4th Aug 1917. A Trade Union Protest

THE TRIBUNALS AT WORK.
RUGBY URBAN TRIBUNAL.

Of the nineteen cases for decision on Thursday evening in last week fourteen concerned local butchers. Mr J J McKinnell presided, and there were also present Messrs W Flint, T A Wise, L Loverock, W H Linnell, and H Yates. Mr H P Highton was the Military representative.

A TRADE UNION PROTEST.

A letter was read from the Rugby Branch of the National Union of Clerks drawing attention to the fact that during the last few months several military units who had been given exemption to find work of national importance had been sent by the officials of the Labour Exchange to fill clerical positions at a local factory, and several were so employed at present. The Union considered this practice reprehensible, unfair, and against the national interest. The case cited a coachbuilder who had been sent by the Labour Exchange to fill a position as material list clerk in the main drawing office of a local factory. This man was of military age, and was thought to a B1 man. This being so, the Union considered it unfair to the other clerks employed in the office that, whereas fully trained clerks in the lowest all medical categories were called to the Colours, they should be asked to train a man from an outside trade as a technical clerk on material list work. The N.U.C failed understand how a coach-builder could become sufficiently proficient under at least twelve months’ training to be of national importance as a clerk, while men of far greater clerical experience were declared to be non-essential. Then, too, if a B1 man (with no experience) was national importance as a clerk, why were trained clerks of all categories being called the Colours ? The clerks doing this particular class of work claimed to be specially trained as the result of experience and hard work, and if they were to train unskilled men sent to them they asked that these men should be ineligible for the Army. In conclusion, the writer said, in justice to themselves and those dependent upon them it was necessary to safeguard the conditions under which and by which they earned their living.—Mr Highton said in the case in question the man was sent to the works as a labourer, but was subsequently transferred to the offices because the other workmen made it “ too hot ” for him.—Mr Wise expressed the opinion that there was a great deal of justice in the complaint, and the Chairman concurred ; but it was pointed out that this matter was not within the purview of the Tribunal, and the Clerk was instructed to reply accordingly.

The case of the Secretary to the Rugby Trades and labour Council was again up for decision.-It was stated that this man had received exemption for a month to enable him to obtain work of national importance, and the Superintendent of the Labour Exchange had suggested that he should undertake the supervision of the structural alterations at the Trades Hall. The Tribunal had Agreed to this ; but the Advisory Committee were of opinion that the work was not of sufficient importance to justify exemption.—Temporary exemption till September was given for work of national importance to obtained.

MUNITIONS TRIBUNAL AT RUGBY.

The first sitting of the Coventry Munitions Tribunal at Rugby was held at the Court House on Friday in last week. Mr E G M Carmichael presided, and the assessors present were : Mr T W Smith (employers), Mrs Griffiths (women), and Mr W H Dexter (men).

Ernest Albert Eyres Riley, Newbold Road, Rugby, applied for a leaving certificate. He stated that he was a night driver on the power and lighting plant. On one occasion he pointed out to a day charge-hand a fault on the engine, and this man accused him of neglecting his work. This was the only time that the charge-hand had complained to him, and he contended that he was not to blame, rather that the fault lay with the chargehand. Applicant had since left the firm, but they had refused to give him a leaving certificate.—The representative of the firm pointed out that the man worked nearly six weeks after the incident referred to ; but in reply to Mr Morris (General Workers’ Union), applicant stated that he only allowed one week to elapse before giving notice.—Refused.

Walter John Farn, borer, 19 Sun Street, also asked for a leaving certificate. He stated that was wounded at Mons, and had since been discharged from the Army as medically unfit. He had been taken from the machine he was accustomed to work and put on another one, which was obsolete and too hard for him.—The representative of the firm stated that the man’s average weekly earnings were £3 7a.-Farn asked that the machine should inspected by a member of the Tribunal.—Mr Carmichael said thought this was a case in which every consideration should be shown to the man.—The firm’s representative pointed out that the difficulty was that Farn refused to give the machine a trial. It was no harder to work than his present machine.—Sent to medical referee, and ordered to give the machine trial.

For failing to work on several dates, W J Price, 9 Holbrook Avenue, was fined £2.—It was slated that this was a case persistent bad time-keeping, but the respondent contended that on a number of occasions there was no work to in the shop.—Mr Carmichael pointed out that had he had no right to leave work without permission.—The representative of the firm stated that there was no shortage in the department where respondent was employed. If the men were temporarily out of a job they were paid day work rates.

H W Jarvis, 60 Victoria Street, who had been fined on three previous occasions for losing time, was fined for a similar offence.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

News has come to hand that Major Cecil Nickalls, Hillmorton, has been wounded in the face and arm. The injuries are, fortunately, not very serious.

Sergt E H Rixom, Suffolk Yeomanry, eldest son of Mrs Rixom, Claremont Road, Rugby, has been gazetted second-lieutenant in the Royal Warwickshire Regiment.

