14th Dec 1918. Rugby’s War Trophy

RUGBY’S WAR TROPHY.
ARRIVAL OF THE CAPTURED GERMAN GUN.

We announced last week that in consideration of the excellent war record of Rugby a German field gun, captured by the Royal Warwicks, had been allocated to the Town; and this interesting relic of a shattered military system duly arrived on Wednesday afternoon. The weather was anything but suitable for an outdoor ceremony. A drizzling rain fell most of the morning, but the weather improved early in the afternoon and a large number of people then turned out to witness the arrival of the gun. It was originally arranged that the Chairman of the Rugby Urban District Council, Mr J J McKinnell, J.P. C.C, should formally receive the gun on behalf of the Town at the urban boundary on the Bilton Road. Unfortunately, however, a break-down occurred at Bilton, and a messenger had to be despatched to Warwick for a spare part, and this necessitated an alteration in the arrangements.

The Rugby School O.T.C, under Capt C P Evers, turned out for the occasion, and, headed by the Corps Band, marched to Bilton, where Mr McKinnell, who was accompanied by Messrs W H Linnell, F E Hands, R S Hudson, T Ringrose, A Morson (Clerk), J H Sharp (Surveyor), T S Shenton (Manager of the Electric Light Dept.) received the gun (a 4.5 field cannon) which has evidently seen much service.

The procession restarted from Bilton shortly after three o’clock and when the gun crossed the parish boundary it was received with enthusiastic cheers and a frantic waving of miniature flags by the schoolchildren who had taken up positions on each side of the road.

The gun will be mounted on the grass plot fronting the Public Baths in Regent Street and to celebrate the auspicious occasion streamers of bunting had been hung round the three sides of this plot. On arriving at the Baths the Chairman standing near the gun said “ Ladies and gentlemen, this gun was captured by the gallant boys of the Royal Warwick Regiment, and all I want to do is to ask you to give three ringing cheers for the R.W.R.”

These having been given, an interesting and unique ceremony came to an end.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Dr Paramore, Bilton Road, Rugby, has been released from the Army and has resumed his practice.

The following B.T.H employes have been reported killed :—Lieut C A Field ; Sergt H M Bradford, R.W.R (Controller factor) ; Pte F J Swingler, Notts and Derby Regt (Collections and Credits Dept) recently died in France from influenza.

Captain R Snewing, eldest son of Mr and Mrs R Snewing, of Bath Street, Rugby, has been awarded the Military Cross. He was educated at the Lower School, and later entered the office of the B.T.H, and it still attached to the staff. He joined the Westminster Dragoons in 1916 as a trooper, and by his smartness and efficiency soon gained promotion and secured his commission, quickly following this up this his Captaincy. He was later attached to the Tank Corps, and gained the honour at La Cateau on October 23rd.

Sergt Ernest Gilbert, son of the late Mr Henry Gilbert, of St Andrew’s Street, Rugby, has been awarded the D.C.M. The Sergeant joined up with the Surrey Yeomanry, and, after serving in India, took part with the Royal Engineers in the operations in Mesopotamia, where he is still on active service.

Pte Gordon Stretton, sen of Mr & Mrs A Stretton, Stanford Road, Swinford, who has been a prisoner of war in Germany, arrived home on Monday night. Thanks to the food parcels that he has received, he has not fared so badly as some, but is thankful to be in England once more.

Bombardier J Jeffery, R.F.A, son of Mr W Jeffery, 33 Rokeby Street, has been awarded the Military Medal for bravery on the field. When his battery was held up by barbed wire he went forward with a sergeant, and under heavy shell fire cleared a path, thereby enabling his battery to come into action.

RUGBY OFFICER’S RETURN.
EXPERIENCES AS A PRISONER.

