6th Apr 1918. Women’s Work on the Land

WOMEN’S WORK ON THE LAND.

At the Empire, Rugby, on Tuesday and Wednesday afternoons, stirring appeals were made to women to volunteer for work on the land. As an introduction to brief addresses, a film was shown depicting the procession of Warwickshire land-workers at the Birmingham rally.

On Tuesday Mrs Neville, of Stratford-on-Avon, said the picture showed that a certain number of women had done what they all ought to have done—viz, to have come out from ease and comfort at home to work on the land, and thus take the place of men who had gone to fight for them. They must have more women to do this work. If they did not come forward, they were not worthy to be the mothers, wives, and sisters of those who fighting for them. She could not imagine during this critical period any man or woman, having good wages, and living at home in comfort, threatening to lay down tools in order to get more money or for some trivial cause. What was that compared with what those brave fellows at the front were doing for them ? Let them do their best for those heroes, and if they could not put in full time work, let them join a part-time gang, who could do a great deal. In Stratford about twenty of them put in three or four thousand hours on the land during a year by giving up their afternoons ; whilst others in business gave up their half-holidays and did good work. Did they think they had at this critical period any right to spare time for holidays ? To older people, like herself, she appealed to them to put enthusiasm to make up any loss in years.

The speaker on Wednesday was Miss Peers, travelling inspector to the Board of Agriculture. At the present time she said the Women’s Land Army consisted of between 7,000 and 8,000 whole-time workers ; but the need of the country was so great that they wanted another 30,000. Could the women of Rugby find any recruits for this army ? They knew how splendidly their Army was doing its duty at the Front, and they wanted another splendid army behind. They wanted the women of England to fight in the British fields. Women of 18 years and upwards who were not doing national work should come and fight for their country, if only for six months, although they would rather that they came for a year. They must fight in the English fields to keep off starvation, to feed the men at the Front and the little children, and to take the place of the men who had made the great sacrifice for their country. They should remember Kitchener’s Army and how the men came forward. They did not ask what the wage was ; they came to fight for their country, and chucked up their jobs, saving : “ Here I am ; I am ready.” They now wanted the women of England to do the same. It they were not doing anything particular in the national interest or for their country they should think twice before they refused to fight for England (applause).

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR.
SCHOOLBOYS AND HARVEST.
To the Editor of the Advertiser.

SIR.—I understand the Warwickshire County Council are desirous of making it as easy as possible for farmers to employ school children in the hay, corn and potato harvest, and with that object the Education Committee have asked the managers of all the schools in the county to fix the summer holidays at a period which will best suit the farmers in the locality of each school.

In writing to suggest to farmers that they should at once see the managers of their local schools, and let them know the date which will best suit their own interests, and therefore the interests of the country, to have the schools closed, so that the boys can help with the harvest. The holidays may be arranged to be taken at one time, or to be divided, as best suits the harvest operations.

I urge that farmers should take action in this matter without delay, as some time will be necessary to make suitable arrangements.—Yours faithfully,

R LEAN,
Secretary, Warwickshire Farmers’ Union.
27 Bridge Street, Stratford-on-Avon.

 

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Colonel H H Mulliner has this week returned from France.

We regret that news has come through that Capt G Gray, 1/5 Lancashire Fusiliers, is reported missing as from March 26th.

Sergt A T Barnett, 1 Temple Street, Rugby, was wounded in France on March 21st. Before joining up he worked as a painter for Messrs Linnell & Son for 15 years.

Lieut C K Steinberg, M.C, of the Machine Gun Corps who was before the war was a member of the B.T.H office staff, was killed in action on March 22nd.

Pte Fred Summers, 2/7 R.W.R, has been killed in the recent fighting. He had spent practically all his life at Clifton, and was formerly employed by Mr M R Trower, and afterwards by Mrs Twells, as a groom-gardener. He was 31 years of age, married, a Sunday School teacher, and member of the choir.

Sergt J Sacree, Rifle Brigade, who was taken prisoner of war a few weeks ago, writes to a friend in Rugby that now his food parcels are arriving from England he is able to have fairly decent meals, and is just beginning to feel himself again. His many friends in Rugby will be glad to know he has nearly recovered from his wounds.

The following New Bilton men have been wounded : Pte Oswald Sydney Houghton, Welsh Regt, son of Mr C Houghton, 6 Bridle Road, mustard gas and pneumonia ; Pte Stanley Williams, R Berks Regt. son of Mr J H Williams, 64 Pinfold Street, groin (severe) ; and Pte W T Kettle, Somerset Light Infantry, machine gun bullet in left leg.

An official telegram has been received by Mrs Pengelly, who resides in Leamington, that her husband, Captain E A Pengelly, M.C, 213th Army Troops Company, has died of gun shot wounds sustained in the recent severe fighting in France. Deceased had previously been a non-commissioned officer in the Warwickshire Yeomanry. He was several times mentioned in despatches, and short time ago was awarded the Military Cross. He was the eldest son of Mr W E Pengelly was extremely popular with his men, and held in high esteem by his superiors, and his speedy advancement was assured.

RUGBY POSTAL OFFICIALS HONOURED.

Major H Neeves, D.S.O, M.C, son of Mr S Neeves, 13 Murray Road, has been promoted Lieutenant-Colonel in the Northumberland Fusiliers.

Another employee at Rugby Post Office, Second-Lieut T H Healey, signalling officer of the 19th Royal Welsh Fusiliers, has been awarded the Military Cross.

Captain Eric Rose, only son of the former Vicar of Norton, Daventry, and grandson of Lieut-Col Rose, of Northampton, has been killed in action.

SECOND-LIEUT EDDIE WILSON KILLED.

Mrs E Wilson, 41 Bridget Street, has received information that her youngest son, 2nd Lieut Edwin Thomas (Eddie) Wilson, Royal Warwickshire Regt, was killed in action during the heavy fighting on March 23. He was 23 years of age, and when he enlisted in the Hussars at the commencement of the war was an apprentice at the B.T.H. In 1915 he was given a commission, and shortly afterwards proceeded to the front. He was invalided home, suffering from trench fever, but returned to France early in 1918. Of a bright and cheerful disposition, he was a prime favourite with all who knew him. He was an old St Oswald’s boy and a member of St Oswald’s Tennis Club. Five of his brothers are still serving with the colours.

DUNCHURCH.

MR & MRS H PEARCE, Coventry Road, have received official news that their son, Sergt B Pearce, of the 10th Bedford Regiment, who was posted as missing on July 12th, is now reported killed on that date. This makes the third son they have lost in the War.

THE inhabitants of Dunchurch very much regret to hear of so many Dunchurch young men who are at the War being wounded. Among them are Pte W Collins, Pte T Shaw (seriously), Pte A Amos, Pte G Elkington, and Pte J Cleaver (who has his leg broken).

LONG ITCHINGTON.

WOUNDED.— Mrs Frank Lane has received news that her youngest son, Pte Herbert W Lane (R.W), is in a base hospital suffering from a badly fractured leg. Her second son, Lance-Corpl Sidney Lane (K.R.R), whose leg was amputated after a severe wound last November, is now in Leyton College Hospital.

FATAL AVIATION ACCIDENT AT RUGBY.
LOW FLYING OVER THE TOWN.

The inquest on Lieut H N Van Duzer, a Canadian attached to the Royal Flying Corps, who, as reported last week, died at, the Brookfield, Nursing Home at the result of a flying accident, was held at Rugby by Mr E F Hadow on Thursday in last week.—Mr [ ] Patchett was foreman of the jury.