Bombardier C W Packwood. Rugby Howitzer Battery, son of Mr C J Packwood. of 10 St Matthew’s Street, has been wounded in the chest in two places during the recent fighting.

Second-Lieut R L Cowley, Northants Regiment, son of Mr John Cowley, of Brackley, and formerly of Kilsby, has been missing since the historic Battle of the Dunes, and great anxiety is felt his parents, who will be glad of any news respecting him.

Bombardier Albert Goode, Rugby Howitzer Battery, son of Mr A Goode, 78 Avenue Road, New Bilton, has been severely wounded, and is now in a base hospital in France. Bombardier Goods is an old St Matthew’s boy, and was a member of the Football XV, which first won the Schools Union Football Shield in 1905. He was employed as an engineer at Messrs Willans & Robinson’s.

The Rev R W Dugdale (curate-in-charge of Holy Trinity Church) has been appointed chaplain of the Royal Flying Corps in France, and he is at present the only R.F.C chaplain in the Army.

Mr & Mrs Meadows, Inwood Cottage, near Rugby, have received information that their son, Gunner C H Meadows, was seriously wounded with gun-shot in the back on July 20th, and is lying at a casualty clearing station in France. Before joined up on November 1st, 1915, he was employed in the Telegraph Department at Rugby Station (L & N-W).

CORPL J C CHIRGWIN KILLED.

Unofficial news has been received of the death in France of Corpl J C Chirgwin, of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment, an assistant master at St Matthew’s School. Corpl Chirgwin was 29 years of age and a native of Cornwall. He came to St.Matthew’s School about seven years ago, soon after leaving college. He attested in the early days of the Derby scheme, and was called up eighteen months ago, and proceeded to the front last Christmas. He had two hairbreadth escapes in the recent fighting, and was killed by a stray shell last week. Corpl Chirgwin, who was shortly taking up a commission, was very popular with the pupils and staff of the school, and the news of his death was received with deep regret.

BOURTON-ON-DUNSMORE.

On Sunday last a memorial service was held at St Peter’s Church, Bourton, for the late Gunner Thomas Wilson, third son of Mr. & Mrs. T. Wilson, Gate Farm, Bourton, and who was killed in action in France on July 10th. He was a splendid specimen of manhood, and was a general favourite amongst the young people in the neighbourhood. Letters of sympathy have been received by his parents from the officers of the regiment, in which he is highly spoken of as being always cheerful, strong, and ever ready to do his duty, and his death will be a great loss to his regiment. Deep sympathy is felt throughout the village for Mr. & Mrs. Wilson and family.

MARRIAGE OF SECOND-LIEUT. L. J. HUNTER.

The marriage of Second-Lieut L J Hunter, Yeomanry, fourth son of Mr & Mrs T Hunter, Elmhurst, Rugby, to Gwenn, only daughter of Mr & Mrs S H Fraser, Kensington at St Andrew’s, Well Street, London, W, on Tuesday, July 31st. The ceremony was performed by the Rev H H Kemble, the uncle of the bride, assisted by the Rev S K Knight, Vicar of St Andrew’s. The service was fully choral, and the hymns, “ O Father all creating ” and “ O Perfect Love,” were sung. The Rev H H Kemble gave a short address. The bride, who was given away by her father, wore a gown of white charmeuse and Georgette, with a ninon train embroidered in silver, and carried a sheaf of lilies. Lieut. J. Mitchell, R.F.C., acted as best man. As the bride and bridegroom left the church Mendelsohn’s “ Wedding March ” was played. few relations and friends returned afterwards to the Langham Hotel.

THE FOOD ECONOMY CAMPAIGN.

A communication has been received from Headquarters advising the local Food Economy Campaign Committee to suspend its active stimulation of propaganda for a period ; but in order to avoid misapprehension the urgent necessity which still exists for the strictest economy in food consumption is urgently emphasised. The situation in regard to food supplies is still extremely grave. Meanwhile local committees may vigorously address themselves to their normal function of war savings.

DEATHS.

CRAWFORD.-In loving memory of Pte ERIC CLEMENT CRAWFORD, 18th Canadians, who died of wounds in University College Hospital, London, on July 23rd.-“ Greater love hath no man than that he gave his life for his friends.”-From his loving Mother and Dad, Sisters and Brother.

HART-DAVIES.-On July 27, 1917 (aeroplane accident) at Northolt, Middlesex), Lieut IVAN BEAUCLERK DAVIES, R.F.C., Rugby ; son of the late Rev John Hart-Davies and Mrs. Hart-Davies, of Southam Rectory, Warwickshire ; aged 39 years.

SPENCER.-Killed in action in France on July 22nd, Pte JAMES BARTLETT SPENCER, 11th R.W.R., son of Mr. and Mrs. Spencer, 94 Wood Street, Rugby.
“ Somewhere in France there is a nameless grave,
Where sleeps our loved one among the brave.
One of the rank and file, he heard the call,
And for his country gave his all.”

