22nd Dec 1917. The Rector of Rugby and the Capture of Jerusalem

THE RECTOR OF RUGBY AND THE CAPTURE OF JERUSALEM.

Preaching at the Parish Church on Sunday morning the Rector (Rev C M Blagden) referred to the capture of Jerusalem. He said they rejoiced in the fact that Jerusalem was now in Christian hands after 739 years, and that British Armies had recovered it without damaging a single stone. The strategic effect of this would be considerable, and the moral effect of this tremendous ; but they must beware of assuming that too great political results could come from the return of the Jews in any number to Jerusalem. They had to think of the Moslem population, who had the Sacred Mosque of Omar standing on the site of the Altar of Burnt Offering, and they also had to think of the Christian connection with Jerusalem. Everything in the Holy City had been re-hallowed by our Lord. Jerusalem was the first centre of the Christian Church ; it claimed the first Bishop and the first council. From Jerusalem began the first preaching of the Gospel. The return of the Jews would produce new difficulties. They were no longer a nation but only a race. They had wonderfully kept their Faith, but the heart of their Faith had disappeared with the disappearance of the sacrifice. The real point was that there was no new covenant between God and man. The Jewish religion doomed, and Christ was the end of the law. The Jews had contributed much to the religion the world, but their religion had no future in front of it. It had had its day and ceased to be, and there was no future for Jerusalem at the centre of that religion. The only future to which they could look forward was that Jerusalem should be once more the centre of the Christian Church, and the only hope for the Jews lay in their becoming Christians and being once more the missionaries of the East. The Mohammedans might listen to them when they would not listen to the Christians. Then there might be in solid fact a new Jerusalem, “ Zion the City of our solemnities, the City of God Himself.”

A TOMMY’S LETTER FROM THE FRONT.

SIR,—You can imagine our feelings in reading the papers of the strikes in Coventry over such trifles, when the men are earning wages which were only earned by very few in pre-war time, and under the most favourable conditions, with a home and home comforts to go to after working-hours. Can they realise what a Tommy is going through out here to protect them and theirs from being treated the same as Belgium, Serbia, Montenegro, and parts of France ?

Here are a few conditions which they might compare with those under which they work at home. I speak as an artilleryman ; the infantry are in a position to claim more sympathy. Firstly, the wages are less per day than the average munitions worker earns per hour. Then, the hours are not eight a day, but all God sends ; still they smile. We are not in a factory warmed or cooled according to the weather, and run under the eyes of health inspectors. It is open air—hail, rain, snow, or shine, and if up to the knees in mud and water, or numbed with cold, one cannot hear anything but cheers and jokes from the men who are proving themselves men in a cause on which stands the future destiny of dear old England. Then the comforts. No, the lads have not a daintily prepared meal, their slippers warmed, a nice fire, a nice bed, and all that a home provides. They have either a ruined building, hut, tent, bivouac, or dug-out, which they make as comfortable as circumstances allow. And do they realise at home that whilst they are in bed, from which they never get disturbed, unless the baby cries or something similar, the men out here are straining every nerve either on the look out, at the guns, or feeding them with ammunition. Some journeys to and from the guns, for instance, occupy four, six, even eight hours, which means another nights’ sleep lost. They can thank God it has been their lot stay at home, but it makes one think who has had two or three years out here that the heads are encouraging such thoughtlessness, and makes one wish that they are made to come here and relieve some of the thousands who have either done their bit or who are unfit to undergo such conditions and strain. Still, those who we hold dear to us can rest assured that the British Tommy, never minding the conditions, is going to do all in his power to protect the flag and the country which gave him birth. All he asks in return is that the men who are left at home to provide the necessities of war will stand by them and uphold Lord Nelson’s motto, “ England expects every man to do his duty,” and so abolish strikes and petty grievances, which are prolonging the war and assisting the enemy.

Kindly excuse writing this epistle, but it tends to discourage those are doing their bit out here.
Yours truly.
ONE WHO WENT OUT WITH THE RUGBY HOWITZER BATTERY.

LORD DENBIGH’S CHRISTMAS MOTTO.

The Earl of Denbigh, lecturing to a large audience of soldiers and civilians at Bury St Edmunds, said it was no time to talk of peace, because we could stick it and had to. In reply to a questioner, who asked him to give a motto for Christmas, Lord Denbigh said : “ Stick it, England, or go under for ever.”

