quite willing to forego fresh milk in the canteen in order that the children may have it.—It was decided that the executive Officer should approach the two firms on this question. and that the Rationing Committee should meet to consider the whole question of milk supply.—Mr Stevenson : Will they consider the retail price ?—The Executive Officer : The price will have to be revised at the end of September.

OTHER ITEMS.
A quantity of second grade bacon has now been received, and it was pointed out that the price of this was 1s 8d per lb straight from the case, and 1s 10d per lb washed and dried.—Both the Executive Officer and Mr Humphrey remarked that this bacon is very nice, almost as good, in fact, as the better quality bacon.—Mr Cripps : Do not praise it too much, or it will be 2s per lb next week.

DEATHS.

AUSTIN.—In loving memory of our darling boy, Pte. CECIL AUSTIN, 1st R.W.R., youngest son of Mr. & Mrs. Austin, 3 Oliver Street, Rugby, who was killed “ somewhere in France ” on August 30, 1918 ; aged 19 years. One of the very best.—From Dad and Mother.

FLEET.—Officially reported having died from gunshot wounds in France on September 10th, Pte. CYRIL WILLIAM FLEET, aged 32, youngest son of William Fleet, 98 Lawford Road, Rugby.

LINES.—In ever-loving, memory of my dearest and youngest son, Pte. J. H. LINES, of the Royal Berks., who was killed in action on August 27th “ somewhere in France ” ; aged 19 years.
“ We do not forget him, nor do we intend ;
We think of him daily, and will to the end.
We miss him and mourn him in silence unseen,
And dwell on the memory of days that have been.”
“ In the midst of life we are in death.”
—Not forgotten by his sorrowing Mother, Father, Brothers and Sisters.

WHITE.—Killed in action in France on July 29th, Pte CHARLES WHITE, 1st Batt. Royal Warwickshire Regt., second son of the late William White, formerly of Willoughby, and Ann White, Carterton, Clansfield, Oxon ; aged 33.

IN MEMORIAM.

CASHMORE.—In loving memory of our dear brother, Pte. CHARLES CASHMORE, 5th Oxon 7 Bucks L.I.
“ Three years have passed,
No one knows
What was this gallant hero’s end
No wooden cross or mound to show
Where he fell fighting against the foe.”
—From his ever-loving Sister, Nell, Violet, and brother George.

CUFAUDE.—In loving memory of No. 40549 EDWARD HENRY CUFAUDE (Yelvertoft) who fell in action on Hill 70 on September 22. 1917.
“ May we in Thy sorrows share,
For Thy sake all peril dare,
Ever know Thy tender care.

GREEN.— In ever loving memory of EDWARD (BERT) GREEN, who fell at the Battle of Loos, September 23-27, 1915.
—Sadly missed by his wife and children.

GRIFFITH.—In loving memory of LLEWELLYN GRIFFITH, who died of wounds on September 18, 1916.—“ Gone from sight, but to memory ever dear.”—From loving Brothers and Sisters—74 South Street.

HOPKINS.—In loving memory of FRANK, the youngest son of Henry Hopkins, late of Long Lawford, killed in action in France on September 18, 1915.
“ He bravely answered duty’s call ;
He gave his life for one and all ;
But thee unknown grave is the bitterest blow,
None but our aching hearts can know.”
—Never forgotten by his loving Father, Sisters, and Brothers.

NEAL.—In loving memory of Bombardier FRANK NEAL, R.F.A., who died of wounds on September 19, 1916.—Never forgotten by his loving sister Carrie.

THOMPSON.—In loving memory of our dear brother LEVI, who was killed in action in France on September 23, 1917.—Not forgotten by his Brothers and Sisters, Will, Tom, Emma, Fanny.

 

23rd Jun 1917. Heavy Thunderstorm, Soldier killed at Ryton-on-Dunsmore

HEAVY THUNDERSTORM.
REMARKABLE HAILSTONES.

The brilliant and summer-like weather which prevailed last week culminated on Saturday in a shade temperature of 87 degrees. In the evening a thunderstorm passed over the district, accompanied by a moderate but welcome rainfall. On Sunday the temperature was 2 or 3 degrees lower, but the atmosphere was still more oppressive. During the morning heavy peals of thunder were heard at a distance, and a little after three o’clock in the afternoon there was a recurrence of these, and the discharges continued without intermission till about eight o’clock. The thunder clouds seemed to be circling round the country north and west of Rugby, and the storm was raging with great violence in the direction of Coventry. At length between five and six o’clock—it took a course over Rugby and the immediate neighbourhood, and rain fell more or less heavily till shortly before eight o’clock, when the climax came in a remarkable bombardment from above. People were startled by a sudden rattling on roofs, windows, and glass-houses-the noise amounting almost to a roar—and hailstones of abnormal size were seen to be crashing down from the clouds. This lasted about five minutes, is which time the ground was well covered with the icy missiles.

The full force of the storm was experienced at Bourton. Some of the hailstones that fell there weighed between 2 and 3ozs, and considerable damage was done to property and growing crops. At Bourton Hall, the residence of Mr F J Shaw, several hundred panes of glass were smashed, and the windows of numerous other houses were broken. The large hailstones tore off the young shoots of fruit trees, strawberries, cucumbers, and kidney beans, and flattened out a large quantity of mowing grass. A great many hailstones were as large as walnuts, and some measured more than 2ins. across. For a short time the wind blew with great force, and an umbrella in the hands of a pedestrian was quickly torn to ribbons. Windows at Draycote Chapel were broken.

At Dunchurch considerable damage was done to crops and glass. No less than 120 panes of glass in windows and greenhouses were broken on Mr Mallam’s School premises. At Dunchurch Lodge and Bilton Grange the glass also suffered badly, some 400 broken panes being counted at the latter place. Windows at the church were broken, and a large piece of lead was torn from the roof. Some of the masses of hail that fell here measured from 2 to 2¼ inches in diameter, and weighed nearly 3ozs.

At Bilton measurements of hailstones taken about ten minutes after the cessation of the storm were from three-quarters of an inch to an inch and a quarter diameter. A fine oak tree on the main road between Bilton and Cawston was struck by lightning and badly seamed.

At Newbold-on-Avon a chimney stack at the Vicarage was split by the lightning, but, unfortunately, the debris instead of penetrating the roof, lodged against another chimney. The electricity passing along the bell-wires fused some of them, and also caused damage to the wall paper in several rooms. Several trees in the neighbourhood were struck.

At Marton a lot of damage was done by the enormous hailstones to windows and greenhouses, and potato tops on many plots were badly cut about. Some hailstones measured six inches in circumference. A thunderbolt was seen to fall in a field belonging to Mr Steane near the church.

The gable end of the Chequers Inn at Lilbourne, occupied by Mrs Rouse, was struck and a number of slates were displaced.

A SOLDIER KILLED AT RYTON-ON-DUNSMORE.