Surgeon-Major Chester Collins deposed that deceased had been attached to the Royal Flying Corps for instruction about six weeks, and he was a very promising pupil. On Sunday afternoon he was called to a field off the Lower Hillmorton Road, where he saw deceased, who had received first aid from Dr Crookes and two other men. Deceased was quite unconscious and his breathing was heavy, showing that his brain was injured. At the Nursing Home afterwards he found the young officer had sustained a fracture of the skull, a compound fracture of the left leg, and a fracture of the left wrist. For twenty-four hours he appeared to do well, but early on Tuesday morning more serious symptoms suddenly developed, and he died within three hours. Death was due to meningitis caused by septic poisoning. The fracture of the skull was at the most vital part. He believed that these injuries were caused through the pilot being thrown against the bar or some other portion of the machine. Dr Collins explained how the accident was possible, and he recommended the use of a padded shield as some protection for this part of the head.

2nd Air Mechanic Pickering and 2nd Air Mechanic Leach, deposed that the engine and rigging of the machine were in good order before the deceased officer started on his flight, and this was confirmed by 2nd Lieut Francis Kenneth Laver, who had flown in the machine earlier in the afternoon.

Lieut Smallman deposed that he examined the machine shortly after the accident, but could find nothing to explain how the accident occurred. Deceased was seen spinning to the ground, and it was possible that he might have turned giddy ; but he was a strong young fellow, and he did not think this was probable. If this evolution was practised below a certain height it would be impossible for him to recover himself.

Dolf Farn, mechanic, deposed that he watched the deceased officer flying over the Eastlands Estate. He had been flying very low, but had commenced to climb. When he was about 1,000 feet up he commenced a spiral dive, and when he had come down about 500 feet the machine turned over. Deceased seemed to be trying to right himself, and had he had another dozen feet witness believed he would have done so, because by the time it cleared the hedge the machine was right side up.—By Captain King : Deceased did about six spins before reaching the ground.

In reply to the Coroner, Captain King, the Commanding Officer, said this evidence did not explain the accident, except that it suggested that deceased might have been spinning too low down and misjudged the height.—The Coroner expressed the opinion that the suggestion of Surgeon-Major Collins was a valuable one, and although he thought the jury could not include it in their verdict, Captain King and other commanding officers might take note of it.—Captain King expressed the opinion that a pad would obstruct the pilot’s view with the present goggles. He had had a pad placed on the machines.— The jury returned a verdict of “ Accidental death,” and associated themselves with the Coroner’s remarks concerning the pad. The Foreman also inquired of the Commanding Officer whether it was necessary for the pilots to fly so low over the town.—Captain King replied that it was not. Since he had heard of the practice he had issued instructions that it must be discontinued.—It was stated by jurymen that messages had been dropped to people in the town, and complaints had been made as to the low flying, which many people considered to be very dangerous.

COVENTRY APPEALS TRIBUNAL.

Held on Wednesday evening in last week. Present : Messrs H W Wale (chairman), P G Loveitt, W Johnson, jun. and S Dicksee. Col Moore was the National Service representative.

The Military appealed against the exemption till June 1st granted to Thomas White (single, 18, Grade I), blacksmith, employed by his father at Dunchurch.—It was contended that it was essential, if the business was to be maintained, that a strong young man should be employed. Two other sons were now serving, and a third had been killed.—Mr J E Cox, the agricultural representative, spoke as to the importance of the work— from an agricultural standpoint—which Mr White was doing ; but Col Moore expressed the opinion that a man of respondent’s age and fitness should be in the Army.— Adjourned for the War Agricultural Committee and the National Service Department to try to substitute the man.

Mr H Eaden represented Howard Harold Allkins, greengrocer and small-holder (39), Wolston, who exemption was appealed against.—Col Moore said this case was brought to relieve the National Service Department of a responsibility. They had promised the Miners’ Unions to comb out all post-war miners, but he supposed the man was as useful employed there as anywhere.—Mr Eaden said that Allkins was exempted to take up work of national importance. He went into the Binley Pit so that he could carry on his market garden after working hours.—The Chairman said the Tribunal were unanimously of opinion that the man could not be left in the mines and the case was adjourned for a month to see if he could be used to substitute the man in the previous case.

Harry Wallis (39, C2), boot maker and repairer, 117 Grosvenor Road, Rugby, who was represented by Mr H W Worthington, asked for a renewal of his exemption and, on the suggestion of Col Moore, he was given till July 1st.

George Francis Harris, licensed victualler, Newbold (C3, 41), asked for a variation of an order whereby he had been exempted upon working 30 hours a week in agriculture. He explained that it was very difficult for him to get agricultural work, and he asked for a full time munition order.—This was agreed to.

Mr H Eadon represented John Edward Pateman (C3), farmer, Monks Kirby, and said his client had been ordered to work 30 hours a week in agriculture, but his physical condition was such that this was impossible The man occupied 50 acres of land, and was feeding 30 beast and two milch cows.—Adjourned for the agricultural representative to inspect the farm. Col Moore stating that if the report was not an adverse one he had no objection to exemption.

RUGBY & DISTRICT FOOD CONTROL COMMITTEE AND MILK PRICES.

The rationing section of Rugby and District Food Committee, having conferred with representatives of the Retailer Dairymen’s Association on the question of the future price of milk, the Food Committee has accepted their recommendation that the April price shall be 2s 4d per gallon, and for May, June, July, August and September 1s 8d a gallon. There is also a proviso that if the retailers produce evidence that the price fixed for after April is unreasonable that price may be re-considered.—The Chairman of the Food Committee (Mr T A Wise) explained that the retailers brought no figures with them, and they thought that if they produce books they could satisfy the committee that they were not getting enough. It would, however, require very strong figures to convince the committee.—Mr W A Stevenson asked if it was not peculiar that the winter price of 2s 4d continue through April, and that there should then be the big drop of 2d a quart.—Mr T Ewart thought it quite consistent. April was as expensive a month to produce milk as any in the year. In May there was all the difference.—Mr G Cooke submitted that milk ought to be cheaper at Rugby in view of railway freightage being avoided.—The Chairman remarked that the producers’ price fixed by the Government was 1s 8d in April and 1s for May.—Mr J Cripps thought the retailers would be well off in May, June, and July with 8d a gallon for retailing.—The Chairman said he thought it a very fair bargain, and that there was not to much to complain of.—Mr A Appleby remarked that when it was admitted that on the figures the retailer was making a fairly large profit, his winter expenses had been exceptionally heavy.

Mr Cooke pointed out that on pre-war prices, if the retailer made 4d on a gallon it was reckoned he was making a very fair profit. They proposed now to give him 100 per cent. advance. The consuming element were only averaging 50 per cent. increase in wages, and some of them not that. There should be the same amount of sacrifice all round whilst we were at war, but the degree of sacrifice was not equal. He regarded 6d a quart for April as affording a very fair margin of profit, and he proposed as an amendment that that should be the price fixed.—Mr C Gay seconded.—Mr Cripps said that 4d a gallon margin would be too low.—Mr H Tarbox : You have to remember that they will get 8d next month.—Mr Ewart thought 100 per cent. Advance quite reasonable. He estimated that the cost of retailing had gone up 100 per cent.—Three votes were recorded for the amendment and 10 against.—The committee’s report was then adopted.

DEATHS.

BOTTERILL.—On March 18th, at Arras, Pte. A. W. BOTTERILL, 2nd Batt. Coldstream Guards, the very dearly beloved husband of Alice Botterill, also second beloved son of Henry and Mary Botterill.—“ O for the touch of a vanished hand and the sound of a dear voice that is still.”—Heart-broken wife, Alice Botterill.

