Brown, Frank Lincoln. Died 3rd May 1917

We recently published the biography of Frederick Louis Brown as the most likely candidate for the F L Brown on the Rugby Memorial Gates. We have now discovered that the man listed should be Frank Lincoln Brown, who was born and lived in Rugby.

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Frank Lincoln Brown was born in Rugby in 1894, the youngest son of Edward, and Sarah Emily (nee Barge). Edward was an assurance agent born in Priors Marston and Sarah was from Wales. They married in Rugby in 1889.

In 1891 they lived at 2 Princess Street and in 1901, when Frank was aged 6, at 3 Newbold Road.

By 1911 Frank was aged 16 he was working as a machinist in a meter factory. The family lived at 33 Stephen Street, Rugby.

Towards the start of the war, Frank Lincoln Brown enlisted at Rugby and joined the 5th Bn. Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry (No. 10444)

He served in France and Flanders from the 20th May 1915. On the 3rd May 1917 the 14th Division, which contained the 5th Ox & Bucks, formed the left flank of the great British offensive at Vis-En-Artois. The attack took place over a twelve-mile front east of Arras with the Ox & Bucks attacking the enemy position at Hillside Work.

The attack commenced at 3.45am in the face of very heavy machine gun and rifle fire. The 5th Ox & Bucks were temporarily held up by an undiscovered enemy trench, which although they were eventually able to capture, they did so with heavy casualties. This obliged them to cease any further advance. At 11am the Germans launched determined counter attack ultimately driving the British back to their original positions.

The action cost the Ox & Bucks 19 men killed, 113 missing and 153 wounded.

Frank was killed in this action, almost two years after arriving in the trenches, on the 3rd May 1917, aged 23, he has no known grave and is today remembered on the Arras Memorial.

There was an announcement in the June 1917 issue of The Pioneer, the Baptist Church magazine that he had been missing for nearly a month. Frank Brown is listed on the Memorial Plaque in Rugby Baptist Church, which reads:

This tablet and the organ in the Church are erected to the memory of those members of this Church who laid down their lives in the Great War 1914 – 1918, whose names are given herewith also as an act of thanksgiving for the safe return of the many others from this Church who served in the war.

On waters deep in the treacherous
On rock bound heights and burning
They poured the offering of their blood
They kept the honour of the land.
A.W. Leeson      

Corporal Frank Lincoln Brown was entitled to the 1914/15 Star, BWM and the Victory Medal.

Sarah Emily Brown died in 1921, she was joined by her husband Edward in 1935.

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

 

With thanks to Kevin Pargeter, who brought this man to our notice and provided the information.

Brown, Frederick Louis. Died 1st Jul 1916    

We have now discovered that Frederick Louis Brown is not the F L Brown listed on the war memorial. See Frank Lincoln Brown, who died 3rd May 1917

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Frederick Louis Brown was somewhat of an enigma.  Recorded on the Rugby Memorial Gate, and remembered on the Thiepval Memorial, he joined the 1/6th Battalion of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment, was promoted to Sergeant, won the Military Medal, and was killed in action on the first day of the Battle of the Somme.

However, there is no record of him being in Rugby, and with no age at death, it is impossible to be absolutely certain of which of many Frederick Browns he might possibly be.

There was however a Frederick Louis Brown on the Birmingham ‘Roll of Honour’ and also a Frederick L M Brown born in Birmingham in late 1891, and living in Birmingham and aged 9 in 1901.  His family lived at 37 Portland Road, Edgbaston and his father was an agent in the cycle trade.  In 1911 he was aged 19, single and a ‘General Engineer Learning’.  With that background and trade, it is possible that he may have worked later at one of the Rugby engineering works, although he is not on any works memorial.

Assuming the CWGC record is correct Frederick Louis Brown joined the 1st/6th Battalion of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment, attained the rank of Sergeant, and was probably re-numbered as No:240069.  He also won the Military Medal, presumably in 1916 as the medal was not established until 25 March 1916.

After much searching two Medal Cards were found for Frederick Browns: the first had an early number 1379.  With that low number it is likely that Frederick enlisted very early during the war.  Soldiers’ records found with the numbers between 2199 and 3420 enlisted in November and December 1914 – his lower number suggests that he enlisted very soon after war was declared.

His early enlistment probably gave time for his promotion, and the 1915 Star Medal Roll confirms that Frederick was a Sergeant ‘on disembarkation’ on 22 March 1915.

The 1st/6th Battalion was formed in August 1914 in Thorp Street, Birmingham, and was part of the Warwickshire Brigade, South Midland Division.  It landed at Le Havre on 22 March 1915 and on 13 May 1915, became part of the 143rd Brigade, 48th (South Midland) Division.  The Division was involved in the Serre Sector of the Somme from 1st-12th July 1916.

Frederick Brown went into the French theatre of war on 22 March 1915, so he was with the main brigade landing at Le Havre.  On 1 July 1916, the …

‘… 1/6th Battalion and the 143rd Brigade, 48th (South Midland) Division was attached to the 11th Brigade (4th Division) followed the 1/8th Royal Warwickshires into attack on the Quadrilateral (1/7) – to the left machine gun fire swept advance and, according to the Battalion historian, reduced it to a strength of 2 weak platoons.  Passed through objective and consolidated ground beyond.  Withdrew to Mailly-Maillet during night and from there to Couin.’

The 1/8th Battalion which they followed are recorded as follows – they had 563 casualties …

‘… 1/8th Battalion …  moved forward from Mailly-Maillet (1/7).  Attached to 4th Division for attack at Redan Ridge.  Right of assault took The Quadrilateral, passed through and gained support trench beyond.  On left, German front line entered under heavy fire from Serre.  No further progress made.  Withdrew to Mailly-Maillet.’

Frederick was ‘Killed in Action’ sometime during 1 July 1916, on the first day of the Battle of the Somme.  His body was not found or identified and he is remembered on Pier and Face 9A, 9B and 1 B. of the Thiepval Memorial.

He was awarded the Military Medal for ‘bravery in battle on land’, and his first Medal Card recorded that he was awarded the 1915 Star.  His second Medal Card which has the later 240069 Number, shows that he was also awarded the British War Medal and the Victory Medal.

As mentioned he was also listed on the ‘Birmingham Roll of Honour, 1914-1918’, although his rank of Sergeant does not appear to be acknowledged.  He is remembered on the Rugby Memorial Gates – but sadly little is known of the Rugby connection of this brave soldier.

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

 

24th Aug 1918. Limitation on the Purchase of Jam

LIMITATION ON THE PURCHASE OF JAM.
An official notice in our advertisement columns informs the public that persons must not purchase any jam while they have in their possession any jam made from sugar allotted to them under the Domestic Preserving Order this year.

RUGBY & DISTRICT FOOD CONTROL COMMITTEE.

Mr H Tarbox (vice-chairman) presided in the absence of Mr T A Wise at a meeting of this committee on Thursday last week, when there were also present : Mrs Townsend, Mrs Dewar, Mrs Peet, Messrs A Appleby, J Cripps, A Humphrey, C Gay, G H Cooke, R Griffin, G H Mellor, and A W Stevenson.

Mr F M Burton (Executive Officer) reported that the Food Controller had sanctioned the increase in the price of milk. He (Mr Burton) had made enquiries as to the retail price of milk per quart in neighbouring towns, and had received replies as under—Coventry, 6½d in August, 7d in September ; Leamington, 6d August, 7d September ; Leicester, 7d August and September ; Northampton, 7d.

It was reported that the Enforcement Officer (Mr B Purchase) had been protected from being called up for military service by the Sub-Committee for Trade Exemptions.

The Executive Officer reported that he had received a request from the Rugby North-West Allotment and Garden Association for permission to sell vegetables at a show in aid of St Dunstan’s Hostel at more than the maximum prices. The Divisional Commissioner was the only person who had power to grant such permission. He had been approached, and had issued a license.

