6th Apr 1918. Women’s Work on the Land

WOMEN’S WORK ON THE LAND.

At the Empire, Rugby, on Tuesday and Wednesday afternoons, stirring appeals were made to women to volunteer for work on the land. As an introduction to brief addresses, a film was shown depicting the procession of Warwickshire land-workers at the Birmingham rally.

On Tuesday Mrs Neville, of Stratford-on-Avon, said the picture showed that a certain number of women had done what they all ought to have done—viz, to have come out from ease and comfort at home to work on the land, and thus take the place of men who had gone to fight for them. They must have more women to do this work. If they did not come forward, they were not worthy to be the mothers, wives, and sisters of those who fighting for them. She could not imagine during this critical period any man or woman, having good wages, and living at home in comfort, threatening to lay down tools in order to get more money or for some trivial cause. What was that compared with what those brave fellows at the front were doing for them ? Let them do their best for those heroes, and if they could not put in full time work, let them join a part-time gang, who could do a great deal. In Stratford about twenty of them put in three or four thousand hours on the land during a year by giving up their afternoons ; whilst others in business gave up their half-holidays and did good work. Did they think they had at this critical period any right to spare time for holidays ? To older people, like herself, she appealed to them to put enthusiasm to make up any loss in years.

The speaker on Wednesday was Miss Peers, travelling inspector to the Board of Agriculture. At the present time she said the Women’s Land Army consisted of between 7,000 and 8,000 whole-time workers ; but the need of the country was so great that they wanted another 30,000. Could the women of Rugby find any recruits for this army ? They knew how splendidly their Army was doing its duty at the Front, and they wanted another splendid army behind. They wanted the women of England to fight in the British fields. Women of 18 years and upwards who were not doing national work should come and fight for their country, if only for six months, although they would rather that they came for a year. They must fight in the English fields to keep off starvation, to feed the men at the Front and the little children, and to take the place of the men who had made the great sacrifice for their country. They should remember Kitchener’s Army and how the men came forward. They did not ask what the wage was ; they came to fight for their country, and chucked up their jobs, saving : “ Here I am ; I am ready.” They now wanted the women of England to do the same. It they were not doing anything particular in the national interest or for their country they should think twice before they refused to fight for England (applause).

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR.
SCHOOLBOYS AND HARVEST.
To the Editor of the Advertiser.

SIR.—I understand the Warwickshire County Council are desirous of making it as easy as possible for farmers to employ school children in the hay, corn and potato harvest, and with that object the Education Committee have asked the managers of all the schools in the county to fix the summer holidays at a period which will best suit the farmers in the locality of each school.

In writing to suggest to farmers that they should at once see the managers of their local schools, and let them know the date which will best suit their own interests, and therefore the interests of the country, to have the schools closed, so that the boys can help with the harvest. The holidays may be arranged to be taken at one time, or to be divided, as best suits the harvest operations.

I urge that farmers should take action in this matter without delay, as some time will be necessary to make suitable arrangements.—Yours faithfully,

R LEAN,
Secretary, Warwickshire Farmers’ Union.
27 Bridge Street, Stratford-on-Avon.

 

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Colonel H H Mulliner has this week returned from France.

We regret that news has come through that Capt G Gray, 1/5 Lancashire Fusiliers, is reported missing as from March 26th.

Sergt A T Barnett, 1 Temple Street, Rugby, was wounded in France on March 21st. Before joining up he worked as a painter for Messrs Linnell & Son for 15 years.

Lieut C K Steinberg, M.C, of the Machine Gun Corps who was before the war was a member of the B.T.H office staff, was killed in action on March 22nd.

Pte Fred Summers, 2/7 R.W.R, has been killed in the recent fighting. He had spent practically all his life at Clifton, and was formerly employed by Mr M R Trower, and afterwards by Mrs Twells, as a groom-gardener. He was 31 years of age, married, a Sunday School teacher, and member of the choir.

Sergt J Sacree, Rifle Brigade, who was taken prisoner of war a few weeks ago, writes to a friend in Rugby that now his food parcels are arriving from England he is able to have fairly decent meals, and is just beginning to feel himself again. His many friends in Rugby will be glad to know he has nearly recovered from his wounds.

The following New Bilton men have been wounded : Pte Oswald Sydney Houghton, Welsh Regt, son of Mr C Houghton, 6 Bridle Road, mustard gas and pneumonia ; Pte Stanley Williams, R Berks Regt. son of Mr J H Williams, 64 Pinfold Street, groin (severe) ; and Pte W T Kettle, Somerset Light Infantry, machine gun bullet in left leg.

An official telegram has been received by Mrs Pengelly, who resides in Leamington, that her husband, Captain E A Pengelly, M.C, 213th Army Troops Company, has died of gun shot wounds sustained in the recent severe fighting in France. Deceased had previously been a non-commissioned officer in the Warwickshire Yeomanry. He was several times mentioned in despatches, and short time ago was awarded the Military Cross. He was the eldest son of Mr W E Pengelly was extremely popular with his men, and held in high esteem by his superiors, and his speedy advancement was assured.

RUGBY POSTAL OFFICIALS HONOURED.

Major H Neeves, D.S.O, M.C, son of Mr S Neeves, 13 Murray Road, has been promoted Lieutenant-Colonel in the Northumberland Fusiliers.

Another employee at Rugby Post Office, Second-Lieut T H Healey, signalling officer of the 19th Royal Welsh Fusiliers, has been awarded the Military Cross.

Captain Eric Rose, only son of the former Vicar of Norton, Daventry, and grandson of Lieut-Col Rose, of Northampton, has been killed in action.

SECOND-LIEUT EDDIE WILSON KILLED.

Mrs E Wilson, 41 Bridget Street, has received information that her youngest son, 2nd Lieut Edwin Thomas (Eddie) Wilson, Royal Warwickshire Regt, was killed in action during the heavy fighting on March 23. He was 23 years of age, and when he enlisted in the Hussars at the commencement of the war was an apprentice at the B.T.H. In 1915 he was given a commission, and shortly afterwards proceeded to the front. He was invalided home, suffering from trench fever, but returned to France early in 1918. Of a bright and cheerful disposition, he was a prime favourite with all who knew him. He was an old St Oswald’s boy and a member of St Oswald’s Tennis Club. Five of his brothers are still serving with the colours.

DUNCHURCH.

MR & MRS H PEARCE, Coventry Road, have received official news that their son, Sergt B Pearce, of the 10th Bedford Regiment, who was posted as missing on July 12th, is now reported killed on that date. This makes the third son they have lost in the War.

THE inhabitants of Dunchurch very much regret to hear of so many Dunchurch young men who are at the War being wounded. Among them are Pte W Collins, Pte T Shaw (seriously), Pte A Amos, Pte G Elkington, and Pte J Cleaver (who has his leg broken).

LONG ITCHINGTON.

WOUNDED.— Mrs Frank Lane has received news that her youngest son, Pte Herbert W Lane (R.W), is in a base hospital suffering from a badly fractured leg. Her second son, Lance-Corpl Sidney Lane (K.R.R), whose leg was amputated after a severe wound last November, is now in Leyton College Hospital.