A sad fatality occurred at Ryton-on-Dunsmore during the storm on Sunday evening to Pte J Stephens, of the Devonshire Regiment, a farm hand who had been working for Mr T Pearman as a substitute. At the inquest on Tuesday Mr E Bagshaw was foreman of the jury.—Pte J James, also of the Devonshire Regiment who had been working with deceased for a fortnight, said he went to evening service at Wolston Church, and on returning to meet Stephens as arranged, found him lying dead under a tree by the roadside.—Laura Mead, of Ryton, who was cycling with a friend, said she went under an elm tree for shelter. Stephens was also there and he advised them to “ hop to Ryton Vicarage, or they would get very wet.” They acted upon his advise, but did not know why he stayed himself. Witness heard afterwards that he had been killed.—Amy Redhouse, also of Ryton, stated that she was cycling home from Wolston with a friend after the storm, and just before reaching the London Road, about 8.15 p.m, saw deceased lying under a tree. By the appearances, she concluded that he had been struck by lightning, and at once rode to inform P.C Jenson at Stretton. This officer described exactly the position in which he found the body feet towards the road and body and head towards the elm tree-and said deceased had evidently fallen exactly where he stood. His hat was split right round the brim and the stiffening wire was torn out. The hair at the back of the head was singed, but there were no other traces of burning. Several nails had been driven out of his boots. About 4½ft. from the tree the road was torn up in the shape of a V to a depth of 1½Ft to 2½ ft, and there were also marks on the tree. Witness was complimented by the Coroner for the excellent description he had given, and also thanked Miss Mead for the trouble she took. He remarked that it was curious that deceased warned the ladies, but did not move away himself. He was evidently willing to take a risk. A verdict of “ Death through being struck by lightning ” was returned.-The jury expressed their sympathy with the widow, and returned their fees for her. A Ryton resident added 5s, and the Coroner said he was also pleased to subscribe.

Deceased was a strong, healthy man, and Mr Pearman found him quite satisfactory as a substitute in all respects. His home was at 28 Gloucester Street, Cirencester. He had served 12 years in the Army before war broke out, and being then nearly 45 years of age, was kept on home service. He was a married man with three children at the time of his death, but since the sad occurrence his wife has given birth to a fourth child.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Mrs Welch, of 35 Union Street, has received official intimation that her husband, Pte Ernest Edward Welch, of the Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, was killed in action in France on April 28th.

The death took place in Rugby Infirmary, on the 10th Inst, of Pioneer Wm Barrows, late 11th Hants Regiment, youngest son of David Barrows, 51 James Street. Before the War he was driver of a Diesel engine at the local Waterworks. He joined up in September, 1914, and saw much service in France at Loos, Ginchy, &c. He was discharged on May 23, 1917, medically unfit, suffering from cancer of the tongue.

Pte Harry Rogers, of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment, and the eldest son of Mr & Mrs H Rogers, of Flore, Northants, and nephew of Mr & Mrs H Miller, 10 Alfred Street, Lawford Road, Rugby, has recently been awarded the Military Medal for gallantry and skill on patrol work. Crawling near to the enemy lines under a heavy shell fire, and after being buried three times under debris, he succeeded in obtaining valuable information. Pte Rogers has been twice wounded, and before the War was employed at Rugby Station (L & N-W Railway).

Captain Edward Ernest Wynne, Leicestershire Regiment, who was killed on June 8th, the day following his 22nd birthday, was the eldest son of the Rev E H & Mrs Wynne, of Guestling Rectory, Sussex, formerly curate of St Matthew’s, Rugby. Educated at Uppingham, he became captain of cricket and fives, and was also a member of the football XV and the hockey XI. After war broke out he quickly obtained a commission in the Leicestershire Regiment, having previously joined the Public Schools Brigade. He had seen close on two years’ service at the front, and fell leading his company in the face of a very heavy fire with the object of taking an enemy machine gun by which they were being delayed.

Mr & Mrs Parkinson, of the Old Bank House, Southam, and formerly of Rugby, has been informed that their son, Second-Lieut Horace J A Parkinson, of the 4th Leicestershire Regiment, was seriously wounded in France on the 8th inst. He was educated at the Lower School, Rugby, and before joining the Army was in Parrs Bank, Leicester, and formerly at the Lutterworth Branch. He is making satisfactory progress.

Lieut H L Satchell, R.W.R, attached to the R.F.C, son of Mr J G Satchell, Dunchurch Road, has been promoted flight commander and temporary captain.

Between £9 and £10, realised by some sports at Tyntesfield School will be divided between the Red Cross Hospitals and the Hospital of St Cross.

THE ACCIDENT TO A FLYING CORPS OFFICER.

The funeral of the late Lieut Fitzroy Porter, R.F.C, whose death from a machine gunshot accident was reported in our last issue, took place on Monday, the 11th inst., at Sefton, Liverpool, near the residence of his father, Blundelsands, amid manifestations of great sorrow and sympathy for the young officer’s tragic death. Several of the officers of the R.F.C Squadron at Lilbourne attended the funeral of their lamented comrade.

In our report of the accident it should have been stated that the deceased officer was detained at the R.F.C Camp Hospital for some time after the accident under the care of Surgeon-Major Charles Collins, M.D, R.F.C, before being removed in the squadron ambulance to the Brookfield Nursing Home of Rugby Hospital for further treatment, where he subsequently died.

MORE LOCAL PRISONERS OF WAR.—There have been three additions to the Rugby list of prisoners of war this week vis :— Pte P Gamble Davis, Lincolnshire Regiment (interned at Doeberitz), and whose home is at Dunchurch, formerly Church Lawford ; Sergt H Beers, King’s Liverpool Regiment (interned at Minden), formerly New Bilton ; and Pte Peddlesdon, East Surrey Regiment (interned at Dulmen), of Rugby. With regard to the last-named man considerable enquiries had to be made before he could be traced to his prison camp. Arrangements have been made for the standard food parcels and bread to be sent to these men on behalf of the Rugby Prisoners of War Help Committee.

NAPTON.

MR J LINE has received information that his son Walter Lines, of the Buffs, was wounded on May 3rd, and is a prisoner in Germany.

BRAUNSTON.

MR A TURNER has received official news that his son, Lance-Corpl Horace W Turner, Royal West Surrey Regiment, was wounded on May 16th. He enlisted in Kitchener’s Army about a month after the outbreak of war.

DUNCHURCH.

MILITARY FUNERAL.-The late Col-Sergt-Major Mulcaster was buried with military honours at Dunchurch on Saturday, last. The coffin was draped with the Union Jack, on which were placed the cap and belt of the deceased, was borne shoulder high to the church by six sergeants of the Manchester Regiment. The path from the churchyard gates to the church door was lined on each side by the boys of Dunchurch Hall School (at which the deceased was gymnastics instructor for twelve years) and the firing party sent down by the Regiment. The Burial Service was read by the Rev B B Carter, military chaplain of the Indian Government and priest-in-charge at Dunchurch. Mrs E R Gilling presided at the organ, and the psalms and hymns were nicely sung by the boys of the choir. The funeral procession left the church to the strains of the Dead March in Saul. Among the mourners were the wife and children of the deceased, Mr Wm Mulcaster (brother), Lieut & Mrs Bullivant (brother-in-law and sister-in-law), Mrs Long (sister-in-law), Mr & Mrs Wolley, Nurse Butcher, Col-Sergt Sutton, Col-Sergt-Major Grognett, Col-Sergt-Major Wilcox, Com-Sergt-Major Pomfret, Com-Sergt-Major Casey, Com-Sergt-Major Smith, Reg-Sergt-Major Prosser (all of the Manchester Regiment), M C G Mallam, Mr More, Mr Oakley, Dr Powell, Mr J H Dew, Mr J H Abbott, M E Iliff, Mr G White, Mr J Loydall, Mr T Haynes, Mr P Heap, Mr T Whiteman, Mr J Nias, and Mr S Whiteman. A number of ladies were present in church, including three of the Dunchurch nurses of the Bilton V.A.D. Hospital. A very large number of people assembled in the churchyard, and quietly and reverently watched the funeral. At the close of the service three volleys were fired over the grave by sixteen men of the Manchester Regiment, and the “ Last Post ” was then blown by two of the same regiment. Floral tributes were laid on the grave from : Wife and Children ; Mr & Mrs Bullivant ; Mr & Mrs Long ; Mr & Mrs Mallam, Joyce, Brenda, John, Monica, and Stephen Mallam ; “ His Boys at Dunchurch Hall ” ; Miss Hume ; Mr Oakley and Mr Mort ; the indoor and outdoor servants at Dunchurch Hall ; Major & Mrs Neilson and Lieut H Holdsworth ; Rev B B & Mrs Carter, Mr P P Rodocanachi ; Mr & Mrs Dew ; Mr & Mrs Wolley ; Mr & Mrs H V Tait ; Mr & Mrs Taylor ; Mrs Weston and family ; “ His Brothers-in-Arms ” ; Teddie Dowling ; the members of the Dunchurch Social Club ; the boys of Dunchurch ; Boughton Endowed School ; and the children of the Dunchurch Girls’ and Infants’ Schools.