The Superintendent of the B.T.H canteen wrote explaining that, owing to the difficulty the Children’s Ward Committee had experienced in getting a caterer for the Hospital Fete, he had consented to act in that capacity. He had endeavoured to obtain twelve gross of mineral waters, but the manufacturer could only supply one gross. Provided, however, that the Food Committee would allot him an additional 96lbs of sugar, the manufacturer would be prepared to make the extra eleven gross.—The committee considered that this application was on all fours with the unsuccessful request of the Co-operative Education Committee for an additional supply of fat for making cakes for the children’s fete and it was accordingly decided to refuse it.

The Executive Officer read a letter to the effect that a new brand of bacon, which was more suitable for boiling than for frying, would shortly be released. The maximum retail price would be ls 8d per lb, and it would be incumbent upon all registered bacon retailers to stock it.

It was reported that, owing to dissatisfaction with the method of conducting business which obtained at Rugby Market, Mr A Appleby—who represented the Committee on the Allocation Committee—had signified his intention of resigning this position. The Executive Officer had written to the Live Stock Commissioner on the subject, and Mr Wright had replied that he was doing his best to bring Rugby Market more up-to-date. He was far from satisfied with the procedure which had been adopted during the last few weeks, but he trusted that Mr Appleby would not carry out his intention of resigning at present, because he felt sure that things would improve at an early date.

Mr Knightly (the Live Stock Sub-Commissioner) also wrote sympathising with Mr Appleby’s contention, and adding that he trusted that in the future there would not be the same cause for complaint. On the previous Monday the allocation commenced at 12.30, and was completed by about 2.30, and he hoped that they would shortly get through the work still earlier.—Mr Appleby said as matters had now improved, he was willing to continue to serve on the committee, and he accordingly withdraw his resignation.

With regard to the probable milk shortage at Brandon and Wolston, due to a farmer who has received notice to quit his farm threatening to dispose of his milking herd, Mr Appleby reported that the man in question supplied 17 houses in Wolston, 15 at Brandon, and Bluemel’s canteen with milk. Several farmers in these villages, however, kept milking cows, and it was possible that arrangements could be made for them to supply people who were willing to fetch the milk.—The Executive Officer was directed to endeavour to make such arrangements.

Mr Stevenson asked as to the position at the public with regard to Blackberries ?—It was pointed out by the Executive Officer that the public would be liable to prosecution if they went on to certain farms—of which notice would be given—to pick blackberries. If the ditch was on the road side of the hedge the hedge was the property of the landlord and farmer, and would, therefore, be included in the prohibition.—In reply to further questions, he said sugar allotted for preserving home-grown fruit could not be used for making blackberry jam ; but the Ministry had under consideration a proposal to release sugar for this purpose.—Mr Humphrey said the Government would have to decide quickly, or they would be too late ; and the Executive Officer was instructed to write to the Divisional Commissioner on the subject.

The Executive Officer reported that he had received applications from confectioners and bakers for 20cwt 88lbs of fats per week, but the allotment for the whole district was only 11cwt 107lbs, so that he had had to reduce all the allotments proportionately.

The Finance Committee reported that they had received advances of £111 and £78 from the Rugby Urban and Rugby Rural Councils respectively.

It was decided to hold the meetings of the committee fortnightly instead of weekly in future.

THE HARVEST.

During the past fortnight the weather has been most favourable for the harvest, and the work of cutting the crops has been almost completed, while many have been carried in splendid condition.

The crops this year are said to be the best since 1868, and with the increased acreage under corn, the yield, it is estimated, will to equal to about 40 weeks’ national supply.

In this district very heavy crops are the rule, especially oats on the ploughed-up grass land.

During the week brilliant sunshine and high shade temperature have been experienced, 83 and 84 degrees in the shade being registered on some days. Favoured with this weather, the work of carrying has been pushed on as rigorously as the supply of labour would permit.

While the dry weather has been all that could be desired for the corn, it having a marked effect upon the potato plant, which is being forced to early maturity, and the weight of the tubers when lifted may not, perhaps, turn out so large as the vigorous growth of the haulm at one time seemed to indicate.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

HIGH HONOURS FOR RUGBY LADIES.
We understand that the King of the Belgians has conferred the Order of Queen Elizabeth upon Mrs H C Bradby, of Schoolfield, and Mrs F E Hands.

MAJOR R W BARNETT KILLED WHILST RECONNOITRING.
Major Reginald Walter Barnett, M.C and bar, son of Mr Walter Barnett, of Bilton Hall, was killed by a sniper in an advanced post early in the morning of August 12th. He was 26 years of age. Educated at Winchester and Pembroke College, Cambridge, he was gazetted to the 11th Battalion, King’s Royal Rifle Corps, in September, 1914 ; went to France in June, 1915 ; became Adjutant in November, 1915 ; Brigade-Major, 189th Division, November, 1916 ; and at the time of his death was Acting G.S.O, II, 6th Division.

BILTON.
ROLL OF HONOUR.—News came to hand last week-end that two more Biltonians had lost their lives in the service of their country. The first intimation was that Major R W Barnett, son of Mr Walter Barnett, of The Hall, was shot by a sniper on August 12th. On Monday Mrs Sparkes received notification from the Officer in Command of the Company that her husband, Pte F W Sparkes, Royal Warwicks, was killed on August 11th by a shell. Before joining up in June, 1916, he had worked for many years for Messrs Linnell & Son. He had served in France about two years, and passed through a lot of hard fighting without a wound. He was 41 years of age, and leaves a widow and three little girls.

WOLSTON.
A TRIBUTE TO THE DEPARTED.—Miss Emily Matthews, daughter of Mr Charles Matthews, Brook Street, who is taking her holidays in London, placed a bouquet of flowers on the war shrine in Hyde Park, with the following inscription :—“ In loving remembrance of our Wolston (Coventry) boys, who nobly laid down their lives for King and country.”

DUNCHURCH.

MR & MRS BROWN, Windmill House, have received news that their son, Pte W Brown, who was a prisoner of war, is dead. Mr & Mrs Brown have three sons in the army, two of them prisoners of war.

LONG ITCHINGTON.
ON FURLOUGH.—Lance-Corpl John Askew (Grenadier Guards), Pte Arthur Russell (R.W.R) and Anthony Russell (15th Hussars) is on furlough. Lance-Corpl Askew has seen four years’ service in France. He has passed through many thrilling experiences, and has been awarded the Military Medal.

JOHN BENNETT WOUNDED.—News has been received by Mr & Mr. John Bennett, Station Cottages, that their eldest son, Pte John Bennett (R.W.R), has been wounded by the explosion of a shell. Pte Bennett’s last visit home was at Christmas, 1917. Before he joined up he was porter at Long Itchington Station (L & N-W), where his genial and helpful disposition gained him a host of friends.

STOCKTON.
Several of our lads from the front have been back in the village lately. It is not easy to get the boys to tell much of what they have experienced ; they seem to like to leave all thoughts of the way behind ; but the little one can glean leaves one full of admiration and gratitude for all they have gone through. George Bicknell landed in France on August 15, 1914, and went through the retreat from Mons with the 1st Cavalry Division ; he has since been to Malta and Salonica, and is now on sick leave. Tom Harker, who got severely wounded in Mesopotamia, being shot through the chest and then hit by a bomb in the back, and finally shot in the leg, has been back from a hospital at Bristol. Donald Fern is here to tell the tale of a torpedoed troopship, from which he has a marvellous escape.

NATIONAL SERVICE PROSECUTION.
CASE AGAINST A BRANDON WIDOW DISMISSED.

At Coventry County Police Court on Friday last week, Ann Mary Archer, a Brandon widow, was summoned on the information of Capt J A Hattrell, Ministry of National Service, Coventry, for having on May 11th and other dates made false and misleading statements with a view to preventing or postponing the calling-up of Walter Harry Archer for military service. The statements complained of were : (1) A false statement to the War Agricultural Committee for Warwickshire of the number of males employed by defendant at her farm at Brandon ; (2) a false or misleading statement in an application for exemption from military service dated May 11th last for Walter Harry Archer, whereby the man was represented to be the only male person employed on the defendants farm ; (3) other oral statements to the Coventry Appeal Tribunal which were misleading, respecting the terms of employment of James Dipper.