WILSON.— Second-Lieut. E. T. WILSON, 10th Batt. R.W.R., son of the late Mr. Ellis Wilson and Mrs. Wilson, 41 Bridget Street, Rugby ; killed in action March 23, 1918.

IN MEMORIAM.

ASHWORTH.—In memory of Sergt. ASHWORTH, killed in action on April 9, 1917. B.E.F.
“ One sigh perchance for work unfinished here ;
Then a swift passing to a mightier sphere.”
—From All at Home.

COLLEDGE.—In affectionate remembrance of our dear son and brother, WALTER EDWARD COLLEDGE, who was killed at the Vimy Ridge on April 9, 1917, in France.
“ Somewhere in France there is a nameless grave,
Where sleeps our loved one among the brave ;
One of the rank and file, he heard the call,
And for the land he loved gave his all.”
—From his sorrowing Mother, Father, Sisters and Brothers.

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16th Sep 1916. Round-up for Shirkers at Rugby

ROUND-UP FOR SHIRKERS AT RUGBY.

On Friday evening last week, and again on Saturday, the local police, in conjunction with the Military Authorities, had a round-up for the purpose of ascertaining how many men are shirking their obligations under the Military Service Act. The Empire, Palace, and the railway stations were visited, and men of military age were challenged to produce their papers. Men were also accosted by police officers in the streets. So thoroughly had the Military Authorities locally done their work, however, that, although a number of men who failed to produce their papers were escorted to the Police Station, they were all able to give satisfactory explanations of their presence in civil life. Both the military and police carried out their duties in a courteous manner, and people generally cheerfully acquiesced on the request, “ Show your papers, please ! ”

RUGBY PETTY SESSIONS.
TUESDAY. Before Dr Clement Dukes (in the chair), T Hunter, T A Wise, J E Cox, and J J McKinnell, Esqrs.

WAR PENSIONS SUB-COMMITTEE IMPOSED UPON.

Grace Anderson, late of Holbrooke Avenue, Rugby, who had been arrested at Woodville, near Burton-on-Trent, was charged on remand with obtaining £2 by false pretences from Agatha Mary West, at Rugby, on August 11th.—On the date named Mrs West was acting as temporary secretary to the local War Pensions Sub-Committee. Prisoner called upon her and represented that she was the widow of Sergt Alec Anderson, of the 1st Battalion Scots Guards, who was killed in action at Loos on September 25th last year. She said she was entitled to a pension, and, believing her story to be true, Mrs West advanced her £2. When enquiries were made of the Officer commanding the 1st Scots Guards it was found that no such man as Sergt Anderson had ever belonged to the battalion. Prisoner had then left the town, and a warrant for her arrest was issued.

The Magistrates’ Clerk said he had seen a letter, in which defendant alleged it was true her husband was killed as stated. If that was so she had better plead not guilty.

Defendant said her husband was killed, and that his name was Anderson, but she gave the wrong number and the wrong battalion, she was not entitled to any more money from the War Pensions Committee.—Mr H Lupton Reddish, solicitor, Rugby, prosecuted.

Mrs West said on the 11th prox. she was acting as secretary temporarily to the local War Pensions Committee of the Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Families Association. Defendant came to see her, and from information she gave witness filled up the form produced, which defendant signed as correct. This form stated that the pension awarded to the applicant was 10s, and the date of award March 16th. Defendant requested that 10s should be advanced that day, and that the committee would help her to find her a place as cook, which they did. Witness advanced her 10s by way of loan. That afternoon or next day defendant called on witness at Bilton. She said she had got a place, and asked for an advance to get clothing. Witness then advanced her 30s, making £2 in all. She told witness that when she was in service she would not need her pension, and would pay the money back as soon as the pension became due.

Asked what she had to say, defendant said she would not have done it had she not been hard up. Her papers were at her home in Liverpool, and she had not written for them because she did not wish her friends to know of the case. Her husband was in the King’s Liverpool Regiment, and since March she had regularly received her pension. She came into the Rugby district because she thought a change would do her good.

Supt Clarke said defendant’s proper name was Grace Lester, and she had undergone one month’s hard labour in 1913 for stealing by trick two ladies’ dresses.

Defendant, whilst admitting the conviction, said she was married to Anderson in 1914.—Supt Clarke said he knew nothing of the man referred to in the letter produced, but he had refused to go bail for defendant. The police had interviewed defendant’s parents, who had not seen her for three years, and declined to have anything to do with her.

The Chairman told defendant a very serious charge was brought against her, and she seemed to have a very bad character. They sent her to Warwick Gaol for three months with hard labour.

[Messrs Hunter and McKinnell, being members of the War Pensions Sub-Committee, did not adjudicate in this case.]

THE TRIBUNALS AT WORK.
COUNTY APPEAL TRIBUNAL.

Mr W K Pridmore (Mayor of Coventry) presided at the Appeal Tribunal held at the Benn Buildings on Wednesday evening. Others present were : Messrs W Johnson, jun, K Rotherham, and W Hill. Mr M E T Wratislaw and Mr F M Burton were the Military representatives.

Frank Walding, boot and shoe dealer, living at 52 Caldecott Street, Rugby, who had been exempted by the Tribunal till September 1st, made application for a further period on business grounds, but this was refused.—Exemption till January 1st. 1917, was given to Horace William Dale, a coal carter, living at 28 Bridge Street, whose previous exemption had expired.—William Henry Smith, plasterer and fitter, Birdingbury asked for a further exemption, and was refused, as was also the application, on business grounds, of Ernest Archie Bromwich, Newton House Farm, Rugby.— Mr Bromwich : Well, I shall sell my farm up. I will see an auctioneer at once.—The Chairman : Very well ; go now. Don’t stand here.

The Military appealed against an additional exemption which had been granted to Joseph Hill, Pailton, and this was upheld, on the Military promising not to serve calling-up papers until October 15th.—Thomas Watts, Stretton-on-Dunsmore, canal labourer and puddler, appealed on business grounds, and was given conditional exemption.—The Military appealed against the conditional exemption which had been granted by the Tribunal to Arthur Williams, a charge hand and refuse destructor at the Urban Council refuse disposal works. The appeal was upheld, and exemption given till October 14th.

The Military also appealed against the additional exemption till October 1st which had been granted to Horace Walter Gilbert, electrician and wireman, living at 58 Newland Street, New Bilton, and this case was adjourned.—Hercules Castley, 22 James Street, carpenter and joiner, appealed on medical grounds, and against the decision of the Rugby Urban Tribunal. This also was adjourned for the case to again go before the Medical Authorities at Budbrooke.—Joseph George Bennett, carriage builder and wheelwright, 7 Gladstone Street, New Bilton, appealed against the withdrawal of the exemption which had been granted to him, and he was given till December 1st.—Archie Ernest Robinson, tobacconist and off-licensed retailer, living at 1 Abbey Street, appealed against the decision of the Urban District Council, but their decision was upheld.—Evan Harris Lloyd, farmer, Brownsover, appealed against the decision of the Rural District Tribunal withdrawing his conditional exemption, and the case was adjourned for the Military to find a substitute.—Ernest Tomlin, grocer, draper, etc, of Dunchurch, asked for exemption, and was given until January 17th by agreement, this to be final.—The application of Horace Basil Wane, schoolmaster, of Bilton Grange, was refused.—Walter Russell, Whitehall Farm, whose exemption had been withdrawn, appealed against this, but his application was refused, the Military promising not to serve the papers until the 15th October.