HARBOROUGH MAGNA.

WOUNDED SOLDIERS’ ENTERTAINED.—On Saturday afternoon the soldiers from Pailton House Hospital were entertained to tea at Harborough Magna School. After tea, which was provided with the money left over from the May festival, and with the help of a few friends, each soldier was presented with a packet of cigarettes by Mrs Bird. During the evening the May-day ceremony was repeated.

BREAD SUBSTITUTES.

An impression has got abroad that war bread is not nourishing. This is erroneous. War bread is made of the most nourishing portions of wheat, barley, maise and rice, and should be found quite as sustaining and nourishing as white bread. A good deal of the imaginary difficulties with war bread would entirely disappear were everyone to make it a practice to thoroughly masticate the bread before swallowing, along the lines of the article which appeared in our columns last week.

There appears to be some confusion on the question of substitutes, and there is no doubt that the question of substitutes has troubled many people. In the early days of the Food Campaign a great deal too much was made of the importance of using substitutes. At the present time rice, barley, maize, oats, rye, &c, cannot be regarded as substitutes, as they form part of the whole bulk of cereals from which flour is obtained for incorporation in our bread. The Food Controller has stated that oatmeal may be used for porridge and rice for puddings outside the limits of the voluntary ration, but the use of other cereals should be kept within limits of the ration. It is also, of course, desirable that oatmeal and rice for porridge and puddings should be used sparingly, as pressure of demand upon these must inevitably tend to produce scarcity in these articles also.

It is clear that those engaged in heavy, manual labour, who have not the money to buy articles of food to take the place of bread, cannot get down to the 4-lb limit ; but they can, to some extent, reduce their consumption of cereals, provided they make a genuine, honest endeavour to do this. It should be borne in mind by everyone, however, that in order to prevent the necessity for compulsory rationing, each one must eat something less of the cereals, so that voluntary rationing can be allowed to continue.

DEATHS.

BARROWS.—On the 10th inst., at the Rugby Infirmary, the beloved son of David and Mrs. Barrows (late 12271, 11th Hants. Regiment) ; aged 45 years.—“ He answered his country’s call.”

TERRY.—On June 7th (died of wounds received in action in Mesopotamia), AMBROSE JOSEPH TERRY, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, the dearly beloved only son of A. & M. A. Terry, of Crick ; aged 24 years.

WELCH.—April 28th, in France, ERNEST EDWARD WELCH, beloved husband of Bertha Welch, 35 Union Street.—“ Gone, but not forgotten.”

WELCH.—Killed in action on April 29th, ERNEST EDWARD WELCH, only son of the late Edward and Mrs. Welch, Union Street, Rugby.
“ Nobly he answered duty’s call,
And for his country gave his all.
Until the day breaks, dear Ern—good-bye.”
-Sadly missed and in silence mourned by his loving MOTHER and SISTERS.

IN MEMORIAM.

GREER.—In loving memory of Private R. GREER, 1st Royal Inniskillings, who was killed in action at the Dardaneles on June 18, 1915.—Never forgotten by his friends at 12 Argyle Street.

HUGHES.—In ever-loving memory of JACK, who was killed in France on June 18, 1915.—“ Though lost to sight, to memory ever dear.”—From MAUD.

HUGHES.—In loving memory of our dear son and brother, JACK, who was killed in action in France on June 18, 1915.
“ Not dead to those who loved him,
Not lost, hut gone before ;
He lives with us in memory,
And will for evermore.”
—Never forgotten by his loving PARENTS, SISTER EDIE, BROTHERS, and KITTY and DICK.

19th Aug 1916. The Fatal Flying Accident.

THE FATAL FLYING ACCIDENT.

The inquest on Lieut Geo S Rogers and Second-Lieut Cyril de Frece, of the R.F.C, who were killed by the collision of two aeroplanes on Thursday in last week, was opened on Saturday by Mr E F Hadow. Mr J Lord was chosen foreman of the jury.

Alfred de Frece, solicitor, 155 Abbey Road, West Hampstead, and 2 Devonshire Square, identified his son’s body, and said he was 18 years of age. He had been associated with the Royal Flying Corps a little over two months ; previous to that he was in the Middlesex Yeomanry. He was a strong lad, with full possession of his sight and hearing.

Capt McEwen, R.F.C, identified the body of Lieut Rogers, who was 23 years of age. He was a Canadian, and belonged to the Canadian Expeditionary Force. His family resided at Barrie, Ontario. He had been attached to the corps for some time, and was a fully qualified pilot, and had full possession of his sight and hearing.

Dr William Chester Collins, attached to the R.F.C, said he saw the bodies a few minutes after the accident. Life was quite extinct in both cases. The bodies had been removed from under the wrecked aeroplane when he saw them. He accompanied and superintended their removal to the mortuary. He had that morning examined the bodies, and found that both officers had sustained fracture of the skull and dislocation of the vertebrae, either of which, apart from their other injuries, would be sufficient to cause instant death.

The Coroner explained that no other evidence was available at that date, and the inquest would be adjourned till Wednesday, August 23rd.

The Foreman, on behalf of the jury, expressed their sympathy with the relatives, in which the Coroner concurred.—Mr de Frece briefly acknowledged this.

Second-Lieut Cyril de Frece was the only son of Mr Alfred de Frece, a London solicitor. He was educated at the Haberdashers’ School, Taplow Grammar School, and in Brussels. His intention was to become an electrical engineer. He also studied under Professor Thompson at the City and Guilds School, London. He joined the Army in October, 1915, and was appointed to the R.F.C and given a commission in the first week in June.

Lieut Rogers, the pilot, was a remarkably skilful aviator.

MEMORIAL SERVICE FOR LIEUT ROGERS.

The funeral of Lieut G S Rogers was arranged for Saturday, but on Friday evening a cablegram was received from his relatives, asking that he might be buried in Canada. The arrangements for the funeral were accordingly cancelled, and a memorial service was held instead. The members of the squadron to which the unfortunate officers were attached marched to the church, headed by the B.T.H Band, which played martial airs on the way to and from the service. The small village church was crowded to its fullest capacity, this being the first service of the kind ever held in the parish. The service, which was very brief, was conducted by the Vicar, and opened with the hymn, “ Peace, perfect peace,” the singing of which was led by the band. A short and sympathetic address was given by the Vicar. The “ Dead March ” from Saul and the sounding of the “ Last Post ” proved a fitting termination to an impressive service.

A number of beautiful floral tributes were sent by the officers of the Squadron, the men of the, Squadron, Capt McEwen, Mrs Balding and Vandy, a model floral aeroplane by the Staff of the Officers’ Mess, Mr and Mrs Richardson, and Mr Hayter ; and these were placed on a large Union Jack in front of the altar during the service.

The coffin containing the remains of Lieut Rogers was put on the train on route for Liverpool on Wednesday evening. A number of deceased’s colleagues were present, and as the train steamed out of the station the “ Last Post ” was sounded.

The funeral of Lieut de Frece took place at the Liberal Jewish Cemetery, Willesden, on Monday.