Mr F J Green. barrister-at-law, instructed by Capt Wratislaw, appeared to prosecute, and Mr Harold Eaden was for the defendant, who pleaded not guilty.

Mr Green, in the course of his statement. said that Walter H Archer was the nephew of defendant. The War Agricultural Committee and the Appeal Tribunal had to depend largely upon the truthful statements made before them, and any false statements produced a miscarriage of justice. At a time like the present it was a very serious matter to attempt to evade the law by such false statements as he was going to prove to the Court were made. He considered that a deliberate system of lying was indulged in by defendant. Regarding the first allegation set out in the information, the prosecution said that the application that was made was false in a material particular—it did not state that one of her employees, a man named Dipper, was working on the farm at all. His name was omitted altogether. It made a great deal of difference whether there was an extra man working on the farm of this small size— about 163 acres, of which 92 acres were in grass. This concealment from the War Agricultural Committee was a very serious offence in itself. She obtained from the Agricultural Committee a certificate enabling the case to go before the Appeal Tribunal by concealing the name of a man of military age who was working on her farm; and she then went before the Appeal Tribunal in Coventry with a more serious mis-statement still. In that statement before the Appeal Tribunal she referred to her nephew as “the only male person I have,” and he submitted that there could be no more misleading statement than that. Dipper had been specially exempted from military service on the condition that he did full-time agricultural work. For a year and some months Dipper had been working for the defendant. When the exemption granted in respect of Dipper was successfully reviewed defendant had the effrontery to claim for the further exemption of Dipper before the War Agricultural Committee. In the first place, Mrs Archer omitted to mention that Dipper worked for her, then told the Tribunal that she did not consider that Dipper worked for her, and later that the man Dipper had been working for her for a year and nine months.

Evidence for the prosecution was then called. It was stated that the man Archer was 19, Grade A, and single. A horse breeder, Mr Ashburner, in answer to Mr Eaden, stated that Dipper was in the employment of Mrs Archer, but he paid the man’s insurance, and also a regular weekly wage of 10s.

Mr Eaden, in his address for the defence, said that the point as to the statement to the War Agricultural Committee was quickly disposed of. Mrs Archer procured the form of application on which she proposed to apply for this nephew. At the head of the form was printed an instruction that none but full-time workers were to be included. This man Dipper was a part-time man, as was shown by the evidence of Mr Ashburner. That being so, no offence had been committed in regard to the War Agricultural Committee application, for she filled in, as she was asked to do, her full-time labour. With regard to the form of application to the Tribunal, he submitted that, considering the amount of land and the amount of livestock on the farm, the Tribunal could not have been deceived into thinking that only one man could do the work. She had never filled up a Tribunal application before, and instead of getting a friend to help her, filled this up herself. Counsel for the prosecution had read part of the statement, but when the full text of the sentence was read it was as follows :—“ And is the only male person I have, being a widow and no brothers to help on the farm.” From that it would be perfectly clear to the Bench that what she intended to convey was that she was a widow on the farm, and the only responsible person she could rely upon to look after her farm was this nephew. He objected to the language used by the prosecution as to a system of lying and effrontery. When Mrs Archer was before the Tribunal on May 24th on this application for her nephew, the official form D.R 17 was placed before the Court, and showed clearly that this man Dipper was in her employ. The Tribunal could not, in face of the information contained in that form, be deceived as to the labour employed.

Mrs Archer went into the witness-box and gave a denial to the charge made against her, giving evidence in support of her advocate’s statement. Her sister also gave evidence, and swore that before the Tribunal, defendants list of labour was read revealing the employment of Dipper, and there was no endeavour to represent Dipper as a “ negligible quantity.”

The Bench dismissed the case.

DEATHS.

BARNETT.—Killed whilst reconnoitring, on August 12th Major REGINALD WALTER BARNETT, M.C and Bar, 60th Rifles, Acting G.S.O. II., dearly beloved son of Walter Barnett, Bilton Hall, Rugby ; aged 26.

BROWN.—In ever-loving memory of my dear husband, Pte. J. W. BROWN, 10th Royal Warwickshire Regiment, who died in hospital at Dulmen, Germany, between July 12th and 18th.
“ Sweet is the memory he left behind
Of a life that was manly, clean and kind.
His fight is fought, he has gained his rest ;
We remember dear Will as one of the best.”
—Deeply mourned by his sorrowing Wife, Mother,
Father, Sisters and Brothers.

SPARKES.—In ever loving and affectionate remembrance of my beloved husband, Pte. FREDERICK WILLIAM SPARKES, 2/7 Royal Warwickshire Regt, killed in action in France on August 11th, 1918, aged 41 years.
“ We miss the handclasp, miss the loving smile ;
Our hearts are broken, but a little while,
And we shall pass within the Golden Gates.
God comfort us ; God help us while we wait.”
—From his sorrowing wife and children.

IN MEMORIAM.

COCKERILL.—In loving memory of Pte. TOM COCKERILL who died of wounds received in action, August 25. 1915.
“ The midnight star shines o’er the grave
Of our dear son and soldier brave.
How dear, how brave, we shall understand
When we meet again in the Better Land.”
—From Mother, Sister, Brothers, & Stepfather.

GILLINGS.—In loving memory of Rifleman WALTER GILLINGS, who died from wounds in France on August 18, 1917.
“ Not dead to us, we love him still ;
Not lost, but gone before.
He lives with us in memory still,
And will for evermore.”
—Lovingly remembered by his Mother, Brothers and Sisters.

GILLINGS.—In loving memory of our dear brother Rifleman W. GILLINGS, who died from wounds in France, August 18, 1917.
“ God takes our loved ones from our homes,
But never from our hearts.”
—From Jack and Nan.

GREEN.—In ever-loving memory of Pte. ALBERT GREEN, killed in action in France on August 26, 1917 ; buried in Aix Noulette Communal Cemetery.
“ To live in the hearts of those they leave behind is not to die.
In loving much he was greatly beloved, and in death deeply mourned.”
—From his Mother, Father, Sisters and Brothers.

SMITH.—In loving memory of our dear son and brother, Bombardier SIDNEY GEORGE Smith, Rugby Howitzer Battery, killed in action in France, August 18, 1917.
“ A faithful son, a loving brother,
One of the best towards his mother.
He served his King and country,
God knows he did his best,
But now he sleeps in Jesus,
A soldier laid to rest.
Could I have missed your dying head,
Or heard your last farewell,
The grief would not have been so hard
For us who loved you well.”
—Deeply mourned by his Mother, Father, Sisters, & Brother.

SUMMERFIELD.—In loving memory of our dear son, Pte. W. E. SUMMERFIELD, who was killed in action in France on August 20, 1917.
“ Sleep on, dear son, in thy foreign grave ;
Your life for your country you nobly gave.
No friends stood near to say ‘ Good-bye,’
Safe in God’s keeping now you lie.”
—From Mother, Father, Brothers and Sisters.

YEOMANS.—In loving memory of Corpl G. YEOMANS, R.W.R., killed in action on August 27, 1917.
“ The moonlight stars are gleaming
On a grave I cannot see ;
Amongst the mist of battle
Lies one most dear to me.”
“ Though death divides, sweet memory lives forever.”
— Ever in the thoughts of Kez.

1st Jun 1918. Airmen’s Practical Joke

AIRMEN’S PRACTICAL JOKE.

A practical joke was perpetuated on Monday afternoon, when an airman, flying over the town, dropped a dummy man, which fell at the back of some premises in Church Street. The object was recovered and taken away by other airmen, who came along Church Street at the time in a motor-car. It is stated that it bore the inscription: “This man does not wish to be buried at Rugby”—evidently a reference to the controversy between the flying officers and the Urban Council concerning the charge for the burial of an officer recently killed near the town. The falling dummy caused a fright to those who saw it, and many people feared that another fatal accident had occurred. A woman in the Market Place fainted, and had to be conveyed into a neighbouring shop.