Freddie Cooper, Brinklow, labourer and haulier’s carter, whose exemption had been withdrawn, unsuccessfully appealed against the decision.-Sidney George College, bread baker and corn dealer, of Brandon, who had been given exemption till September 15th without further appeal without permission, was now given till October 14th.—William Frederick Brooks, carrier, Flecknoe, appealed for exemption, but this case was adjourned for a substitute to be found by the Military.—The appeal of Edward William Steane, jun, batcher, of Marton, was refused by the Tribunal.—Frank William Goode, shepherd and horseman, of Broadwell, was given one month exemption, final, and, as he was an unattested man, this will carry two months.

MUNITION WORKERS WASTING TIME.—Cecil Winn, apprentice, 12 Railway Terrace, Rugby, claimed through Samuel Winn, his father, a shell turner, from Harry Carter, machinist, 14 Railway Terrace, Rugby, to recover possession of a show Homer pigeon, value 5s, wrongfully detained by defendant.—The case was heard late in the afternoon, and Samuel Winn said his son had been fetched back to work.—Defendant said it was a “ blooming ” neighbour’s quarrel, and the pigeon was a stray one.—His Honor elicited the information that both men were working on munitions, and said they were wasting time by coming into Court over a pigeon worth only 2s 6d or 3s. He awarded the pigeon to plaintiff, with no reflection on anybody, and expressed the hope that this would be the end of the quarrel.

OVERSTAYING HIS LEAVE.—Lance-Corpl Harry Gilbert, who had been arrested at 6 St Matthew Street, Rugby, was charged with being an absentee without leave from the 1st Royal Warwicks. He said he came out of hospital on sick leave, and should have gone back on Tuesday night.—P.S Goodwin said a telegram was received instructing the police to arrest, and when he acted upon it the previous morning he found Gilbert fully dressed and with his bag packed ready to go away.—Defendant said he had a railway warrant to return if he was allowed to do so ; but the Magistrate decided to remand him to await an escort.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Mr L W Eadon, second son of Mr W Eadon, of Hillmorton Road, who enlisted in the H.A.C soon after the outbreak of the War, has been gazetted to a second lieutenancy in the R.F.A.

Mr B C Simmonds, son of Mr W T Simmonds, headmaster of the Elborow School, and Mr Everard Turner, son of Mr E Turner, of 30 Lancaster Road, Rugby, have been gazetted to second lieutenancies in the Infantry Machine Gun Corps. Mr Turner has already seen active service with the Oxford and Bucks L.I. in France.

Mr T Collins, of 37 Stephen Street, Rugby, has received a letter from his second son, Rifleman R Collins, of the Rifle Brigade, stating that he was wounded in a German trench, which had been captured three hours before. He had two wounds in the left thigh, one in the right, and one in the right shoulder. Rifleman Collins, who is now in a Military Hospital at Stockport, is an old St Matthew’s boy, and previous to the War was employed by Messrs Parnell & Son. Although he is not quite 19 years of age, this is the second time he has been wounded, the first occasion being at Ypres over twelve months ago. He enlisted on September 3, 1914.

PTE F J SUMMERS NOTIFIED AS KILLED.

Mr F H Summers, of Bridget Street, has received a notification from the War Office that his son, Pte F J Summers, Oxford & Bucks L.I, missing since September 25th of last year, is killed. Pte Summers was an old boy of St Matthew’s School, and a prominent, junior footballer and athlete.

ST MATTHEW’S OLD BOYS WOUNDED.

Amongst the casualties in the great advance are Gunner F Favell, R.G.A, Rifleman R Collins, Rifle Brigade, Pte E J Hewitt, Royal Warwickshire Regt, and Pte A Barrows, Dorset Regt, all wounded.

B.T.H CASUALITIES.

Great regret will be felt by employees at the B.T.H at the news that Corpl Frank Thistlewood, of the Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, has been killed in the recent advance. Corpl Thistlewood, who was 35 years of age, enlisted in September, 1915, prior to which date he had been employed for several years in the Cost Statistics Department. He was a native of Leamington.

Official news has been received at the B.T.H that Pte Newell, of the Royal Fusiliers, has been posted as missing since August 7th last, and his parents have received private intimation that he was killed on that date. Pte Newell enlisted early in the year, and was formerly employed in the B.T.H Drawing Office. He was a native of Nottingham, and was well known in B.T.H athletic circles.

Sergt J D Sutton and Lance-Sergt A J L Moore have been wounded—the latter seriously and the former in the stomach with shrapnel. Both were natives of Loughborough, and enlisted in the same battalion of the Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, as Corpl Thistlewood, in September, 1914. Sergt J D Sutton was employed in the Accountancy Department, and Sergt Moore, who was visited by his mother in France, in the Cost Department.

BRANDON.

MR & MRS HENRY BARNETT, of Brandon, have received news that their son, Corpl Wilfred Barnett, of the K.R.R, has been wounded. His escape from death was lucky, as the missile happened to strike a cigarette-case he had in his pocket, and deflected it on to his head. His brother Albert, some few weeks ago, was struck in 90 places by shrapnel, but is now recovering.

DUNCHURCH.

CASUALTIES.—Pte W Wilkes (Mill Street), of the Oxon and Bucks Light Infantry, has been wounded in the foot and leg, and is in hospital at Halifax, going on fairly well ; and Sergt C T Hedgcock, of the 22nd Brigade, Machine Gun Company, has been wounded in the head.

BRINKLOW.

PTE FRANCIS COMPTON, nephew of Mr W Compton, of Brinklow, has been awarded the Military Medal for bravery on the field.

CLIFTON.

Mr James Morton, the sub-postmaster here, has been called up, and it now in the Durham L.I.

WOLSTON.

WOUNDED SOLDIERS.—Pte W Barker, Royal Warwicks, has been wounded in the arm and is in hospital. He is the second son of Mr N Barker.—Pte J E Flowers, the second son of Mr John Flowers, of Brook Street, is in hospital at Newport, Mon., having had one of his fingers blown off. He has been in France about 18 months, and has been in a number of engagements at Ypres with the Rifle Brigade.
NEW ATTENDANCE OFFICER.-Mr Gumbley, of Warwick, is now school attendance officer for the district in place of Mr A J Poxon, who is in training with the Royal Naval Flying Corps. He is an old soldier, and has six sons serving their King and country, three of whom are at present in France.

THE PARCELS sent this week by the Rugby Prisoners of War Help Committee to local men who are prisoners of war in Germany contained :- ¼lb of tea, 1lb sugar, 1 tin of herrings in tomatoes, 1 tin of condensed milk, 1 tin of baked beans, ½-lb of butter, 2-lb box of biscuits and one pair of socks.

 

IN MEMORIAM.

BARNETT.—In loving memory of Lance-Corpl. Samuel George Barnett, of the 5th Oxon and Bucks, killed in action, September 25th, 1915 ; aged 21.
“ We often sit and think of him,
And tenderly breathe his name ;
Nothing left for us to look at
But his photo in the frame.
Some day our eyes shall see
That dear face still kept in memory.”

HOPKINS.—In loving memory of Frank, the beloved and youngest son of Henry Hopkins, of Long Lawford, who was killed in action in France, September 18th, 1915.
“ He sleeps, not in his native land,
But ‘neath some foreign skies,
And far from those that loved him best ;
In a hero’s grave he lies.”
—From his FATHER, BROTHERS & SISTER.

MASON.-In loving memory of Sergt. Arthur T. Mason, beloved and only son.—From his sorrowing MOTHER and SISTER, 40 Rutland Gardens, Hove, Brighton.

 

26th Feb 1916. Restrictions on the Use of Paper

RESTRICTIONS ON THE USE OF PAPER.

A WORD TO OUR READERS.

In consequence of the restriction on the importation of paper and materials for making it which come into force on March 1st, it will be necessary for publishers to exercise the strictest economy in the use of the paper they are allowed to receive, and reduce all wastage to the lowest possible point. Newsagents will in all probability find that the extra copies they have been able to obtain to meet casual sales will have to be limited, if not stopped altogether.