FATAL AVIATION ACCIDENT AT RUGBY.
LOW FLYING OVER THE TOWN.

The inquest on Lieut H N Van Duzer, a Canadian attached to the Royal Flying Corps, who, as reported last week, died at, the Brookfield, Nursing Home at the result of a flying accident, was held at Rugby by Mr E F Hadow on Thursday in last week.—Mr [ ] Patchett was foreman of the jury.

Surgeon-Major Chester Collins deposed that deceased had been attached to the Royal Flying Corps for instruction about six weeks, and he was a very promising pupil. On Sunday afternoon he was called to a field off the Lower Hillmorton Road, where he saw deceased, who had received first aid from Dr Crookes and two other men. Deceased was quite unconscious and his breathing was heavy, showing that his brain was injured. At the Nursing Home afterwards he found the young officer had sustained a fracture of the skull, a compound fracture of the left leg, and a fracture of the left wrist. For twenty-four hours he appeared to do well, but early on Tuesday morning more serious symptoms suddenly developed, and he died within three hours. Death was due to meningitis caused by septic poisoning. The fracture of the skull was at the most vital part. He believed that these injuries were caused through the pilot being thrown against the bar or some other portion of the machine. Dr Collins explained how the accident was possible, and he recommended the use of a padded shield as some protection for this part of the head.

2nd Air Mechanic Pickering and 2nd Air Mechanic Leach, deposed that the engine and rigging of the machine were in good order before the deceased officer started on his flight, and this was confirmed by 2nd Lieut Francis Kenneth Laver, who had flown in the machine earlier in the afternoon.

Lieut Smallman deposed that he examined the machine shortly after the accident, but could find nothing to explain how the accident occurred. Deceased was seen spinning to the ground, and it was possible that he might have turned giddy ; but he was a strong young fellow, and he did not think this was probable. If this evolution was practised below a certain height it would be impossible for him to recover himself.

Dolf Farn, mechanic, deposed that he watched the deceased officer flying over the Eastlands Estate. He had been flying very low, but had commenced to climb. When he was about 1,000 feet up he commenced a spiral dive, and when he had come down about 500 feet the machine turned over. Deceased seemed to be trying to right himself, and had he had another dozen feet witness believed he would have done so, because by the time it cleared the hedge the machine was right side up.—By Captain King : Deceased did about six spins before reaching the ground.

In reply to the Coroner, Captain King, the Commanding Officer, said this evidence did not explain the accident, except that it suggested that deceased might have been spinning too low down and misjudged the height.—The Coroner expressed the opinion that the suggestion of Surgeon-Major Collins was a valuable one, and although he thought the jury could not include it in their verdict, Captain King and other commanding officers might take note of it.—Captain King expressed the opinion that a pad would obstruct the pilot’s view with the present goggles. He had had a pad placed on the machines.— The jury returned a verdict of “ Accidental death,” and associated themselves with the Coroner’s remarks concerning the pad. The Foreman also inquired of the Commanding Officer whether it was necessary for the pilots to fly so low over the town.—Captain King replied that it was not. Since he had heard of the practice he had issued instructions that it must be discontinued.—It was stated by jurymen that messages had been dropped to people in the town, and complaints had been made as to the low flying, which many people considered to be very dangerous.

COVENTRY APPEALS TRIBUNAL.

Held on Wednesday evening in last week. Present : Messrs H W Wale (chairman), P G Loveitt, W Johnson, jun. and S Dicksee. Col Moore was the National Service representative.

The Military appealed against the exemption till June 1st granted to Thomas White (single, 18, Grade I), blacksmith, employed by his father at Dunchurch.—It was contended that it was essential, if the business was to be maintained, that a strong young man should be employed. Two other sons were now serving, and a third had been killed.—Mr J E Cox, the agricultural representative, spoke as to the importance of the work— from an agricultural standpoint—which Mr White was doing ; but Col Moore expressed the opinion that a man of respondent’s age and fitness should be in the Army.— Adjourned for the War Agricultural Committee and the National Service Department to try to substitute the man.

Mr H Eaden represented Howard Harold Allkins, greengrocer and small-holder (39), Wolston, who exemption was appealed against.—Col Moore said this case was brought to relieve the National Service Department of a responsibility. They had promised the Miners’ Unions to comb out all post-war miners, but he supposed the man was as useful employed there as anywhere.—Mr Eaden said that Allkins was exempted to take up work of national importance. He went into the Binley Pit so that he could carry on his market garden after working hours.—The Chairman said the Tribunal were unanimously of opinion that the man could not be left in the mines and the case was adjourned for a month to see if he could be used to substitute the man in the previous case.

Harry Wallis (39, C2), boot maker and repairer, 117 Grosvenor Road, Rugby, who was represented by Mr H W Worthington, asked for a renewal of his exemption and, on the suggestion of Col Moore, he was given till July 1st.

George Francis Harris, licensed victualler, Newbold (C3, 41), asked for a variation of an order whereby he had been exempted upon working 30 hours a week in agriculture. He explained that it was very difficult for him to get agricultural work, and he asked for a full time munition order.—This was agreed to.

Mr H Eadon represented John Edward Pateman (C3), farmer, Monks Kirby, and said his client had been ordered to work 30 hours a week in agriculture, but his physical condition was such that this was impossible The man occupied 50 acres of land, and was feeding 30 beast and two milch cows.—Adjourned for the agricultural representative to inspect the farm. Col Moore stating that if the report was not an adverse one he had no objection to exemption.

RUGBY & DISTRICT FOOD CONTROL COMMITTEE AND MILK PRICES.

The rationing section of Rugby and District Food Committee, having conferred with representatives of the Retailer Dairymen’s Association on the question of the future price of milk, the Food Committee has accepted their recommendation that the April price shall be 2s 4d per gallon, and for May, June, July, August and September 1s 8d a gallon. There is also a proviso that if the retailers produce evidence that the price fixed for after April is unreasonable that price may be re-considered.—The Chairman of the Food Committee (Mr T A Wise) explained that the retailers brought no figures with them, and they thought that if they produce books they could satisfy the committee that they were not getting enough. It would, however, require very strong figures to convince the committee.—Mr W A Stevenson asked if it was not peculiar that the winter price of 2s 4d continue through April, and that there should then be the big drop of 2d a quart.—Mr T Ewart thought it quite consistent. April was as expensive a month to produce milk as any in the year. In May there was all the difference.—Mr G Cooke submitted that milk ought to be cheaper at Rugby in view of railway freightage being avoided.—The Chairman remarked that the producers’ price fixed by the Government was 1s 8d in April and 1s for May.—Mr J Cripps thought the retailers would be well off in May, June, and July with 8d a gallon for retailing.—The Chairman said he thought it a very fair bargain, and that there was not to much to complain of.—Mr A Appleby remarked that when it was admitted that on the figures the retailer was making a fairly large profit, his winter expenses had been exceptionally heavy.