RUGBY PRISONERS OF WAR COMMITTEE.

The monthly meeting of the Rugby Prisoners of War Help Committee was held at Benn Buildings on Monday evening, the chairman (Mr Wm Flint) presiding. There were also present : Mrs Blagden, Mrs J H Lees, Mrs Anderson, Mr G W Walton, Mr R P Mason, Mr A E Donkin, J.P., Mr J H Mellor, and the Hon Secretary, Mr J Reginald Barker.

The Chairman reminded the committee that at the last meeting the Hon Secretary warned them that there was every reason to expect a big increase in the number of prisoners and in consequence a large increase in the financial burden. His forecast had, unfortunately come true, and they were now faced with a very great expense every month. Thanks to their Hon Secretary and the foresight of the committee in looking ahead in the manner they had done, they were at the moment able to face these additional responsibilities, but it was very necessary that renewed and continued support be given to the fund.

Mr Barker stated that during May the receipts from all sources amounted to £102 16s 9d, whilst the cost of food panels was £218 11s, a deficit for the first time for seven months. The committee would remember that he mentioned at a recent meeting that he was enquiring into the bona-fides of all the prisoners on their list. He found there were a few men, who, whilst they had relatives living in the town, were themselves quite strangers, having lived in other parts of the country before joining up. In one case the man’s wife had only come to Rugby since her husband had been a prisoner. He had proved to the Regimental Care Committees concerned that these men in question, about a dozen in all, had no claim in the Rugby Fund, and they had therefore been transferred to the committees of their own districts. In addition they had been fortunate in having several of their prisoners transferred to Holland or Switzerland, and the numbers were thereby reduced to 60. During the present month, however, 35 men from Rugby and district had become prisoners of war, bringing the total to 95, whilst there were still a number reported missing, some of whom in all probability being prisoners of war. They were now fated with an expenditure of nearly £300 per month, and he regretted to say the Central Committee found it necessary, owing to the increase in the cost of foodstuffs and materials, to raise the price of the standard parcels from 8s to 10s each as from July 11th ; that was six weeks hence, so they had a little breathing space. It would mean that instead of £2 15s 6d per man every four weeks, or £3 per calendar month, they would have to provide £3 7s 6d per man every four weeks, or £3 13s per calendar month. Mr Barker also informed the committee that arrangements had been made to speed up the delivery of the first parcel for newly-captured men. It took at the earliest two months from the time a man was captured until his first parcel reached him from this country, and often as long as three months. In order to bridge over the interval the Central Committee had recently established a large depot in Rotterdam, where a supply is kept of 28,000 emergency parcels, each of which is sufficient to keep two prisoners for a week. The British Help Committees which now exist in all prison camps in Germany, are empowered to draw upon the Rotterdam depot for such parcels as are required for new prisoners until the arrival of the parcels from England.

It was satisfactory to be able to state that although a certain amount of miscarriage was unavoidable, from 80 to 90 per cent of the parcels eventually reached their destination. This, said Mr Barker, was not over-estimated. He kept a careful register of the acknowledgements received from the men on the Rugby list ; the acknowledgements being filed under each men’s initial.

The Chairman said the proof they had that the parcels reached the men would do much to encourage all concerned in their efforts on behalf of their unfortunate townsmen in captivity. With regard to the expense to which they were now committed, he asked the committee to carefully consider the question of additional expense caused by the proposed increase in the price of the standard food parcels.— Mrs Blagden said they had always in the past met the demands and she trusted they would continue to do so without having to ask the Red Cross Society to make good any deficit. She felt sure that Rugby and district would continue its support, and proposed that the committee should, as and when required, provide the funds necessary to maintain in full the value of the parcels.—This was seconded by Mr Walton and unanimously carried.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Capt P W le Gros, Royal Warwicks, who is reported wounded, was in the Cricket XI and the XV at Rugby. In 1919 he was the most effective bowler in the School and afterwards he played for Buckinghamshire.

Major-General Sir F C Shaw, K.C.B, who commanded the 29th Division during their stay in Warwickshire, has just been appointed Commander-in-Chief of the Forces in Ireland.

Sergt F Turner, 220th Army Troops Company (Rugby Fortress Company), Royal Engineers, has been mentioned in General Allenby’s despatches. He is native of Easenhall.

Rifeman W Griffin, of the Rife Brigade, who before the War was employed in the Illuminating Engineers’ Department at the B.T. H, has been reported killed in action about April 23rd.

Pte H W Fallen, Wiltshire Regiment, son of Mr & Mrs Fallen, 7 Adam Street, and Pte Horace Horsley, Manchester Regiment, son of Mrs McKie, 33 Albert Street, are reported missing. Pte Horsley is a B.T.H employee.

Rifleman Albert Walters, Post Office Rifles, London Regiment, son of Mr & Mrs R Walters, 12 Bennett Street, has written to his friends stating that he has been wounded and taken prisoner. He was an old St Matthew’s boy, and before joining the Army he was employed as a postman at Rugby.

News has been received that Pte E Martin, R M.L.I, son of Mr & Mrs Martin, 103 Wood Street, was killed in action on May 8th. He was formerly employed by Messrs Linnell & Son. He joined the Army two and a half years ago, and had been in France two years. He leaves a widow and two children.

Lieut C W Peyton, formerly of the B.T.H Test Department, has been promoted Captain.

Corpl Joseph Branston, Marine Division, fourth son of Mr & Mrs F Branston, 38 Chester Street, has been severely wounded in the arm and thigh by shrapnel, but is progressing well. He has been in the forces for 9 ½ years, and this is the second time he has been wounded.

Corpl Clarence A Eyden, Royal Engineers, elder son of Mr Alfred Eyden, acting district goods manager, L & N-W Railway, Northampton, was killed in France (where he had been on active service for over three years) on Whit-Sunday. Corpl Eyden was educated at Rugby, where his parents were well-known residents for some years ; and at the time of his enlistment, shortly after the outbreak of war, he occupied the position of private clerk to the present Acting General Manager of the L & N-W Railway. He was 27 years of age, and his great musical abilities, always so readily given in aid of charitable movements, will be long remembered in this town. His brother, Lieut Maurice Eyden, of the 2nd Northants Regiment, is actively engaged with his regiment abroad.

The record of casualties among Old Rugbians in the War up to May 4th was as follows :—Killed 542, wounded 872, prisoners 62, missing 22—total, 1,498.

The following local men, some of whom have already been reported missing, are now known to be prisoners of war :—Pte J C Harris, Royal Scots, son of Mr Samuel Harris, 18 Adam Street, New Bilton. He presented himself for enlistment at the Drill Hall in the early days of the War, and as he was only 16 years of age, he was claimed by his father. He subsequently walked to Coventry, and enlisted in the R.W.R. Before he was 17 years of age he was wounded and claimed by his mother, being transferred to the Reserves. He joined up again on his 18th birthday. His father, Lance Corpl Harris, is serving in Italy.—Pte F Lenton, Oxon and Bucks L.I, 64 Wood Street, Rugby, employed in the Assembly Department at the B.T.H.— Pte W A Bland, Somersetshire L.I, 1 Pinders Lane.—Pte J W Wood, Oxon and Bucks L.I, 28 Chester Street, an employee in the B.T.H Tool Room.—Lance Corpl R G Salmon, M.G.C, son of Mr & Mrs G H Salmon, 17 Lower Hillmorton Road.—Pte J Hart, Wiltshire Regiment, The Green, Hillmorton, formerly employed by Mr S Robbins.—Pte A G Shilvock, Gloucester Regiment, 42 Abbey Street.

SECOND-LIEUT F MOLONEY.

