1st Sep 1917. French Honour English Lady

FRENCH HONOUR ENGLISH LADY.—On Friday afternoon last week, M. Painleve, the French Minister of War, presented the Cross of the Legion of Honour to Dr Frances Ivens (formerly Harborough Parva), who has had charge of the Scottish Women’s Hospital at the Abbaye de Royaumont for nearly three years. Miss Ivens is also associated with Lady Michelham in the charge of the Michelham Foundation Hospital, Hotel Astoria, Paris, which M. Painleve attended to make the presentation.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Rifleman G Lorriman, of the Rifle Brigade, son of Mr J Lorriman, of 40 Essex Street, Rugby, was wounded in the head on August 19th. This is the second time he has been wounded, the previous occasion being on September, 1916, at Guillemont.

The friends of Sert-Major Hopewell, of the Rugby Howitzer Battery, will be pleased to hear that he has received the D.C.M. Sergt-Major Hopewell has been in the Battery since its formation and went out with it to France three years last March. During the time he has been there the Battery has taken part in a lot of fighting, and recently it has been very severe.

Mr J C Cowley, of Brackley (formerly of Kilsby), Northamptonshire, received on Saturday last a card dated July 15th (written with his left hand), from his son, Second-Lieut R L Cowley. Northampton Regt, who has been missing since the battle of “ The Dunes,” on July 10th. He is in a German hospital wounded in the right arm, and is going on nicely.

Lance-Corpl F H Hadfield, K.R.R, of 4 Charlotte Street, and Pte H A J Barnett, R W.R., of 174 Murray Road, have written home stating that they are prisoners of war in Germany. The news of Pte Barnett’s capture has only just reached his parents although he was taken prisoner on April 28th. Lance-Corpl Hadfield, who was formerly employed by Mr W Flint, wine merchant, was reported as missing five weeks ago.

OLD MURRAYIAN KILLED.

Mr W T Coles Hodges, of the Murray School, has received information that Rifleman Leslie J Ensor, son Mr J C Ensor, Nottingham, formerly of Rugby, was killed in action on July 10th. Rifleman Ensor, who was 21 years age, enlisted in the King’s Royal Rifles with his brother Claude in September, 1914, and they were drafted to France in July, 1915. For eight months they were in the trenches near Ypres. They were in the second battle of Ypres, and were in reserve at the battle Loos. They were engaged in various “ scraps,” the battle of Arras, and also in a good deal of sanguinary fighting on the Somme, their Battalion being specially commended for the capture of Guillemont. In this battle Claude Ensor was severely wounded, and his brother was also slightly wounded twice, the first time near Trones Wood. He was also buried and slightly wounded near Combles, and after spending four months in England returned France in January last. He was at first sent to St Quinten, and was afterwards moved up to the coast, where he fought his last fight with the K.R.R.s and Northamptons at Lombartzyde. Rifleman Leslie Ensor was battalion bomber, and held the instructor’s certificate for Stoke’s Trench Mortars. His brother Claude has now recovered from his wounds but at present has only the partial use of the left arm. He was recently offered a commission, but declined it, as he preferred to go to Hythe for a course of musketry. He was successful in gaining the first-class certificate and was promoted Sergeant-Instructor in musketry. Both lads stood 6ft 2in and weighed 13 stones, and their fine, manly characters made them popular with all who knew them.

FLECKNOE.

ROLL OF HONOUR.—Another Flecknoe young man, Frederick Cox, lost his life through shell-shock on the 16th of August, in France. In a letter received by the young man’s sister, Miss E Cox, the Colonel of his Regiment—a Battalion of the Royal Warwicks—states that he will be sadly missed by the officers and men. The young man was 24 years of age, and had been in France about 12 months. Before joining the army he was in the employ of Mr Thompson, farmer, of Wolfhampcote Hall, and bore an excellent character.

WOLSTON.

PRIVATE READER MISSING.—Mrs Reader has received news both from the War Office and the Adjutant of his Company, that Private Gerald Reader, her husband, is missing. Before joining the army he was manager for Mr Udal at Wolston. He was one of a body of men who made a successful raid upon the enemy. He joined the 4th Royal Warwicks, but was afterwards transferred to the Welsh Fusiliers. Much sympathy is felt in the district for Mrs Reader, who has four children, several of whom are very delicate. The day on which he was missing was the 12th anniversary of his wedding day.