Mr Cooke pointed out that on pre-war prices, if the retailer made 4d on a gallon it was reckoned he was making a very fair profit. They proposed now to give him 100 per cent. advance. The consuming element were only averaging 50 per cent. increase in wages, and some of them not that. There should be the same amount of sacrifice all round whilst we were at war, but the degree of sacrifice was not equal. He regarded 6d a quart for April as affording a very fair margin of profit, and he proposed as an amendment that that should be the price fixed.—Mr C Gay seconded.—Mr Cripps said that 4d a gallon margin would be too low.—Mr H Tarbox : You have to remember that they will get 8d next month.—Mr Ewart thought 100 per cent. Advance quite reasonable. He estimated that the cost of retailing had gone up 100 per cent.—Three votes were recorded for the amendment and 10 against.—The committee’s report was then adopted.

DEATHS.

BOTTERILL.—On March 18th, at Arras, Pte. A. W. BOTTERILL, 2nd Batt. Coldstream Guards, the very dearly beloved husband of Alice Botterill, also second beloved son of Henry and Mary Botterill.—“ O for the touch of a vanished hand and the sound of a dear voice that is still.”—Heart-broken wife, Alice Botterill.

WILSON.— Second-Lieut. E. T. WILSON, 10th Batt. R.W.R., son of the late Mr. Ellis Wilson and Mrs. Wilson, 41 Bridget Street, Rugby ; killed in action March 23, 1918.

IN MEMORIAM.

ASHWORTH.—In memory of Sergt. ASHWORTH, killed in action on April 9, 1917. B.E.F.
“ One sigh perchance for work unfinished here ;
Then a swift passing to a mightier sphere.”
—From All at Home.

COLLEDGE.—In affectionate remembrance of our dear son and brother, WALTER EDWARD COLLEDGE, who was killed at the Vimy Ridge on April 9, 1917, in France.
“ Somewhere in France there is a nameless grave,
Where sleeps our loved one among the brave ;
One of the rank and file, he heard the call,
And for the land he loved gave his all.”
—From his sorrowing Mother, Father, Sisters and Brothers.

Advertisements

1st Sep 1917. French Honour English Lady

FRENCH HONOUR ENGLISH LADY.—On Friday afternoon last week, M. Painleve, the French Minister of War, presented the Cross of the Legion of Honour to Dr Frances Ivens (formerly Harborough Parva), who has had charge of the Scottish Women’s Hospital at the Abbaye de Royaumont for nearly three years. Miss Ivens is also associated with Lady Michelham in the charge of the Michelham Foundation Hospital, Hotel Astoria, Paris, which M. Painleve attended to make the presentation.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Rifleman G Lorriman, of the Rifle Brigade, son of Mr J Lorriman, of 40 Essex Street, Rugby, was wounded in the head on August 19th. This is the second time he has been wounded, the previous occasion being on September, 1916, at Guillemont.

The friends of Sert-Major Hopewell, of the Rugby Howitzer Battery, will be pleased to hear that he has received the D.C.M. Sergt-Major Hopewell has been in the Battery since its formation and went out with it to France three years last March. During the time he has been there the Battery has taken part in a lot of fighting, and recently it has been very severe.

Mr J C Cowley, of Brackley (formerly of Kilsby), Northamptonshire, received on Saturday last a card dated July 15th (written with his left hand), from his son, Second-Lieut R L Cowley. Northampton Regt, who has been missing since the battle of “ The Dunes,” on July 10th. He is in a German hospital wounded in the right arm, and is going on nicely.

Lance-Corpl F H Hadfield, K.R.R, of 4 Charlotte Street, and Pte H A J Barnett, R W.R., of 174 Murray Road, have written home stating that they are prisoners of war in Germany. The news of Pte Barnett’s capture has only just reached his parents although he was taken prisoner on April 28th. Lance-Corpl Hadfield, who was formerly employed by Mr W Flint, wine merchant, was reported as missing five weeks ago.

OLD MURRAYIAN KILLED.

Mr W T Coles Hodges, of the Murray School, has received information that Rifleman Leslie J Ensor, son Mr J C Ensor, Nottingham, formerly of Rugby, was killed in action on July 10th. Rifleman Ensor, who was 21 years age, enlisted in the King’s Royal Rifles with his brother Claude in September, 1914, and they were drafted to France in July, 1915. For eight months they were in the trenches near Ypres. They were in the second battle of Ypres, and were in reserve at the battle Loos. They were engaged in various “ scraps,” the battle of Arras, and also in a good deal of sanguinary fighting on the Somme, their Battalion being specially commended for the capture of Guillemont. In this battle Claude Ensor was severely wounded, and his brother was also slightly wounded twice, the first time near Trones Wood. He was also buried and slightly wounded near Combles, and after spending four months in England returned France in January last. He was at first sent to St Quinten, and was afterwards moved up to the coast, where he fought his last fight with the K.R.R.s and Northamptons at Lombartzyde. Rifleman Leslie Ensor was battalion bomber, and held the instructor’s certificate for Stoke’s Trench Mortars. His brother Claude has now recovered from his wounds but at present has only the partial use of the left arm. He was recently offered a commission, but declined it, as he preferred to go to Hythe for a course of musketry. He was successful in gaining the first-class certificate and was promoted Sergeant-Instructor in musketry. Both lads stood 6ft 2in and weighed 13 stones, and their fine, manly characters made them popular with all who knew them.

FLECKNOE.

ROLL OF HONOUR.—Another Flecknoe young man, Frederick Cox, lost his life through shell-shock on the 16th of August, in France. In a letter received by the young man’s sister, Miss E Cox, the Colonel of his Regiment—a Battalion of the Royal Warwicks—states that he will be sadly missed by the officers and men. The young man was 24 years of age, and had been in France about 12 months. Before joining the army he was in the employ of Mr Thompson, farmer, of Wolfhampcote Hall, and bore an excellent character.

WOLSTON.

PRIVATE READER MISSING.—Mrs Reader has received news both from the War Office and the Adjutant of his Company, that Private Gerald Reader, her husband, is missing. Before joining the army he was manager for Mr Udal at Wolston. He was one of a body of men who made a successful raid upon the enemy. He joined the 4th Royal Warwicks, but was afterwards transferred to the Welsh Fusiliers. Much sympathy is felt in the district for Mrs Reader, who has four children, several of whom are very delicate. The day on which he was missing was the 12th anniversary of his wedding day.

ROLL OF HONOUR : MESSRS BLUEMEL’S WORKS LIST.—The above firm has given another proof of its sincere regard for men who have left their works to uphold the honour of their country. Through the instrumentality of Mr W R Glare, the genial works’ manager, who has continually had before him the welfare of not only the men but their dependants, two beautiful and expensive designs have been purchased. These have been mounted and placed in oak frames. The two rolls contain the names of 104 men from the works who have entered the Navy or Army. The records show that 16 have been killed, 27 wounded, two died from the effects of the war, three missing, whilst one is a prisoner of war and one is suffering from shell-shock. All the names have been beautifully inscribed on the two lists, and these are surrounded by artistic illuminations. Although they are not yet placed in a permanent position, a number of residents have viewed them and greatly admired their appearance. It is hoped by several who have had this privilege that it will be an incentive to the surrounding parishes to provide similar rolls of honour. There still remains plenty of space for the names of others who may yet join the forces.