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

In Sir D. Haig’s list of names, published on Tuesday last, of those deserving special mention is that of Lt.-Col. W. Elliott Batt, R.F.A.

Corpl F Evans, son of Mr Evans, 13 James Street, Rugby, was wounded on November 30th, and is probably a prisoner of war. It is quite believed he is in hospital behind the German lines.

Mrs Lamb, 17 St Marie’s Terrace, Rugby, has received notification from the War Office that her eldest son, Gunner W Lamb, of the R.F.A, has been severely wounded in the left leg. He was pupil at St Marie’s School.

The list of successful candidates for admission to the R.M.A, Woolwich, was published on Thursday, and contained the name of F R Kittermaster, captain of the Rugby School Football XV.

Major H H Neeves, D.S.O., M.C., was mentioned in Sir D Haig’s despatch, published in the “ London Gazette ” on December 14th, for gallant service on the Western’ Front.

News has been received at the B.T.H that Corpl C W Horley, 2nd Sherwood Foresters, recently died from wounds. Before enlisting Corpl Horley was employed in the Winding Department.

Mrs Neville had received a telegram from the King and Queen regretting the loss she has sustained by the death of her son (Capt Frank Neville) in the service of his country and sympathising with her in her sorrow.

Mr & Mrs Baskott, of East Haddon (formerly of Rugby), have been notified that their eldest son, Second-Lieut James E Baskott, died of wounds in France on December 11th. Second-Lieut Baskott who was 27, years of age, was educated at St Matthew’s Boys’ School, Rugby, and joined the Royal Garrison Artillery as a private early in the War, being gazetted to a commission in the same regiment about six months ago. He had been in most of the recent heavy fighting, and had built up a reputation for coolness and bravery, being regarded as a general favourite and an officer of considerable promise.

Pte Hugh Lissimore, Coldstream Guards, son of Mrs Lissimore, 23 Lodge Road, was killed in action on November 28th in the Battle for Bourlon Wood. Pte Lissimore was 19 years of and an “ old boy ” of St Matthew’s School. In announcing his death his officer writes to Mrs Lissimore :—“ Your son was very popular with the men in his platoon always cheerful and bright, and was a very brave soldier and a good man. He was keen on his work, knowing his Lewis gun thoroughly. I shall miss him very much.”

NEWS OF WOUNDED SOLDIERS.—Mr & Mrs Alfred Webb have returned home after visiting their son, Rifleman Wm Webb, who was lying badly wounded in hospital at Etaples. He was the victim of a terrific blow at close quarters from the butt-end of a German rifle, and was afterwards hit in the back by shrapnel. The visit of his parents (who are loud in praise of the hospitality and kindness they experienced in France and en route) cheered the gallant soldier greatly, and he has since been removed to a London hospital.—Mrs Frank Lane has now received a communication from her son, Lance-Corpl Sidney Lane, K.R.R. He is still in hospital at Rouen. He has lost a leg, and is very seriously ill. There is great hope that these two brave men will pull through.

FATAL FLYING ACCIDENT.

An inquest was held on Thursday by Mr E F Hadow, touching the death of Second-Lieut Charles Robert Rawbone (20), R.F.C, son of Mr C T Rawbone, Civil servant, of 4 Templar Street, Myerts Park, London, which took place at the Brookfield Nursing Home as the result of an accident on December 7th.

Evidence was given to the effect that deceased had been in the R.F.C for nine or ten months. On December 7th he went up in an aeroplane, the rigging, control, and engine of which had been previously tested and found to be in good order. He was practising with a machine gun, and while doing so engine trouble developed; and he turned, evidently with the intention of going to have it seen to. As he turned the engine “ picked up,” and this brought the nose of the machine down, and caused it to dive to the ground. An eye-witness, Second-Lieut Claude E Mayors expressed the opinion that turning while so close to the ground—the machine was about 100 ft up—showed a lack of judgment. Lieut Rawbone was immediately attended to by Dr Chester Collins, and was subsequently removed to the Brookfield Nursing Home and treated by Drs Collins and Hoskyn; but, despite every care and skilful nursing, he died ten days after the accident, meningitis having set in.