Second-Lieut F Moloney, whose parents live at Kilsby was killed in action on April 9th in Egypt. He was employed in the Winding Department at the BT.H, and joined Kitchener’s Army as a private in 1914 at the age of 17, and by his excellent work he soon earned promotion, and was eventually granted a commission. His father, although over military age and recently discharged, joined the Army to be with his son, and Lieut Moloney for a time enjoyed the somewhat unique position of being his father’s sergeant in France. He possessed to a marked degree the typical British traits of restraint and determination, and was described by his Commanding Officer as one of the steadiest and most reliable of his junior officers. He was killed by a high explosive shell while returning from clearing out enemy nests in a captured village. He had previously been wounded in France, where his father is still serving.

DUNCHURCH.
MR & MRS J BROWN, of the Windmill Houses, Dunchurch, have received news that their eldest son, Pte W Brown, of the Warwicks, is a prisoner of war. Mr & Mrs A Gillings, The Heath, Dunchurch, have also been notified that their second son, Pte C Gillings, is a prisoner.—Another son of Mr W D Barnwell, farmer, Daventry Road, Dunchurch, was called up on Thursday. This makes the fourth son Mr Barnwell has in the Army.

BRAUNSTON.
MISSING.—Pte R G Green, Cheshire Regt, has been officially reported missing on April 16th. He is the second son of Sergeant and Mrs Green, Yeomanry House, Braunston. He joined the Northants Yeomanry at the age of 17, in the spring of 1915 ; then transferred to the R.F.C., and went to France, where he remained for over two years. He was then sent to England, transferred to the infantry early this year and returned to France a few months ago.

LONG ITCHINGTON.
MISSING.—Official information is to hand that Pte Arthur Whitehead (R.W.R.) to missing. He is only son of the late Mr and Mrs William Whitehead.

CHURCH LAWFORD.
MR & MRS BEERS, whose only son, Pte C Beers, was reported missing on April 11th, have since heard that he is a prisoner of war in Germany.

A DESERTER.—At the Rugby Police Court on Monday—before Mr J E Cox—Pte John Nolan pleaded guilty to being a deserter from the 1st Border Regiment since March 11th, and was remanded to await an escort.

THE GERMAN ATTACK.
To the Editor of the Rugby Advertiser.

Sir,—I shall be greatly obliged if you will spare me a little of your valuable space, in order to place before your readers a few facts with regard to the situation arising from the recent German attacks.

Since March 21st (the date of the first great German advance) it has been apparent to every British subject that the German Army has been enormously augmented by the collapse of Russia. Great Armies of trained German soldiers, and thousands of guns with ammunition, were transferred to the West for use against the Allied armies. The Military situation was immediately altered and the need for men became and is now urgent.

The County of Warwickshire has already sent thousands of young men to the Army and Navy, but still there remains much to be done.

Two thousand men are needed for the month of June from Warwickshire.

To supply this requirement, there must be a revival of the Voluntary spirit. There are many thousands of men who must necessarily be retained to provide munitions of war, there are, however, many young men who can possibly be spared for service in the field. To these young men this communication is principally addressed, and at the same time there is a need for older and less fit men for service behind the line.

One Volunteer at once may easily prove to be worth two “ called up ” men in three mouths hence, and I appeal for the revival of the time when men freely surrendered their exemption and joined up to fight the enemy in the field.

I shall be glad to give information and advice to anyone desiring it. A railway warrant will be sent to a man living at a distance to Coventry who wishes to Volunteer.

Yours truly, J. W. E. TINGLE,
Assistant Director of National Service,
Ministry of National Service, Warwickshire Area, Union Street, Coventry.

RUGBY AND DISTRICT FOOD CONTROL COMMITTEE.
NATIONAL RATIONING.

Application Forms will shortly be distributed by the Postal Authorities to every Householder to make application for Ration Books, which are to take the place of the Ration Cards which expire on the 13th July next.

The Committee are endeavouring to make arrangements with the School Managers of all the Elementary Schools in the Rugby District for the Schools to be open to the Public, and the Teachers to be available to instruct the Public how to fill up the Forms of Application.

Enquiry must be made locally as to the day and hours the Teachers will be in attendance.

APPLICATION FORMS MUST BE RETURNED TO THE FOOD OFFICE NOT LATER THAN SATURDAY, 15th JUNE NEXT.

F. M. BURTON, Executive Officer.
Local Food Office,
6 Market Place, Rugby.

MARGARINE RATION TO BE INCREASED.

At a meeting of the Rugby Food Control Committee on Thursday it was decided to increase the ration of margarine to 5ozs per coupon. The butter ration will remain at 4ozs, as heretofore.

THE SUPPLEMENTARY MEAT RATION.

The work in connection with the supplementary meat rationing scheme locally has now been completed, and practically everyone entitled to the extra ration has received the necessary card. About 6,000 such cards have been distributed, including 300 for women employed on heavy manual labour. The work involved has occupied five weeks, and was very successfully carried out by the Rationing Offier, who received valuable voluntary assistance from a number of ladies.

NEWBOLD-ON-AVON.
DISPOSAL OF SURPLUS VEGETABLES.—At a recent meeting of the Food Economy Committee a proposal was made that a weekly collection of surplus vegetables and garden produce grown in the village should be sold to the Warwickshire Vegetable and Food Collecting Society. This proposal was enthusiastically received by the villagers ; a dumping station was decided upon, and on Wednesday last the first consignment, including spring cabbages, mint, parsley, sage, 416 lbs rhubarb, and eggs were dispatched.

THE PAPER SUPPLY.
No Newspaper Returns.

The effect of a new Order which will come into force early this month will be that no newspapers, &c., may be supplied to newsagents on “ Sale or Return ” ; consequently there will be no copies for sale casually, and only regular customers can be supplied.

Those who desire to have the Rugby Advertiser regularly, and all new subscribers, should therefore place their orders with a newsagent, and when extra copies are required for any purpose, notification should be given in time to enable the Agent to send the order to the head office.

We should like to thank our readers for the loyal and effective help they have given us in meeting the difficulties due to the paper restrictions by adopting our suggestion to pass copies of the Advertiser on to their friends. The result has been that, notwithstanding the necessary reduction in the number of papers printed, the Advertiser is read by as many people as before, and the paper stands pre-eminently the best medium in the district for all classes of advertisements.

DEATHS.

EYDEN.—Killed on active service in France on Whit-Sunday, May 19, 1918, Corpl CLARENCE ALFRED EYDEN, R.E., dearly beloved elder son of Mr. & Mrs. Alfred Eyden, 53 St. Matthew’s Parade, Northampton ; aged 27 years.

IN MEMORIAM.

CONOPO.—In memory of W. D. Conopo, of Kilsby, who lost his life on H.M.S. Queen Mary in the Battle of Jutland, May 31, 1916.—At rest.
“ Two years have passed, Oh, how we miss him,
Never will his memory fade ;
Loving thoughts will ever linger
Around his ocean grave.”
Oh ; for a touch of that vanished hand ;
Oh, for a voice that is still.”
—From his loving Father, Mother, Brothers and Sisters.

MASKELL.—In loving memory of our dear son, Pte. A. G. MASKELL, killed in action in France on May 30, 1916.
“ days of sadness still come o’er us,
Tears in silence often flow,
Thinking of the day we lost you,
Just two years ago.
Too far away thy grave to see,
But not too far to think of thee.”
—Sadly missed by all at home.

9th Mar 1918. The Paper Famine – Share Your Advertiser with Others

THE PAPER FAMINE.
SHARE YOUR ADVERTISER with OTHERS.

It is a very unusual experience in the history of a local newspaper to have to stem the tide of an increasing circulation, and our readers may feel assured it goes very much against the grain of the proprietors of the Advertiser to announce that, owing to further drastic reductions in the weight of paper they are allowed by the Government to purchase, it is impossible to satisfy the increasing demand for copies of the paper. We are rationing the supplies sent out to our agents, and it may be the increase of the price of the paper to 2d, which we find it necessary to adopt with this issue because of the enormous advance in the cost of production, will automatically assist them in the difficult task of apportioning the papers they have for sale satisfactorily among their customers.