BRANDON.

WOUNDED.—Mrs Blackman has received news that her husband has been wounded in the head, shoulder, and right hand. He has been out at the front for nearly nine months. He belongs to the Hertfordshire Regiment, and is well known at Brandon, having been in the employ of Colonel R J Beech a few years ago. Although very deaf from the result of his wound, he is progressing favourably.

STRETTON-ON-DUNSMORE.

MUCH sympathy is felt for Mr and Mrs T Nicholas, Lime Kiln Farm, who have received news that their third son, Stewart, who was wounded and missing on September 29th, 1916, is now reported to have been killed on that date.

ACCEPTANCE OF LETTER BY THE POST OFFICE FOR URGENT CENSORSHIP.—The sender of a specially urgent letter for Portugal, Russia, the United States of America, or any neutral country in Europe or America, may secure its specially expeditious treatment by the Post Office and by the Military Censors, by posting it at the counter the Rugby Office, with a special fee of half-a-crown in stamps in addition to the full ordinary postage. No responsibility is taken for delay, but in general letters posted under the special conditions will be despatched appreciably sooner than those posted in the ordinary way.

SERIOUS HARVEST OUTLOOK.

The harvest prospects, which month ago were of a hopeful character all round, have gradually become less and less satisfactory owing to unfavourable weather conditions, and this week the situation has assumed a more serious aspect, in consequence of the exceptionally severe storms for the time of year. Reports from all parts of the country indicate that very boisterous, stormy weather became general in the course of Monday evening and night, the wind rising to the strength of a gale, accompanied by violent squalls in many districts—apparently the most widespread gale experienced for a long time past. In the Rugby district rain fell with little intermission from Sunday evening till Wednesday midday, and there were heavy downfalls on Thursday.

NO SUGAR FOR MARROW JAM.—The Ministry of Food has officially advised the Liverpool Corporation that vegetable marrows are not fruit within the meaning of the Sugar Domestic Preserving Order (1917) and people are not entitled to use sugar for making jam from marrows.

DEATHS.

GILLINGS.—In loving remembrance of Rifleman WALTER GILLINGS, R.B., of Dunchurch, who died of wounds received in action August 18th, 1917.—Though lost to sight, to memory ever dear.—From Annie.—Rest nobly won.

HOLLAND.—Fred (2nd Lieut. Sherwood Foresters), son of Supt. W HOLLAND, Lutterworth, died of wounds at the Liverpool Merchants’ Hospital, Etaples, France, on August, 22nd, 1917, aged 22 years.

IN MEMORIAM

OLDS.—In fond memory of Pte. G. Olds, R.W.R, of Gaydon, killed in action in France, Aug. 30, 1916.
“ There are two things death cannot sever,
Love and remembrance live for ever.”
—An Old Friend.

OLDS.—In loving memory of Pte. G. OLDS, Gaydon, killed in action Aug. 30, 1916. Never forgotten by his Mother, Father, Brothers, and Sister.

MASON.— In dearest, proudest memory of my darling husband, Sergt. ARTHUR MASON, Oxon & Bucks, killed in action August 31st, 1916.—Until we meet.

WHITEMAN.—In glorious remembrance of Lance-Corpl. T. WHITEMAN, R.W.R., killed in action in France, September 3rd, 1916.—From his loving wife, Father, Sisters, and Brothers.

7th Oct 1916. Lieut-Colonel West Killed in Action

LIEUT-COLONEL WEST KILLED IN ACTION.

The news, which came to hand on Friday last week that Lieut.-Colonel F C B West, R.F.A, of Bawnmore, Bilton, had been killed in action was received with the deepest regret in Rugby and neighbourhood. The unfortunate event happened on September 29th. While riding, as he had often done before, down a section of road which was much subjected to the enemy’s artillery fire, a shell burst close to him, killing him instantly, and wounding his orderly, Driver Barlow, who had been with him since before Christmas, 1914. Both their horses were killed. Col West was buried in the cemetery in which the remains of Lieut Wyley, Major Brown, and Major Stone, who had been killed only a few days previously, were laid to rest.

When at Baddow, before going out to France, and also for some time afterwards, Col West, Capt Kidd—subsequently promoted Major—and Lieut Wyley were working together on the Head-Quarter Staff. Then they were separated, and it is a sad coincidence that all three of them were killed within a period of ten days in different parts of the line.

Lieut.-Colonel West was the only surviving son of the late Rev C F C West, Fellow of St John’s College, Oxford, and Vicar of Charlbury. He was educated at Cheltenham College & St John’s College, Oxford, where he rowed for his college in 1904 and 1905, both in Torpids and Eights. He took his degree in 1905, and was called to the Bar in 1907, but never practised. On the formation of the Territorial Force he received a commission in the R.F.A, and went to the front with his brigade as commanding officer in March, 1915. He married, in June, 1909. Agatha Mary, elder daughter of William Dewar, of Rugby. He leaves a widow and four daughters, to whom the deepest sympathy is extended.

Lieut-Col West took a very great interest in the Territorial movement, and always preferred to be regarded as a “ Territorial.” He did his utmost to prove that the term was synonomous with proficiency, and, being keen himself on gunnery, he spared no pains to ensure the effectiveness of the officers and men in his command and to explain technical details to them.

He was the first Captain of the Rugby Howitzer Battery, when it was formed some years ago through the instrumentality of Col Mulliner, and was afterwards promoted to Major and transferred to the Coventry Battery. In August, 1914, as Lieut-Colonel, he succeeded Col Mallock to the command of the Brigade.

Polo and hunting were his favourite sports and for a season he acted as master of a pack of hounds in the South of Ireland.

Col West was a member of the Lawrence Sherriff Lodge of Freemasons, and for a time served on the House and Finance Committee of the Hospital of St Cross. He took the greatest interest in the Working Men’s Club at Bilton (of which he was a vice-president), and generously assisted in the provision of the new Club premises a few years ago.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Captain Charles Edward Anderson (Gordon Highlanders), of Rokeby House, Rugby, who was killed in France on July 20th, has left estate of the value of £8,929, the whole of which he gave to his mother, Mrs. Anne Rose Anderson.

SECOND-LIEUT HORACE NEEVES PROMOTED.

Second-Lieut Horace Neeves, of the Northumberland Fusiliers (the Old Fighting 5th), son of Mr and Mrs S Neeves, of Murray Road, Rugby, has been promoted to the rank of captain. The gallant young officer was formerly in the Warwickshire Yeomanry, and took part in the landing at Suvla Bay. On returning home he received a commission with the Northumberland Fusiliers, has been at the front since June, and has seen a lot of fighting.
The second son of Mr and Mrs Neeves is serving with the Australian Light Horse.

INTERNATIONAL O.R KILLED BY A BURSTING SHELL.

The Rev R E Inglis (Rugby and Oxford), whose death occurred, at the age of 53, from shell-burst while tending wounded, was an old English Rugby International. After getting his XI and XV colours at Rugby, he played against Cambridge in 1883 and 1884. He played for England in all three matches of 1886. His club football was identified with that of Blackheath. Mr Inglis was the youngest son of the defender of Lucknow, Major-General Sir John Inglis, and we believe we are correct in stating that his son was the googlie bowler of this year’s Rugby XI. Mr Inglis volunteered to join the Forces as a chaplain, and went to the front in July, 1915. During the time he was at Rugby School as a Town boy, his mother, Lady Inglis, lived at The Lawn, Newbold Road.