Our readers who are in the habit of obtaining copies of the “Rugby Advertiser” here and there in a casual way, will greatly assist the agents and the publishers if they place an order for the paper with a particular agent, and always obtain it there, so that the number required each week may be definitely ascertained.

As the space available for news, etc, in the reduced size will be greatly curtailed, we regret that we shall not be able to insert gratuitously any Volunteer Orders for the week, appeals for gifts or subscriptions, acknowledgments of gifts, official notices, musical successes, shorthand successes, and so forth.

OLD MURRAYIANS IN THE EASTERN THEATRE.

Mr W T Coles Hodges has this week received the following letters from soldiers formerly connected with the Murray School, who are now in the Eastern theatre of the war. Pte A S Horswell, Signalling Section, 10th Middlesex Regiment, writes :—

“ The greater part of October and all November we spent in dug-outs on the side of Lala Baba. We used to go out morning, afternoon, and night doing ghastly fatigue work, such as making a road across Salt Lake, digging trenches (a specialised form of gardening), and unloading wood for lighters ; carrying railway sleepers across loose sand to load them on mule carts also forms a pleasant interlude between tea and supper, especially when the interlude is of six hours’ duration and the music is supplied by the Turkish orchestra a couple or three miles away. Of course, you know that the Peninsula is now evacuated.

“ We were at Suvla Bay . . . . At the end of November, the 26th, to be accurate, there was a violent storm that swamped the whole dug-outs and made the trenches like rivers. The storm abated at about 10 or 11 p.m. We could not sleep or lie down in our dug-outs as they were a foot deep in wet, clayey mud. Four of us got what blankets we could find in a more or less dry state, and went and found a tolerably dry spot near an ‘incinerator’ on the slopes of Lala Baba, adjoining C Beach. The next day we were due to leave the peninsula, but the sea was too rough, and our company was sent at night to guard some trenches facing Salt Lake. That night was absolutely IT. We had to do sentry-go in a blinding sleet storm and the usual accompaniment of a howling wind. The next morning the sleet stopped. I forget details, but I know our wet clothes froze on us, and whole crowds, including myself, went into the hospital on C Beach with exposure, rheumatism, frost-bite, etc.

I ultimately found myself at the Citadel Hospital, Cairo, and got into bed for the first time since leaving England. I got to Cairo on Friday, December 3rd. . . . We had an A1 Xmas at the hospital, roast beef, turkey, and plum pudding, with ail the usual accompaniments. The Citadel Hospital was formerly one of the Khedive’s palaces. It is a fine building, most picturesque, and the thing that struck me most was the colour scheme of the whole affair. The exterior was colour washed a bright orange, with a white dado affair at the top where the gutters our roofs would be. The window fittings and lattices were green, all three forming vivid contrasts. When you saw all this against a background of bright blue sky, with white splashes of cloud here and there, the effect was very striking. I could not help wishing for a camera, but at the same time I realised that it would lose the greater part of its beauty when reduced to mere black and white. It was a beautiful, building, full of opportunities for the water colour artist. The place abounded with balconies, pagodas, and odd, queer staircases in corners of quadrangles and courts, but colour was most essential in any pictorial reproduction. Without colour, ‘ musquise ’ (no good), as the natives here would say.”

The writer states that on New Year’s Day he visited the Pyramids and the Sphinx, and says:

“ The trams take you within 300 and 400 yards of it. Then there is an uphill climb, which can be done on ‘ Shanks’s pony,’ donkey, or camel. A native attached himself to me in the capacity of guide, philosopher, and friend, and discoursed in ‘ pidgin ’ English on the beauties of the Sphinx and Egypt generally, in the hope of ‘ backsheesh ‘ to come. The place, if you can call it a place, was crowded with soldiers and civilians, all bent on sightseeing. Taking things on the whole, the place resembled Hampstead Heath in fair time without the roundabouts.” The writer expressed himself as disappointed with the Sphinx and Pyramids, and adds: “ One felt that one wanted to be alone. There was too much of the military element to allow of much ‘ mysticism.’ My last impression was that of two 20th Century motor cars standing at the base of the Great Pyramid, which was built 4,000 years B.C.”

Pte Horswell was afterwards drafted to the base near Alexandria, of which he says: “ It is a very, fine town. Of course the European element is very much in evidence. French is the language spoken most—other than the native Arabic. All official notices, names of streets, etc, are duplicated in French and Arabic. There is a large Italian and Greek population, as well. There is the usual type of English shop, kept, generally by French people, and also the native bazaar. Strangely enough, there are no restaurants or cafes in the ordinary English acceptance of the term. A cafe here is usually only a drinking place, nothing to eat being obtainable.”

T Hillwell, another Old Murrayian, who is with the allied Forces at Salonica, in a letter says : “ The dawn of the 1st of November saw us step out of the train on to Serbian soil, and exceedingly thankful we were, for a night’s travelling on an open truck is not conducive to warmth. First of all, we had long marches to do, and we were struck by the excellence of the roads. They were really remarkable. November was a comparatively quiet month, so far as fighting was concerned, but the last week we were busy fighting another enemy-frost-bite. To realise what this means, one must be really on the spot. Then came the celebrated retreat, which has filled columns in the English newspapers. It was an exciting affair altogether, and it is a marvel to me how we got safely out of it. But out of it we did get, and with great credit, too. I feel really proud to have belonged to an Irish Division. Without a doubt these Irishmen can fight. So we are back again and enjoying a well-earned rest.

OLD MURRAYIAN WITH THE HOWITZER BATTERY.

Gunner A J Renshaw, of the Rugby Howitzer Battery, in a letter to his old schoolmaster, says :— “I arrived safely back to the land of mud and water, commonly known as ‘ Sunny France.’ During my absence there was plenty of fun going on, and ‘Fritz’ and his ‘brudders’ gave our infantry a surprise visit the other night, but as they strongly objected to their presence in our lines they ‘struck oil’ somewhat and were soon out again on the hop. Since then we have returned their visit with much more success. Of late considerable activity has been shown, and by now they are aware of the fact that we are out for business, for we have given them ‘ cold feet ‘ this last month or so, and soon you may here with confidence of our continued success. Of that there is very little doubt. We shall fight until we have avenged the dastardly atrocities they have committed in France and Belgian.”

A ST. MATTHEW’S OLD BOY IN SALONICA.

Extracts from letter of Pte F E Morley, R.A.M.C, an “ old boy ” of St Matthew’s School to Mr R H Myers, headmaster :—

“ We were the first of the British Expedition to land at Salonica, and you can well understand that, coming from Gallipoli, many of us wondered what we were doing to land in Greece at all. Still, it did not take long to make us aware of our mission, which was, of course, to link up with the gallant Serbian Army.

“ We spent a few days at Salonica before entraining for Gyevgeli, from which place we marched across country, landing about ten miles ahead of Dviran. Here we began to link up with the French troops, which were holding fast the road to Strumnitza. Fairly good progress was made, and by the end of November we were 22 miles ahead of Dviran. The country so for had been fairly decent, for at any rate it allowed the full use of transport, but as we began to get into the hills, mule transport only was possible. To describe to you the nature of the country where we were operating is far beyond my powers. From an artistic point of view it was ideal, but for the troops—well, just impossible.

“ Matters were very quiet for some few days and the weather conditions fairly favourable. Now and again Bulgar deserters came over to us and gave information of an impending attack which subsequently proved correct.