LOCAL WAR NOTES,

Mr W College, of 48 Church Street, Rugby, has this week received a postcard from his son, Pte W F College—who was reported missing—stating that he is now a prisoner in Germany.

From further information to hand it appears that Pte Sidney H Dicken, of the 14th Gloucester Battalion, son of Mr and Mrs W Dicken, of 131 Claremont Road, died from laceration of the abdomen, and that the officer of the regiment was killed outright by the same shell.

Mrs S Reynolds, of 26 West Leyes, received official notification that her son, Pte Arthur Reynolds, of the Royal Warwickshires, had been posted, as missing after the engagement on July 19th. She has since received a postcard from him to say he is a prisoner at Gefanenlager, Dulmen Camp, Germany. He enlisted on July 22, 1915, and went abroad to May 22, 1916.

MR FRED STAINES IN EGYPT.

Pte Fred Staines, of the Midland Battalion of the Rifle Brigade, 2nd officer of the Rugby Fire Brigade, has for some time past been ill in hospital in Egypt. From a letter, dictated by him, and received by relatives, it appears he has been down with typhoid fever, but he speaks very cheerfully of the satisfactory progress he is making, adding that he is in good hands, and that his friends have no need to worry about him.

AN OFFICER’S APPRECIATION OF PTE R ALAND.

Mr W Aland, of 30 Arnold Street, whose son, Pte Roy Aland, of the Royal Warwicks, has been badly wounded in France, has received a letter from Lieut Hubbard, attached to that regiment, in which he says :—“ Your boy was my orderly, and I always found him cool, collected, and resourceful. He was much liked and sought after by his comrades, and his loss has been keenly felt by us all. At the time he was wounded I was just posting the company along some trenches we had just taken over, and he was just behind me. A very severe bombardment was going on, and when the shell pitched the trench was instantly filled with smoke. It was difficult to see anything owing to the darkness ; but young Aland was master of himself, although so badly wounded. A stretcher was brought in about five minutes, and when he was placed on it and the bearers were about to lift he called out : ‘ Mr Hubbard, just a minute. Down the trench about five yards, in a bunk hole on the right, you will find a bag ; it’s your grub bag. I put it there for safety.’ I recite this incident to show the pluck and unselfishness and thought for others, which was truly admirable, coming from a man who was so badly wounded as your poor boy was. You have every reason to be proud of him. He was a splendid soldier, and in him we have suffered the loss of a good comrade. . . . Will you please remember me to him. I know he will put up a plucky fight, and do his best to carry out his watchword, ‘ Keep smiling.’

LOCAL CASUALTIES.

Second-Lieut N Edyean-Walker (Royal Fusiliers), nephew of Mr C H Fuller, solicitor, Rugby, and to whom he is articled, has been wounded in France, and is now in hospital in London.

News has been received that Pte James Pitham, of the Royal Warwicks, has been wounded in the thigh by shrapnel. He is a native of Rugby, and as a youth worked at the Rugby Lamp Factory, but joined the Army from Bedworth. Pte Pitham has two brothers serving with the colours.

PTE G H WRIGHT, of WILLEY.

News has been received that Pte G H Wright, R.W.R, of Church Gate, Willey, died in hospital from wounds on August 11th. Prior to his enlistment, Pte Wright was employed in the Winding Department at the B.T.H.

RUGBY BRICKLAYER KILLED.

Pte J Shaw, of the Royal Warwicks, is reported to have been killed by the bursting of a shell on August 1st. He had only been at the front a fortnight. He was a bricklayer, whose home was at Dunchurch, and worked for Mr Cobley, of Rugby.

Deceased was buried behind the lines by the Army Chaplain. In a letter to Mrs Shaw, who is left with two little children, the O.C the Company says :- “ Although your husband had been with us fora short time only, he had shown a soldierly spirit, and his loss will be felt in the Company.”

SERGT J W MILNER LOSES A LEG.

The many friends of Sergt J W Milner, R.W.R, son of Mrs Milner, of 7 Bath Street, will regret to hear that he has been seriously wounded. His right knee was smashed, and the limb has since been amputated. Sergt Milner, who was a member of “ E ” Company, and was employed in the Accounts Office at the B.T.H before mobilisation, is still in a French hospital, and is doing well.

SERGT HAROLD LEE, of DUNSMORE.

Sergt Harold Lee, R.W.R, who, as we reported last week, was seriously wounded on July 23rd, died in the Canadian Hospital, France, on August 6th, in the presence of his parents. Sergt Lee, who was 26 years of age, enlisted at the beginning of the War, and had been in France over twelve months. His home was at Cubbington, near Leamington, but between five and six years ago he took up work in the gardens of Dunsmore, and was employed there when war broke out. He was of a bright disposition, and was very popular with all whom he came in contact with.

IZAAK WALTONIAN’S SON BADLY WOUNDED.

Probably no member of the Isaak Walton Angling Association is better known, than Mr Fred Taylor, of 59 Abbey Street. Mr Taylor has two sons at the War, the elder of whom—Pte Wm Taylor, of the 6th Leicesters-has been severely wounded. He was shot through the arm and neck, and had his head badly hurt by shrapnel, his injuries including a broken jaw. He staggered some distance before being taken in hand by a member of the R.A.M.C, whose aid was very timely. Pte Taylor being much exhausted from loss of blood, and without prompt attention would probably have died. He is now in hospital in Surrey, where his parents have visited him. They found their son quite cheerful, in spite of numerous wounds, and he is reported to be making good progress towards recovery.

 

DUNCHURCH.

CORPL B PEARCE, of the Bedfords, one of the twin sons of Mr and Mrs Pearce, Coventry Road, has been made sergeant. He is the youngest soldier from Dunchurch who has attained that rank, and he has only been in the Army 18 months.

The people of this parish always take a great pride in the flower borders in front of their houses. Mr H Pearce and Mr W Busby have a fine lot of stocks ; and Mr J Cleaver, The Heath, makes a good show of all kinds of flowers not often seen at a cottage. Mr H Burrows, Mr F Stanton, and Mrs Burton, all of Mill Street, have excellent displays ; Mr Jennings bas a good show of stocks. The flowers on the front of the Dun Cow Hotel make quite an attractive display.

Second-Lieut J D Barnwell, of the R.W.R, second son of Mr W D Barnwell, farmer, who was wounded a short time ago in the foot, has had to have all the toes amputated. He is going on favourably.

DEATHS.

DEVONPORT.—In loving memory of Alfred William, Royal Garrison Artillery, who died of wounds, July 7, 1916 (in France), aged 28 years. Also Arthur John, 6th Leicestershire Regiment, killed in action, July 17, 1916 (in France), aged 22 years.—Beloved sons of Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Devenport, Napton Road, Southam.

DUNCUFF.—On August 3, 1916 (died of wounds in France), Arthur Francis, 6th Oxon and Bucks L.I., dearly beloved husband of Mildred G. Duncuff, Benn Street, aged 22 years.
“ Lord, ere I join the deadly strife,
And battles terrors dare ;
Fain would I render heart and life
To Thine Almighty care.
And when grim death in smoke wreaths robed
Comes thundering, o’er the scene,
What fear can reach a soldier’s heart
Whose trust in Thee has been.”

HOWKINS.—Killed in action on August 4th, in Egypt, Lieut. Maurice Howkins, West Riding R.H.A., elder son of Mr. and Mrs. William Howkins, of Hillmorton Grounds, Rugby ; aged 22 years. “ One of the brave boys, when shall their glory fade.”

ILIFF.—Killed in action, July 26th, Corpl. E. Iliff, Royal Warwicks, second and only surviving son of Mr. and Mrs. E. Iliff, Dunchurch.

LOVEROCK.-Died of wounds received in action, Second-Lieut, Harold George Loverock, second son of Lewis Loverock, of Greylands, Hillmorton Road, Rugby, aged 25.