LOCAL CASUALTIES.

Mr T Reynolds, builder, Dunchurch Road, Rugby, received official intimation on Thursday that another of his soldier sons, Corpl J Reynolds, of the Grenadier Guards, had been seriously wounded and was in Chichester Hospital. Prior to joining the army Corpl Reynolds was in the Metropolitan Police Force, and was expecting early promotion. Mr Reynolds had four sons in the army. Two have been killed and two wounded.

PTE J R BRADLEY.

Pte J R Bradley, of the Northumberland, Fusiliers, who was killed in action on September 1st, was prior to the War employed by the B.T.H Company on the outside construction staff.

PTE H LEE KILLED.

Mrs Lee, of 34 Sandown Road, Rugby, received a letter from Sergt Burton, of Hillmorton, this week, informing her that her son, Pte H Lee, of the R.W.R, was killed in action on September 3rd. The writer said he was in command of the platoon, and saw him struck by a piece of shell in the head, and he died in a very short time. He was a brave and noble soldier, and highly respected by all N.C.O’s and men of his Company, for he always did his duty well, “ and feared nothing.” Deceased was 25 years of age, and before, the war was employed as a labourer in the Test Department. He was in the reserve, and was mobilised at the commencement of the war. He had already been wounded. Mrs Lee has four other sons at the front, two of whom have been wounded, and a son-in-law was killed 12 months ago.

HILLMORTON.

MEMORIAL SERVICE.—On Sunday evening a memorial Service was held in the Parish Church for Reginald Bartlett and Joseph Barnett, who have fallen in France. The Vicar preached an impressive and comforting sermon from St John xiv 27.

Mr J W Barnett, 264 Western Road, Leicester, has received official information that her husband, Pte J W Barnett, Queen’s Royal West Surrey Regiment, was killed in action on September 11th. Deceased was the second son of Mr and Mrs J Barnett, Rossmount, Hillmorton Paddox. He was 27 years of age, was called up in February, and sent to France early in July. Prior to his enlistment he was employed by the Leicester Tramway Company.

CHURCHOVER.

KILLED IN ACTION.—Quite a gloom was cast over this village on Friday when it was known that Pte Frank Sutton, of the Grenadier Guards was killed in action on September 15th. Frank was liked and respected by all who knew him. He was working in Coton House gardens when he answered his country’s call. Mrs Sutton’s three sons have all joined the colours, and the deepest sympathy of the parish is extended to her in the great loss that she has sustained. A memorial service was held in the church an Saturday by. the Rev L J Berrington. All the parish was represented. The xe Psalm and Hymns 536 and 537 were sung, and the service was very impressive.

DUNCHURCH.

On Sunday, Sept 10, the collections at both Dunchurch and Thurlaston Churches were devoted to the Lord Kitchener National Memorial Fund. The satisfactory sum of £32 7s 6d was sent up to headquarters.

Sergt W J Constable, R.E, youngest son of Mr and Mrs John Constable, late of Dunchurch, has gained the Military Medal for bravery.—Private Fissard, of the R.E, who has been home on sick leave, has gone to Bletchley to a rest camp for three months.

The Dunchurch Girls’ and Infants’ School have sent £2 to St Dunstan’s Hostel for Blind Soldiers, £2 to the Jack Cornwell Ward in the Star and Garter Home, £1 to Bilton Red Cross Hospital, and 11s to Mrs Neilsen for egg fund. The money was the proceeds of the entertainment held in the spring, and also includes contributions by the children for the Jack Cornwell Memorial Fund during the month.

STRETTON-ON-DUNSMORE.

News has been received by Mr and Mrs J Nicholas, of Lime Kiln Farm, Stretton-on-Dunsmore, that their youngest son, Percy, was wounded in action at the Battle of Thievpal. He received shrapnel wounds in both arms and hands. He is going on well in hospital in Cambridge. This is the second son wounded in action.

WEARING NAVAL UNIFORM WITHOUT AUTHORITY.

Claude Henry Hammond, aged 21, formerly of New Bilton, and of Rugby, charged at Lancaster with giving false information to Morecambe boarding-house keepers and wearing a naval uniform at Morecambe without authority, was committed for six months. Accused stayed at three places in Morecambe, and registered in false names. He described himself as a graduate of Pembroke College, Cambridge, and gave the name of a relative at Nottingham. All the statements were false. He was a deserter, and was wanted at Sheffield and Blackpool for false pretences.

DEATHS.

BARNETT.—Killed in action, September 11th, 1916, Pte. J. W. BARNETT, 6399, Queen’s London Regiment, second son of Mr. & Mrs. J. Barnett, Rossmount, Hillmorton Paddox.
“ Oh ! just to clasp your hand once more,
Just to hear your voice again ;
Here life to us without you
Is nought but grief and pain.
Could we have raised your dying head,
Or heard your last farewell ;
The grief would not have been so hard
For us who loved you well.”
—From his sorrowing WIFE, FATHER, MOTHER, BROTHERS and SISTERS.

GREEN.—On September 7th, RFN. FREDERICK JOHN GREEN, King’s Royal Rifles, died of wounds in France, the dear son of Frederick and the late Louisa Greenfield Green, of 4 Gladstone Street, New Bilton, aged 25.—Sadly mourned by his Father, Brothers, Sisters, and Minnie.

WARD.—On September 3rd, Rifleman C. WARD, 10th Rifle Brigade, second son of Thomas and Mary Ward, of Brandon. Killed in action in France.
“ We often sit and think of him,
And tenderly breathe his name ;
Nothing left for us to look at
But his photo in the frame.
Some day our eyes shall see
That dear face still kept in memory.”

IN MEMORIAM.

FRANKTON.—In loving memory of Pte. Frederick Frankton, Grenadier Guards, of Lawford Road, Rugby, killed on 27th September, 1915, at Loos.
“ Could we have raised his dying head,
Or heard his last farewell ;
The grief would not have been so hard,
For us who loved him well.
A light is from the household gone,
The voice we loved is still’d.
A vacant place is in our home,
Which never can be filled.”
—From his loving Wife, Children, and Mr. and Mrs. Reynolds.

RUSSELL.—In loving memory of Gunner PERCY EDGAR RUSSELL, R.F.A., who was killed in action, October 3, 1915.—“ He gave his life that others may live.”— Never forgotten by FATHER, MOTHER, SISTERS and BROTHERS.

15th Apr 1916. The Tribunals at Work

THE TRIBUNALS AT WORK.

FURTHER INTERESTING CASES.

Compared with the previous sitting a fortnight earlier, there were fewer cases to be dealt with by the District Appeal Tribunal at the Benn Buildings on Friday evening last week ; but the Court lasted for two and a half hours, and some interesting points were raised. Mr M K Pridmore (Mayor of Coventry) presided, and there were also present : Messrs P G Loveitt, K Rotherham, and J Johnson, jun. Mr F Channing represented the Board of Agriculture, and Lieut Beard the Military Authorities.