“ The last day of November saw the hills covered with a deep snow, a keen frost and biting wind accompanying it. Never before have I faced such a blinding storm, and one had a thousand pities for the boys in the trenches who had precious little protection. I happened to be at an advanced dressing station just behind the ‘ line,’ but fortunately we were able to make use of some houses in a deserted village, so that we had the comfort of a log fire.

“ We had many cases of exposure to deal with, and more than one poor fellow dropped to sleep in the snow, but, alas ! it meant the Sleep of death.

“ One night we were sent up to the ‘ line ’ for some sick men. The frost had continued making the ground very treacherous, so that it took us a matter of three hours to cover a distance of barely four miles. At frequent points on the way we had to crawl on hands and knees, while more than once we were ‘ footing it’ knee-deep in snow. Such were the conditions under which the jolly Irish boys held the line, and when you remember that only a few weeks back we had experienced the intense heat of Gallipoli, and then were suddenly transferred to this cold region, I think that the gallant conduct of our men during the subsequent,retirement into Greece is worthy of all praise.

“ We are now camped ‘ somewhere around Salonica,’ awaiting the anticipated attack. I cannot say much about the position, but I can assure you that ‘all’s well’ on this Front, and our boys would rather relish an attack in this quarter.

“ We have had a couple of air raids at Salonica, but very little damage was done. During the second our gun-firing was splendid, and I had the pleasure of seeing one Taube brought to earth.

“ I would like to come across some of our ‘old boys,’ but have not done so yet. Good luck to them, and may the day soon come when we shall be able to greet each other, proud in the knowledge that we have done our ‘little bit’ for old England and for the honour of the school.”

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Mr C Pegg, of 1 Addison Road, New Bilton, has heard from his son, Pte George Pegg, of the Leicestershire Regiment. He has been wounded in the leg, but is going on well.

The Chief Constable of Warwickshire has approved a scheme put forward by the Sutton Coldfield Volunteer Training Corps for “ police ” service in the event of a Zeppelin raid. Men have been allocated to districts in the borough, and their duty will be to see that all lights are extinguished, to regulate street traffic, and to prevent panic.

Corporal W Bale, an “ old boy ” of St Matthew’s School, serving in the 2nd Royal Welsh Fusiliers, has been promoted to the rank of Sergeant, for conspicuous gallantry on the field. Sergt Bale, who was recently mentioned in despatches, has been in the Army nine years, and was transferred from India to France on the Outbreak of the War.

WOUNDED TERRITORIALS.

1/7th Batt. Royal Warwickshire regiment : Pte. H. Snell, 2526, and Pte. A. Summers, 1351.

RECRUITING AT RUGBY.

During the past few weeks the number of recruits attested at the Drill Hall, Park Road, has averaged about 100 per week, of whom 70% have been single men. Those single men who wish to attest before the Military Service Act comes into force have only till midnight on Tuesday to do so, after then they will be conscripts and absorbed into the Army according to their classes.

In order to avoid a rush, which is anticipated at the last moment, men wishing to attest should visit the Drill Hall at once, and as early in the day as possible.

The Group system will remain open for married men after March 1st.

Attested men who wish to be medically examined before their groups are called up should make application to the Recruiting Officer at the Drill Hall. The medical examinations will take place at Warwick, and recruits will have to pay their own railway fare.

RUGBY COMMITTEE’S PARCELS FOR PRISONERS OF WAR ARRIVE WITHOUT DELAY.

It has been frequently brought to the notice of the Rugby Prisoners of War Help Committee that parcels sent by individuals to prisoners of war in Germany invariably arrive after long delay and almost useless, whereas the parcels sent through the Rugby Committee get through quickly and in perfect condition. This is mainly owing to good packing, and the fact that the committee is a registered and recognised society.

The Rugby Prisoners of War Help Committee are anxious to avoid this waste, and desire to make it known that they will gladly pack and forward food and clothing to any prison camp in Germany without charge.

Thus, if there are any persons in Rugby or the surrounding villages who have been in the habit of forwarding their own parcels, they are invited to send same in future to the Rugby Committee, who will indicate on the parcels the name of the giver.

Parcels should be sent to Mrs Blagden, at the Rectory, or to the Hon Secretary, Mr J Reginald Barker, 9 Regent Street, Rugby.

The Committee will also be glad to receive the names of any men from Rugby and district who are prisoners of war.

ASHLAWN HOSPITAL CLOSED.

In consequence of Ashlawn being required by the owner for residential purposes, it was closed as a V.A.D. Hospital on Tuesday last, and the patents were removed to other places.

Other premises have not yet been obtained, and Mrs E D Miller, the commandant, is looking out for a suitable house.

RUGBY PETTY SESSIONS.

TUESDAY.—Before Dr Clement Dukes (in the chair), Arthur James, T Hunter, A E Donkin, and W Dewar, Esqrs.

EXEMPTION FROM RATES.—“ Te Hira,” now used as a Red Cross Hospital, and 67 Albert Street, Rugby, occupied by Belgian refugees, were exempted from the poor rates.—A similar application was made in respect of 39 Albert Street, Rugby, also occupied by Belgians, but this was adjourned for the assistant overseer to ascertain the earnings of the occupants of the house.

DOG OWNERS’ EXEMPTIONS.—Applications had been received from 212 farmers in the division for exemptions from licenses in respect of 273 dogs, and from 49 shepherds respecting 53 dogs.—Objection was made by the police in two instances.—Superintendent Clarke mentioned a bailiff who had applied for exemption as a farmer, but at present he had no dog, although he had kept one.—It was understood the man would be having a dog soon, and the Magistrates’ Clerk ruled that in the circumstances there was no reason why the exemption should not be granted.

THE MILITARY SERVICE ACT AND AGRICULTURE.

This Act practically applies to all fit single men and widowers (without children) between the ages of 18 and 41.

The Act does not apply to men voluntarily attested under Lord Derby’s scheme.

Every man to whom the Act applies and who is not exempted will be deemed to have enlisted, as from March 2nd, 1916.

WHO MAY BE EXEMPTED.

FARMERS & MARKET GARDENERS.

Farmer (including Market Gardener and Fruit Farmer)—provided that—

(a) farming is his sole occupation and his personal labour or superintendence is indispensable for the proper cultivation of his holding ; or

(b) if he is partly occupied in another occupation, his personal labour or superintendence is indispensable for the proper cultivation of his holding and such cultivation is expedient in the national interest.

Agricultural Machinery, Steam Ploughs and Threshing Machines :-
Attendant ; Driver ; Mechanic.
Farm—Bailiff, Foreman, Grieve, Steward.
“ Beastman, Byreman, Cattleman, Stockman, Yardman.
“ Carter, Horseman, Ploughman, Teamster, Wagoner.
“ Hind (if Foreman or Ploughman).
“ Servant (if Foreman or Ploughman), Scotland.
” Shepherd.
Thatcher.
Stallion Man (a man who looks after and travels a stallion).
Stud Groom (Scotland).
Hop, Fruit, and Market Gardens : Foreman.

CERTIFICATES OF EXEMPTION.

Application must be made to the Local Tribunal for a certificate of exemption in the case of every unmarried man of military age in one of the “ certified occupations ” who has not attested and who desires to be exempted from enlistment under the Act. The fact that he may have already been “starred” makes no difference in this respect.

Such applications must be made to the Local Tribunal BEFORE MARCH 2nd NEXT.

A certificate of exemption must be granted by the Local Tribunal to any man who shows that his principal and usual occupation is one of those in the list of “ Certified Occupations ” unless an objection has been received from the military representative.

Any appeal from the decision of the Local Tribunal must be made within three days after the decision of the Local Tribunal on a forms supplied by the Clerk.