SHAW.—Killed in action “ somewhere in France,” August 1, 1916, Pte. J. C. Shaw (Jack), 11th Batt. R.W.R., aged 26 years 11 months, the dearly beloved husband of Edith Annie Shaw (nee Harris).
“ We often sit and think of you,
And tenderly breathe your name ;
Nothing left of you to look at
But your photo in a frame.”

13th May 1916. Rugby Soldier Decorated with the D.C.M.

RUGBY SOLDIER DECORATED WITH THE D.C.M.

PLEASING CEREMONY IN THE CALDECOTT PARK.

Sunday was a great day for Sergt Bale, of the 2nd Battalion Royal Welsh Fusiliers, whose home is in Lagoe Place, Rugby. Arrangements had been made to present him in Caldecott Park with a Distinguished Conduct Medal, awarded for bravery in France, and the occasion partook somewhat of the character of a civic function, there being present Messrs J J McKinnell (Chairman), W Flint (Vice-chairman), T A Wise, W H Linnell, T Ringrose, H Yates, R W Barnsdale, and W A Stevenson (members of the Rugby Urban District Council). Col F F Johnstone, recruiting officer at Rugby, consented to make the presentation, and the local Volunteer Training Corps paraded, under Company Commander C H Fuller ; also the Royal Defence Corps (late the 5th South Lancashire Regt), with Lieut Gandy in charge ; and the 1st Company Boys’ Brigade, under Capt W F Wood. These formed a “ hollow square ” on the greensward, and cleared a space for the ceremony, which was witnessed by a large concourse of people.

DEEDS OF GALLANTRY.

Colonel Johnstone, in making the presentation, said the medal was given to N.C.O.’s and men of H.M forces performing gallant duties beyond their ordinary duties. The special duty performed by Sergt Bale was that on February 9th, 1916, he was ordered out with a reconnoitring party, consisting of one officer, one sergeant, one corporal, and four men, to ascertain the strength of the enemy’s trenches, what they contained, and what entanglements there were before those trenches. The party proceeded about 9.30 at night, and after they had been out an hour or so the sergeant and one of the privates got wounded. Corpl Bale (as he was then) took these men, one by one, under the enemy’s fire, into a place of safety. The whole patrol then returned to the trenches, and, after a certain amount of rest, Lieut McKay and Corpl Bale volunteered to go out again and finish their reconnoitring duties. When they got up to the wire entanglements, the officer was wounded through the thigh. Corpl Bale went to the assistance of his officer, taking him up, under fire, and carrying him back into the trenches. Now, those acts of bravery really deserved the Victoria Cross (hear, hear). Those deeds reflected very much upon the soldier-like conduct of Corpl Bale, and he had pleasure in pinning the decoration upon his breast. He felt sure all would agree with him in thinking Corpl Bale richly deserved this promotion to the rank of sergeant and also the Distinguished Conduct Medal (applause). Having pinned the medal on the solders tunic, Colonel Johnstone said he trusted the gallant deeds would long live in their memories, and that when the young men present were called upon to do their duty in the face of the enemy they would emulate the example of Sergt Bale (cheers).

MR MCKINNELL’S TRIBUTE.

Mr J J McKinnell, as Chairman of the Urban District Council, congratulated Sergt Bale, in the name of the town, on the great honour he had achieved. They felt that he had conferred lustre upon the name of Rugby, and he wanted Sergt Bale to understand that his fellow-citizens were extremely proud of him (cheers). The town of Rugby, which they all loved so much, had, he thought he might say, with becoming modesty, earned a good name in the last troublous months that we had passed through. He believed Rugby did very well all through the time of recruiting, and he was sure her sons, who had gone forth to fight in the various theatres of war, would acquit themselves creditably, and they sent Sergt Bale forth with their best wishes that his future would be covered with more laurels (applause).

HUMOROUS PREDICTION RECALLED.

Cheers having been given for Sergt Bale, Capt W F Wood made a short speech. It afforded him more pleasure than he could find words to express to be present at that ceremony, especially as Sergt Bale was one of his old boys (applause). It was some ten years since Sergt Bale joined the Brigade, and proved himself to be a hard worker. That morning he had met a soldier and a sailor, who reminded him that at the Llandudno camp some years ago he told Sergt Bale he would live either to be hanged or to earn the Victoria Cross (laughter and applause). He thought Sergt Bale was on the right way to win one or the other (laughter).

Sergt Bale expressed his thanks for the honour that had been done him, and his pleasure to have been so much congratulated during the three weeks he had been on leave. Sergt Bale then reviewed his exploits in France, including the retreat from Mons, and the circumstances under which, in addition to winning the medal, he had been twice mentioned in despatches.

ANOTHER PRESENTATION.

Colonel Johnstone then presented the Donegal Bronze Medal to Corpl Murray, of the 3rd Platoon of the Rugby Volunteer Training Corps, given by the National Rifle Association, for a creditable total of 397 points out of a possible 450, and entitling the holder to take part in the Donegal Competition at Bisley.

Mr McKinnell, addressing the V.T.C., said they had been working now for some months, and he thought they had received very little encouragement from the Government. Their fellow-citizens had, perhaps, regarded them with a sort of kindly curiosity, but they had gone on working steadily; they had given up their evenings and their Sundays in order to train themselves to be of use to their country in any supreme crisis, which they hoped would never come ; and latterly they had turned out of their comfortable beds in the middle of the night in order to help their fellow-citizens. He wanted the Corps to understand that their fellow-citizens thought well of them, and appreciated the work they were doing (applause).

Company Commander C H Fuller, on behalf of the Training-Corps, thanked Mr McKinnell for his kind words.

Cheers were given for Colonel Johnstone, who, in acknowledgment, said he very much appreciated the way in which recruits came forward first of all. There were not so many to come forward now, but under the new system to be commenced he hoped they would have more, and that many others would follow the example of the brave Sergeant and would come back to the country with the V.C. or the D.C.M. (hear, hear).

Sergt Bale was then played back to his home in Lagoe Place by the band of the Boys’ Brigade, and afterwards enjoyed a motor car drive with several friends.

At the Empire Picture Palace on Monday night Sergt Bale was presented by B Morris, on behalf of the management, with a wrist watch.

Sergt Bale belonged to the 1st Rugby Company Boys’ Brigade for four years, and was a bugler in the band. He left at the age of 16 to join the army, and is one of about 300 old members of the Brigade now serving in H.M. Forces by land or sea. Up to the present there have been few casualties amongst them.

The V.T.C. spent the afternoon in useful exercises in the fields between Hillmorton and Barby, returning at 8.30 p.m.

WARWICKSHIRE TERRITORIALS.

The 35th meeting of the Warwickshire Territorial Force Association was held on Monday at Birmingham, the Earl of Craven presiding. The War Office letter, dated April 10 last, regarding the administration of the Volunteer Force by the County Association was considered, and on the motion of Colonel Wyley, seconded by Colonel G M Seabroke, a resolution was passed agreeing to undertake the administration of the Volunteer Training Corps in the county on the county basis, and a committee was appointed for the purpose.

Colonel Lewis, Commandant of the Warwickshire Volunteer Training Corps, said they had in Warwickshire five battalions of infantry, a very useful corps of electrical engineers, and a small cycle corps. The 1st Battalion had now the names of nearly 900 members on its books, the second something like 1,500, the third had never been higher than 700, the fourth about 700,and the fifth about 800. Later enlistments had denuded these figures, but he hoped that if an appeal were made the city battalions would have 600 members each to start with, and the county battalions more. In all there were about 1,350 men clothed, armed, and equipped. There was no machinery for maintaining that state of equipment.