Captain Gabriel Gray (Lancashire Fusiliers), who was wounded and taken prisoner on March 26th, returned to Rugby on Tuesday evening, having been interned at Pforyheim Camp, Baden, with 180 other officers. Capt Gray has returned home in the best of health and spirits. After a month in hospital at Bielefeld, he proceeded to Karlsruhe, a distributing centre for officers. From there he went to Pforyheim. The food supply, which up to this time had been of a very meagre description, was augmented in June by the arrival of Red Cross parcels, and from that time there was no more talk of starving by inches. The prisoners at Pforyheim entrained on December 3rd, and proceeded to Basle, where they had a very hearty reception from the inhabitants, and again at Pontalier, on crossing the frontier, they were received with enthusiasm. By easy stages they reached Boulogne on the 9th, and crossed to Dover on the 10th.

DUNCHURCH.

PTE HARRY EVANS, whose funeral took place recently at Dunchurch, was at the time of his death (from pneumonia) in the A.S.C. and was formerly a corporal in the 7th Battalion, K.R.R. He joined the regiment on September 2, 1914, and served through the battles of Ypres and the Somme. He was wounded in the last-named battle, and being unfit for further active service was transferred to the A.S.C. Owing to the prevalence of influenza at the depot, it was impossible to arrange for a military funeral, but a bugler was sent over to sound the “ Last Post.”

In a letter to his mother, the C.O states that Pte Evans was one of the best and most reliable men in Transport department and respected by everyone in the Company. His loss was especially felt by members of the football team, of which he was one of the best and sturdiest players. The respect in which he was held was shown by six beautiful wreaths sent by his officers and comrades. His elder brother, Pte W Evans, was killed in June, 1917, and the remaining son, Driver A Evans, M.G.C, is now recovering from an attack of fever.

LONG ITCHINGTON.
On Thursday afternoon last week Pte Bertie Evetts, Gloucester Regiment, arrived home after eight months’ captivity. He has spent his time behind the German lines, and looks very little the worse for his adventures. When he reached home he had to be informed of the recent loss of his mother, who died from influenza on the 8th ult. He enlisted on February 28, 1917, on reaching the prescribed age, and had previously lost his father and elder brother in the War, who both died fighting for their country.

KINETON.
MUCH sympathy is felt for Mr & Mrs Askew, who were notified this week of the death of their son Horace. This is the third son they have lost in the War.

LILBOURNE.
A CONCERT was given in the schoolroom on Wednesday, December 4th, by the R.A.F Concert Party. A large and appreciative audience greatly enjoyed the varied programme, and called for several encores, to which the performers kindly responded. The proceeds will be sent to the soldiers from this parish, and will take the form of postal orders instead of parcels.

DEMOBILISATION QUESTIONS.
AN OFFER TO OUR READERS.

The question of demobilisation is uppermost in everyone’s thoughts at the moment, and it is beset with endless difficulties and misunderstandings. This being so, we shall be pleased to secure an official reply from the Department of Demobilisation and Resettlement in London to any questions our readers may care to put to us, addressed to the Editor at 2 Albert Street, Rugby.

RUGBY MUNITIONS TRIBUNAL.
FRIDAY. Before Mr E M G Carmichael (chairman), Mr J Findlay (assessor for employers), and Mr E G Evans (assessor for the men).
FITTER’S SUCCESSFUL COMPENSATION CLAIM.

Kenneth H Lythgoe, fitter, 4 Kimberley Read, Rugby, claimed £4 15s compensation from the B.T.H. Company, for dismissal without notice.—Lythgoe stated that he entered the firm’s employment in 1916, and on October 26th was informed by the charge hand that there was no more work for him. He then asked for notice, or failing that a week’s wages. He subsequently saw the foreman, who said he was entitled to a week’s wages and referred him to the office, where he was told that if he had any complaint he must apply at the Tribunal.— In reply to Mr London, representing the B.T.H. Company, complainant stated that owing to the shortage of matches a Bunsen gas burner, which was used for heating materials, was kept burning during working hours, although when it was not in use it was turned low. One day the charge hand approached him with a circular from the head office urging the necessity of economy in the use of gas, and he (the chargehand) asked complainant to turn the gas out when it was not required. Complainant replied that he would turn the gas out if the chargehand would supply him with matches.—The chargehand explained that it was not so much what complainant said as the way in which he said it. On the day following this affair complainant stayed away from work, and when he returned on Saturday he was dismissed on the grounds of general insolence and unreliability as a timekeeper.—Complainant urged that he had never held a job up during his connection with the company.—The Chairman said the firm were quite justified in getting rid of such a workman, but they were not entitled to dismiss him instantly and peremptorily as they had done. Complainant would be awarded a week’s wage as compensation.