HEAVY FALL OF SNOW.—During Wednesday night there was a heavy fall of snow in the Midlands, which continued almost without intermission throughout Thursday. The landscape presented a very wintry appearance in consequence, snow lying on the ground to a depth of several inches—nearly a foot in some places. Townspeople were busy on Thursday clearing the footpaths, in accordance with the request of the Urban District Council, and in the afternoon members of Rugby School from Mr Wilson’s house were occupied in this way in front of the School buildings in Lawrence Sheriff Street. Boys at the preparatory schools were also in their element, clearing snow away, and members of the fair sex did not hesitate to show their ability to use shovels, brushes, and any other implement that came handy.

Summers, Frederick John. Died 25th Sep 1915

Frederick John Summers’ birth was registered in the third quarter of 1893 in Rugby. He was baptised on 4 February 1894 at St Matthews Church. The baptism record shows his parents were Frederick Henry (born 1864 in Eathorpe) and Mary Ann Summers. They lived at 5 Bridget Street, Rugby and his father’s profession was entered as grocer’s warehouseman. Mary Ann was born Mary Ann Stevens in 1868 in Rugby.

In 1901 the family were living at 4 Bridge Street and father was still a grocer’s warehouseman. In 1911 they were at the same address and father was a white metal moulder, and Frederick John was a driller.

Frederick John Summers enlisted with the 5th Battalion of the Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry, Regimental number 11077 at the end of August 1914. Formed at Oxford as part of K1 and placed under orders of 42nd Brigade in 14th (Light) Division they landed on 21 May 1915 at Boulogne.

Frederick was a Private fighting in the action to capture Bellevarde Farm, a diversionary action for the Battle of Loos, on 25 September 1915 and was initially reported as missing in action. (See more about the Battle of Bellevarde Farm and the Battle of Loos on Rugby Remembers.)

The Rugby Advertiser dated 6 November 1915 reported:

Private Fred Summers Missing

General regret is expressed in St Matthew’s district at the news that Pte Fred Summers, 5th Oxon and Bucks Light Infantry has been missing since the great advance in September.   Pte Summers, who enlisted in August 1914, is a son of Mr F H Summers of 4 Bridget Street and when the war broke out he was employed at the Rugby Conservative Club. He was an old St Matthew’s boy, Secretary of the St Matthew’s Boys Club, a keen athlete and prominent junior footballer and cricketer.   He was also a former member of the lst Rugby Company Boys Brigade. Of   bright and cheerful disposition, he was popular with all who knew him, and the hope is universally expressed that ere long his anxious parents may have news of him. He was 21 years of age.

Frederick was killed in action and was awarded the British War, Victory and 1915 Star Medals awarded

Frederick John Summers is remembered on Panel 37 and 39 of Ypres Menin Gate Memorial and on the Rugby War Memorial.

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

18th Sep 1915. Warwickshire Yeomanry at the Dardanelles.

WARWICKSHIRE YEOMANRY AT THE DARDANELLES.

In a recent account of the fighting at the Dardenelles, when the new landing was effected at Sulva Bay, and an attack was made on Hill 70, Mr Ashmead Bartlett gave a vivid description of the valiant work of the Yeomanry. There was nothing in it, however, to connect any particular regiment with it ; but news of some of the casualties which came to hand private seemed to indicate that the Warwickshire Yeomanry, which includes the Rugby troop, took part in the attack. It is now known that they were in the splendid charge which took place on August 21st—only one day after their arrival at Gallipoli from Egypt. This being so, it may be interesting to repeat Mr Ashmead Bartlett’s,description :-

“ For about an hour there was no change in the situation, and then the Yeomanry again moved forward in a solid mass, forming up under the lower western and northern slopes.

“ It was now almost dark, and the attack seemed to hang fire, when suddenly the Yeomanry leapt to their feet, and, as a single men, charged right up the hill. They were met by a withering fire, which rose to a crescendo as they neared the northern crest, but nothing could stop them.

“ They charged at amazing speed, without a single halt, from the bottom to the top, losing many men, and many of their chosen leaders, including gallant Sir John Milbanke.

“ It was a stirring sight, watched by thousands in the over-gathering gloom. At one moment they were below the crest ; the next on top. A moment afterwards many had disappeared inside the Turkish trenches, bayoneting all the defenders who had not fled in time, whilst others never stopped at the trench line, but dashed in pursuit down the reverse slopes.

“ From a thousand lips a shout went up that Hill 70 was won. But night was now rapidly falling, the figures became blurred, then lost all shape, and finally disappeared from view. The battlefield had vanished completely, and as one left Chocolate Hill one looked back on a vista of rolling clouds of smoke and huge fires, from the midst of which the incessant roar of the rifle fire never for a moment ceased.

“ This was ominous, for, although Hill 70 was in our hands, the question arose : Could we hold it throughout the night in the face of determined counter-attacks ? In fact, all through the night the battle raged incessantly, and when morning broke Hill 70 was no longer in our possession. Apparently the Turks, were never driven off a knoll on the northern crest, from which they enfiladed us with machine-guns and artillery fire, whilst those of the Yeomanry who had dashed down the reverse slopes in pursuit were counter-attacked and lost heavily, and were obliged to retire.

“ During the night it was decided that it would be impossible to hold the hill in daylight, and the order was given for the troops to withdraw to their original positions. Nothing, however, will lessen the glory of that final charge of England’s Yeomen. Thus ended this great fight.”

OLD ST. MATTHEW’S BOYS WITH THE FORCES.

A large number of old scholars of St Matthew’s Boys’ School are serving with the Forces, and Mr R H Myers, the popular headmaster, has received many letters from the firing line, all breathing the same optimistic, quietly determined spirit which characterises the British Jack and Tommy. Two letters which Mr Myers has received lately are typical specimens, and give interesting details of use in both the Grand Fleet and the trenches of Flanders, and a few extracts may be welcomed.

ANXIOUS FOR THE DAY.

Petty Officer Telegraphist E W Penney, H.M.S Lion, in a letter says :—“ Unfortunately we in the Grand Fleet are not in the limelight like some of our more fortunate brothers, in the Dardanelles ; but although we envy them, we are proud to think that they are upholding the traditions of the Navy. We in the battle, cruisers, under Sir David Beatty, himself an Old Rugby man, have had two brushes with the Huns, at Heligoland and last January at the Dogger Bank ; but what we are all looking forward to is the glorious day (Der Tag) when we meet the High Sea Fleet for the first and last time. Many old scores will be paid on that day, and the murderers of the Lusitania, Scarboro’, and later the E 15, will get the punishment they so richly deserve. Although we have been engaged on the most dreary and monotonous work that a fleet is called upon to perform, i.e, a blockade, it has not damped the spirits of the men in the least. On the contrary, we have no pessimists, and everyone is as keen as mustard. I won’t describe a modern naval engagement, but it is exciting, especially during the chase which one always gets on meeting the Huns, as they are past-masters at running. Referring to one of the engagements, the writer says: ‘ We had several large shells aboard, and they wrecked everything near, but we got off very lightly, and only the Lion and Tiger were hit, and neither seriously damaged. I had a rather nasty cut an the head, caused by a bursting shell, but I made a speedy recovery, and am now anxious to get my own back. Of course, unlike the Huns, we have no ‘ Hymn of Hate’ ; but, to tell the truth, I don’t think the man is born who could put ours on paper. Unlike Dr Lyttleton, we do not love the Huns. Oh I dear no ; nor would he if he had witnessed a Zeppelin dropping bombs on our destroyers while they were trying to pick up survivors from the Bluecher. I hope before long we shall have come to grips with them again, and you can rely on the Grand Fleet winning the Modern Trafalgar, and I hope I am privileged to be present on Der Tag.”

GERMANS USE LIQUID FIRE.