A ROVING COMMISSION.

The case of James Henry Ivey, of the Mission Hall, Hillmorton, had been put back from the previous Court for applicant to be medically examined.—Having raised other points without avail, Mr Eaden, who represented applicant, passed on the claim on conscientious grounds, and applicant called his sister to prove that he had expressed views against war prior to Jan 1st, 1915.-The Chairman said they would want some other evidence, and Mr Watson was called. He said Applicant had expressed an opinion to him since he had an idea that he would be called up for military service (laughter).—Applicant said in the course of half an hour he could fetch two witnesses, and the case was put back to enable him to do this.

Later in the evening William George Loveday, Probation Officer, Rugby, said he had known applicant from his birth, and he had expressed to him his conscientious objection to warfare ten years ago and since.—Pressed by Lieut Beard for the exact words, Mr Loveday said applicant had told him that Jesus Christ came on purpose to save life, not to destroy it, and as His follower and disciple he had the same opinions as his Master.

Lieut Beard asked to have the other witness called, but the Chairman said they were satisfied. They thought Mr Loveday was a perfectly straight witness, and in the circumstances Mr Eaden objected to the calling of further evidence.

The Chairman : We offer you national service.-Applicant : I think I am doing better where I am.

The Chairman said people were nice and comfortable in their own places, and had conscientious objections, but were not prepared to make sacrifices. They would adjourn the case for a fortnight for applicant to get into some really national service. A committee had been appointed by the Government, and Mr Eaden would be given the Secretary’s address, and asked to communicate with him, the Chairman stating that if the Secretary to the National Committee said applicant’s present employment was satisfactory, that would satisfy the Tribunal.

DUNCHURCH SHEPHERD WITH A MOTOR BICYCLE.

Arthur Russell, Mill Street Farm, Dunchurch appealed for an exemption for George Clifford Dumblebee, described as a shepherd and stockman.-The Local Tribunal found the case unsatisfactory, being of opinion it was a case of a farm pupil staying on as farm labourer to avoid military service.

Mr Harold Eaden represented appellant, who said he was first educated at the National School at Eastbourne, and then at Eaton House School, Hull. Previous to coming to Mr A Russell in July, 1915, as stockman and shepherd at £1 a week, he was employed by Mr T Russell, of Anstey. Four years ago a premium of £50 a year was paid to Mr Russell’s father in respect of applicant.-Q : It has been suggested that you spend your time shooting.-No ; I do not.-The Chairman : Have you ever used a gun ?-A : Yes.-Q : What for ?-A : I have to go into the ploughed fields and “ tent ” the crows with it.-He added that it was Mr Russell’s gun, and the shooting was preserved by Mr Blyth of Cawston House.-Mr Eaden : The whole of your shooting consists of scaring the crows ?-A : That is so.-The Chairman : Have you ever shot at rabbits ? -A : I have shot a rabbit in my life.-By Lieut Board : He had a motor-bicycle given him by his mother on his birthday.-Q : Do you ride on it for pleasure ?-A : Not much.-Applicant said when he rode the bicycle for business Mr Russell paid for the petrol.-The Chairman : Who pays the tax on the motorcycle ?-A : I do.-By Lieut Beard : He had a driving license and paid for it himself, but he had never had a side-car.-Lieut Beard : Have you not been out on “ joy rides ” with girls on your motorcycle ? –A : No-Mr. Eadon : That is wide of the mark, I suggest – Lieut Beard : It is very near the mark. (To appellant): Do you think it consistent with your occupation that you should be going out riding a motor-cycle ? -A : I had it given me.-Q : Do you know of any other cowman and stockman who rides a motor-bicycle ?-A : I don’t know very many.-Mr Russell said he knew a postman who rode a motor-bicycle.

Further questioned, applicant said he left school at 16, and was now 21. He went to Mr Russell, sen, as a pupil to learn farming.-Lieut Beard : With what object ?-A : To get to know how to do the job properly.-Lieut Beard : Yes, and then to get a farm of your own ?-Applicant : If I could scratch together enough money.

The Chairman said they were not satisfied the man was indispensable on the farm and that it was in the national interest he should continue there. The appeal would be dismissed.

Lieut Beard said it had been reported that Mr Russell had used some threats to a member of the Local Tribunal, and perhaps the Chairman would say something to him about it.-Mr Russell said he had used no threats whatever.-Mr Eaden said this was not a matter for the Tribunal. There was a proper place to deal with any threats said to have been used.

The Chairman said they did not think Mr Russell was justified in bringing the case before them. Mr Russell : Well, gentlemen, I do think this-

The Chairman : It does not matter what you think. The case is finished.

MUNITION VOLUNTEER WITH A CONSCIENTIOUS OBJECTION.

Although a munition volunteer, Thos Wm Pillerton, 7 Bridget Street, New Bilton, described as a coremaker and engineering inspector, claimed to have a conscientious objection to military service. He said he recognized that the State had a right to service from every individual, and for that reason he was working on munitions.-This case had been adjourned for applicant to apply for his discharge.-Applicant said when he applied his discharge was at first refused, but he was now under a week’s notice.-Fredk Wm Shaw, assistant works manager at Messrs Willans & Robinson’s, said from the report in the local paper it appeared that appellant misled the Tribunal. He had been shown as a skilled inspector of munition work. His “ skill ” amounted to a total service of seven months, and the period covered at the works as an inspector had been from January 18th to that date. Prior to that he was engaged by them in 1911 as a labourer. He was ultimately put to core making, and stayed with them 3½ years. During that time he left for one-short period, but came back when the war broke out, leaving again ostensibly to join the army.

The Chairman (to applicant) : Do you agree you left ostensibly to enlist ?—A : I did not go to enlist—Q : Did you state you were going to enlist ?-A : Certainly not.—Mr Shaw said at the time the man was in the foundry, and the foundry foreman or one of his assistants put his name on the foundry roll of honour. He added that this was not the official roll of the firm.-Appellant : That was simply done as a wager that I could not pass the doctor. The Chairman : Have you still got your conscientious objection ?-A : Yes, certainly.

The Chairman : A man who puts his conscience to a wager would sell his conscience ; and he is doing munition work too.

Applicant said the firm was simply biassed against him because he took part in a strike three years ago. They paid him £2 5s a week as an inspector, and he was a member of the Amalgamated Society of coremakers, who would not have him unless he was a skilled man.

The Chairman said they were quite satisfied there was no conscientious objection, and they would put applicant for combatant service.

The Military representatives appealed against a conditional exemption granted to Arthur William Mackaness, farmer, Cawston, on the ground that his father could supervise the farm.—Lieut Beard asked for an adjournment because he had not been properly instructed, but the Chairman said that was not the fault of the Tribunal, besides which it was a military appeal.—Lieut Beard said he was informed applicant was put in his present occupation with the intention of avoiding military service.—Applicant said he took the farm 12 months last January, prior to which he managed another farm.—Mr Channing contended that the man was indispensable, and, the Tribunal concurring, the appeal was dismissed.

F H Lawley, representing R B Wright, of Bilton Hall Farm, appealed for an exemption for his son, Ernest Chas Lawley, a wagoner on a farm of 140 acres, more than half of which was ploughed land.—Mr F M Burton said at the Local Tribunal Mr Wright said he did not think they would grant an exemption—it was the man’s mother who did not want him to go.—The Chairman told Lawley he was not the man aggrieved. If Mr Wright did not come there and let them know the facts himself, all they could do was to dismiss the appeal.

CONSCIENTIOUS OBJECTOR GIVEN COMBATANT SERVICE.

Thomas Barnett, clerk, 12 Arnold Street, Rugby who said he was a member of the community of the Son of God, and appealed on conscientious grounds, called Clifford Chas Beardsworth, 15 Arnold Street, Rugby, who had known him five years, and who said appellant had on several occasions stated to him that he could not take human life or render unconditional allegiance to any earthly monarch.—Although working at the B.T.H applicant said he was not doing munition work. His occupation was to check invoices, some of which dealt with shells.—The Chairman : Do you really mean to say your conscience will allow you to draw a salary in a controlled firm under the Government and won’t allow you to use those munitions under the control of the Government ? Why don’t you cut the terrible thing altogether and get into some other employment ?—Applicant : As far as making munitions is concerned and firing them, I cannot have anything to do with it.—The Chairman : But you do ! You are just as much assisting in killing them as if you were killing them.— A : I don’t see that —Lieut Beard asked that applicant should be given combatant service.—Applicant : If it is made a condition of exemption, I am willing to give in my notice to-morrow.—The Chairman : We are not satisfied that you have a genuine conscience, and we shall put you for combatant service. If you are assisting in making munitions, you are assisting in using them.

GETTING NEAR THE MILITARY BUSINESS.

Another salvationist, Alfred John Routley, a house painter, lodging at 2 Benn Cottages, North Street, who is a conscientious objector, had been recommended for non-combatant service, appealed because he objected to take part in warfare. All nations were his brothers, whether Germans or any other nationality, and he could not raise a hand to destroy them.—Learning that appellant belonged to the Salvation Army, the Chairman said : You got as near the military business as you could.—Chas Fredk Stowe, with whom appellant lived, said he had expressed views on the same lines since his conversion six years ago.—The Chairman asked applicant if he was willing to do any national service, as painters could be done without at the present time ? Was he willing to go as a farm labourer ?—Applicant : Then I should be releasing somebody to go to the war, I suppose.—The Chairman : You can go for non-combatant service. You are fed at the expense of the men fighting in the North Sea, and yet you won’t’ go and earn your bread on the land. One of these days you will get a conscience that will help you to earn your living.—Appeal dismissed.

 

Barnett, Samuel George. Died 25th Sep 1915

Samuel George Barnett’s birth was registered in September 1894 and his christening was on 7 September at St Andrew’s Church Rugby.

In 1901 he was living with his widowed mother Mary Ann Barnett and 4 siblings. Mary Ann had firstly been married to Henry Lee in September 1875 and they had had two children. Widowed, Mary Ann then married James Barnett, a Brick Layer’s Labourer, in December 1885. Mary Ann and James had three children, Samuel being the third. By 1901 Mary Ann was again widowed and married Walter J Sansom and they had one son.

In the 1901 and 1911 censuses the family were living at 5 Gas Street, Rugby. In 1911 Samuel was employed as a Meter Magnetiser in the BTH Electrical Engineering Department.

Samuel Barnett enlisted with the 5th Battalion of the Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry, Regimental number 10554 on 11 August 1914. He became part of the Machine Gun Section. The battalion was formed at Oxford in August 1914 and placed under orders of 42nd Brigade in 14th (Light) Division. Following training, he would have left for France on 20 May 1915.

He was a Lance Corporal fighting in the action to capture Bellevarde Farm, a diversionary action for the Battle of Loos, on 25 September 1915 and was killed in action.

There is no Service Record for Samuel except for a Register of his Effects. His mother Mary Ann Sansom, sole legatee was sent his pay of £5 17s 2d in 1917 and a gratuity of £3 10s 0d in 1919.

Samuel George Barnett is remembered on Panel 37 and 39 on Ypres Menin Gate Memorial, in the BTH Memorial Dedication Book and on the BTH War Memorial and also on the Rugby War Memorial. He is also remembered on gravestone K302 in Clifton Road Cemetery, Rugby.

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

23rd Jan 1915. Letters from the front

A BRINKLOW REPRESENTATIVE IN THE TRENCHES.

Private Bernard Wolfe, son of Mr Augustine Wolfe, railway missioner, Bolton, probably one of the first of Kitchener’s Army to participate in actual fighting, sends home a striking account of his experiences. Private Wolfe joined in the last week of August, and has been in the firing line since December 21. His father is a native of Brinklow, and is well-known to Railway Mission men at Rugby. His grandfather and great-grandfather were also residents of Brinklow.

“ The Germans dropped between 20 and 30 shells over our trenches, but did no damage. Our artillery got their range beautifully, and dropped shell after shell right among them, and eventually succeeded in silencing their batteries. Our company (“ D ” Company) lost three men and a few wounded.

“ The German shell devastation in some of the towns and villages here is beyond all imagination. Cafes, houses, convents, are all deserted, and everything left holus bolus. Some of the brave Belgians remain in their remnants of homes. They have lost everything but their great and noble hearts and I don’t think there is compensation available on this earth to make good their losses and deprivations, I think the German troops are getting demoralised, and I honestly think the war will end suddenly, and will surprise all nations when it does collapse.

” It is very weird at night-time. Picture a dark night. British trenches and German about 70 or 80 yards from one another, with just an occasional rip zip of bullets to let each side know there’s a watch being kept. Then the “ Allemandes ” send a fire ball across, just like an enormous blue light, which illuminates the whole length of trenches. And then, what ho! bob down ! if you don’t you get it, for as soon as the light goes up volley after volley comes as long as the light lasts, which will be 30 or 40 seconds.”

FROM A LILBOURNE MAN.

An interesting letter has been received by Mrs Barnett, of Lilbourne, from her husband. Private A Barnett, 1st Royal Warwicks, in which he says that life in the trenches with such wet weather is most trying—otherwise, he states that he in in a good slate of health. Barnet says : ” I received a parcel just before Christmas from Miss Mary Mulliner, Clifton Court (where he was employed before the outbreak of war). Please thank her if you see her. I am also so pleased the children received toys from the Court ; I am sure they would be pleased. We are having four days in the trenches and four out, the different regiments relieving one another as soon as it gets dusk. I believe the trenches we occupy are in Belgium, but when we are out at rest, we are in France. We have had about four months of it now. I wish we could get out of the danger zone for a while for a good rest. At a place near Armentieres we had 31 days in the trenches without coming out, the enemy being entrenched about 200 yards away. We are nearer now—only 100 yards separating us. You can imagine we have to be very careful in our movements. We were on fairly good terms with them at Christmas, not a single shot being exchanged. They said they would not fire if we did not, and the truce was kept, and we were able to enjoy Christmas rather better. Bitter foes as we are we were able to talk to some of them, also exchange cigarettes and cigars. Anyone that did not se it could not believe that such a thing could happen in warfare : nevertheless, it’s true. Some of our men got hold of souvenirs, but I failed to manage one myself.