ROLL OF HONOUR : MESSRS BLUEMEL’S WORKS LIST.—The above firm has given another proof of its sincere regard for men who have left their works to uphold the honour of their country. Through the instrumentality of Mr W R Glare, the genial works’ manager, who has continually had before him the welfare of not only the men but their dependants, two beautiful and expensive designs have been purchased. These have been mounted and placed in oak frames. The two rolls contain the names of 104 men from the works who have entered the Navy or Army. The records show that 16 have been killed, 27 wounded, two died from the effects of the war, three missing, whilst one is a prisoner of war and one is suffering from shell-shock. All the names have been beautifully inscribed on the two lists, and these are surrounded by artistic illuminations. Although they are not yet placed in a permanent position, a number of residents have viewed them and greatly admired their appearance. It is hoped by several who have had this privilege that it will be an incentive to the surrounding parishes to provide similar rolls of honour. There still remains plenty of space for the names of others who may yet join the forces.

BRANDON.

WOUNDED.—Mrs Blackman has received news that her husband has been wounded in the head, shoulder, and right hand. He has been out at the front for nearly nine months. He belongs to the Hertfordshire Regiment, and is well known at Brandon, having been in the employ of Colonel R J Beech a few years ago. Although very deaf from the result of his wound, he is progressing favourably.

STRETTON-ON-DUNSMORE.

MUCH sympathy is felt for Mr and Mrs T Nicholas, Lime Kiln Farm, who have received news that their third son, Stewart, who was wounded and missing on September 29th, 1916, is now reported to have been killed on that date.

ACCEPTANCE OF LETTER BY THE POST OFFICE FOR URGENT CENSORSHIP.—The sender of a specially urgent letter for Portugal, Russia, the United States of America, or any neutral country in Europe or America, may secure its specially expeditious treatment by the Post Office and by the Military Censors, by posting it at the counter the Rugby Office, with a special fee of half-a-crown in stamps in addition to the full ordinary postage. No responsibility is taken for delay, but in general letters posted under the special conditions will be despatched appreciably sooner than those posted in the ordinary way.

SERIOUS HARVEST OUTLOOK.

The harvest prospects, which month ago were of a hopeful character all round, have gradually become less and less satisfactory owing to unfavourable weather conditions, and this week the situation has assumed a more serious aspect, in consequence of the exceptionally severe storms for the time of year. Reports from all parts of the country indicate that very boisterous, stormy weather became general in the course of Monday evening and night, the wind rising to the strength of a gale, accompanied by violent squalls in many districts—apparently the most widespread gale experienced for a long time past. In the Rugby district rain fell with little intermission from Sunday evening till Wednesday midday, and there were heavy downfalls on Thursday.

NO SUGAR FOR MARROW JAM.—The Ministry of Food has officially advised the Liverpool Corporation that vegetable marrows are not fruit within the meaning of the Sugar Domestic Preserving Order (1917) and people are not entitled to use sugar for making jam from marrows.

DEATHS.

GILLINGS.—In loving remembrance of Rifleman WALTER GILLINGS, R.B., of Dunchurch, who died of wounds received in action August 18th, 1917.—Though lost to sight, to memory ever dear.—From Annie.—Rest nobly won.

HOLLAND.—Fred (2nd Lieut. Sherwood Foresters), son of Supt. W HOLLAND, Lutterworth, died of wounds at the Liverpool Merchants’ Hospital, Etaples, France, on August, 22nd, 1917, aged 22 years.

IN MEMORIAM

OLDS.—In fond memory of Pte. G. Olds, R.W.R, of Gaydon, killed in action in France, Aug. 30, 1916.
“ There are two things death cannot sever,
Love and remembrance live for ever.”
—An Old Friend.

OLDS.—In loving memory of Pte. G. OLDS, Gaydon, killed in action Aug. 30, 1916. Never forgotten by his Mother, Father, Brothers, and Sister.

MASON.— In dearest, proudest memory of my darling husband, Sergt. ARTHUR MASON, Oxon & Bucks, killed in action August 31st, 1916.—Until we meet.

WHITEMAN.—In glorious remembrance of Lance-Corpl. T. WHITEMAN, R.W.R., killed in action in France, September 3rd, 1916.—From his loving wife, Father, Sisters, and Brothers.

27th Mar 1915. Rugby Volunteer Training Corps

RUGBY VOLUNTEER TRAINING CORPS.