IN MEMORIAM.

DUNCUFF.-In ever-loving memory of ARTHUR FRANCES DUNCUFF, dearly beloved husband of Mildred Grace Duncuff, who died of wounds on Aug. 8, 1916.

DUNCUFF.-In ever-loving memory of our son and brother, who died from wounds received in action in France on August 3, 1916 ; aged 22 years 11 months.
“ Death hides, but it cannot divide ;
Thou are but on Christs’s other side.
Thou with Christ and Christ with me,
And so together still are we.”

GOODMAN.-In loving memory of GUNNER FRED GOODMAN, R.F.A., who died from wounds received in action on August 3, 1916 ; aged 20 years. Also Pte W. G. GOODMAN, brother of the above, of the 1st Royal Warwicks, who was killed in action on August 27, 1914 ; aged 29 years.
“ Farewell, dear sons, in a soldiers grave ;
A grave we may never see ;
But as long as life and memory lasts
We will remember thee.”
-From his loving Mother and Father.

GURNEY.-In ever-loving memory of our dear son, Pte HARRY GURNEY, of Church Lawford, who was killed in action on July 30, 1916 ; aged 21 years.
“ Could I have raised his dying head,
Or heard his last farewell.
The grief would not have been so hard
For those who loved him well.
We often sit and think of him,
And think of how he died ;
To think we could not say ‘ Good-bye ‘
Before he closed his eyes.”
-From Mother and Father, Brothers and Sister.

HOWKINS.-In proud and loving memory of Lieut. MAURICE HOWKINS, W.R., R.H.A., elder son of William Howkins, Hillmorton Grounds, Rugby, who gave his life for his country at the Battle of Romani, Egypt, August 4, 1916 ; aged 22 years. Mentioned in despatches for valuable services in the field, F.C.C. “ A fine soldier. I never wish to see a better officer ” (his C.O.).-“ Be thou faithful unto death, and I will give thee a Crown of Life.”

NEAL.-In loving memory of our dear son and brother, WILLIAM NEAL, of the Berkshire Regt., who was killed in action on his 19th birthday, July 30, 1916.
“ One year has passed away
Since our great sorrow fell ;
Still in our hearts we mourn the loss
Of him we loved so well.”
-From Father and Mother, Sisters and Brother.

PURTON.-In loving memory of HARRY PURTON, be beloved husband of Sarah Purton, who fell asleep on December 3, 1912. Also Lance-Corpl G. H. PURTON, son of the above, who died of wounds in France on August 6, 1916 ; aged 24 years.
“ His country called, he answered with his life ;
Not gone from memory, not gone from love,
But gone to dwell with his dear father
In God’s bright home above.”
-From his loving Mother, Brother and Sisters.

 

23rd Jan 1915. Letters from the front

A BRINKLOW REPRESENTATIVE IN THE TRENCHES.

Private Bernard Wolfe, son of Mr Augustine Wolfe, railway missioner, Bolton, probably one of the first of Kitchener’s Army to participate in actual fighting, sends home a striking account of his experiences. Private Wolfe joined in the last week of August, and has been in the firing line since December 21. His father is a native of Brinklow, and is well-known to Railway Mission men at Rugby. His grandfather and great-grandfather were also residents of Brinklow.

“ The Germans dropped between 20 and 30 shells over our trenches, but did no damage. Our artillery got their range beautifully, and dropped shell after shell right among them, and eventually succeeded in silencing their batteries. Our company (“ D ” Company) lost three men and a few wounded.

“ The German shell devastation in some of the towns and villages here is beyond all imagination. Cafes, houses, convents, are all deserted, and everything left holus bolus. Some of the brave Belgians remain in their remnants of homes. They have lost everything but their great and noble hearts and I don’t think there is compensation available on this earth to make good their losses and deprivations, I think the German troops are getting demoralised, and I honestly think the war will end suddenly, and will surprise all nations when it does collapse.

” It is very weird at night-time. Picture a dark night. British trenches and German about 70 or 80 yards from one another, with just an occasional rip zip of bullets to let each side know there’s a watch being kept. Then the “ Allemandes ” send a fire ball across, just like an enormous blue light, which illuminates the whole length of trenches. And then, what ho! bob down ! if you don’t you get it, for as soon as the light goes up volley after volley comes as long as the light lasts, which will be 30 or 40 seconds.”

FROM A LILBOURNE MAN.