The Coroner, addressing the Jury, said the cause of the accident was not very clear, although Lieut Mayors had shown them that Lieut Rawbone chose to take a very grave risk when banking by relying on the impetus gained from the dive rather than on the engine, and had it come off all right it would probably have been applauded. The Jury would join with him in sympathising with the parents, and would feel that they had lost one of their young flying men who, after all, were the bravest of the brave.

The Jury returned a verdict of “ Accidental death.”

The witnesses were Mr C T Rawbone, Second-Lieut C E Mayors, Dr Chester Collins, 2nd A/M Thos Staines, A/M Geo Nicholls, and Corpl G E Southcott.

BROADWELL.
WOUNDED.—Mr T Gulliver has received news that his son, Harry Gulliver, of the Royal Warwicks, has been wounded in the back. Mr Gulliver’s younger son was killed in action in France about two months ago.

WOLSTON.
CHRISTMAS GIFTS.—All soldiers who left Messrs Bluemel’s Works to fight for their country will be again well remembered this Yuletide. Messrs F Stevenson, L Jeacock, S Everton, T Boneham, H Chater. and J Satchwell have acted as a committee, under the able guidance of Mr W R Glare, the genial works manager. A collection was made amongst the employees and staff, which realised £22 11s. Forty soldiers each received a tuck box, 27 stationed in England received a 5s P.O each, and two prisoners of war in Germany each received an 8s parcel of food through the Rugby Prisoners of War Help Committee. Each employee who is now, or has been, with the Colours received a fine Christmas card, which had been specially designed by Mr W R Glare. The directors have independently sent each soldier a postal order for £1.

FLECKNOE.
ROLL OF HONOUR.—Only last week the sad news was received in Flecknoe that another of its young inhabitants had given his life for his country. Pte Charles Frank Rose was the son of Mr Charles Rose, who has long held the position of postmaster and assistant overseer in the parish, and was most popular among young and old. He was one, too, who could ill be spared from the life of the village. Frank, whose age was only 25, was attached to the Machine Gun Section of the King’s Own Yorkshire Regiment, and was killed in action on the Western Front on November 24th. The general respect felt for his memory and the sympathy for his sorrowing parents, brothers and sisters, was well shown by the number who attended the memorial service held in the Village Church of St Mark’s on Sunday last.

TERRITORIALS’ FAMILIES AND WOUNDED SOLDIERS ENTERTAINED.

The third annual tea and entertainment to the wives, sisters, mothers, and families of members of the 7th R.W.R, Howitzer Battery and Yeomanry was given by the Territorial Committee on Wednesday last. As on the last occasion, about 300 wounded soldiers and nurses from the local Red Cross Hospitals, “ Te Hira,” Infirmary, St John’s, Bilton Hall, Cawston House, Pailton House, and the officers from Clifton Court Hospital were invited, and everything possible was done to make the occasion a really enjoyable one.

The proceedings began with an entertainment at the Empire, kindle provided by Mr B Morris, who procured a special film for the occasion. The variety artistes also gave their services, and the excellent programme was thoroughly enjoyed. After the entertainment the guests repaired to the Co-operative Hall, where, by special permission of the Food Controller, an excellent tea was served. About 600 sat down, and among the visitors were the Rev C M & Mrs Blagden, Rev Bernard McNulty (Leamington) “ padre,” to the Division, of which the 7th Royal Warwicks and the Howitzer Battery form a part ; Major C P Nickalls and Lieut Matheson (Rugby Howitzer Battery), Col F F Johnstone, Col G M Seabroke, Mr Pridmore (Coventry), Mr J J McKinnell, Capt C H Fuller, Lieuts Wharton and Yates (Rugby V.T.C), Mr A E & Miss Donkin, Mrs Cecil Nickalls, Mrs P Nickalls, Mrs Marsham, &c. During tea, crackers were distributed, and as these were exploded the beaming faces of the children bore eloquent testimony to their enjoyment, and gave ample recompense to all who had worked so hard in the organisation of the entertainment. After tea a variety programme was given by the Clifton Court Hospital Party and the members the V.A.D there, under the direction of Mr Yardley ; and, needless to sy, this was much appreciated.