Some will certainly have to go without—particularly those who have been in the habit of making casual purchases ; others will voluntarily relinquish the paper for the time being, but it does not follow that the actual number of readers need be reduced. On the contrary, we do not wish our friends to sever their association with their favourite journal altogether. If will be quite possible and easy for relatives or neighbours to arrange to make one copy serve for two or more households, and this is a system which “ The Times ” (London) proposes to force upon its patrons if the rationing system which they, like the Advertiser, have been compelled to adopt, does not limit the demand sufficiently. They intimate that in such an event they will only supply those people who will agree to share their copies with others.

For our part we prefer to rely upon the indulgence and voluntary co-operation of our readers to assist us in tiding over this unprecedented crisis, which we hope will only be temporary.

We have no doubt the agents for the Advertiser will be glad to assist in such a scheme by re-purchasing papers and passing them on to others who cannot otherwise be supplied. On our part, we are prepared to do this by purchasing at a penny each, clean copies brought to the Advertiser Office while it is open from 9 a.m till mid-day on Saturdays ; and in this way it should still be possible for a great many to have an opportunity peruse the Advertiser at no greater cost than before.

Newspapers are recognised as a national necessity, but further tonnage has to be saved, and food and the raw materials for munitions must come first. It is urgently necessary to release more tonnage for food supplies, and for that reason paper imports have had to be cut down.

THE FOOD RATIONING SCHEME.
POSTPONED TILL APRIL 7TH.

The National Food Rationing Scheme, which was to have come into force on March 25th, has been postponed a fortnight—to April 7th. But there are certain duties to be performed by the people as a preliminary to getting their cards, and all applications for food cards must be in by to-day (Saturday). In our advertisement columns will be found the official time table relating to these duties, which must be strictly observed.

ENFORCED CULTIVATION OF FARMS.

We understand the Warwickshire Agricultural Committee are, under the powers given to them, entering upon four farms in the vicinity of Knightlow Hill for the purpose of seeing that they are properly cultivated. The occupiers have had to turn out at a month’s notice.

ALLOTMENT-HOLDERS AND A WILD RUMOUR.

In several districts, including Birmingham, credence appears still to be given by a few people in the recent rumour that the Food Controller would take over compulsorily the produce of allotments and gardens this year. Three weeks ago the Food Production Department denied the truth of this rumour, and stated that there was no foundation for it whatever. A fortnight ago the Department renewed this assurance, and it now emphasises the denial in view of the persistence of the rumour.

RUGBY RURAL FOOD CONTROL COMMITTEE.

At the weekly meeting on Thursday in last week there were present : Mr H Tarbox (chairman), Rev R S Mitchison, Mrs Draper, Mrs Neilson, Mrs Anderson, Mrs Townsend, Mrs Peet, Messrs   J C Harrison, W Woodward, A Appleby, J Cripps, A T Watson, and T E Smart.

It was reported that 200 lbs of sugar had been deducted from the monthly allotment in respect of a school, the housekeeper of which had reported having this quantity left over from the amount alloted them for jam-making last year.

A long discussion took place as to the system by which the new sets of sugar coupons were being issued by the Postal Authorities.—It was stated that some the sub-postmasters in the district had received books of coupons, but no instructions as to how they were to be issued, and in some cases they were being handed out without regard to the question of whether the first set of coupons had been issued.—The Executive Officer was directed to write to the Postmaster, and ask that proper instructions be given to sub-postmasters in the district.

The Executive Officer read a letter from the Ministry of Food, stating that the position with regard to cheese will improve rapidly within the next two months.

The Executive Officer reported that Mr J T Clarke had been appointed to take charge of the preliminary arrangements for the rationing scheme. The period of his employment would be six weeks, and the salary £3 weekly.

This being the last meeting of the committee as then constituted, the Chairman briefly thanked the retiring members for their assistance, and also expressed his gratitude to the committee as a whole for the manner in which they had applied themselves to their duties. He mentioned that it was unique for the sole representative of organised labour to be elected chairman, and he was very grateful for the support they had accorded him.—On the motion of the Rev R S Mitchison, seconded by Mr Smart, a hearty vote of thanks was accorded Mr Tarbox for his services as chairman.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Lance-Corpl G S Taylor (OL), of the 1st H.A.C, has been given a commission in that regiment.

In the Ministry of Munitions Estimates an extra grant is included of £300 a year to the widow and children of the late Mr L S Robertson, formerly a Director of Messrs Willans and Robinson, who was drowned with Lord Kitchener when the “ Hampshire ” was torpedoed.

News has come to hand that Acting-Sergt T G H Buxton, A.T.C, R.E, has been mentioned in despatches, and promoted to the rank of Second-Lieutenant. His home is at 10 Frederick Street, Rugby. He joined up in May, 1915, and has been serving in Egypt two years.

Pte H Addison, 3rd Royal Warwickshire Regiment, who was posted as missing on May 13th last, has now been reported to have been killed in action on that date. Prior to enlisting he was employed in the B.T.H Lamp Works.

Corpl A E Lamb, 18th Middlesex Regt, has been awarded the Military Medal for bravery in the field. Corpl Lamb has seen service in China and South Africa during his twelve years with the colours. He was employed in the B.T.H controlling department previous to his joining up at Rugby in November, 1915.

HILLMORTON.

THE death of Lance-Corpl W A Blockley, D.C.L.I, took place at Fargo Military Hospital, Salisbury Plain, on February 27th. The remains were interred at Hillmorton on the 3rd Inst, with military honours, a party from Budbroke being sent at the instigation of Col Johnstone. There were many wreaths, and a large number of parishioners paid their last tribute of respect. Before joining the Army he was in the employ of a firm of chemists in Rugby. By his perseverance he gained the confidence of his employers, and was soon promoted to the position of assistant. He was the chairman of the Junior League of the Conservative Club. He joined up in December, 1916, and soon gained promotion, but his health began to fail, and consumption developed. He leaves a widow and two children. The widow desires to thank all who have so kindly shown sympathy in her sad bereavement.

HARBOROUGH MAGNA.

WAR SAVINGS.—Since its formation m January. 1917, the Harborough War Savings Association has purchased 482 15s 6d certificates.

SAPPER R BAYNES, whose parents live in this village, asks us to state that he is conversant with most of the burial grounds on the Somme, and if any relatives of soldiers who have fallen and have been buried in any of the cemeteries out there will communicate with him he will take the first opportunity of visiting the graves indicated to see if they are being attended to.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR.
WRITING ON WALLS.

To the Editor of the Advertiser.
DEAR SIR,—I would like to be allowed to protest vigorously against the growing nuisance of marking and writing with chalk on hoardings and walls in the town. Some of it may be done by thoughtless schoolboys, but more appears to be the work of youths of low and degraded intelligence, and is both disgraceful and disgusting. It is sad to think that when England should be striving to aspire to a purer life and service of God the young people can find no better thoughts or occupation than this.—Yours faithfully.
OBSERVANT.

DEATH OF A CRIMEAN VETERAN.

The death look place, at the Rugby Institution Infirmary, on Saturday, of Thomas Brown, of Lawrence Sheriffe Almshouses. He was 82 years of age, and was born near Watlington, Oxfordshire. As a young man he joined the 16th Army Battalion of the Oxfordshire Regiment, and served in the Crimea War, subsequently leaving the Army with the rank of corporal. He was very reticent concerning his early days, and left no record of the engagements in which he participated, although on occasions he favoured his personal friends with accounts of the terrible experiences through which our soldiers passed in the dark days of that war. He came to Rugby about 40 years ago, and was well known as a jobbing gardener.

The funeral took place with military honours on Wednesday afternoon, and was witnessed by a large crowd of sightseers. A firing party from Budbroke attended, together with a detachment from the Rugby Company of the Volunteer Corps, under Capt C H Fuller. The deceased was a member of the Salvation Army, and the local band attended and played the “ Dead March ” on the way to the cemetery, and also led the singing of the hymns, “ O God, our help in ages past,” and “ Rock of ages ” at the graveside, where the service was conducted Major Vickers, of Northampton, assisted by Adjutant Tickner. The Rugby Board of Guardians was represented by Messrs J W Pendred, W Dickens, Mrs Dickens, and Nurse Gordon, and amongst others present were several old soldiers, including Lance-Corpl Joe Norman, late R.F.A, another veteran, who also served through the Crimean War.