An interesting letter has been received by Mrs Barnett, of Lilbourne, from her husband. Private A Barnett, 1st Royal Warwicks, in which he says that life in the trenches with such wet weather is most trying—otherwise, he states that he in in a good slate of health. Barnet says : ” I received a parcel just before Christmas from Miss Mary Mulliner, Clifton Court (where he was employed before the outbreak of war). Please thank her if you see her. I am also so pleased the children received toys from the Court ; I am sure they would be pleased. We are having four days in the trenches and four out, the different regiments relieving one another as soon as it gets dusk. I believe the trenches we occupy are in Belgium, but when we are out at rest, we are in France. We have had about four months of it now. I wish we could get out of the danger zone for a while for a good rest. At a place near Armentieres we had 31 days in the trenches without coming out, the enemy being entrenched about 200 yards away. We are nearer now—only 100 yards separating us. You can imagine we have to be very careful in our movements. We were on fairly good terms with them at Christmas, not a single shot being exchanged. They said they would not fire if we did not, and the truce was kept, and we were able to enjoy Christmas rather better. Bitter foes as we are we were able to talk to some of them, also exchange cigarettes and cigars. Anyone that did not se it could not believe that such a thing could happen in warfare : nevertheless, it’s true. Some of our men got hold of souvenirs, but I failed to manage one myself.

“ Our Battalion has suffered very badly : out of 1,110 men I am afraid there is not above 200 left. No doubt many are prisoners of war. When we arrived here we encamped near Langy. Just when they had completed a big retirement from Mons, we took up some trenches at Bueq-Le-Long, and on being relieved we reckoned on a rest. Instead of that we had four days’ march, resting at Rozet-St-Albin, Crepy, Rully-Verberi, and St Omer. From the latter place we rode with motor transport, packed in like sardines for three hours, to Caistre. Next morning we advanced and encountered the enemy at a place called Meteren, which they occupied and were made to evacuate alter a sharp encounter lasting about three hours. Our casualties numbered about 100. It was raining all the time and we were soaked to the skin. During our march through France I did not see anything that took my fancy much. I do not know what there is to make a fuss about. Old England can compare with it for scenery or anything else—except that it is a little warmer here.”

A NAPTON MAN AT THE FALKLAND ISLANDS.

William Watson, of Napton, writing from H.M.S Cornwall on December 9. 1914, says :- “ Dear Mother,— Just a line to let you know how we are getting on. I think the last time I wrote to you was when we were at Montevideo.

On December 7th we arrived at the Falkland Islands, and all of a sudden, when we were in the midst of coaling, we heard a gun fired. It was the Germans come to bombard Port Stanley. Directly we knew we stopped coaling, and our ship and four more British ships, viz, the Inflexible, Invincible, Carnarvon, and Glasgow, gave chase. When we had been steaming along as fast as we could go for about one and a-half hours we saw the smoke of five German ships. At last we gradually got nearer, and the Inflexible engaged with the Scharnhorst. We caught the Leipzic up, and had an engagement with her, which lasted four hours. By the way, I forgot to tell you I am wireless messenger, and I was on watch when we were in action. We fired over 1,000 rounds of lyddite shell at them before we set the Leipzic on fire. We have had several bad hits ourselves, one of which passed through the funnel down into the painters’ shop ; but we put the fire out before it did very much damage. At last, about ten minutes past seven, we hit her right forward with a lyddite shell, and she caught on fire. You ought to have seen he r; I stood and watched her. At last she made a headlong plunge, and down she went. I think out of about a crew of 900 eighteen were saved. Five of them we have in our sick bay. Of the five German ships four have been sunk and one escaped, but she will get captured sooner or later. Out of our crew there are only about four injured, and no one killed. Well, mother, I think we shall come home. Tell them all at Napton I am quite well and happy.”

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

On October 14th the sister of Scout J Farn, [?] Worcester Regiment, forwarded to him on the Continent a parcel, containing some cigarettes and handkerchiefs. On October 21st. however, he was wounded, and never received the parcel. This has recently been returned to another sister of Scout Farn, to whom he had left his property by his will , the authorities evidently being under the impression that he had been killed. The parcel has probably an interesting history attached to it, because when it was opened a piece of shrapnel shell was found inside it, the letter and some notepaper were torn to shreds, and the handkerchiefs were perforated, evidently by pieces of shell, but how this came about is a mystery. We are informed that Scout Farn, who is still in Cedar Lawn Hospital, Hampstead, has undergone two operations, and is going on as well as can be expected. He was wounded by fragments of shrapnel in the right arm.

Trooper Harvey Woods, of the 17th Lancers, is paying a short visit to his home in William Street, Rugby, from the front. His regiment was drafted from India to France, and this is the first time he has been home for seven years. While wishing to say nothing as to the actual fighting, Trooper Woods states that his regiment has been diverted from its ordinary duties, and has been serving in the trenches. In fact, he came straight from the trenches to Rugby. In many instances the men are standing waist deep in water. He spent Christmas Day very quietly in the reserve trenches.

NEW BILTON SOLDIER WOUNDED.

Mrs H Anderson, 39 Pinfold Street, New Bilton, has received official news that her son, Pte John Elson, 1st Northumberland Fusiliers, received a gunshot wound in the back in action on January 7th, and is at present in a General Hospital at Rouen. Pte Elson, spent Christmas Day in the trenches, has also written home to say that the wound is not serious. Mrs Anderson has another son in the Howitzer Battery and one in Lord Kitchener’s Army, and her husband has also a son wounded at the front.