It was mentioned that 19 non-commissioned officers and men of the Warwickshire Territorials had received D.C.M. medals, and the payments, numbering 15,525 had been made in respect of separation allowances to wives, children, and dependants of soldiers. The cost of administration was considerably less than the maximum sum fixed by the Government.

Colonel Marsh said there ought to be some arms to be had from Ireland.—Colonel Lewis: The Territorial Force has already applied for them.

The question arose as to the payment and the granting of separation allowances to members of the Volunteer Force in the event of its mobilisation. The opinion was expressed by one member that if the Force was mobilised to repel an invading enemy they would automatically receive the Army pay under the term “ deemed on actual military service.”—Colonel Wyley said the question of pay, allowances, etc, was a matter for future consideration.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

War casualties among London and North-Western Railway men number 3,683, of whom 725 have died.

Second Lieut K W Lane (son of the Rev F D Lane, formerly Vicar of Clifton) who, as reported last week had been dangerously wounded, is progressing favourably.

Viscount Feilding, D.S.O, Coldstream Guards, son of the Earl of Denbigh, has been promoted to a captaincy.

The following appointments have been gazetted :—South Midland Brigade : Major (temporary Lieut.-Col) F C B West to be Lieut.-Col. 17th December, 1914. Capt (temporary Major) C P Nickalls to be Major. 17th December, 1914.

The Postmaster-General announces that the despatch of matches by post to the troops has resulted in numerous fires which have destroyed a large quantity of mails. It has consequently been necessary to entirely prohibit their despatch to any destination. The friends of Lieut Allan Hand, 81st Provisional Battalion, T.F, will be pleased to hear that he is now well on the way to recovery. He was taken ill with measles near the end of March, pneumonia subsequently developed, and for a time he was in a very critical condition, and had to undergo an operation.

Mr S E Rogers, who has been with the B.T.H Company for many years, and who joined the 5th Warwickshire Howitzer Battery in August, 1914, has been transferred to the 6th Somerset Light Infantry, to which regiment he has been gazetted as Second Lieutenant. It will be remembered that his brother, H G Rogers, of hockey renown, held a commission in the Somersets at the time of his death last June in the Dardanelles. Two other brothers, F G and W J, are also joining the army, the first-named a cadet at the Royal Military College, Camberley, and the latter (also a well-known hockey player) just back from the West Coast of Africa, to enter the London Scottish Regiment.

Several old Rugbeians have recently arrived in England with the Canadian contingents, including Walter Hillyard, a former employe at Messrs Frost’s and an ex-member of ” E ” Company; and the brothers Albert and Walter Francis. A grandson of the late Mr Richard Over, of Rugby, is also with the contingent.

Lieut F J Hadden, Remount Squadron, an old Rugbeian, who died of pneumonia on May 5 in Egypt, was before the war a tea-planter in Ceylon, where he was well known in connection with all sports, notably racing and polo. He was 55 years of age.

CAPT H PODMORE AWARDED THE D.S.O.

Rugbeians, past and present, will welcome the announcement which has been made this week that Capt H Podmore, O.R, an assistant master at Rugby School, has been awarded the D.S.O. for conspicuous gallantry in the field. The news was received in a letter from Lieut-Col W T Wyndowe, commanding the 6th Battalion Northants Regt, and which reads : “ We have just got the news that Capt Podmore has got the D.S.O for gallantry and devotion to duty on the morning of the 13th April, when his company, after enduring an intense bombardment, repulsed a raid that the enemy attempted on our front line. Though he had only one, the young officer doing duty with the company, they stuck to their parapets like heroes, inspired by the coolness and entire disregard of danger of their commander.” A really good fast bowler, Capt Podmore frequently assisted the Rugby Cricket Club some two or three seasons ago. His father was a fine Rugby football player, and represented Oxford v Cambridge in the first Rugby match between the Varsities.

ANOTHER ST. MATTHEW’S OLD BOY KILLED.

Notification has just been received of the death of Pte H P Watts, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, who was killed in action on April 5th. The mother of Pte Watts, who lives at 10 Bridget Street, New Bilton, has received a message of sympathy from Lord Kitchener. Pte Watts was educated at St Matthew’s Boys’ School, and is the fourteenth old boy of that school to be killed in action. He was 23 years of age, and was working at the Newbold Cement Works when he enlisted. He left England at the end of October.

B.T.H MEN REPORTED KILLED.

Information has reached Rugby that Bombardier E Cox, of the Rugby Howitzer Battery, was killed by a shrapnel shell on Thursday week. Gunner Cox was formerly a charge hand in the Turbine Department at the B.T.H, and was well known and generally respected in the works. He came to Rugby six or seven years ago as a fitter. Major Nickalls, in a letter reporting Bomb Cox’s death, says : “ I and my officers, N.C.O’s, and men grieve for the loss of not only a grand man and a fearless soldier, but one who had endeared himself to us all by his splendid devotion to duty, his great ability, his untiring energy, and unfailing cheeriness. He set a great example to the Battery, and, speaking as his Battery Commander, I am deeply grateful to him for all his good work.”

Official news has been received at the B.T.H that Pte Bert Blake, of the Wiltshire Regt, who was reported to be missing on June 16th last, was killed in action on that date. Prior to the war Pte Blake was employed in the Purchasing Department of the B.T.H.

Mr and Mrs J Gurney, late of Catthorpe, now living at 67 Cambridge Street, Rugby, have received official intimation of the death of their son, Lance-Corpl John Thomas Gurney, Royal Warwickshire Regt, who had been reported missing since April 25, 1915. He was employed at the B.T.H before the war, and was called up on Reserve.

CALLING UP THE LAST MARRIED GROUPS.

The new proclamation, calling the remaining groups of married men to the colours was posted in Rugby yesterday (Friday). It refers to men in groups 42 to 46, and the commencing date of the call is June 13th. A further proclamation calls up men of group 24 as they attain the age of 19, and the same date applies.

CONSCIENTIOUS OBJECTOR ARRESTED AND RELEASED.

A peculiar situation arose out of the arrest of a conscientious objector named Horace Kingston, gardener, of Hillmorton, who failed to answer a summons to join the Colours on Monday. He was brought before a magistrate (A S Donkin, Esq), and admitted that he was an absentee under the Military Service Act, but added that he was a Christadelphian and a conscientious objector. He would refuse to obey any orders from the Military authorities.-Mr Donkin: You know you are liable to be fined £25 ?—Defendant : Yes, but I can’t help that.-He was remanded to await an escort and fined £2, which was ordered to be deducted from his Army pay.-After the Magistrate had left the Court a sergeant from the recruiting station arrived, and asked for the man’s release, explaining that they had received instructions that he was not to be arrested.-The Assistant Clerk pointed out that the man had already been fined £2, which could not be altered.

THE LATE PERCY HEFFORD.-Mr and Mrs W F Wood have had erected in the cemetery a handsome memorial stone with a double grave kerb in memory of their son, Percy Hefford, second officer of the ill-fated Lusitania. Sunday was the first anniversary of the sinking of the vessel, and flowers were placed upon the grave space by relatives and friends. They included a tribute from the widow, now living in Philadelphia.

IN MEMORIAM.

BERRIDGE.—In loving Memory of my dear son, George Edward Berridge, Barby, who was killed in action somewhere in France, May 13th, 1915.
“ One year has passed, oh how we miss him.
Some may think the wound has healed ;
But they little know the pain and sorrow
Deep within our hearts concealed.”
—From his loving Mother and Brother.

KEEN.—In loving Memory of our dear son and brother, Arthur William, killed in action, May 9th, 1915.

PORTER.—In ever loving Memory of our dear son and brother George, who was killed in action on May 8th, 1915, at St Elei.
—Sadly missed by his loving Mother, Father, Brothers and Sister.