THE SALVATION ARMY BAND, in connection , with their Christmas playing, are making a special effort to provide more instruments for their comrade bandsmen, who will soon be returning from active service, when a generous response is hoped for.

ABOUT 45 Army horses were sold at last Monday’s market by Messrs Howkins & Sons at prices ranging from 20 to 76 guineas each. Several bunches of store cattle also met a good trade, the prices realised being £30 to £39 per pair.

SCRAP RUBBER WANTED.—The Ministry of National Service, Rubber Salvage Department, are appealing to the public for scrap rubber, which will be sold to the War Office, and the proceeds devoted to the Red Cross. The Hon Secretary of the Rugby Part-Time Committee, Mr A W Sheasby, of 30 Sheep Street, will be pleased to receive motor-cycle, cycle and other old tyres, rubber boots, air cushions, rubber flooring, hose, belting, waterproof clothing, hot water bottles, air beds, water beds, rubber toys, heels, soles of boots, rubber off electric cables and shock absorbers, or, in fact, any form of rubber, and he will forward it to the department.

DEATHS.

BRAIN.—In ever loving memory of GEORGE WILLIAM BRAIN, of Dunchurch, who was killed in action somewhere in France or Belgium on November 1st, 1918, aged 18.
“ We loved him, yes, no tongue can tell,
How much we loved him and how well.
God loved him too, and thought it best
To take him to his Heavenly rest.
Gone from us, but not forgotten.
Never shall thy memory fade ;
Sweetest thoughts shall ever linger
Round the spot where thou art laid.”
—Deeply mourned by his sorrowing Father, Mother, Brothers & Sisters.

IN MEMORIAM.

INGRAM.—In proud and loving memory of Gunner ERNEST B. INGRAM (BEN), of the R.F.A., killed in action on Dec. 8, 1916. aged 22 years.
“ Somewhere in France in a lonely grave
There sleeps our loved one amid the brave.
One of the rank and file, he heard the call,
And for the land he loved he gave his all.”
—Loved and sadly missed by his sorrowing Mother, and not forgotten by his sisters and brothers and all who knew him.

MATTHEWS.—In loving memory of HARRY J. MATTHEWS (the dearly beloved and only son of D. and M. A. Matthews), who died in France Dec. 14th, 1917, aged 28 years.—Never forgotten by his Father, Mother, and Sisters.

READ.—In loving memory of CHARLES GEORGE READ, the beloved son of Charles John and Minnie Read, 46 Rokeby Street, Rugby, who was killed in action December 15, 1916, aged 22 years.
“ The Lord gave, the Lord hath taken away ;
Even so His servants are tried ;
Blessed be the Name of the Lord.”
—From his loving Father, Mother, Brothers and Sisters.

6th Apr 1918. Women’s Work on the Land

WOMEN’S WORK ON THE LAND.

At the Empire, Rugby, on Tuesday and Wednesday afternoons, stirring appeals were made to women to volunteer for work on the land. As an introduction to brief addresses, a film was shown depicting the procession of Warwickshire land-workers at the Birmingham rally.