WITH THE HON. ARTILLERY COMPANY AT THE FRONT.

The following extracts from a letter from a “ H.A.C. ” man at the front to his friends at Rugby will be read with interest :-

“ While doing duty in the trenches the other day one of our men went back to a barn to fetch something, and on returning he was shot. He went down with a call for help. I ran along the communicating trench in order to assist him, when a bullet took my shoulder strap off. Our officer recalled me at once. Some time after our bugler crawled out to the man, bound up his wounds, and stayed with him till dusk. He was shot soon after nine o’clock in the morning. They were sniped all the day through, but fortunately they were not hit. When we picked him up at dusk one of the men in my section was shot through the arm and knee.

“ Another day, owing to the continual rain, the communicating trench got full of water. It was my lot to cut a way through the side to enable the water to drain away. I had to stand for an hour up to my middle in the water ; it was bitterly cold, and I felt very exhausted towards night—so much so that I tumbled over when marching home. Our officer insisted on my riding his horse back, for which I was grateful. Unfortunately he has since been killed. He was a great favourite with the men.

“Early in the New Year we determined to have a festive gathering to which we invited some of the Scots Guards. The barn was lit up with candles. When the plum pudding arrived all the lights were extinguished and the brandy set alight. Of course, it was received with cheers.”

“ The other day, on our return after three days in the trench’s we decided to have a concert, so we stopped up all the cracks and crevices, so that no light could be seen from outside. The concert commenced, but we could not have it to ourselves. The Germans took part in part. They commenced to shell us. Towards four o’clock we had to clear out, and whilst packing up our wagon two shrapnel shells burst just over us in the trees, but luckily no one was hit.

“ We attended a very impressive service the other night ; it was held in a convent. The chaplain used a small electric torch, so that he could read the service. We all stood round and sang ‘God save the King,’ and, as you may suppose, the line ‘ Scatter his enemies’ was emphasised.”

RECRUITING AT RUGBY.

During the past week 27 recruits have been sworn in at Rugby. Their names are :—R.A.M.C, W Bax and W D Bottrill ; Northants Regiment, G S Carr ; R.F.A, H Dale, H Blythe, W H Morgan, C E Godwin, F B Allibon, W F Bolton, and E A Baines ; Gloucesters, T M Horrell ; A.S.C, W J Barnwell, A Copeman, I Green, A J Townsend, and T Worrall ; R.W.R, J Smith, E Summer, and C E Newman ; Dublin Fusiliers, J Cody ; Worcester Regiment, H Wells ; Lancashire Fusiliers Bantams, F Lowndes and P J Dunkley ; Oxford and Bucks L.I, E Harvey and W Jephcott ; Coldstream Guards, E W Davenport and H Payne.

 

14th Nov 1914. Soldiers’ Stories From The Front

A Lance-Corporal in the Welsh Fusiliers, whose parents are Old Rugbeians, writing from the trenches on November 4th, says :-“ We have been in the trenches now for 14 days, and it is awful. They are shelling us continually all day. Our regiment has lost about 300 killed and wounded so far. Just about 50 yards in front of our trench there are plenty of Germans that we killed about ten days ago. The shells are doing all the damage. I have got a German helmet for a souvenir if I come safely through it. I am lucky, as the chap next to me got killed the first day. . . . It is a shame to see old people and little children trudging along the road with no home. You can see our troops giving them something to eat when possible. I saw a Rugby Advertiser to-day ; I notice it has got some soldiers’ stories in it. I will keep you interested when I come home with them. . . . . I could do with a wash-have not had one for 16 days. We are all the same. . . . You should see the damage the Germans do to the villages. You can’t realise it. There is a church facing us—smashed to bits by shells. Every night you can see flares in the sky. It is the Germans building up their reputation by burning up the villages. Every day a drove of aeroplanes comes over us looking for our position so as to bring effective fire on to us.”

Sergt Freemantle, 123rd Battery R.H.A, writes under date October 29th :—“ We are all well here and getting plenty of supplies up. Only just a few “ Jack Johnson’s ” to keep us company. The weather is fine, but cold. The day has been favourable again for us. One of our Batteries, 80th R.F.A, is reported to have wiped a whole German Battalion out. The German prisoners are surprised when they are told that the Germans have not captured London or Paris. All prisoners say how pleased they are to be taken by the English. One boy, about 17 years old, walked into our trenches, with a dixie full of chicken stew. He had lost his way, so one can imagine his surprise when we collared him. I have not received one mark up to now, although our Battery had bad luck at Mons, Le Cateau, Sossoins, Aisne. The Germans have been trying to find us now for days, but I don’t think they can hit anything now only houses. The Indian troops with us seem to frighten them. The only thing that grieves us most are the snipers. They sit on haystacks or trees and have pot shots at us. One of our fellows (known in Rugby) was sent to find a sniper in the Brewery at —. He found three civilians with a maxim. They are now very happy. Our Battery, 123rd R.F.A, has been repaying old debts. We suffered at Le Cateau, but now we have turned the tables. We have five Legion of Honour men in our Brigade.