SLEATH.—In loving Memory of Trooper Sam Sleath, of the Leicestershire Yeomanry, who fell in action, May 13, 1915, at Ypres, aged 22 years.
“ He sleeps not in his native land,
But ‘neath some foreign skies ;
And far from those who loved him best,
In a hero’s grave he lies.”
-From his loving Mother, Father, Sister, and Brothers.

17th Jul 1915. More Reports from the Front

INTERESTING LETTER FROM A RUGBY TERRITORIAL.

Mr W F Wood, Market Place, last week received a very interesting letter from Pte W H Evans, “C” Company (formerly “E” Company), 1/7th Royal Warwickshire Regiment (son of Mr W Evans, tailor), from which we make the following extracts :—

I must write in sympathy with you in the loss of your stepson. But it must be a consolation to you knowing that he died doing his duty, the death of a true Englishman. He has set an example for all Rugby fellows to follow, more so the fellows out here who belonged to the Brigade and knew him so well. . . . We are now out of the trenches and have marched for four nights, so, of course, are a good way back from the firing line, and it is a real treat to be out of the sound of gun and rifle fire. We are now billeted in a village where the Germans have not been ; so everything is standing and the natives are living their simple life. So you see we are faring well. I often think of the times I had while in your Brigade, and one thing often comes across my mind. That is, while at Conway one year we had to sleep eight in a tent, and we grumbled. You had us in front of you, and talked to us, and said that perhaps some day we should be glad to sleep twelve in a tent. Your words have come true, for we have slept in some “rum places” since we have been out here—cow sheds where the cows have been a few hours before, loft with rats for company, and lots of funny places, but we must not grumble, for it has got to be done, and the sooner this lot is over the better.-The writer then refers in sympathetic terms to the death of Corpl Johnson, which we recorded at the time, and says that he often used to talk with him at the front of the old days with the Brigade. He adds : “ It was a blow to me, for he was my best chum.”—In conclusion, he expresses the hope that the Brigade is up to strength, and wishes it the best of success.

Both Pte Evans and Corpl Johnson were old members together of the Boys’ Brigade, the former being the bass drummer and the latter a side drummer. They both won the Recruits’ Cup for shooting the first year they were in the Territorials.

AN “OPEN LETTER” TO THE CITIZENS OF RUGBY.

FROM MEMBERS OF THE 1ST BORDER REGIMENT.

SIR,-We have read with interest the “ open letter ” published in the Advertiser of last month, and we are sure that the feelings expressed therein are reciprocated by the whole of the 87th Brigade, especially the Border Regiment. It will interest the good people of Rugby to know that those of their late guests who remain of the 87th Brigade are faring pretty well, under the circumstances, thanks to the rotten marksmanship of the Turkish artillery, the shells of which the boys have christened “ Wandering Willies ” and “ Algys.” With regards to the “ Wandering Willies,” they got their name on account of the wandering habits of the gun they are fired from, which after every shot wanders across the peninsula to another position. As regards the “ Algys,” their christening is due to the fact that they are too gentle to hurt. We are of opinion that the gun which fires the “ Algys” is manned by a blind gun crew !

The boys would like to know if there are any vacancies in the B.T.H harriers, as we can recommend the Turks as very good runners—when they see us fixing our bayonets.

The majority of our Brigade have been wounded, but have left the various hospitals and gone back to the peninsula. You will have learnt that our list of killed is rather heavy, but we have the consolation of knowing that the Turkish list is far heavier than ours.

Wishing every prosperity to the citizens of the town that so hospitably entertained us, we conclude with best wishes to all our late landladies from the boys of the 1st Border Regiment.—Sir, believe us to be, Yours, etc,

9973 Pte William E Groom,
8213 Pte W A Little.
9794 Pte S George.
8387 Pte G Weller.
5701 Pte T Grunder.

“DEAR OLD RUGBY.”

APPRECIATION FROM SERGT MILLS, OF INNISKILLING FUSILIERS.

Sergt E A Mills, 1st Batt Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, writing from Graylingwell War Hospital, Chichester, Sussex, states :—“ After the delightful time we spent in dear old Rugby, we have undergone some trying experiences, which you have read about in Sir Ian Hamilton’s dispatch, and I am sure the people of Rugby feel proud to know of the splendid exploits of the soldiers of the 87th Brigade, who formed a part of the renowned 29th Division. During all those trying experiences all you could hear was ” Roll on, Rugby,” but alas ! many of those splendid fellows will never see that picturesque town again, but those of us who are left will have the consolation of knowing that the people of Rugby will always have our fallen comrades in their minds. I consider myself very fortunate in arriving back in dear old England again, although a Turkish sniper only missed my “Cupid’s dartboard” by half-an-inch, and I am hoping to pay a visit to your town before I go out again to do a little more for King and country and the world’s peace. I must take this opportunity of thanking those ladies who inserted that splendid letter to the soldiers, which I happened to read in your paper, which I receive from my respected friends in Oxford Street. I must conclude now, by wishing every success to all the residents of “Dear old Rugby.”—I remain, respectfully yours, SERGT. MILLS, of the “ Skins.”

 

HILLMORTON SOLDIER’S NARROW ESCAPE.

VALISE BLOWN AWAY.

Machine-Gunner R S Bartlett, of the 5th Battalion Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, son of Mrs T Smith, of School Street, Hillmorton, has sent home a souvenir of the war, his valise, or what remains of it, for whilst entering the trenches, it was blown off his back by the explosion of a shell, which killed four comrades and wounded two others badly. Gunner Bartlett must have had a very narrow escape, judging by the torn and threadbare appearance of the remnants of the “ rucksack,” as he calls it, which we have had an opportunity of inspecting. It seems almost incredible, from the appearance of the valise, that the wearer should have escaped, yet in letter to his mother, he is able to record that he got off “ without a scratch.” It is not surprising that he adds, “It gave me a ‘oncer’ at the time, and I thought my back had gone.” Home cured ham was in the valise, “ but better that than me,” observes the soldier, “ and I am still in the pink.”

In a letter to a brother, Pte Bartlett gives additional particulars. He says:-“ When we were coming to the trenches on Saturday night they sent a tidy lot of ‘souvenirs,’ I can tell you, and blew my large coat, canteen of sugar and tea, some home-cured ham, cake, and all the sweets ; two bars of carbolic soap and writing-case, water-proof sheet and two sandbags, also a loaf ; and it left just the back of the rucksack on. I went to look for some of it after, but all I could find was an envelope on the parapet. I wondered what hit me for a minute, and I thought my back had gone. Toby Bates got his rucksack cut a bit in front of me. I asked him how he was and he said “ all right.” We started to laugh till we turned to look at the back of us and that did it. We had to pull Ayres out. . . . Billy Chamberlain got wounded coming up, and he was reported missing. . . . It’s the worse “ do ” we have had, but most of us are none the worse for it, and the other poor chaps have done their duty.”

LOCAL CASUALTIES OF THE WAR.

WELL-KNOWN RUGBY ATHLETE KILLED.

Members of the Rugby Hockey and Cricket Clubs in particular, and the residents of the town in general, will hear with regret that Second Lieut H G Rogers, of the 9th Somerset Light Infantry, has been killed at the Dardanelles. Second-Lieut Rogers, who received his commission in September last, had resided at Rugby for four or five years before the outbreak of the war, and was formerly employed on the staff of the B.T.H and latterly with Mr Ivan B Hart-Davies. He was a fine all-round athlete and especially excelled in hockey. He was a prominent member of the Rugby Club, and had also played for Warwickshire and the Midland Counties, and narrowly missed securing his inter-national cap. Second-Lieut Rogers was also an excellent cricketer, and did useful service for the premier local eleven. Of a most genial disposition, he was very popular with all with whom he came in contact, and his early death will be mourned by a large circle of friends. He was about 24 years of age.