On Tuesday Mrs Neville, of Stratford-on-Avon, said the picture showed that a certain number of women had done what they all ought to have done—viz, to have come out from ease and comfort at home to work on the land, and thus take the place of men who had gone to fight for them. They must have more women to do this work. If they did not come forward, they were not worthy to be the mothers, wives, and sisters of those who fighting for them. She could not imagine during this critical period any man or woman, having good wages, and living at home in comfort, threatening to lay down tools in order to get more money or for some trivial cause. What was that compared with what those brave fellows at the front were doing for them ? Let them do their best for those heroes, and if they could not put in full time work, let them join a part-time gang, who could do a great deal. In Stratford about twenty of them put in three or four thousand hours on the land during a year by giving up their afternoons ; whilst others in business gave up their half-holidays and did good work. Did they think they had at this critical period any right to spare time for holidays ? To older people, like herself, she appealed to them to put enthusiasm to make up any loss in years.

The speaker on Wednesday was Miss Peers, travelling inspector to the Board of Agriculture. At the present time she said the Women’s Land Army consisted of between 7,000 and 8,000 whole-time workers ; but the need of the country was so great that they wanted another 30,000. Could the women of Rugby find any recruits for this army ? They knew how splendidly their Army was doing its duty at the Front, and they wanted another splendid army behind. They wanted the women of England to fight in the British fields. Women of 18 years and upwards who were not doing national work should come and fight for their country, if only for six months, although they would rather that they came for a year. They must fight in the English fields to keep off starvation, to feed the men at the Front and the little children, and to take the place of the men who had made the great sacrifice for their country. They should remember Kitchener’s Army and how the men came forward. They did not ask what the wage was ; they came to fight for their country, and chucked up their jobs, saving : “ Here I am ; I am ready.” They now wanted the women of England to do the same. It they were not doing anything particular in the national interest or for their country they should think twice before they refused to fight for England (applause).

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR.
SCHOOLBOYS AND HARVEST.
To the Editor of the Advertiser.

SIR.—I understand the Warwickshire County Council are desirous of making it as easy as possible for farmers to employ school children in the hay, corn and potato harvest, and with that object the Education Committee have asked the managers of all the schools in the county to fix the summer holidays at a period which will best suit the farmers in the locality of each school.

In writing to suggest to farmers that they should at once see the managers of their local schools, and let them know the date which will best suit their own interests, and therefore the interests of the country, to have the schools closed, so that the boys can help with the harvest. The holidays may be arranged to be taken at one time, or to be divided, as best suits the harvest operations.

I urge that farmers should take action in this matter without delay, as some time will be necessary to make suitable arrangements.—Yours faithfully,

R LEAN,
Secretary, Warwickshire Farmers’ Union.
27 Bridge Street, Stratford-on-Avon.

 

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Colonel H H Mulliner has this week returned from France.

We regret that news has come through that Capt G Gray, 1/5 Lancashire Fusiliers, is reported missing as from March 26th.

Sergt A T Barnett, 1 Temple Street, Rugby, was wounded in France on March 21st. Before joining up he worked as a painter for Messrs Linnell & Son for 15 years.

Lieut C K Steinberg, M.C, of the Machine Gun Corps who was before the war was a member of the B.T.H office staff, was killed in action on March 22nd.

Pte Fred Summers, 2/7 R.W.R, has been killed in the recent fighting. He had spent practically all his life at Clifton, and was formerly employed by Mr M R Trower, and afterwards by Mrs Twells, as a groom-gardener. He was 31 years of age, married, a Sunday School teacher, and member of the choir.

Sergt J Sacree, Rifle Brigade, who was taken prisoner of war a few weeks ago, writes to a friend in Rugby that now his food parcels are arriving from England he is able to have fairly decent meals, and is just beginning to feel himself again. His many friends in Rugby will be glad to know he has nearly recovered from his wounds.

The following New Bilton men have been wounded : Pte Oswald Sydney Houghton, Welsh Regt, son of Mr C Houghton, 6 Bridle Road, mustard gas and pneumonia ; Pte Stanley Williams, R Berks Regt. son of Mr J H Williams, 64 Pinfold Street, groin (severe) ; and Pte W T Kettle, Somerset Light Infantry, machine gun bullet in left leg.