IN MEMORIAM.

BENCH.—In ever-loving memory of our dear brother, Pte J. BENCH, who passed away in a hospital at Puchevillers, France, on March 5, 1917.
“ He left us and home like a soldier brave,
Wounded though he had been ;
But now he lies in a warrior’s grave,
Dearest Joe, we should loved to have seen.
It breaks our hearts to think of him,
Of how our boy has died ;
Not one of us went near him,
Not even by his side.
And yet some time there’ll come a day
When our loved ones we shall meet,
To be together for ever and aye,
Kneeling Jesus’ feet.”
—From his loving Father, Sisters and Brothers.

FIDLER.—In loving memory of W. G. FIDLER, who died March 7, 1916, in France.
“ He sleeps not in his native land,
But under foreign skies ;
Far from his friends who loved him best,
In a hero’s grave he lies.”
—From his Father and Mother.

FIDLER.—In loving memory of my dear brother, Pte. W. G. FIDLER, of Harborough Magna, who was accidentally killed in France on March 7, 1916.
“ Rest on, dear brother, in a far-off grave ;
A grave we may never see ;
But as long life and memory lasts
We will remember thee.”
—From your loving sister, Nell.

REEVE.—In loving memory of Pte. ARTHUR KIMBELL REEVE, Royal Berkshire Regiment, who died in Queen Alexandra Hospital, Dunkirk, France, on March 4th, 1917.
“ Oh ! just to clasp your hand once more,
Just to hear your voice again.
Here life to me without you
Is nought but grief and pain.
Could I have raised your dying head,
Or heard your last farewell,
The grief would not have been so hard
For me who loves you well.”
—Sadly missed by his sorrowing Wife & Daughters.

REEVE.—In loving memory of my dear son, Pte. ARTHUR KIMBELL REEVE, who died in France on March 4th, 1917.
“ One year has passed since that sad day,
When one we loved was called away.
God took him home, it was His will,
But in our hearts he liveth still.”
—Deeply mourned by his sorrowing Mother, Brothers and Sisters.

5th Feb 1916. Midlands visited by Zeppelins

MIDLANDS VISITED BY ZEPPELINS.

WANTON SLAUGHTER OF CIVILIANS.

59 KILLED AND 101 INJURED.

Many people in Warwickshire did not regard it as probable, or even possible, that Zeppelins would ever come so far inland as the centre of the country, but that feeling of security was shattered on Monday night when it became known that German aircraft were cruising over a wide district, which included the Midlands and the Eastern Counties, and The Official Report from the War Office was eagerly awaited and this was issued in the early hours of Tuesday morning. Supplementary reports being issued in the evening.

From these it was gathered that the raid was undertaken by six or seven Zeppelins, and covered a larger area than on any previous occasion ; but the raiders were hampered by the mist. After reaching the coast they steered various courses, and dropped over two hundred bombs in Norfolk, Suffolk, Derbyshire, Leicestershire, Lincolnshire, and Staffordshire. Considerable material damage was caused in one part of Staffordshire, but in no case was there any military damage.

The latest particulars of the casualties are :—

Killed : Men, 33; women, 20; children, 6; total, 59.

Injured : Men, 51; women, 48; children, 2; total, 101.

Total killed and injured, 160.

One church and a Congregational chapel were badly damaged, and a parish room wrecked. Fourteen houses were demolished, and a great number damaged less seriously by doors, window-frames, etc, being blown out. Some damage, not very serious, was caused to railway property in two places ; only two factories, neither being of military importance, and a brewery were badly damaged, and two or three other factories were damaged slightly.

In many localities pre-arranged regulations for extinguishing all lights and taking other precautions were promptly carried out, and it would appear that those places suffered most where such means to baffle the invaders were not adopted.

Trains on railways were brought to a stand-still, and in many instances passengers had to remain seated right through the night while Zeppelins were passing and repassing over them, and bombs were being dropped in the vicinity.

Some very pathetic fatalities are recorded, Staffordshire seems to have suffered somewhat badly. Two visits were paid to some districts in that county, and there was considerable loss of life.

In one house a man and his wife, with their daughter and son-in-law and their two children, were killed instantly. The bombs fell on footpath of the narrow thoroughfare, smashing in the front of the house. The occupants, who were sitting round the fire, were terribly mangled.

A boy walking along the street received the full force of the explosion and was killed on the spot, while a man standing in front of his house some distance away also met with instant death. In another case a man was carrying on his business in a small shop, and the place collapsed and he was killed. One of the bombs, falling in a field, made a hole 6ft or 7ft deep and 10ft square.

Another bomb fell in front of a public house and demolished it, but the, landlord, his wife, and their two sons had a wonderful escape.

Passing on, the Zeppelins dropped five bombs on a small township some miles away. A man walking along was killed. In an adjoining borough some heavy bombs fell, and damage was done to small houses. A family of five, sitting together here, met with an instant and terrible death, a bomb dropping directly on the roof of the house and scattering the brickwork and furniture in all directions.

In another borough, one man was killed instantly, and another has since died. The Mayoress was struck by a fragment of a bomb, and seriously injured, and now lies in a critical condition. A bomb removed a portion of the roof of a congregational church, and another dropped in a public park.

Some of the victims were killed as they hurried through the streets. In one street a woman and her child lost their lives, while another woman had both legs blown off. Over an area of about one and a half miles several bombs were dropped in all direction.

On the other hand,a great many bombs were dropped on open spaces, where they did no damage except to excavate enormous holes ; but generally speaking the raiders paid particular attention to localities where lights were visible.

The Zeppelin fleet was observed passing the coastline between 4.30 and 7 o’clock on Monday night, and most of the damage in the Midlands was done between the latter hour and about 1 a.m.

THE LIGHTING REGULATIONS.

SATISFACTORY RESULTS.

One result of the Zeppelin raid over the Midlands on Monday night has been to convince those who considered restrictions with regard to lighting which have been enforced in Rugby unnecessary and vexatious, that the authorities were right after all. The fact has been established all too clearly that these airships can reach the Midlands, and that in all probability many towns within the area covered by the visitation of the Zeppelin fleet owe their immunity from damage to the happy circumstance that the regulations had been complied with, and being in total darkness they could not be located by the navigators.

While the raid lasted, it was a very anxious time for the heads of police in the various localities.

As far as Rugby is concerned, Superintendent Clarke is much gratified with the way in which the inhabitants have fallen into line with the requirements. At Northampton about 100 tradesmen and householders were summoned this week for non-compliance, but at Rugby it has not been found necessary in any case to do anything more than to point out here and there that a little more might be done, and in every instance the suggestions of the police have been cheerfully and promptly carried out.

Superintendent Clarke feels sure the inhabitants will continue to do their best to keep their lights subdued or screened for the next few weeks, especially on dark, still nights, and, where possible, go a little farther in securing total obscuration.

In order to minimise the danger to pedestrians during the dark evenings, the posts in the Church Walk and other narrow passages in the town have been painted white. A much needed improvement has also been effected near the Lawrence Sheriffe Almshouses, where the protruding arm of the iron railings and the awkward step have been removed and the path levelled.

DEFENCE OF THE REALM.

NEW REGULATIONS.

The “London Gazette ” contains a long list of new regulations under the Defence of the Realm Act. They deal with a variety of offences. One of the regulations provides that if any person without lawful authority or excuse, by the raising of blinds, removal of shades, or in any other way uncovers wholly or in part any light which has been obscured or shaded in compliance with any directions given in pursuance of such an order, he shall be guilty of a summary offence against these regulations.”

CARRIER PIGEONS.