“ Our Battalion has suffered very badly : out of 1,110 men I am afraid there is not above 200 left. No doubt many are prisoners of war. When we arrived here we encamped near Langy. Just when they had completed a big retirement from Mons, we took up some trenches at Bueq-Le-Long, and on being relieved we reckoned on a rest. Instead of that we had four days’ march, resting at Rozet-St-Albin, Crepy, Rully-Verberi, and St Omer. From the latter place we rode with motor transport, packed in like sardines for three hours, to Caistre. Next morning we advanced and encountered the enemy at a place called Meteren, which they occupied and were made to evacuate alter a sharp encounter lasting about three hours. Our casualties numbered about 100. It was raining all the time and we were soaked to the skin. During our march through France I did not see anything that took my fancy much. I do not know what there is to make a fuss about. Old England can compare with it for scenery or anything else—except that it is a little warmer here.”

A NAPTON MAN AT THE FALKLAND ISLANDS.

William Watson, of Napton, writing from H.M.S Cornwall on December 9. 1914, says :- “ Dear Mother,— Just a line to let you know how we are getting on. I think the last time I wrote to you was when we were at Montevideo.

On December 7th we arrived at the Falkland Islands, and all of a sudden, when we were in the midst of coaling, we heard a gun fired. It was the Germans come to bombard Port Stanley. Directly we knew we stopped coaling, and our ship and four more British ships, viz, the Inflexible, Invincible, Carnarvon, and Glasgow, gave chase. When we had been steaming along as fast as we could go for about one and a-half hours we saw the smoke of five German ships. At last we gradually got nearer, and the Inflexible engaged with the Scharnhorst. We caught the Leipzic up, and had an engagement with her, which lasted four hours. By the way, I forgot to tell you I am wireless messenger, and I was on watch when we were in action. We fired over 1,000 rounds of lyddite shell at them before we set the Leipzic on fire. We have had several bad hits ourselves, one of which passed through the funnel down into the painters’ shop ; but we put the fire out before it did very much damage. At last, about ten minutes past seven, we hit her right forward with a lyddite shell, and she caught on fire. You ought to have seen he r; I stood and watched her. At last she made a headlong plunge, and down she went. I think out of about a crew of 900 eighteen were saved. Five of them we have in our sick bay. Of the five German ships four have been sunk and one escaped, but she will get captured sooner or later. Out of our crew there are only about four injured, and no one killed. Well, mother, I think we shall come home. Tell them all at Napton I am quite well and happy.”

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

On October 14th the sister of Scout J Farn, [?] Worcester Regiment, forwarded to him on the Continent a parcel, containing some cigarettes and handkerchiefs. On October 21st. however, he was wounded, and never received the parcel. This has recently been returned to another sister of Scout Farn, to whom he had left his property by his will , the authorities evidently being under the impression that he had been killed. The parcel has probably an interesting history attached to it, because when it was opened a piece of shrapnel shell was found inside it, the letter and some notepaper were torn to shreds, and the handkerchiefs were perforated, evidently by pieces of shell, but how this came about is a mystery. We are informed that Scout Farn, who is still in Cedar Lawn Hospital, Hampstead, has undergone two operations, and is going on as well as can be expected. He was wounded by fragments of shrapnel in the right arm.

Trooper Harvey Woods, of the 17th Lancers, is paying a short visit to his home in William Street, Rugby, from the front. His regiment was drafted from India to France, and this is the first time he has been home for seven years. While wishing to say nothing as to the actual fighting, Trooper Woods states that his regiment has been diverted from its ordinary duties, and has been serving in the trenches. In fact, he came straight from the trenches to Rugby. In many instances the men are standing waist deep in water. He spent Christmas Day very quietly in the reserve trenches.

NEW BILTON SOLDIER WOUNDED.

Mrs H Anderson, 39 Pinfold Street, New Bilton, has received official news that her son, Pte John Elson, 1st Northumberland Fusiliers, received a gunshot wound in the back in action on January 7th, and is at present in a General Hospital at Rouen. Pte Elson, spent Christmas Day in the trenches, has also written home to say that the wound is not serious. Mrs Anderson has another son in the Howitzer Battery and one in Lord Kitchener’s Army, and her husband has also a son wounded at the front.

WITH THE HON. ARTILLERY COMPANY AT THE FRONT.

The following extracts from a letter from a “ H.A.C. ” man at the front to his friends at Rugby will be read with interest :-

“ While doing duty in the trenches the other day one of our men went back to a barn to fetch something, and on returning he was shot. He went down with a call for help. I ran along the communicating trench in order to assist him, when a bullet took my shoulder strap off. Our officer recalled me at once. Some time after our bugler crawled out to the man, bound up his wounds, and stayed with him till dusk. He was shot soon after nine o’clock in the morning. They were sniped all the day through, but fortunately they were not hit. When we picked him up at dusk one of the men in my section was shot through the arm and knee.

“ Another day, owing to the continual rain, the communicating trench got full of water. It was my lot to cut a way through the side to enable the water to drain away. I had to stand for an hour up to my middle in the water ; it was bitterly cold, and I felt very exhausted towards night—so much so that I tumbled over when marching home. Our officer insisted on my riding his horse back, for which I was grateful. Unfortunately he has since been killed. He was a great favourite with the men.

“Early in the New Year we determined to have a festive gathering to which we invited some of the Scots Guards. The barn was lit up with candles. When the plum pudding arrived all the lights were extinguished and the brandy set alight. Of course, it was received with cheers.”

“ The other day, on our return after three days in the trench’s we decided to have a concert, so we stopped up all the cracks and crevices, so that no light could be seen from outside. The concert commenced, but we could not have it to ourselves. The Germans took part in part. They commenced to shell us. Towards four o’clock we had to clear out, and whilst packing up our wagon two shrapnel shells burst just over us in the trees, but luckily no one was hit.

“ We attended a very impressive service the other night ; it was held in a convent. The chaplain used a small electric torch, so that he could read the service. We all stood round and sang ‘God save the King,’ and, as you may suppose, the line ‘ Scatter his enemies’ was emphasised.”

RECRUITING AT RUGBY.

During the past week 27 recruits have been sworn in at Rugby. Their names are :—R.A.M.C, W Bax and W D Bottrill ; Northants Regiment, G S Carr ; R.F.A, H Dale, H Blythe, W H Morgan, C E Godwin, F B Allibon, W F Bolton, and E A Baines ; Gloucesters, T M Horrell ; A.S.C, W J Barnwell, A Copeman, I Green, A J Townsend, and T Worrall ; R.W.R, J Smith, E Summer, and C E Newman ; Dublin Fusiliers, J Cody ; Worcester Regiment, H Wells ; Lancashire Fusiliers Bantams, F Lowndes and P J Dunkley ; Oxford and Bucks L.I, E Harvey and W Jephcott ; Coldstream Guards, E W Davenport and H Payne.