An official telegram has been received by Mrs Pengelly, who resides in Leamington, that her husband, Captain E A Pengelly, M.C, 213th Army Troops Company, has died of gun shot wounds sustained in the recent severe fighting in France. Deceased had previously been a non-commissioned officer in the Warwickshire Yeomanry. He was several times mentioned in despatches, and short time ago was awarded the Military Cross. He was the eldest son of Mr W E Pengelly was extremely popular with his men, and held in high esteem by his superiors, and his speedy advancement was assured.

RUGBY POSTAL OFFICIALS HONOURED.

Major H Neeves, D.S.O, M.C, son of Mr S Neeves, 13 Murray Road, has been promoted Lieutenant-Colonel in the Northumberland Fusiliers.

Another employee at Rugby Post Office, Second-Lieut T H Healey, signalling officer of the 19th Royal Welsh Fusiliers, has been awarded the Military Cross.

Captain Eric Rose, only son of the former Vicar of Norton, Daventry, and grandson of Lieut-Col Rose, of Northampton, has been killed in action.

SECOND-LIEUT EDDIE WILSON KILLED.

Mrs E Wilson, 41 Bridget Street, has received information that her youngest son, 2nd Lieut Edwin Thomas (Eddie) Wilson, Royal Warwickshire Regt, was killed in action during the heavy fighting on March 23. He was 23 years of age, and when he enlisted in the Hussars at the commencement of the war was an apprentice at the B.T.H. In 1915 he was given a commission, and shortly afterwards proceeded to the front. He was invalided home, suffering from trench fever, but returned to France early in 1918. Of a bright and cheerful disposition, he was a prime favourite with all who knew him. He was an old St Oswald’s boy and a member of St Oswald’s Tennis Club. Five of his brothers are still serving with the colours.

DUNCHURCH.

MR & MRS H PEARCE, Coventry Road, have received official news that their son, Sergt B Pearce, of the 10th Bedford Regiment, who was posted as missing on July 12th, is now reported killed on that date. This makes the third son they have lost in the War.

THE inhabitants of Dunchurch very much regret to hear of so many Dunchurch young men who are at the War being wounded. Among them are Pte W Collins, Pte T Shaw (seriously), Pte A Amos, Pte G Elkington, and Pte J Cleaver (who has his leg broken).

LONG ITCHINGTON.

WOUNDED.— Mrs Frank Lane has received news that her youngest son, Pte Herbert W Lane (R.W), is in a base hospital suffering from a badly fractured leg. Her second son, Lance-Corpl Sidney Lane (K.R.R), whose leg was amputated after a severe wound last November, is now in Leyton College Hospital.

FATAL AVIATION ACCIDENT AT RUGBY.
LOW FLYING OVER THE TOWN.

The inquest on Lieut H N Van Duzer, a Canadian attached to the Royal Flying Corps, who, as reported last week, died at, the Brookfield, Nursing Home at the result of a flying accident, was held at Rugby by Mr E F Hadow on Thursday in last week.—Mr [ ] Patchett was foreman of the jury.

Surgeon-Major Chester Collins deposed that deceased had been attached to the Royal Flying Corps for instruction about six weeks, and he was a very promising pupil. On Sunday afternoon he was called to a field off the Lower Hillmorton Road, where he saw deceased, who had received first aid from Dr Crookes and two other men. Deceased was quite unconscious and his breathing was heavy, showing that his brain was injured. At the Nursing Home afterwards he found the young officer had sustained a fracture of the skull, a compound fracture of the left leg, and a fracture of the left wrist. For twenty-four hours he appeared to do well, but early on Tuesday morning more serious symptoms suddenly developed, and he died within three hours. Death was due to meningitis caused by septic poisoning. The fracture of the skull was at the most vital part. He believed that these injuries were caused through the pilot being thrown against the bar or some other portion of the machine. Dr Collins explained how the accident was possible, and he recommended the use of a padded shield as some protection for this part of the head.

2nd Air Mechanic Pickering and 2nd Air Mechanic Leach, deposed that the engine and rigging of the machine were in good order before the deceased officer started on his flight, and this was confirmed by 2nd Lieut Francis Kenneth Laver, who had flown in the machine earlier in the afternoon.

Lieut Smallman deposed that he examined the machine shortly after the accident, but could find nothing to explain how the accident occurred. Deceased was seen spinning to the ground, and it was possible that he might have turned giddy ; but he was a strong young fellow, and he did not think this was probable. If this evolution was practised below a certain height it would be impossible for him to recover himself.

Dolf Farn, mechanic, deposed that he watched the deceased officer flying over the Eastlands Estate. He had been flying very low, but had commenced to climb. When he was about 1,000 feet up he commenced a spiral dive, and when he had come down about 500 feet the machine turned over. Deceased seemed to be trying to right himself, and had he had another dozen feet witness believed he would have done so, because by the time it cleared the hedge the machine was right side up.—By Captain King : Deceased did about six spins before reaching the ground.

In reply to the Coroner, Captain King, the Commanding Officer, said this evidence did not explain the accident, except that it suggested that deceased might have been spinning too low down and misjudged the height.—The Coroner expressed the opinion that the suggestion of Surgeon-Major Collins was a valuable one, and although he thought the jury could not include it in their verdict, Captain King and other commanding officers might take note of it.—Captain King expressed the opinion that a pad would obstruct the pilot’s view with the present goggles. He had had a pad placed on the machines.— The jury returned a verdict of “ Accidental death,” and associated themselves with the Coroner’s remarks concerning the pad. The Foreman also inquired of the Commanding Officer whether it was necessary for the pilots to fly so low over the town.—Captain King replied that it was not. Since he had heard of the practice he had issued instructions that it must be discontinued.—It was stated by jurymen that messages had been dropped to people in the town, and complaints had been made as to the low flying, which many people considered to be very dangerous.

COVENTRY APPEALS TRIBUNAL.

Held on Wednesday evening in last week. Present : Messrs H W Wale (chairman), P G Loveitt, W Johnson, jun. and S Dicksee. Col Moore was the National Service representative.

The Military appealed against the exemption till June 1st granted to Thomas White (single, 18, Grade I), blacksmith, employed by his father at Dunchurch.—It was contended that it was essential, if the business was to be maintained, that a strong young man should be employed. Two other sons were now serving, and a third had been killed.—Mr J E Cox, the agricultural representative, spoke as to the importance of the work— from an agricultural standpoint—which Mr White was doing ; but Col Moore expressed the opinion that a man of respondent’s age and fitness should be in the Army.— Adjourned for the War Agricultural Committee and the National Service Department to try to substitute the man.

Mr H Eaden represented Howard Harold Allkins, greengrocer and small-holder (39), Wolston, who exemption was appealed against.—Col Moore said this case was brought to relieve the National Service Department of a responsibility. They had promised the Miners’ Unions to comb out all post-war miners, but he supposed the man was as useful employed there as anywhere.—Mr Eaden said that Allkins was exempted to take up work of national importance. He went into the Binley Pit so that he could carry on his market garden after working hours.—The Chairman said the Tribunal were unanimously of opinion that the man could not be left in the mines and the case was adjourned for a month to see if he could be used to substitute the man in the previous case.

Harry Wallis (39, C2), boot maker and repairer, 117 Grosvenor Road, Rugby, who was represented by Mr H W Worthington, asked for a renewal of his exemption and, on the suggestion of Col Moore, he was given till July 1st.

George Francis Harris, licensed victualler, Newbold (C3, 41), asked for a variation of an order whereby he had been exempted upon working 30 hours a week in agriculture. He explained that it was very difficult for him to get agricultural work, and he asked for a full time munition order.—This was agreed to.

Mr H Eadon represented John Edward Pateman (C3), farmer, Monks Kirby, and said his client had been ordered to work 30 hours a week in agriculture, but his physical condition was such that this was impossible The man occupied 50 acres of land, and was feeding 30 beast and two milch cows.—Adjourned for the agricultural representative to inspect the farm. Col Moore stating that if the report was not an adverse one he had no objection to exemption.

RUGBY & DISTRICT FOOD CONTROL COMMITTEE AND MILK PRICES.

The rationing section of Rugby and District Food Committee, having conferred with representatives of the Retailer Dairymen’s Association on the question of the future price of milk, the Food Committee has accepted their recommendation that the April price shall be 2s 4d per gallon, and for May, June, July, August and September 1s 8d a gallon. There is also a proviso that if the retailers produce evidence that the price fixed for after April is unreasonable that price may be re-considered.—The Chairman of the Food Committee (Mr T A Wise) explained that the retailers brought no figures with them, and they thought that if they produce books they could satisfy the committee that they were not getting enough. It would, however, require very strong figures to convince the committee.—Mr W A Stevenson asked if it was not peculiar that the winter price of 2s 4d continue through April, and that there should then be the big drop of 2d a quart.—Mr T Ewart thought it quite consistent. April was as expensive a month to produce milk as any in the year. In May there was all the difference.—Mr G Cooke submitted that milk ought to be cheaper at Rugby in view of railway freightage being avoided.—The Chairman remarked that the producers’ price fixed by the Government was 1s 8d in April and 1s for May.—Mr J Cripps thought the retailers would be well off in May, June, and July with 8d a gallon for retailing.—The Chairman said he thought it a very fair bargain, and that there was not to much to complain of.—Mr A Appleby remarked that when it was admitted that on the figures the retailer was making a fairly large profit, his winter expenses had been exceptionally heavy.

Mr Cooke pointed out that on pre-war prices, if the retailer made 4d on a gallon it was reckoned he was making a very fair profit. They proposed now to give him 100 per cent. advance. The consuming element were only averaging 50 per cent. increase in wages, and some of them not that. There should be the same amount of sacrifice all round whilst we were at war, but the degree of sacrifice was not equal. He regarded 6d a quart for April as affording a very fair margin of profit, and he proposed as an amendment that that should be the price fixed.—Mr C Gay seconded.—Mr Cripps said that 4d a gallon margin would be too low.—Mr H Tarbox : You have to remember that they will get 8d next month.—Mr Ewart thought 100 per cent. Advance quite reasonable. He estimated that the cost of retailing had gone up 100 per cent.—Three votes were recorded for the amendment and 10 against.—The committee’s report was then adopted.

DEATHS.

BOTTERILL.—On March 18th, at Arras, Pte. A. W. BOTTERILL, 2nd Batt. Coldstream Guards, the very dearly beloved husband of Alice Botterill, also second beloved son of Henry and Mary Botterill.—“ O for the touch of a vanished hand and the sound of a dear voice that is still.”—Heart-broken wife, Alice Botterill.

WILSON.— Second-Lieut. E. T. WILSON, 10th Batt. R.W.R., son of the late Mr. Ellis Wilson and Mrs. Wilson, 41 Bridget Street, Rugby ; killed in action March 23, 1918.

IN MEMORIAM.

ASHWORTH.—In memory of Sergt. ASHWORTH, killed in action on April 9, 1917. B.E.F.
“ One sigh perchance for work unfinished here ;
Then a swift passing to a mightier sphere.”
—From All at Home.

COLLEDGE.—In affectionate remembrance of our dear son and brother, WALTER EDWARD COLLEDGE, who was killed at the Vimy Ridge on April 9, 1917, in France.
“ Somewhere in France there is a nameless grave,
Where sleeps our loved one among the brave ;
One of the rank and file, he heard the call,
And for the land he loved gave his all.”
—From his sorrowing Mother, Father, Sisters and Brothers.