A Rugby man, a private in the South Wales Borderers, writing home on October 25th, says :-” You will read in the papers about the quantity of shells bursting around us day and night, and those who come out of it are lucky. We lost a great lot of officers and men on the 21st-my birthday, which will be one to remember. With God’s help I hope to be with you soon, as I think they (the Germans) must see by now that they are a beaten army, and the sooner they give in the better. We had 31 days in the trenches under fire, and then two days and nights riding in a train—if you can call it so with forty in a truck with our equipment, so you can guess it was a treat—and right into the firing line again.”

Capt Mortimer, of the 27th Battery, 32nd Brigade, R.F.A, who was for several years the Adjutant of the Rugby and Coventry Howitzer Batteries, has been awarded the Cross of a Chevalier of the Legion of Honour for saving the guns by “ man handling ” them under heavy fire, at Ligny, in France, on August 26th. On the same day a D.S.O was awarded to one of the officers of the Battery and D.S.M to seven of the men.

WOUNDED.

Pte A W Bottrill, 2nd Co. 1st Coldstream Guards, has written to his parents, residing at 94 Bridget Street, Rugby, stating that he is in hospital suffering from rheumatism and a shrapnel bullet wound in the shoulder. He was being transferred to Versailles, near Paris. Pte Bottrill, who is a reservist, was employed in the Turbine Department of the B.T.H, and was called up on August 5th—two days after his marriage. In one of the postcards he has sent home he states that he has heard from some of the Royal Warwicks that his brother Frank, who is a reservist in that regiment, was wounded, but so far the parents have received no confirmation of this.

Pte G John Wills, a reservist of the North Staffs. Regiment, has written informing, his wife, who lives at 77 Jubilee Street, that he has been wounded. He says : “ I have had a rough time since I wrote last. We have been shelled night and day, and the Germans have been trying to break through time after time. We took up some fresh trenches to relieve another regiment, and in front of them were scores of dead Germans. Our company’s turn to go into them came on the night of Nov. 1. They shelled a few times up till five o’clock ; then they let loose (talk about being in hell, that’s not in it !) as hard as they could with their guns on our few trenches ; then, when they had finished, they attacked us. I got wounded in the arm and shoulder, not severely, and don’t know how I got out. I am at a field hospital.”

Pte Chas King, 1st R.W.R, of 47 Pinfold Street, New Bilton, has written to his mother to the effect that he was wounded in the muscle of the right arm on October 27th, but is “ still carrying on.” He has previously been in hospital with gout, caused by service in the trenches. Pte King is a reservist, and has seen active service in India among the Afridis. Pte King mentioned that he had seen nothing of the three Rugby men—Corpl Hancox, Pte W G Goodman, and Pte W Busson, who had been reported as missing from the R.W.R. ; but pointed out that units were continually becoming detached.

Mr W J Farn, of the Mechanical Transport, Department, A.S.C, who was wounded at the Battle of the Aisne, has received a card from his brother, Scout J Farn, of the Second Worcester Regiment, stating that he has been wounded, and is in a base hospital. Scout Farn, who, like his brother, went through the Battles of Mons, Marne, and the Aisne, was, before he enlisted, in the employ of Mr Bradby, Barby Road. Driver Farn’s leave of absence expired this week, but this has been extended because he has not fully recovered from his wound. While at the front he had several exciting experiences, and witnessed the annihilation of about 2,000 Germans in a British ambush, and also the treachery of the Germans with the white flag when opposed to the Northamptonshire Regiment in the trenches, and the speedy retribution with the aid of a machine gun which overtook the Germans.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Both the Leicestershire and the Northants Yeomanry Regiments have gone on foreign service.

Rather more than 100 recruits are required to complete the 7th (Reserve) Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment, which is fixed at 600.

The Warwickshire Yeomanry are still in their Berkshire quarters, but with everything ready to go abroad at a few hours’ notice when required. The order may come at any moment, or they may remain for some time yet.

The 7th Warwickshire Territorial Battalion is busily preparing to join the Expeditionary Forces, orders for which may be expected any time after the end of the month.

THE 7th BATTALION, R.W REGT.

There have been considerable changes in the personnel of the 7th Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment in the last few weeks. Col Freer Ash is not now in command, having been gazetted to the 8th Reserve Battalion. The whole battalion has been, to a certain extent, reorganised. The main body are in Essex, and are taking part in work of an important character, the nature of which, owing to the censorship, cannot be disclosed. A part of the battalion are still doing guard duty at a Government ammunition factory near London.

RECRUITING AT RUGBY IMPROVING.

Although the figures of recruits in the town during the past week show a considerable improvement on those of recent weeks, the numbers are by no means so satisfactory as could be desired. Since Friday last week 20 have been attested for the New Army, as against eight the previous week. The recruiting sergeant is very optimistic, however, and is of opinion that there will shortly be another boom, as many villages in the neighbourhood have so far hardly been affected at all by the call for men.

A detachment of about 50 men of the National Reserve, who in future will act as bridge guards, has arrived.

A RUGBY SAILOR’S GRATITUDE.

A local sailor on H.M.S Zephyr, torpedo destroyer, writes :—“ Dear Sir,—I should like to give a word of thanks to the Rugby people for getting subscriptions up for warm clothes for the North Sea flotillas, as I am a Rugby man and doing patrol duty in the North Sea. I think they are much needed for the coming winter. No one would hardly realise what we have to go through in all weathers, night and day, with hardly any sleep, risking our lives where there are such a lot of floating mines. We have been very busy getting rid of them. We found out and sunk 19 in one day, so you see the risk we are under. We are very grateful to Admiral Powlett for what he is doing on our behalf, and hope the funds will increase. The writer goes on to say : I hope I shall be able to have a go at the Germans before long, as I should not be satisfied with myself to be blown up with a mine. They get frightened as soon as they see our ships, and run for all they are worth. There’s no doubt we shall spend Christmas in the Navy this year, when I was hoping to be back with the wife and family ; but, never mind, we are not down-hearted, and hope to finish them off before long. I get the Advertiser sent to me every week, and see how things are going on. Good luck to the North Sea Flotilla Fund.”

 

7th Nov 1914. War Casualties

Scout J Farn, 2nd Worcesters, has been wounded at the front. His brother, Driver W J Farn, was wounded at the Battle of the Aisne.

George Lines, a reservist in the Coldstream Guards, living at Newbold, has been wounded, and is reported to be in Sheffield Hospital. Lines was also wounded in the Boer War.

Lieut O’Connor, of the Cameronians, son of Mrs O’Connor, Overslade Manor, arrived home yesterday (Friday) with an injured ankle. He has a staff appointment in the 7th Division, and hopes in a few days to return to his duties.

The parents of Pte Harry Hales, 1st R.W.R, of Pinfold Street, New Bilton, have received official intimation that their son was killed in action on October 13th. Last week we reported that they had already received intimation, from a comrade of their son’s, of his death.

The death took place on October 31st, at Plymouth, of enteric fever, contracted on voyage whilst crossing with Canadian Contingent, of Aubrey, aged 20, younger son of Percy Ridley-Thompson, of Park Close, Bloxham, Banbury, and formerly of The Croft, Dunchurch. Deceased was an old pupil of Mr T Arnold Wise, of “ Oakfield,” Rugby.

Pte Harry Nash, of the 1st Northamptonshire, Regiment, son of Mr C Nash, the cemetery-keeper at Rugby, arrived home on Thursday. He looks very well, although he is still lame.

RUGBY OFFICERS WOUNDED.

The two sons of Mrs Anderson, of Rokeby Farm, Rugby, who have been in the fighting line, have been wounded, and as a result are now back in England. Lieut C E Anderson, of the Gordon Highlanders, was shot through the knee, and is now under treatment at the Empire Hospital, Vincent Square, London. His brother, Second Lieutenant R G F Anderson, of the Royal Welsh Fusiliers, was wounded in the head by shrapnel, and has been brought to his home at Rugby, where for the present he has to be kept very quiet, and is not allowed to see visitors. Mrs Anderson has another son in the army, Lieut W R W Anderson, 4th South Midland Howitzer Brigade, who is in camp at Great Baddow, Essex.

A WOUNDED RUGBY SOLDIER.

News reached Mr George Cook, of 13 Temple Street, Rugby, on Monday evening that his son, Ernest, who is a private in the Oxford and Bucks light Infantry, has been wounded, and is now in hospital at Tidworth, Wilts. Pte Cook went to the front with his regiment early in September, and on October 21st was wounded in the left leg and the right cheek. “ I hope to be on sick leave in Rugby before very long,” he says, and adds: “It is so different here to what it is in the trenches, for I am so comfortable.”—Before enlisting, Pte Cook assisted for a time at the School Armoury, and then worked at the locomotive engine sheds at Rugby. He was also in the Territorial Army before joining the Regulars.

B.T.H EMPLOYEE WOUNDED.

News has been received that Pte A J Vineall, of 65 Winfield Street, Rugby, has been rather badly wounded in the foot, and is at present in hospital at Leeds. On Tuesday he had several toes amputated, and on Wednesday, when visited by his wife, was still suffering from the effects of this, but appeared to be going on well. Pte Vineall, who was attached to the East Surrey Regiment, is a reservist, and has served 12 years with the colours, eight of which were spent in India. He also went through the South African War. Before being called up he was a fitter in the B.T.H foundry.

“ MISSING.”

Mrs H Flavell, of 14 Newbold Road, recently received intimation from the War Office that her husband, a reservist in the Coldstream Guards, was missing. She has, however, since received a post card from her husband, dated after the day mentioned in the War Office message, and the assumption is that he has become detached from his unit. Pte Flavell was an employee of the B.T.H Co.