Pte F J Summers, of the 5th Oxon and Bucks Light Infantry, in a letter to his old schoolmaster says :- “ We have had some very hard and exciting times lately. Our last turn in the trenches was one of eleven days in the firing line and three in support. All the time we were in we were subjected to very severe artillery bombardments, being the recipients of some very heavy shells. Our artillery near us proved superior in the exchanges, blowing the German trenches flat. The part of the ground that we held was protected somewhat from their smaller guns, as it was just behind the rise of a hill. The Germans send over a shell which we have nick-named ‘ whizz-bang ’; but so far they have gone over our parapet. Rather lucky for us. You will have read in the newspapers that the advance which followed the bombardment was entirely successful. The part we have been holding has always been one of the hottest in the line, and the enemy has tried every dirty method of attack there. Thanks to a kindly Providence, the direction of the wind protected us from gas during our time in. They tried gas shells though, but they were not very effective. An attack was made on our right with their liquid fire, but our counter-attack regained the small portion of line evacuated, and soon after our regular troops pushed them back farther still. The prisoners taken did not seem very keen : they were completely cowed by our shells, and in some cases gave themselves up. We find it rather trying in the trenches with so many alarms, often having to stand to arms just as we have got down to rest. I have often thought of the old school motto, ‘ Think of rest, but work on.’ I little thought when sitting beneath it that it would be recalled to my mind under such out of the usual circumstances.”

TWO HEROIC BRITISH SOLDIERS.

ONE OF THEM A RUGBEIAN.

Pte Swainsford, of the 1st Royal Warwickshire Regiment, writing to a Birmingham contemporary, says :—

Sir,—I have read in your paper on several occasions accounts of doings and happenings from the front, and so I am writing this to bring to your notice one of the most courageous acts during this campaign—at least it is so in my estimation. It was at the second battle at Ypres. We had just come out of the trenches for a short rest when we received the information that the Rifle Brigade ware to make an attack end that we should be in support. Well, the attack was successful, and two lines of trenches were taken. After the attack the Germ-Huns bombarded us terribly, thousands of shells being fired during the three days following. While the bombardment was at its hottest, our C.O sent an order that a machine-gun was to attempt to get up into the line. This seemed an almost impossible feat, considering the shells that were falling about ; but for all that, and despite all the advice received on the way up that it was impossible (I was in the reserve trench and heard the remarks), the officer, sergeant, and a private succeeded in reaching their goal. But no sooner did they get there than the officer was wounded, leaving the sergeant to take charge.

New follows information received from some of the Rifle Brigade who were there :

The Warwick machine-gun section succeeded in getting up to our position—in itself a most wonderful piece of work. They right away got their gun in action. After 15 minutes’ continual firing they had the misfortune to be buried, also the gun. Another 15 minutes and they were in action again. They had been in action, as near as I can say, about 2½ hours when the sergeant, looking through his glasses, spotted the place where the German reinforcements, gathered together, were waiting to advance to what was now their firing line ; but, unfortunately, owing to an advanced trench of ours, he was unable to fire on them. As soon as he realised this he explained the position to the private who was with him, and then, without the least sign of fear, they both caught up the gun and, despite a terrible fire, ran forward to the right flank, put the gun in position, and opened fire. The enemy dropped just as though they had been struck from above, very few escaping. They then picked up their gun and dashed back to their lines without injury ; but for all that it was the bravest thing I have seen in this war. The same night I was relieved, and so had to part from them, but in my opinion no praise is too good for those two heroes. Their names were Sergeant J Cresswell and Private King, Machine Gun Section, 1st Royal Warwickshire Regiment, 4th Division, 10th Brigade, British Expeditionary Force.—Yours, etc,

PRIVATE SWAIWSFORD.

1st Royal Warwickshire Regiment,

British Expeditionary Force, France.

The Private King referred to is the son of Mr and Mrs G King, 46 Pinfold Street, New Bilton. He resided with his parents till the outbreak of the war ; and he went to France on August 22nd, 1914.

GAVE HIS LIFE FOR A WOUNDED COMRADE.

A SPLENDID N.C.O.

Captain Conway, commanding B Company of the 7th South Staffordshire Regiment, has written to Mrs Woodward, now residing at Daventry Road, Kilsby, describing the noble way in which her husband, Lce-Corpl A Woodward, sacrificed himself for the sake of a wounded comrade. The writer says :-” I am forwarding you a bundle of letters and photo found in the Turkish trenches after our occupation of Chocolate Hill, on the Sunday after landing at Suvla Bay. I also thought perhaps you would be pleased to know what a noble death your husband died. The morning (Saturday, 7th August) alter landing, your husband was one of a patrol sent out to reconnoitre the hill now known as Chocolate Hill, about 1,500 yards to our front. About 200 yards from the hill the Turks opened a heavy fire on them, wounding several. The patrol than fell back on our lines, leaving one man (Pte Butler) badly wounded behind. It was not till later in the day that I learned that your husband had volunteered to stay with the wounded man where he fell. Sergt Evans, of my Company, volunteered to go out with a party and bring them in, but as it would have been certain death to anyone attempting this during the day-time, I had it postponed till darkness set in.

“ Unfortunately, during the afternoon, it was reported to me that your husband and Butler had been brought in by the R.N.D stretcher party. This report I afterwards found out to be untrue, as when we advanced on to Chocolate Hill on Sunday morning we passed the bodies of both, and I had them buried where they fell.

“ I am sure, dear Mrs Woodward, it will be some little satisfaction to you to know that he could not have died a more noble death, for he gave his life trying to save his wounded comrade. He was a splendid N.C.O, always ready and willing to do anything he was called upon to do.

“ Unfortunately, I was wounded the same evening, and was taken on board the hospital ship, but I took the first opportunity of bringing his gallant conduct to the notice of his Commanding Officer.—With deepest sympathy from Yours,

W I COWAP, Captain.

“ It would appear that the Turks had rifled your husband’s pockets and dropped the letters on retreating from Chocolate Hill.”

Lce-Corpl A Woodward was a nephew of Mrs Woodward, 73 Jubilee Street, New Bilton, with whom he and his wife resided at the time of joining the forces in September, 1914. He was 23 years of age, and had only been married two months before he joined to Miss E Worcester, of Kilsby. He was employed at the B.T.H Works.

RECRUITING AT RUGBY.

There has been a slight falling off in the number of recruits at the Rugby Drill Hall this week. The following have been accepted :—S Butler, R.F.A ; T Kirby, R.A.M.C ; H Brookes and A H Lorriman, A.S.C ; J H Hall, A S Smith, F Kirby, G H Chapman, and W Skeet, 220th Fortress Company, R.E ; W G Chater, R.W.R ; T Kenny, Leicester Regiment.

TALE OF DISASTER TO THE WARWICKSHIRE YEOMANRY.

CONVICTED FOR SPREADING FALSE NEWS.

At Stratford-on-Avon, on Wednesday, Albert Henry Brooks, chauffeur in the employ of Lieutenant Tate, Billesley Manor, was charged under the Defence of the Realm Act with spreading false reports as to disaster to the Warwickshire Yeomanry in the Dardanelles.

It was stated that defendant, on August 30th, came into Stratford and told several persons that Mrs Tate had that morning received a cablegram from her husband stating that the Warwickshire Yeomanry had been in action, that all the officers had been killed or wounded, and about 200 men put out of action.—Police-Sergeant Lee Instituted enquiries and found that the report was false. He was directed by the military authorities to prosecute. No cablegram had been received. The report had caused much distress, as a number of Stratford men are serving in the Warwickshire Yeomanry.

Defendant was fined £5, with the alternative of one month’s imprisonment.