TWO DIFFICULTIES ELUCIDATED.

The present membership of the Volunteer Training Corps for Rugby is 235, More would, no doubt, have joined but for two points on which there has recently been information given of value to those interested in the movement. In the first place, men have been deterred from joining owing to the impression that they were not likely to be asked to perform any serious duties. With regard to this objection, we may state that the War Office has recently enquired from the Central Association of Volunteer Training Corps if the members of the various corps would do local patrol work, and how many men would be able to go away to undertake similar duties elsewhere. Further, that War Office has asked how many men would be able to go away for service in other parts of England in the event of invasion. Lord Crewe has expressed the hope that those corps would become a permanent organisation when the war is over, so that it may now be taken for granted that the value of such corps is recognised, and that those in authority are anxious to know what the members are able to do.

Another difficulty had been the declaration members are expected to sign. On this point Mr B B Cubitt, assistant secretary to the War Office, has written as follows respecting the declaration :—

“ This undertaking is not a mere formality, and the man signing it is expected to fulfil his obligation. If a man who may be called upon is not in a position to fulfil his engagement he can leave the corps.”

Mr Tennant, speaking in the House of Commons on March 1st, said : “ In cases where good and sufficient reasons are not shown a man ought not to be allowed to take the lesser obligation when he ought to fulfil the greater obligation of serving with the colours.” As to their powers, Mr Tennant pointed out that they could only use the power of persuasion. He also expressed appreciation of the self-sacrifice of the men who had joined the corps.

Col H R Vaughan, writing from the War Office on the question of railway men, points out that a railway employee, even if he joined a corps, could not be asked to join the Army unless he had the permission from his employers to go. There can be no doubt that the same condition applies equally to men who are engaged in Government contract work.

A County Committee for Warwickshire has now been formed by the Lord-Lieutenant and Col Wyley, of Coventry, has been appointed County Commandant.

ORDERS FOR NEXT WEEK.

RUGBY VOLUNTEER TRAINING CORPS.

“A” Company.

Till further notice.—No. 1 Platoon : Outdoor drill, Wednesdays (fall-in top Barby Road, town end), 8 0 p.m. Big School, Fridays (except Good Friday), 8.0 p.m.—No. 2 Platoon : Outdoor Tuesdays (fall-in top Murray Road, 7.30 p.m. ; Drill Hall, Thursdays, 8.0 p.m.- No. 3 Platoon : Outdoor Wednesdays and one other day as arranged.—No. 4 Platoon : Outdoor, Tuesdays (fall-in top Murray Road), 7.30 p.m ; Drill Hall, Fridays, 8.0 p.m.

Saturdays, fall-in 2.30 p.m top of Barby Road.

Shooting Range is open at Drill Hall, 7.30 to 9.30, every week-day except Saturday.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Seventy members of the Rugby Conservative Club are at present serving with the colours in various capacities.

It is estimated that the extra money put into circulation in Rugby during the stay of the soldiers was about £8,000 per week—probably more.

The 7th Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment, which includes the Rugby Infantry Company, left Essex this week, presumably for foreign service.

Harold Loverock, second son of Mr Lewis Loverock, who has been in South Africa for the past three years, has joined the Natal Light Horse, and is at the Front in German South-West Africa.

Maurice Howkins, son of Mr W Howkins, of Hillmorton Grounds, who recently received a commission as second lieutenant in the 1st London Brigade Royal Field Artillery, has now been gazetted second lieutenant in the Royal Horse Artillery.

A son of Mrs Wheeler, of 135 Abbey Street, has been promoted to the rank of sergeant in the Oxon and Bucks Light Infantry (Cycling Section). He is at present at Bradford-on-Avon, Wilts. Mrs Wheeler has three sons serving their country—two in the Royal Warwicks and one in the Oxon and Bucks Light Infantry. The latter has served 7 1/2 years in Africa.

Pte Alfred Hawkins, of the Northamptonshire Regiment, son of Mr A Hawkins, of Harborough Magna, was wounded in the arm by shrapnel on March 11th, and is at present in a hospital at Rouen. His parents received a letter on Thursday, stating that he was progressing favourably.