Writing to a friend in Rugby from the Dardanelles, under date of June 21st, the late Second-Lieut Rogers said :—“ I landed a month ago and was attached to the Royal Dublin Fusiliers—a topping crowd, who did awfully well in the landing. Well, from the first we have not been out of shell-fire ; even landing they shell the beach, and it is perfectly beastly. Leman von Sanders must be told to stop it. Three other Somerset men came out with me, and, thank God, we are all here still, although we have lost since we landed about eight officers and 300 men—quite enough ! Still things are very merry and bright. We have only had two real scraps—one on the 4th, when we had to attack up a nullah, which was not pleasant, and then on top a couple of days in some perfectly rotten trenches, which held all right. Then lately we had five days in the trenches. I had a perfectly lovely bit, jetting out at right angles to our main line and with the Turks only about forty yards away on two flanks. The trench had only just been taken from the Turks, and was in an awful state, dead all along the bottom less than an inch down, and built into the sides all over the place. Well, we had a beastly time for three days and nights. I averaged three hours’ sleep per 24 hours, and then not consecutive hour’s all five days. Then, on the night of the third day, at 8.30 p.m, they attacked us in force on both sides, throwing any number of hand-bombs (awful things), and eventually, about 5.30 a.m, they got half the sap, but we drove them out again by 6.30, and still hold the trench. A wounded man, who gave himself up, said that 500 men had come up specially for the attack, and only three got back. I was ‘severely’ wounded. I was sitting on the parapet firing my revolver at the brutes ten yards away, when one of their bullets just took the skin off my first finger. I tell you I did not stay sitting there long ; it was lucky. We are just at the end of our rest and expect to go up to-night, so will have an exciting time again.”

SERGT. MARTIN, OF BILTON, REPORTED KILLED.

Sad news has been received by Mr and Mrs Martin, of 4 Addison Terrace, Bilton, concerning their son, Sergt D C Martin, of the 7th King’s Royal Rifles. The official communication is to the effect that he has been wounded in action, but the officers’ letters carry the tidings beyond this, and there seems no doubt from what is learnt from this and other sources, that the unfortunate soldier has been killed. Sergt Martin joined the forces on the outbreak of the war, and received quick promotion. At the time he enlisted he was employed at Messrs Willans & Robinson’s, and previously he worked for a number of years at the Rugby engine-sheds; first as a cleaner and subsequently as a fireman. He was popular and much liked amongst his associates, and being fond of football he assisted both the Village Club and the Elborow Old Boys. Amongst the latter he had several intimate friends, and joined the army with them. For a number of years Sergt Martin belonged to the Rugby Infantry Co, so he was not unfamiliar with military matters when he enlisted in the King’s Royal Rifles.

Major Geoffrey St Aubyn, in a letter to the parents, says: “I regret to inform you that Sergt Martin was killed in action on 1st of July, 1915. Please accept my sincerest sympathy in your great loss. Your son promised to be a really good soldier. He had been in my Company since he joined the army, and his promotion was very quick because I thought so well of him. Please allow me to convey to you the sympathy of his comrades in the Company, both officers and men.”

Another letter which was much appreciated by the parents, has been received from Lieut G H Gibson. It is dated July 10th, and it as follows : “ Dear Mr Martin,—Just a line to tell you as best I can, how sad and sorry I am to lose your son. He died a soldier’s death, and I should like you to know how highly we all thought of him. I knew him very well, and I feel a sense of great personal loss. You have my very deep sympathy. May God give you strength to help you through. We have one consolation, that he died doing his duty. Would that he could have been spared, but God willed otherwise.—With my sincere sympathy, Believe me, Yours sincerely, G H Gibson, Lieut.”

BILTON MAN KILLED IN ACTION.

Mr and Mrs Maddocks, of Bilton, have received news that their son, Pte Cyrus Underwood (aged 22), who enlisted in the 1st Royal Warwicks on December 4th, was killed in action on July 9th.

In a letter conveying the sad news to Mrs Maddocks, a chum of the late Pte Underwood says:—“ I can assure you he died without any pain, as he was shot through the forehead by a sniper. He lived about half-an-hour after, but never regained consciousness. You have my deepest sympathy. I have already missed him very much, not only me but a good many more in our company, as I don’t think he was disliked by anyone. He was killed in the early hours of Friday morning, July 9th, I was with him in a dug-out all day on Thursday, and we had some fun together. I can hardly realize his old cheery face has left us for ever.”

Lce-Corpl J Dark confirms the regrettable news, and says deceased was a bomb thrower, and it was while throwing bombs at the Germans that he was killed. He adds: “ Your son was respected by all his comrades and we deeply mourn the loss of him.”

For several years Pte Underwood was employed at Bilton Grange as a footman.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

J H Watts and Arthur Massey, both of Long Lawford, and Bertie Howard, of Dunsmore Stud Farm, have enlisted in the 3/7th Batt Royal Warwickshire Regiment, which is in training at Wedgnock, near Warwick.

F C E Rendall, B.A. has been appointed to a second-lieutenant in the 13th Service Battalion, Royal Warwickshire Regiment. He has been selected to attend a class of instruction at Fort Purbrook, Portsmouth, and Saturday, July 17th.

Leslie K Phillips, second son of Mr J Phillips, of St Aubyn, Hillmorton Road, Rugby, has received a commission as second-lieutenant in the Royal Marine Light Infantry (Portsmouth Division), stationed at Gosport. He was a pupil at “Oakfield” School, and is also an Old Rugbian. His elder brother, Eric S Phillips, is a second-lieutenant in the 8th Battalion of the Border Regiment.

Second-Lieutenant A K Bennett, son of Mr A Bennett, of Elmdon House, Rugby, who some months ago was detailed from the 9th Battalion Warwicks to the Divisional Cyclists Corps, sailed with his Division a fortnight ago to join the Mediterranean Force. In his letters home he refers to the splendid accommodation on the troopship, and the excellent health and spirits of all on board, notwithstanding the great heat they were experiencing during the voyage.

RUGBY SOLDIERS WOUNDED.

News has been received by Mrs C Batchelor, of 16 Pinder’s Lane, that her son, Pte A J Batchelor, who enlisted in the 5th Oxon and Bucks Light Infantry at the commencement of the war, was wounded in the hand on June 24th, and is now in the Cumberland Hospital at Carlisle, where he is doing well.

News has been received by Mrs W Sansome, of 5 Gas Street, that her son, Lance-Corpl Samuel George Barnett, of the 5th Oxon and Bucks Light Infantry, was wounded in the back in France on June 16th. He has now been discharged from hospital and admitted to a convalescent home.

RECRUITING AT RUGBY.

The following have been accepted at the Rugby Drill Hall during the past week :—E Hartopp and F Coleman, Leicester Regiment ; A W Ades and J Harvey, Royal Sussex Regiment ; G Holloway and F S C Pickering, R.W.R ; F Rogers, Army Service Corps ; F Bull, Worcester Regiment ; E F Mack, East Kents.

It has been decided to accept for enlistment in the Infantry not only men who are fit for service in the Field, but also those who are fit for garrison service abroad, or for home service only.

In future no man will be rejected provided he is free from organic disease and is fit for duty in garrisons at home or abroad.

Men enlisted “ Fit for home service only,” although enlisted for general service, who are at the moment only fit for garrison service, will not be taken for service in the Field unless they become fit.

In future men will be enlisted as follows :-

(a) Service in the Field at home or abroad.

(b) Garrison service at home or abroad.

(c) Home service only.

F F JOHNSTONE, Lieut-Col,

July 14, 1915.             Recruiting Officer.