WOUNDED WARWICKS FROM RUGBY HOMES.

In the fighting in the neighbourhood of Ypres, France, the 2nd Royal Warwickshire Regiment has taken a gallant part, and several men, whose homes are in Rugby and district, have been wounded.

Pte Wm B Wheeler, youngest son of Mr and Mrs J Wheeler, of 135 Abbey Street, Rugby, was wounded at Menin, near Ypres, on Trafalgar Day (October 21st), and is now in hospital at Portsmouth. He has a bullet ground in his right fore-arm, and says he received it where the heaviest and hardest fighting was going on. He adds in a letter to his parents :

“ It is hard fighting, I can tell you with those “ Jack Johnsons ” and shrapnel flying about in all directions. It’s a treat to be clear of them for a time. Whilst we were in a hospital in France, the German aeroplanes dropped two bombs just outside.” Describing the battle, he states: ” We were under heavy fire of big guns and so we retired for a short distance. Then we advanced still under the heavy firing, and moved so rapidly that we got within fifty yards of the German guns, thinking we were going to capture them, this being our intention, but as our artillery was giving a flanking fire, the officers would not take them. I was on the extreme right when I got hit.” Pte Wheeler mentions a number of comrades who were also wounded, and considers it is a wonder there are any of his Company left to tell the tale.

Lce-Sergt Wm Harper, whose home is at 20 Old Station, Rugby, is also wounded, being under treatment at a hospital at Aldershot. His parents went to see him on Thursday last week, and have a souvenir in the shape of a crumpled up whistle, which was struck by shrapnel and is considered to have saved their son’s life. His chief wound is in the arm, which was broken, and the flesh lacerated by a shell. Sergt Harper was ordered to the front with his regiment from Malta. Within six weeks of leaving Southampton for France he was back again wounded in the leg and arm. During the whole of the time from his embarkation at Malta until he was treated for wounds, he had not removed his clothes nor slept in a bed, and he has passed days without food and water, so strenuous and fierce has been the conflict in the trenches.

Pte F Batchelor, whose parents live at 35 Worcester Street, Rugby, is another soldier from the same regiment who has been wounded, he having been shot through the muscle of the right arm, on October 27th. He has this week been recuperating at Rugby, and told an Advertiser representative some of his experiences. He landed with his regiment at Zeeburghe, in Belgium, and first got into touch with the enemy near Ghent. He was one of a patrol party of 28 sent out to ascertain what force the enemy had in the neighbourhood, and that got to within 1½ miles of the German headquarters. The party was billeted in two houses, and then learnt with surprise that two doors away was a house occupied by 32 Uhlans. “We are in for a warm time,” remarked the officer, adding that each man was thenceforth to shift for himself. Refugees provided the soldiers with civilian clothing and walking sticks, and with their military dress tied up in bundles, the men mingled with the fugitives, and took train with them to Bruges, where they re-joined the column and marched to Ostend. The water here had been poisoned, and many dead fish floated on the surface. The troops entrained, intending to proceed to Antwerp, but news came of the fall of that city, and the column journeyed instead towards Ypres, and there joined the main French and Belgian armies.

“ C ” Company, to which Pte Batchelor belongs, was billetted in Zonnebeke, which place was left at 8.0 a.m, without a German in sight, but on returning at 1.45 p.m there was a large number of the enemy in the vicinity. The infantry took up a position behind a church, in which a number of wounded lay, and the position was vigorously shelled. Pte Batchelor was included in a patrol consisting of a lance-corporal and three men, who came upon a Uhlan in a tree, with platform and signalling equipment complete, his duty being to indicate what effect the German artillery was having upon the Allies positions. The patrol might have overlooked him had he not shouted out excitedly, “ English, mercy,” but he omitted to throw down his arms, and the patrol opened fire, and killed him.

Pte Batchelor had several narrow escapes. Although wounded, he was crawling along to the aid of a comrade shot in the abdomen, when the lance-corporal told him to go back for treatment, and went himself to the assistance of the man calling out, and promptly received five bullet wounds in his right arm. Having had his own wound dressed at the field station, Pte Batchelor proceeded with other wounded soldiers to Ypres, where 400 of them were looked after by the Sisters of a Convent. Subsequently he reached Boulogne, and crossed the Channel to Southampton. He was for a short time in Chatham Hospital, and in the next bed was lying Pte Osborne, of Hillmorton, who was shot in the cheek and ear, which has resulted in partial deafness. Pte Batchelor has seen some terrible sights, the most sickening being that of a comrade who received the full force of a shell, which blew away completely his head and left arm—a spectacle which filled all who witnessed it with a thirst for revenge. Lieut-Col Loring, though wounded in the foot, still continued to direct operations. He has since been killed in action. Pte Batchelor is now quite convalescent, and had orders to report himself at headquarters at Warwick yesterday (Friday).