Lce-Corpl G A Barrett, of the 5th Rifle Brigade, an old St Matthew’s boy, who, as stated in the Advertiser last week, had been wounded, is at present in a hospital in England. We understand that he has been seriously wounded in the lungs, and some time will necessarily elapse before he makes a complete recovery. His father, Mr F T Barrett, of 17 Stephen Street, visited him last Saturday, and Lce-Corpl Barratt has since, written a very cheerful postcard. Lce-Corpl Barrett, who formerly worked for Messrs Frost, joined the army on the outbreak of the war, and had only been at the front a short time before he was wounded. A rumour gained currency during the week that he had succumbed to his wounds, but this, happily, proved to be untrue.

Pte Albert Batchelor, of the 2nd Royal Warwickshire Regiment, son of Mr and Mrs B Batchelor, of 34 Arnold Street, Rugby, is again an inmate suffering from wounds received at the Front. On Saturday, March 6th, he was wounded at 10.30 a.m, and lay 8 1/2 hours before receiving attention. He is now at the Sailors’ Rest, Ramsgate. Pte Batchelor, who is an old St Matthew’s boy, was previously incapacitated in October with a bullet wound in the neck and shrapnel in the knee. His brother Oscar is a despatch rider in Lord Kitchener’s Army.

Lce-Corpl Sidney Hubert Hadfield, 1st King’s Royal Rifles (third son of Mr J Hadfield, of 4 Charlotte Street, Rugby), who was seriously wounded in the right leg, by shrapnel near Mons at the commencement of the war, has arrived home for a short time. The unfortunate young fellow, who is only 26 years of age, has been in a London Hospital for the past six months, but, despite the best of attention, it is feared that he is doomed to be a cripple for life. His general health has also been adversely affected, and he has been sent home to effect, if possible, an improvement in this before undergoing an operation. He has served eight years in the army.

WAR CASUALTIES.

Regret will be felt in Rugby by many people to learn of the death of Sapper Ernest Lawrence Manton, of the East Anglican Royal Engineers. A native of Bedford, Sapper Manton, whose age was 24, was employed for a time at the B.T.H Works. He then took a situation in Coventry, though still residing in Rugby, journeying to business each morning. He was also engaged to be married to a Rugby lady, with whom much sympathy will be felt. The last letter received from him stated that he expected to take part in a big battle next day, and it was probably in the fighting at Neuve Chapelle that he was killed.

Sapper Manton was a member of Bilton Football Club, for whom he kept goal. During last summer he won first prize in a billiard handicap at the Regent Street Billiard Rooms, and for several months was a member of St Matthew’s Church Choir.

From a Bedford contemporary we learn that deceased was the younger of two brothers who were in the Royal Engineers. He had been in the Bedford Engineers for four years, and has resigned, but on the outbreak of the war he rejoined his old regiment, and went to the Front with the 1st Company. His mother received a letter from Second-Lieut O H Keeling, of the E.A.R.E, stating that her son was killed in action on March 10th. “ He was in my section,” the officer continued, “ and in him the section has lost one of the best of its men. I have heard something of the sacrifice he made when volunteering in August. He was always so cheery and ready to do his duty. Only last week he struck me particularly in this respect, when he was working in mud and water up to his knees—working at draining a trench that others might walk dry shod in it. Please let me offer my sincere sympathy to you in your great loss, but I hope your sorrow may be in some way lessened by the thought that he died for his country.”

RECRUITING AT RUGBY.

There has been a marked improvement in recruiting at Rugby during the past week, and 16 men have been attested. Suitable men are now required to be trained for non-commissioned officers in the 13th R.W.R ; and wheelwrights, shoeingsmiths, and saddlers are also wanted. Those who have enlisted this week are: Cavalry, S Dyson ; R.E, H Baines ; A S.C, H J Rowe, T Burns, R J Reaves, and H S Jude ; R.F.A, W G Fuller, J Cox and W Cox ; Northants, E Smith and G Southern ; 13th Gloucesters, W Moore ; Middlesex, A Page, R Philpott, and W A Walker ; Royal Welsh Fusiliers, W E Bennett.

REJECTED AT LEICESTER, ACCEPTED AT RUGBY.

The “ Leicester Daily Post ” for Wednesday remarks, with reference to the slackness in recruiting in that city, that it is stated that in Leicester and Leicestershire there have been a larger proportion of rejects than in other adjoining areas for medical reasons which to the would-be soldiers did not seem quite sufficient, and that from the beginning of the war up till now many men unable to enlist there have been accepted at Rugby.