The committee responsible for the arrangements consisted of Mrs Cecil Nickalls, Mrs West, Mrs Claude Seabroke, Mr A W Adnitt, Mr F E Hands, assisted by Major Nickalls. The staff of the Co-operative Society and friends of the committee rendered useful service by waiting at the tables.

BAPTIST CHURCH.—A “ Dickens’ Evening ” was held in the Large Hall on Wednesday, and was largely attended. The Rev J H Lees presided. Three sketches were given in an excellent manner from Dickens’ Christmas carol, viz, “ Scrooge in His Office,” “ Visit of Marley’s Ghost,” and “ Cratchit’s Christmas Dinner.” Miss W Davidson two solos, and during intervals there were refreshments and games.

MILK DELIVERY IN RUGBY.—In the New Year there will be only one delivery of milk per day in Rugby.

WINTER.—Severe frost set in on Wednesday night, 14 degrees being registered. During Thursday night the thermometer recorded 9 degrees.

CHRISTMAS POSTAL ARRANGEMENTS.—To ensure delivery for Christmas parcels should be posted not later than Saturday evening, and letters and cards by Sunday night or early Monday morning. [Christmas Day was Tuesday]

HIGH PRICES FOR POULTRY.—In Messrs Tait, Sons & Pallant’s Smithfield on Monday a fine lot of 500 birds came under the hammer, and prices were the highest known. Turkeys made up to 52s each, geese 24s, ducks 8s, cockerels 8s 6d, hens 6s.

DEATHS.

LISSIMORE.—In loving memory of Pte. HUGH LISSIMORE, the beloved son of Mrs. and the late Wm. Thos. Lissimore, 23 Lodge Road, Rugby, who was killed in Bourlon Wood, France, on November 28, 1917.—“ Thy will be done.”

ROSE.—Killed in action on November 24, 1917, in France, CHARLES FRANK ROSE, M.G.S., King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry, aged 25, second and dearly beloved son of Charles and Catherine Rose, of Flecknoe.
“ Father, in Thy gracious Keeping, Leave we now our dear on sleeping.”—CHAS. ROSE, Post Office, Flecknoe.

 

1st Sep 1917. French Honour English Lady

FRENCH HONOUR ENGLISH LADY.—On Friday afternoon last week, M. Painleve, the French Minister of War, presented the Cross of the Legion of Honour to Dr Frances Ivens (formerly Harborough Parva), who has had charge of the Scottish Women’s Hospital at the Abbaye de Royaumont for nearly three years. Miss Ivens is also associated with Lady Michelham in the charge of the Michelham Foundation Hospital, Hotel Astoria, Paris, which M. Painleve attended to make the presentation.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Rifleman G Lorriman, of the Rifle Brigade, son of Mr J Lorriman, of 40 Essex Street, Rugby, was wounded in the head on August 19th. This is the second time he has been wounded, the previous occasion being on September, 1916, at Guillemont.

The friends of Sert-Major Hopewell, of the Rugby Howitzer Battery, will be pleased to hear that he has received the D.C.M. Sergt-Major Hopewell has been in the Battery since its formation and went out with it to France three years last March. During the time he has been there the Battery has taken part in a lot of fighting, and recently it has been very severe.

Mr J C Cowley, of Brackley (formerly of Kilsby), Northamptonshire, received on Saturday last a card dated July 15th (written with his left hand), from his son, Second-Lieut R L Cowley. Northampton Regt, who has been missing since the battle of “ The Dunes,” on July 10th. He is in a German hospital wounded in the right arm, and is going on nicely.

Lance-Corpl F H Hadfield, K.R.R, of 4 Charlotte Street, and Pte H A J Barnett, R W.R., of 174 Murray Road, have written home stating that they are prisoners of war in Germany. The news of Pte Barnett’s capture has only just reached his parents although he was taken prisoner on April 28th. Lance-Corpl Hadfield, who was formerly employed by Mr W Flint, wine merchant, was reported as missing five weeks ago.

OLD MURRAYIAN KILLED.

Mr W T Coles Hodges, of the Murray School, has received information that Rifleman Leslie J Ensor, son Mr J C Ensor, Nottingham, formerly of Rugby, was killed in action on July 10th. Rifleman Ensor, who was 21 years age, enlisted in the King’s Royal Rifles with his brother Claude in September, 1914, and they were drafted to France in July, 1915. For eight months they were in the trenches near Ypres. They were in the second battle of Ypres, and were in reserve at the battle Loos. They were engaged in various “ scraps,” the battle of Arras, and also in a good deal of sanguinary fighting on the Somme, their Battalion being specially commended for the capture of Guillemont. In this battle Claude Ensor was severely wounded, and his brother was also slightly wounded twice, the first time near Trones Wood. He was also buried and slightly wounded near Combles, and after spending four months in England returned France in January last. He was at first sent to St Quinten, and was afterwards moved up to the coast, where he fought his last fight with the K.R.R.s and Northamptons at Lombartzyde. Rifleman Leslie Ensor was battalion bomber, and held the instructor’s certificate for Stoke’s Trench Mortars. His brother Claude has now recovered from his wounds but at present has only the partial use of the left arm. He was recently offered a commission, but declined it, as he preferred to go to Hythe for a course of musketry. He was successful in gaining the first-class certificate and was promoted Sergeant-Instructor in musketry. Both lads stood 6ft 2in and weighed 13 stones, and their fine, manly characters made them popular with all who knew them.

FLECKNOE.

ROLL OF HONOUR.—Another Flecknoe young man, Frederick Cox, lost his life through shell-shock on the 16th of August, in France. In a letter received by the young man’s sister, Miss E Cox, the Colonel of his Regiment—a Battalion of the Royal Warwicks—states that he will be sadly missed by the officers and men. The young man was 24 years of age, and had been in France about 12 months. Before joining the army he was in the employ of Mr Thompson, farmer, of Wolfhampcote Hall, and bore an excellent character.

WOLSTON.

PRIVATE READER MISSING.—Mrs Reader has received news both from the War Office and the Adjutant of his Company, that Private Gerald Reader, her husband, is missing. Before joining the army he was manager for Mr Udal at Wolston. He was one of a body of men who made a successful raid upon the enemy. He joined the 4th Royal Warwicks, but was afterwards transferred to the Welsh Fusiliers. Much sympathy is felt in the district for Mrs Reader, who has four children, several of whom are very delicate. The day on which he was missing was the 12th anniversary of his wedding day.

ROLL OF HONOUR : MESSRS BLUEMEL’S WORKS LIST.—The above firm has given another proof of its sincere regard for men who have left their works to uphold the honour of their country. Through the instrumentality of Mr W R Glare, the genial works’ manager, who has continually had before him the welfare of not only the men but their dependants, two beautiful and expensive designs have been purchased. These have been mounted and placed in oak frames. The two rolls contain the names of 104 men from the works who have entered the Navy or Army. The records show that 16 have been killed, 27 wounded, two died from the effects of the war, three missing, whilst one is a prisoner of war and one is suffering from shell-shock. All the names have been beautifully inscribed on the two lists, and these are surrounded by artistic illuminations. Although they are not yet placed in a permanent position, a number of residents have viewed them and greatly admired their appearance. It is hoped by several who have had this privilege that it will be an incentive to the surrounding parishes to provide similar rolls of honour. There still remains plenty of space for the names of others who may yet join the forces.

BRANDON.

WOUNDED.—Mrs Blackman has received news that her husband has been wounded in the head, shoulder, and right hand. He has been out at the front for nearly nine months. He belongs to the Hertfordshire Regiment, and is well known at Brandon, having been in the employ of Colonel R J Beech a few years ago. Although very deaf from the result of his wound, he is progressing favourably.

STRETTON-ON-DUNSMORE.

MUCH sympathy is felt for Mr and Mrs T Nicholas, Lime Kiln Farm, who have received news that their third son, Stewart, who was wounded and missing on September 29th, 1916, is now reported to have been killed on that date.

ACCEPTANCE OF LETTER BY THE POST OFFICE FOR URGENT CENSORSHIP.—The sender of a specially urgent letter for Portugal, Russia, the United States of America, or any neutral country in Europe or America, may secure its specially expeditious treatment by the Post Office and by the Military Censors, by posting it at the counter the Rugby Office, with a special fee of half-a-crown in stamps in addition to the full ordinary postage. No responsibility is taken for delay, but in general letters posted under the special conditions will be despatched appreciably sooner than those posted in the ordinary way.

SERIOUS HARVEST OUTLOOK.

The harvest prospects, which month ago were of a hopeful character all round, have gradually become less and less satisfactory owing to unfavourable weather conditions, and this week the situation has assumed a more serious aspect, in consequence of the exceptionally severe storms for the time of year. Reports from all parts of the country indicate that very boisterous, stormy weather became general in the course of Monday evening and night, the wind rising to the strength of a gale, accompanied by violent squalls in many districts—apparently the most widespread gale experienced for a long time past. In the Rugby district rain fell with little intermission from Sunday evening till Wednesday midday, and there were heavy downfalls on Thursday.

NO SUGAR FOR MARROW JAM.—The Ministry of Food has officially advised the Liverpool Corporation that vegetable marrows are not fruit within the meaning of the Sugar Domestic Preserving Order (1917) and people are not entitled to use sugar for making jam from marrows.

DEATHS.

GILLINGS.—In loving remembrance of Rifleman WALTER GILLINGS, R.B., of Dunchurch, who died of wounds received in action August 18th, 1917.—Though lost to sight, to memory ever dear.—From Annie.—Rest nobly won.

HOLLAND.—Fred (2nd Lieut. Sherwood Foresters), son of Supt. W HOLLAND, Lutterworth, died of wounds at the Liverpool Merchants’ Hospital, Etaples, France, on August, 22nd, 1917, aged 22 years.

IN MEMORIAM

OLDS.—In fond memory of Pte. G. Olds, R.W.R, of Gaydon, killed in action in France, Aug. 30, 1916.
“ There are two things death cannot sever,
Love and remembrance live for ever.”
—An Old Friend.

OLDS.—In loving memory of Pte. G. OLDS, Gaydon, killed in action Aug. 30, 1916. Never forgotten by his Mother, Father, Brothers, and Sister.

MASON.— In dearest, proudest memory of my darling husband, Sergt. ARTHUR MASON, Oxon & Bucks, killed in action August 31st, 1916.—Until we meet.

WHITEMAN.—In glorious remembrance of Lance-Corpl. T. WHITEMAN, R.W.R., killed in action in France, September 3rd, 1916.—From his loving wife, Father, Sisters, and Brothers.

23rd Dec 1916. The New Food Regulations

THE NEW FOOD REGULATIONS.

The regulations limiting the number of courses to be served in hotels and restaurants came into force on Monday. Under the regulations breakfast and luncheon are limited to two courses, and dinner in the evening to three courses. Everywhere caterers and consumers showed themselves ready to make the best of the new system, although in some quarters doubts were expressed as to its value from the point of view of economy. Under the new regulations hors d’oeuvre containing no fish or meat is a half course, but if it contains fish or meat it counts as a whole course, as does also soup containing meat in solid form ; fish, meat, poultry, game, and sweet ; soup without solid meat and dessert are half courses. Plain cheese does not count as a course.

At the Grand Hotel, Rugby, the regulations have made very little difference, because, owing to the threatened shortage of food the dinner menu was reduced from five to three courses several weeks ago, when the entrees and savoury were discontinued. Although only three courses are served, the guests have a varied choice for dinner each evening, and no complaint has been received regarding the reduced menu.

At the Royal George, where a 6 or 7 course dinner was the rule, the management have also welcomed the change, and the bill of fare at all meals is as varied as the permit will allow.

THE CHRISTMAS TRAIN SERVICE.

There are very few alterations in the local train service during the Christmas festival this year, and the ordinary trains will be run on Saturday and Sunday on the L & N-W Railway. On Christmas Day the service will be the same as Sunday, and on Boxing Day the ordinary week-day trains, with the exception of the 7.30 to Coventry. There are several alterations on the Great Central line. On Saturday there will be a relief train for Leicester, Loughborough, Nottingham, Sheffield, and Manchester, leaving Rugby at 1.54. On Christmas Day the usual Sunday trains will be run, except that the 11.16 to the South and the 4.39 to Sheffield will be cancelled. On Boxing Day the following trains will be cancelled :—1.35 a.m and the 11.23 a.m to Bristol. The 1.55 to London and the Great Western will only run as far as Woodford, and there will be no G.W connection there. A train will leave Rugby for Leicester at 11.15. In place of the ordinary train due at Rugby at 7.2, a special train will leave Oxford on Tuesday at 5.55, Banbury at 6.30, and reach Rugby at the usual time.

The new railway rules were announced on Wednesday. On and after January 1 the passenger services are to be restricted. Passenger fares will be increased by 50 per cent, but this will not affect workmen’s fares or season tickets for distances not exceeding 40 miles.

NOTICE !

Tuesday next being Boxing-Day, the Mid-week Edition of the Advertiser will be published on WEDNESDAY Afternoon at the usual time.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

The number of Old Rugbeians known to be serving with the forces is now 2,661. The total casualties to December 14th are : 361 killed, 544 wounded, 14 prisoners wounded, 17 prisoners unwounded, and 21 missing, making a total of 957. The honours number 692, including two V.C’s, 48 D.S.O, 120 Military Cross, and 444 mentioned in despatches.

The parcels sent to the local men who are prisoners of war in Germany, on behalf of the Rugby Prisoners of War Committee, this week contained :— 1 tin marmalade, ½ lb lunch tongue, 1 tin paste, 1 tin baked beans, ¼ lb ham in tin, ¼ lb tea, ½ lb sugar, 3 soup squares, ½ lb biscuits, ½ lb dripping in tin, 50 cigarettes, 1 lb Quaker oats.

Captain Brinkley, Chief Constable of Warwickshire, has issued notices to several men in the county forces, calling them to hold themselves in readiness to go to France for duty in the mounted military police force.

Major and Adjutant L St Cheape, Dragoon Guards, the famous polo player, one of the team who won the International Cup for England in 1914, who was killed in Egypt on April 23rd, left property of the value of £10,608.

THE ROLL OF HONOUR.

Another employee of the Rugby Advertiser, Mr F J Jones, who attested on December 10, 1915, has now been called up, and joined the Colours on Thursday. Mr Jones, who is 38 years of age and has a wife and three children, has been a compositor and machineman at the Advertiser Office about 26½ years, and the firm, and also his fellow-workman, naturally regret his departure and hope for his speedy and safe return. This feeling will be shared by his fellow-craftsmen in the town, Mr Jones having been vice-president of the Rugby branch of the Typographical Society for two years. Ninety per cent. of the eligible men at the Advertiser Office have now been called up.

LOCAL CASUALTIES.

LANCE-CORPL H MAYES DIES OF WOUNDS.

Lance-Corpl Horace Mayes, elder son of Mr D Mayes, of 28 Abbey Street, died from wounds in a hospital at Bristol on December 6th. The unfortunate young man—he was only 20 years of age—enlisted in the Oxford and Bucks L.I. at the commencement of the War, and was seriously wounded in France on September 15th, and remained in hospital there for two months, when he was brought to England. Before the War, Lance-Corpl Mayes was an apprentice at the B.T.H. The body was brought to Rugby, and the funeral took place at the Cemetery last week. A firing party attended from Warwick, and the coffin was draped with the Union Jack. The Rev T J Simcox conducted the service.

RUGBY MAGISTERIAL.

MONDAY.—Before J E Cox, Esq.

NEATLY CAUGHT BY BILTON CONSTABLE.—Fred Pratt pleaded guilty to a charge of being absent without leave from the Royal Warwickshire Regiment.—P.C Day, stationed at Bilton, said from prisoner’s appearance he suspected him, and asked him to explain how it was he was absent from his regiment. He said he had been temporarily released from the Army to work under the agricultural scheme. Prisoner added that he had been working for a farmer at Knowle. Witness arrested him on suspicion, and on the way to the Police Station he admitted having left his regiment, stationed at Cheltenham, a month ago.—He was remanded in custody to await escort.—The Magistrate said it was an exceptional case. The constable acted very wisely, and he would be rewarded for it.

 

EMPLOYMENT OF GERMAN PRISONERS.—Warwickshire War Agricultural Committee met on Saturday at Warwick, when the question of the employment of German prisoners on the land was under consideration. Captain Fellows explained the Government proposals. One speaker offered the suggestion that threshing machines should be manned by German labour, and a resolution was passed calling upon the Government to provide gangs of German labourers for every threshing machine in the country. A committee was appointed to prepare for the employment of German labour, and it was stated that Messrs Greaves, Bull, and Lakin were prepared to employ about 30 men at their cement works at Harbury.

PAILTON.

CHRISTMAS PARCELS FOR SOLDIERS.—A parcel, containing cigarettes, cafe au lait or cocoa, oxo, socks, sweets, stationery, &c, has been sent to the men from Pailton both at the front and at home. Judging by the letters of thanks received, the parcels are much appreciated.

THURLASTON.

A VERY successful sale in aid of funds for the new Recreation Room for the soldiers at Bilton Hall Hospital was held on Friday last week at the Mill House, kindly lent by Mr Stanley. The stalls were laden with provisions, rabbits, poultry, new goods and rummage, and in a short time nearly everything was sold. The sale was organised by Miss Hackforth and Miss Johnson, assisted by Mrs Appleby, Mrs Hopps, Miss Stanley, the Misses Hopps, Miss Roberts, Mrs Pickering, Miss Prestige, Mrs J Shaw, and Miss Burns. The receipts amounted to £27 7s 4d.

WOLSTON.

AWAY BUT NOT FORGOTTEN.—The Directors and employees of Messrs Bluemel Bros, Ltd, have again this year dispatched Christmas presents to the men who have joined the colours from the Wolston Works, numbering about 90. To those in France, Salonica, Egypt, and India useful boxes have been sent ; and those who are at present in this country in hospital or training have received a postal order for 5s. Besides this, a specially designed Christmas greeting card has been sent to each one, at home or abroad. This design was the work of the Works Manager, Mr W R Glare, and was bountifully done. Its jovial side and the good wishes thereon would undoubtedly cheer the recipients. The _____ lied what should be sent, and the committee carried out their wishes admirably.

STRETTON-ON-DUNSMORE.

ON SATURDAY morning last Mrs S Wells received news that her husband, Pte S Wells, of the 1st Royal Warwicks, had been dangerously wounded in the head, and is now lying in a critical condition in hospital in France. This is the second time he has been wounded, having only recently gone back to the trenches. It is now two years since his brother, Corpl Walter Wells, died from wounds in Ipswich Hospital. Pte S Wells had only recently been transferred to the Royal Warwicks.

NAPTON.

At the Warwickshire Appeal Tribunal on Thursday last week, Mr C Badger, Napton, sought the further exemption of his son, F E Badger (21, single), cowman and wagoner, and said he would be compelled to give up the farm if his son joined the army. Appellant said he was a canal foreman, and therefore could not see to the farm. He had another son, aged 39, who was exempt.—The appeal was dismissed.

CHRISTMAS PARCELS.—Since the War commenced over 100 men have answered their country’s call from the parish of Napton—five of whom have given up their lives, one is a prisoner of war, and one has died. As Christmas approaches the thoughts of those left behind go out to the men who have gone, and the necessary preparations were made for Tommy’s and Jack’s Christmas parcels. The whole parish has subscribed in one way or another generously for this end, and already about 90 parcels have been despatched. The ladies engaged in packing the parcels feel very proud of the parishioners’ gifts. Each parcel cost 6s, and contained a cake, salmon or sardines, tobacco, pipe, cigarettes, oxo, and concentrated tea or coffee. Already several answers have been received from the recipients.

NEWBOLD-ON-AVON.

CHRISTMAS PUDDINGS FOR SOLDIERS.—The members (together with a few friends) of the Heart and Hand Lodge of Oddfellows (M.U) have collected and forwarded through their Secretary, Mr G Leeson, the sum of £1 2s 6d towards a Daily Paper Fund for supplying Christmas plum puddings to the soldiers at the Front.

DEATHS.

EVERTON.—Lance-Corpl. WILLIAM ROBERT EVERTON, who died at Brinklow on November 27, 1916, while home on leave from France ; aged 27 years.—“ Thy will be done.”

LOMAS.—In loving memory of Pte. GEORGE LOMAS, who was killed in action in France on November 22nd, 1916 ; only son of Thomas Lomas, Pailton ; aged 39.
“ Somewhere in France there is a nameless grave,
Where sleeps our loved one amid the brave ;
One of the rank and file, he heard the call.
And for the land he loved he gave his all.”

IN MEMORIAM.

BROWN.—PERCY EDWIN BROWN, 11 York Terrace, Dunchurch Road, killed in action on Sept. 25, 1915.