Another regulation provide that “if any person (a) without lawful authority or excuse kills, wounds, molests, or takes any carrier or homing pigeon not belonging to him ; or (b) having found any such carrier or homing pigeon dead or incapable of flight, neglects forthwith to hand it over or send it to some military port or some police constable in the neighbourhood, with information as to the place where the pigeon was found ; or (c) having obtained information as to any such carrier or homing pigeon being killed or found incapable for flight, neglects forthwith to communicate the information to a military post or to a police constable in the neighbourhood; he shall be guilty of a summary offence against these regulations.”

INTOXICANTS.

With regard to intoxicants, it is laid down that if any person gives, sells, procures, or supplies, or offers to give, sell, procure, or supply, any intoxicant (a) to or for a member of any of his Majesty’s forces with the intent of eliciting information for the purpose of communicating it to the enemy, or for any purpose calculated to assist the enemy ; or (b) to or for a member of any of his Majesty’s forces when not on duty with the intent to make him drunk or less capable of the efficient discharge of his duties ; or (c) to or for a member of any of his Majesty’s forces when on duty either with or without any such intent as aforesaid ; he shall be guilty of an offence against those regulations.”

HELPING THE ENEMY.

A substituted regulation sets forth that “if any person assists any prisoner of war or interned person to escape, or knowingly harbours or assists any such person who has escaped, or without lawful authority transmits, either by post or otherwise, or conveys to any prisoner of war or interned person any money or valuable security or any article likely to facilitate the escape of any prisoner of war or interned person, or in any way to interfere with the discipline or administration of any place of detention for prisoners of war or interned persons, he shall be guilty of an offence against these regulations.

RECRUITING AT RUGBY.

The figures for Rugby have shown a distinct falling off during the past week, and only about twenty men have attested. All of these have enlisted under the Group System, and there have been no volunteers for immediate service.

The departmental, non-combatant units are now closed, and only fighting men are needed.

The recruiting appeal tribunals for the Urban and Rural districts have held several sitting during the last few weeks, and we understand that a large number of men have been either exempted or put back until later groups.

WORK FOR DISABLED SAILORS & SOLDIERS.

Employers desirous of obtaining assistance in nearly every occupation, could obtain such help by means of disabled sailors or soldiers on application to the Recruiting Officer, Drill Hall, Park Road, Rugby, who would see that these are forwarded to the proper quarter ; or by applying direct to the Soldier’ and Sailor’ Help Society.

LIEUT. T. A. TOWNSEND, R.A.M.C., PROMOTED.

Lieutenant Thomas Ainsworth Townsend, R.A.M.C, has been gazetted Captain—promotion to date from December 25th.

Captain Townsend, who is in France, is regimental surgeon to the 24th London Regiment, which has done so splendidly in and around Loos and the Hohenzollern Redoubt. He has had a very busy time of late, and on the occasion of the visit of the sailors from the Grand Fleet to his trench, the Germans exploded five mines close to them.

We are glad to learn that he is well, and in a recent letter to his father, Captain Townsend says :—

“ We have had rather a strenuous time of late and you can imagine how welcome news is, and the Rugby Advertiser is always a joy. We are now resting in very pleasant surroundings till probably ——, when we go up to a fresh line of trenches. Last week we had a mine attack, and have had a very thrilling time on the whole. This piece of line was always rather a nasty bit and I think we got out of it pretty luckily. Strangely enough, on the day they blew up the mines, quite close to us, we had a visit from the Navy! I was fortunate enough to be in the front line at the moment, and our Colonel had taken up —(who was in command of the Naval chaps) that day. Tremendous explosions followed—hell let loose—but our men had manned the parapets in no time, and the sailors were soon letting fly with anything they could lay hands on. I only had about thirty casualties, I am thankful to say.

“ We had a pretty lucky escape in our Aid Post, which was a dug-out and unusually close to the front line—in the support trenches. An hour or so after I had got back, blest if the back part of it wasn’t blown in by a shell, and we were lucky to get off with a few bruises. My orderly (who was in rubber trench boots at the time) had one of them cut right across and got his toe damaged, and I was well bruised over the right leg and left foot—as I was standing at the time — writing up my cases !

“ I must have had a near shave, as we were all temporarily laid out for a second or two.

— behaved awfully well, as it was our second dug-out that day, in fact, -—’s third, and he took it in very good part.

“ Tea is a wonderful stand-by, and after a bit of a rest I enjoyed a very good dinner, but was simply covered with mud from head to foot. We had a pretty disturbed night, and units, from all and sundry, came in from the Brigadier downwards, through the night.

“ The next day cooled off considerably, and we have now moved into reserve, and all is well with us.”

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

HILLMORT0N SOLDIER KILLED.

Official news was received in Hillmorton on Friday last week that Pte Walter Brown, of the 11th Hants Pioneers, whose home is in School Street, Hillmorton, had been killed in action on January 23rd. Pte Brown, who leaves a widow and two children, was at one time employed in the Locomotive Department on the L & N.-W Railway, but he afterwards became a bricklayer’s labourer.

The following letter has been received by Mrs Brown from the officer in charge of his company:

DEAR MRS BROWN.—It is with regret that I have to inform you of the death of your husband, Pte W Brown, No 12272. He was wounded by rifle fire last night, and died about 8.45 a.m to-day. He was buried this evening, and the service was conducted by the Rev Webb Peploe (Major), Chaplain to the Forces. His loss will be deeply felt by all in the company and by myself, as he was always a good soldier, keen and smart, and a great example to all those with whom he came in contact, and he received his wounds whilst bravely doing his duty. In extending to you my sincere sympathy, I feel that it may be of some help to you in your loss, to know his end came quietly and he died in the execution of his duty.—Yours faithfully, CAPT. ANDREWS.

[Walter Brown is remembered on the Hillmorton War Memorial]

1 /7th WARWICKS IN THE FIGHTING

In a recent letter to his brother and sister a private of the 1st/5th Warwickshire Regiment states that they went into the trenches again on January 28th. The company they relieved had a very trying time, the Germans sending over about 2,000 shells of all sizes. Fortunately only two men were killed. The enemy also sent a bombing party to the trench, but they were soon driven out. The Germans left a chalk line so that they should be able to find their way back to their own trenches. The 7th Warwicks had to stand at attention all night as the Germans made a gas attack on the left of the Warwicks’ position, but no infantry attack followed.

 

Brown, Percy Edwin. Died 25th Sep 1915

Percy Edwin BROWN’s birth was registered in early 1890 in Rugby, and in 1891, he was living at his widowed maternal grandmother’s house at 10 Gas Street, Rugby, with his parents, Rugby born John Brown, and his mother, Harriet, who was born in Hillmorton. By 1901 the family had moved to 153 Lower Street, Hillmorton, and his father was working as a bricklayer’s labourer.

By 1911, Percy had already become a soldier as No. 8533, in the 2nd Bn. Leicestershire Regiment. He was probably in a home depot company, as the bulk of the 2nd Battalion was in India until 12 October 1914, when the Division was brought back from India to France as the British Battalion of the Garhwal Brigade of the 7th Indian Division and landed at Marseilles for service in France.

The early spring of 1915 saw a great hammer blow delivered by British troops on the German position at Neuve Chapelle between 10-13 March 1915. The 2nd Battalion led the brilliant attack on the right … and quickly overwhelmed the enemy holding the trenches covering the village and woods at Neuve Chapelle.[1]

However, according to his Medal Card, Percy would have missed this action as he did not go to France until 1 April 1915, and would have been part of the reinforcements for the Battalion.

On the 25 September 1915 the Battle of Loos began, as the Allies tried to break through the German defences in Artois and Champagne and restore a war of movement. A fuller description of the battle is given elsewhere on this site.

During that first day, Percy was killed, and he has no known grave. He is remembered on the Loos Memorial, which forms the sides and back of Dud Corner Cemetery. His name is included on the 2nd Bn. Panels 42 to 44.

He was awarded the Victory and British medals and the 1915 Star.

[1]       History abstracted from: http://www.royalleicestershireregiment.org.uk/history-of-the-regiment/?p=2

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM