30th Jun 1917. Lord Roberts Memorial Workshops

LORD ROBERTS MEMORIAL WORKSHOPS FOR DISABLED SOLDIERS & SAILORS.

RUGBY & DISTRICT TRIBUTE DAY Saturday, July 7th.

At the beginning of the present War it was realised, both by Lord Roberts and by the Committee of the Society, that in order to deal with the numbers of soldiers and sailors returning disabled it would be necessary to greatly extend the original Workshops Scheme. Various plans were discussed, but while the matter was still under consideration the great Field-Marshal passed away in the midst of his troops.

A SUITABLE MEMORIAL.

As the question of a suitable Memorial was raised, it was felt that by using the money subscribed to carry out Lord Roberts’ own suggestions and ideas with regard to the Workshops no greater and more lasting Memorial, could be given to him. After consultation, therefore, with the Countess Roberts, who gave the proposal her warmest support, it was decided to start the Lord Roberts’ Memorial Fund for Workshops for Disabled Soldiers and Sailors, and arrangements were at once made to acquire a large Factory in London, with the idea that from this centre a large manufacturing business could be established, which would give employment to all disabled men who wished to profit by the scheme.

TOY-MAKING the STAPLE INDUSTRY.

After due consideration, the Committee decided to start Toy-making as the staple industry, to this way serving two purposes, for there was no time to lose in setting about the capture of this pre-eminently German trade.

Machinery for making wooden toys was duly installed, and the services of suitable instructors obtained.

By the end of 1915 over 80 different varieties of toys had been produced in large quantities, over 100 disabled men were employed, the public interest was aroused and the future of the Workshops as a manufacturing centre was assured.

So far so good ; but the business men in charge of the work saw much farther. They saw the need of not only providing employment for these men, but of providing a market for their goods—of manufacturing in such a way that the articles made could be sold to the trade at a trade price.

In this way—and in this way only—could they hope to make the Workshops pay their own way in the future, for it was obvious that, as the Society proposed to provide permanent employment a self-supporting industry was the only thing to be contemplated.

A STIFF PROBLEM.

The problem was a stiff one. Almost every day batches of disabled men were arriving, each knowing that good work and good pay were assured him the moment he entered the Workshops. Those who had started early were now becoming experts, and the quantity of toys being turned out was enormous.

It became apparent that London alone could not deal with the constant demands for employment, and it was decided to open Provincial Branch Workshops under the control of London, thus enabling the men to work, if they desired it, in their own localities.

ECONOMIC VALUE OF SPECIALIZATION.

That the foundation of these Branches would require an immense amount of capital—a great deal more than had originally been subscribed—was obvious from the outset, as each one must be thoroughly equipped and suitably prepared before even one disabled man could be sent there. But, on the other hand, as specialisation was to be the keynote of the idea, the centre could eventually save money by arranging to manufacture goods which would assist the other Branches and the Main Workshops, and at the same time manufacturing completed articles for sale. In this way the proposed metal working Branch at Birmingham would not only make lead soldiers and other metal toys, but would provide all metal parts, hinges, bolts, dies, &c., which are wanted in the manufacture of wooden toys in London, Bradford, the Printing Branch, would print all the catalogues, posters, stationery, &c., for all the centres, and at the same time could take outside orders in abundance. And so on with every other branch.

The Workshops would thus avoid paying out to other firms what they would necessarily demand as profit, and at the same time be enabled to build up several quite distinct and important industries.

YOUR HELP IS WANTED-NOW.

The disabled men are applying in large numbers for admission, and we want your help to give them what they ask.

The Workshops provide not for the present only, but for the whole future life of these brave men. They take them as they come, lame and halt, from the battlefield, and make of them efficient, capable workmen—not receivers of charity, but valuable units of a huge industrial and economic scheme.

LOCAL SUPPORT.

Rugby’s Tribute Day is fixed for Saturday, July 7th, Mr. J. J. McKinnell, C.C., chairman of the Rugby Urban District Council, being President of the effort, and he has entrusted the organisation to Mr. J. Reginald Barker.

Every penny that can be got is wanted now. The smallest amount is not too small, but big sums are wanted too. Do not let the Workshops be held up and the work curtailed for lack of your help. Send every penny you can spare to the Hon. Treasurer, Mr. R. P. MASON, Manager, London City and Midland Bank, Rugby, and do all you can to assist the Fund in helping Rugby’s effort towards success. These Workshops are the most practical, way of finding work for our permanently disabled men in the War.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Second-Lieut O M Samson, of Rugby, has been gazetted temporary lieutenant in the R.G.A.

M House and P D Stokes, who about two years ago were prominent members of Rugby School XV, have recently been killed in action. M House was also a member of the XI.

Capt Charles H Alexander, of the Trench Mortar Section, Australian Imperial Forces, was killed in action in France on June 8th. For some years Capt Alexander was a member of the staff of the B.T.H Company, and subsequently went out to Australia, where he joined the Australian Forces on the outbreak of war. He was a brother of Mrs John Martin, of Clifton, and brother-in-law of Mr Fred Clough, of Hillcrest, Hillmorton.

Sapper G Smith, Royal Engineers Signals, son of Mr & Mrs Smith, 12 Acacia Grove, has been appointed to a temporary commission as second-lieutenant in the Special Reserve of Officers, and posted to the 3rd Royal Warwickshire Regiment. Mr Smith, who was a member of the Old Volunteer Force, was mobilized at the beginning of the War, and proceeded to France with Rugby “ E ” Company. He is a member of the permanent staff of the Post Office and an Old Murrayian.

AN OLD SCHOOL SERVANT KILLED.

Mr W Evans, of Catthorpe, has received official notice that his son, Pte William Evans, Royal Warwicks, was killed in action by a German shell on June 10th. He was for over two years a footman with Dr David at the School House, Rugby, and a member of the School Servants’ Cricket Club. At the time he joined—January, 1915—he was a butler at Eton College. He was seriously wounded by shrapnel on September 3rd on the Somme at the taking of Ginchy. After being in hospital three months, he returned to France in January, and had seen some severe fighting since then with the Warwicks. The Officer of his Company, writing to the parents, states that Pte Evans was killed while taking stores up to the line. As one of the Company runners, he had always shown a splendid spirit—a fine, brave boy throughout. His straight, upright character was respected and admired by all the men, and all felt his loss very keenly. Mr Evans’ second son, who is in the K.R.R, has been wounded twice and discharged as medically unfit, and his third son is serving at the Front in a Machine Gun Corps.

STOCKTON.

ROLL OF HONOUR.—Mr James Green, of Calcutt, Stockton, has received news that his son, Sergt Charles Green, R.F.A, was killed in action on June 9th. He enlisted in September, 1914, went to France the following July, and straight into action with his Battery. He went through every engagement the Battery took part in, and was wounded at the Somme in August, 1916. Since then he has been slightly wounded three times—once in the thigh by a bullet, which he pluckily extracted with his jack-knife ; once in the check, causing a nasty flesh wound ; and then again on the heel by a shell. He has also been gassed, and suffered from frozen knees, and was temporarily buried with others by the bursting of a shell. This was only a week prior to the hit that ended fatally. Letters from the Major and Lieutenant of his Battery speak highly of him as a brave and fearless soldier, and say his last action, doubtless, saved the lives of several of his comrades.

ANOTHER LOCAL PRISONER OF WAR.

Another prisoner of war has been added to the list of the local committee, viz, Lance-Corpl C J Colley, 7th Royal Fusiliers, who is interned at Wahn. He was reported missing on April 21st, and it was not until Sunday last that he was further reported prisoner of war. His parents live at Coton House. Mr J R Barker, hon. secretary, has arranged for the standard food parcels and bread to be sent to him on behalf of the committee.

The many friends of Pte A E Hirons, of Churchover, will be glad to learn that news has at last been received of him. A letter received from another prisoner of war at Soltan says :— “ All the parcels have turned up ; it was owing to the frequent changes of address that they went astray. As soon as a parcel arrives I acknowledge and thank you for it. The chief difficulty is the address. We cannot let you know, of course, when we move and the parcels go adrift. I work in the post office here, and three weeks ago found no less than 23 parcels for Pte Hirons’ which I immediately sent on. Everything is done in order that the parcels reach their owners.”

CONCERT.—The wounded soldiers of the Rugby Infirmary Hospital gave a most enjoyable entertainment in their mess-room on Thursday last week, under the presidency of Mr W Dickens, The Commandant and most of the staff, as well as several friends from the town, attended. The programme, which was a long and varied one, was sustained throughout by the “ boys,” and every item was deservedly encored. Sergt Till (East Lancs Regiment), a fine baritone singe, was in splendid voice, and his rendering of “ Thora ” (by special request) was especially good. Others who contributed largely to the success of the evening and who deserve a word of praise were : Sergt Evans, Corp Beckett and Bostock, Ptes Heath and Holme, and “ Wee Geordie,” who impersonated Charlie Chaplin.

SPOTTED FEVER.—A fatal case of spotted fever has occurred in the Rugby rural district. All precautions have been taken.

A REGULATION has been published prohibiting an occupier of an agricultural holding in Great Britain selling or parting with possession of any horse used or capable of being used for the cultivation of the holding except with the authority of a license granted by the Board of Agriculture.

DEATHS.

EVANS.—On June 10th, WILLIAM EVANS, the beloved eldest son of W. E. & A. M. Evans ; killed in action by a German shell in France.- “ Greater love hath no man than this that he laid down his life for his friends.”
“ Thy will be done.”

GREEN.—Killed in action in France on June 9th, Sergt. CHARLES GREEN, beloved son of James and Flora Green, of Calcutt, Stockton ; aged 28.
“ Not dead to those who loved him,
Not lost, but gone before ;
He lives with us in memory,
And will for evermore.”

IN MEMORIAM.

ASTILL.—In loving remembrance of Pte. HERBERT ASTILL, who died of wounds received in action on June 29th, 1915.—From his sorrowing MOTHER and SISTERS.

COOMBES.—In loving memory of my dear husband, Pte. ARTHUR COOMBES, who died of wounds in King George’s Hospital, London, June 30, 1915.
“ Farewell, dear wife, my life, is past ;
You loved me dearly to the last,
Grieve not for me, but to prepare
For heaven be your greatest care.”
Also my dear son ARTHUR, who died February 26th, 1915. From loving WIFE and MOTHER.

CHATER.—In ever-loving memory of our beloved and only child, Rifleman W. H. Chater, R.B., of Dunchurch, who was killed in action at Ypres on June 30, 1916.—“ No lips need speak where the heart mourns sincerely.”—From FATHER and MOTHER.

CHATER.—In affectionate remembrance of Rifleman W. H. Chater, 12th Rifle Brigade ; killed in action at Ypres on June 30, 1916.—“ They miss him most who loved him best.”—From ADA.

COOPER.—In loving memory of 9178 Sergt. JOHN COOPER, 1st Yorks, and Lancs. Regiment ; killed in action in France on July 1, 1916.
“ Sleep on, dear brother, in a far-off grave :
A grave we may never see ;
But as long as life and memory lasts
We will remember thee.”
—From MOTHER, SISTER, and BROTHER.

7th Oct 1916. Lieut-Colonel West Killed in Action

LIEUT-COLONEL WEST KILLED IN ACTION.

The news, which came to hand on Friday last week that Lieut.-Colonel F C B West, R.F.A, of Bawnmore, Bilton, had been killed in action was received with the deepest regret in Rugby and neighbourhood. The unfortunate event happened on September 29th. While riding, as he had often done before, down a section of road which was much subjected to the enemy’s artillery fire, a shell burst close to him, killing him instantly, and wounding his orderly, Driver Barlow, who had been with him since before Christmas, 1914. Both their horses were killed. Col West was buried in the cemetery in which the remains of Lieut Wyley, Major Brown, and Major Stone, who had been killed only a few days previously, were laid to rest.

When at Baddow, before going out to France, and also for some time afterwards, Col West, Capt Kidd—subsequently promoted Major—and Lieut Wyley were working together on the Head-Quarter Staff. Then they were separated, and it is a sad coincidence that all three of them were killed within a period of ten days in different parts of the line.

Lieut.-Colonel West was the only surviving son of the late Rev C F C West, Fellow of St John’s College, Oxford, and Vicar of Charlbury. He was educated at Cheltenham College & St John’s College, Oxford, where he rowed for his college in 1904 and 1905, both in Torpids and Eights. He took his degree in 1905, and was called to the Bar in 1907, but never practised. On the formation of the Territorial Force he received a commission in the R.F.A, and went to the front with his brigade as commanding officer in March, 1915. He married, in June, 1909. Agatha Mary, elder daughter of William Dewar, of Rugby. He leaves a widow and four daughters, to whom the deepest sympathy is extended.

Lieut-Col West took a very great interest in the Territorial movement, and always preferred to be regarded as a “ Territorial.” He did his utmost to prove that the term was synonomous with proficiency, and, being keen himself on gunnery, he spared no pains to ensure the effectiveness of the officers and men in his command and to explain technical details to them.

He was the first Captain of the Rugby Howitzer Battery, when it was formed some years ago through the instrumentality of Col Mulliner, and was afterwards promoted to Major and transferred to the Coventry Battery. In August, 1914, as Lieut-Colonel, he succeeded Col Mallock to the command of the Brigade.

Polo and hunting were his favourite sports and for a season he acted as master of a pack of hounds in the South of Ireland.

Col West was a member of the Lawrence Sherriff Lodge of Freemasons, and for a time served on the House and Finance Committee of the Hospital of St Cross. He took the greatest interest in the Working Men’s Club at Bilton (of which he was a vice-president), and generously assisted in the provision of the new Club premises a few years ago.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Captain Charles Edward Anderson (Gordon Highlanders), of Rokeby House, Rugby, who was killed in France on July 20th, has left estate of the value of £8,929, the whole of which he gave to his mother, Mrs. Anne Rose Anderson.

SECOND-LIEUT HORACE NEEVES PROMOTED.

Second-Lieut Horace Neeves, of the Northumberland Fusiliers (the Old Fighting 5th), son of Mr and Mrs S Neeves, of Murray Road, Rugby, has been promoted to the rank of captain. The gallant young officer was formerly in the Warwickshire Yeomanry, and took part in the landing at Suvla Bay. On returning home he received a commission with the Northumberland Fusiliers, has been at the front since June, and has seen a lot of fighting.
The second son of Mr and Mrs Neeves is serving with the Australian Light Horse.

INTERNATIONAL O.R KILLED BY A BURSTING SHELL.

The Rev R E Inglis (Rugby and Oxford), whose death occurred, at the age of 53, from shell-burst while tending wounded, was an old English Rugby International. After getting his XI and XV colours at Rugby, he played against Cambridge in 1883 and 1884. He played for England in all three matches of 1886. His club football was identified with that of Blackheath. Mr Inglis was the youngest son of the defender of Lucknow, Major-General Sir John Inglis, and we believe we are correct in stating that his son was the googlie bowler of this year’s Rugby XI. Mr Inglis volunteered to join the Forces as a chaplain, and went to the front in July, 1915. During the time he was at Rugby School as a Town boy, his mother, Lady Inglis, lived at The Lawn, Newbold Road.

LOCAL CASUALTIES.

Mr T Reynolds, builder, Dunchurch Road, Rugby, received official intimation on Thursday that another of his soldier sons, Corpl J Reynolds, of the Grenadier Guards, had been seriously wounded and was in Chichester Hospital. Prior to joining the army Corpl Reynolds was in the Metropolitan Police Force, and was expecting early promotion. Mr Reynolds had four sons in the army. Two have been killed and two wounded.

PTE J R BRADLEY.

Pte J R Bradley, of the Northumberland, Fusiliers, who was killed in action on September 1st, was prior to the War employed by the B.T.H Company on the outside construction staff.

PTE H LEE KILLED.

Mrs Lee, of 34 Sandown Road, Rugby, received a letter from Sergt Burton, of Hillmorton, this week, informing her that her son, Pte H Lee, of the R.W.R, was killed in action on September 3rd. The writer said he was in command of the platoon, and saw him struck by a piece of shell in the head, and he died in a very short time. He was a brave and noble soldier, and highly respected by all N.C.O’s and men of his Company, for he always did his duty well, “ and feared nothing.” Deceased was 25 years of age, and before, the war was employed as a labourer in the Test Department. He was in the reserve, and was mobilised at the commencement of the war. He had already been wounded. Mrs Lee has four other sons at the front, two of whom have been wounded, and a son-in-law was killed 12 months ago.

HILLMORTON.

MEMORIAL SERVICE.—On Sunday evening a memorial Service was held in the Parish Church for Reginald Bartlett and Joseph Barnett, who have fallen in France. The Vicar preached an impressive and comforting sermon from St John xiv 27.

Mr J W Barnett, 264 Western Road, Leicester, has received official information that her husband, Pte J W Barnett, Queen’s Royal West Surrey Regiment, was killed in action on September 11th. Deceased was the second son of Mr and Mrs J Barnett, Rossmount, Hillmorton Paddox. He was 27 years of age, was called up in February, and sent to France early in July. Prior to his enlistment he was employed by the Leicester Tramway Company.

CHURCHOVER.

KILLED IN ACTION.—Quite a gloom was cast over this village on Friday when it was known that Pte Frank Sutton, of the Grenadier Guards was killed in action on September 15th. Frank was liked and respected by all who knew him. He was working in Coton House gardens when he answered his country’s call. Mrs Sutton’s three sons have all joined the colours, and the deepest sympathy of the parish is extended to her in the great loss that she has sustained. A memorial service was held in the church an Saturday by. the Rev L J Berrington. All the parish was represented. The xe Psalm and Hymns 536 and 537 were sung, and the service was very impressive.

DUNCHURCH.

On Sunday, Sept 10, the collections at both Dunchurch and Thurlaston Churches were devoted to the Lord Kitchener National Memorial Fund. The satisfactory sum of £32 7s 6d was sent up to headquarters.

Sergt W J Constable, R.E, youngest son of Mr and Mrs John Constable, late of Dunchurch, has gained the Military Medal for bravery.—Private Fissard, of the R.E, who has been home on sick leave, has gone to Bletchley to a rest camp for three months.

The Dunchurch Girls’ and Infants’ School have sent £2 to St Dunstan’s Hostel for Blind Soldiers, £2 to the Jack Cornwell Ward in the Star and Garter Home, £1 to Bilton Red Cross Hospital, and 11s to Mrs Neilsen for egg fund. The money was the proceeds of the entertainment held in the spring, and also includes contributions by the children for the Jack Cornwell Memorial Fund during the month.

STRETTON-ON-DUNSMORE.

News has been received by Mr and Mrs J Nicholas, of Lime Kiln Farm, Stretton-on-Dunsmore, that their youngest son, Percy, was wounded in action at the Battle of Thievpal. He received shrapnel wounds in both arms and hands. He is going on well in hospital in Cambridge. This is the second son wounded in action.

WEARING NAVAL UNIFORM WITHOUT AUTHORITY.

Claude Henry Hammond, aged 21, formerly of New Bilton, and of Rugby, charged at Lancaster with giving false information to Morecambe boarding-house keepers and wearing a naval uniform at Morecambe without authority, was committed for six months. Accused stayed at three places in Morecambe, and registered in false names. He described himself as a graduate of Pembroke College, Cambridge, and gave the name of a relative at Nottingham. All the statements were false. He was a deserter, and was wanted at Sheffield and Blackpool for false pretences.

DEATHS.

BARNETT.—Killed in action, September 11th, 1916, Pte. J. W. BARNETT, 6399, Queen’s London Regiment, second son of Mr. & Mrs. J. Barnett, Rossmount, Hillmorton Paddox.
“ Oh ! just to clasp your hand once more,
Just to hear your voice again ;
Here life to us without you
Is nought but grief and pain.
Could we have raised your dying head,
Or heard your last farewell ;
The grief would not have been so hard
For us who loved you well.”
—From his sorrowing WIFE, FATHER, MOTHER, BROTHERS and SISTERS.

GREEN.—On September 7th, RFN. FREDERICK JOHN GREEN, King’s Royal Rifles, died of wounds in France, the dear son of Frederick and the late Louisa Greenfield Green, of 4 Gladstone Street, New Bilton, aged 25.—Sadly mourned by his Father, Brothers, Sisters, and Minnie.

WARD.—On September 3rd, Rifleman C. WARD, 10th Rifle Brigade, second son of Thomas and Mary Ward, of Brandon. Killed in action in France.
“ We often sit and think of him,
And tenderly breathe his name ;
Nothing left for us to look at
But his photo in the frame.
Some day our eyes shall see
That dear face still kept in memory.”

IN MEMORIAM.

FRANKTON.—In loving memory of Pte. Frederick Frankton, Grenadier Guards, of Lawford Road, Rugby, killed on 27th September, 1915, at Loos.
“ Could we have raised his dying head,
Or heard his last farewell ;
The grief would not have been so hard,
For us who loved him well.
A light is from the household gone,
The voice we loved is still’d.
A vacant place is in our home,
Which never can be filled.”
—From his loving Wife, Children, and Mr. and Mrs. Reynolds.

RUSSELL.—In loving memory of Gunner PERCY EDGAR RUSSELL, R.F.A., who was killed in action, October 3, 1915.—“ He gave his life that others may live.”— Never forgotten by FATHER, MOTHER, SISTERS and BROTHERS.

24th Jul 1915. Rugby Man Arrested by Sentry

PHOTOGRAPHY IN WAR TIME.

RUGBY MAN ARRESTED BY SENTRY.

At Bangor, on Saturday, Frank James Hawkins, 59 Regent Street, Rugby, electrical engineer, a visitor to Llandudno, was charged under the Defence of the Realm Act (a) with taking a photograph in the neighbourhood of Menai Bridge without authority or sanction of a competent military officer, with intent to assist the enemy, and (b) with being in possession of photographic instruments in the shape of a hand camera, etc.

Accused pleaded not guilty to the first charge, but admitted the second.

Private Jones, a sentry at the Carnarvonshire end of the Menai Suspension Bridge, said he saw the accused on top of a wall, apparently taking a photograph of the opposite side of the Straits, which included a view of the Anglesey end of the suspension bridge.

Hawkins said he was totally ignorant of the regulations on this subject. He was staying at Llandudno, and on the day in question went on a motor-cycle through the Pass of Llanberis, and came to Carnarvon, and thence towards Bangor, and seeing a road marked “ To Menai Bridge,” he took that road, as he wished to see the bridge. He got on a wall and saw a nice view of the village, and he thought he would photograph it.

The Bench expressed themselves quite satisfied that defendant had acted in ignorance imposed a light fine of 20s.

FROM AN INTERNMENT CAMP IN GERMANY.

“ TAFFY, THE CRANE DRIVER,” A PRISONER OF WAR.

The Rev F Potter, of St Marie’s College, Rugby, has received an interesting communication from Pte Wm Turner, of the Royal Munster Fusiliers, who formerly worked as a crane-driver at Messrs Willans & Robinson’s Works, and is now a prisoner in Germany. He says :-

“ I am going on quite well, hoping you and all the old country are the same. I am interned in a camp composed of Irishmen and Roman Catholics. Our camp is situated on a hill in the beautiful valley of the Rhine overlooking the city of Limburg on the Lahn. The treatment and the accommodation is all that can or could be desired in this camp. There are also Russian and French prisoners interned here, but separated by barbed wire from us. We do a little light work daily as exercise. You may probably be aware of the object in having all Irishmen together ; we are in the Catholic district.

“ I should like my friends and workmates of Messrs Willans & Robinson to know that I am still alive and well, after ten months on the Continent, but am now, unfortunately, guest of the German Government. They are sure to remember ‘Taffy, the crane-driver,’ as I was known at the Victoria Works. Probably you may have amongst your congregation in or around Rugby some good Samaritan who would like to help the prisoners here by sending a few little comforts, such as cigarettes, tobacco, or food-stuffs, as we depend chiefly on our good peopled for such luxuries. I ask nothing for myself, as my wife, who as you know lives at Ashby, sends me all I require, but for those who have neither relatives or friends. Should any be sent through me, I shall be only too pleased to distribute them amongst the most deserving causes, and will acknowledge all gifts to the best of my ability. We receive a little occasionally from ladies in England, but as the number of men is great (about 2,000), and by far exceed the supply received, the individual quantity is very infinitesimal. I trust that men from Rugby and district now serving at the front are quite well. My prayers and those of my comrades interned here are offered for their safe return to their homes in the near future. I trust you are quite well, and shall be only too pleased to hear from you or anyone wishing to communicate with me. Our treatment is very fair. We have every facility for cleanliness, and the German Authorities supply change of underclothing as required, so we have nothing very much to complain about. Wishing you and all the old country the best of luck and good wishes, and a speedy conclusion to the terrible war. I remain, Rev Sir, Yours very respectfully. No 7242 William Turner, Royal Munster Fusiliers (late crane-driver Victoria Works), Limburg, Lahn.”

The Catholic Chaplain, Father Crotty, Dominican at Limburg, writing to Father Potter about this man, among other things says : “ You may assure Mrs Turner that her husband is being well cared for. Yesterday, with the other prisoners of war, he took part in our grand procession of the Blessed Sacrament through the Irish Quarter of the lager.” This chaplain is an Englishman. Since this above was written, Pte Turner has sent a post-card saying that he has been removed from the above camp.

B.T.H. MAN KILLED.

Mr and Mrs Davenport, of the Home Farm, Lindley Lodge, Nuneaton, have received the sad news that their son, Pte Henry Herbert Davenport, was killed by a German sniper on the morning of June 22nd. At the time he enlisted deceased was working at the B.T.H, and formerly at Churchover, where he was a schoolboy.

The following sympathetic letter from his captain has been received by Mrs Davenport, and we are sure the acquaintances of the young soldier will share the regret expressed by the officer :-“ Dear Madam,—It is with the deepest regret that I have to write and tell you of the death of your son, No 10608, Pte H Davenport. He was shot through the head by a German sniper, and died almost at once. He was buried close to where he fell, just behind the trench, and the spot is marked with a cross. The ground becomes the property of the British Government, and the grave will be well cared for. The Officers and the Company deeply sympathise with you in your great loss, and we all respected your son for his fine character and soldierly qualities. He was killed on the morning of the 22nd.—Yours with deep sympathy, A W T WEBB, Captain.”

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Pte Bertie Cecil Mander (Rugby), of the 4th Battalion of the Canadian contingent, has been wounded in action in Flanders.

Mr W J Peddell, auctioneer, Rugby,has been gazetted to a second-lieutenant in in the 10th South Staffs Regiment. Lieut Peddell has arranged with Messrs Tait, Sons, & Pallant to carry on his business during his absence.

Lce-Corpl Stanley Hidden son of Mr and Mrs George Hidden, Moultrie Road, Rugby, late of the Leicestershire Yeomanry, has received a commission as second-lieutenant in the Warwickshire Yeomanry.

Messrs Hoare, Clench, Jones, West, and Reynolds, all employees of the Co-operative Society, Rugby, presented themselves for enlistment at Coventry this week for the 7th Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment. Unfortunately Clench, Jones, and West were rejected for medical reasons, but have signified their intention of offering their services in the manufacture of munitions.

SAPPER SNOOK WOUNDED.

Mrs Snook, of 40 Lodge Road, has received news from the War Office that her second son, Sapper A E Snook, of the Royal Engineers, has been severely wounded in the scrotum and right thigh, and is now in a hospital in this country. Sapper Snook was with his brother and several friends when the shell which wounded him burst ; and although another Rugby man was wounded at the time, the rest had a marvellous escape. Mrs Snook has three sons with the colours. Two have been to the front, and the youngest is expecting to go shortly. All three enlisted at the commencement of the war, when they were employed at the B.T.H Works.

WOUNDED IN HAND AND FACE.

Pte Ernest Luthwaite, of the 1st Hampshire Regiment, son of Mr J Luthwaite, of 39 Lodge Road, Rugby, has been wounded in the right hand and the face. The news was communicated to Rugby by the Rev T L Bruce, chaplain of No. 1 Canadian General Hospital France, where Pte Luthwaite is under treatment as a patient. He is reported to be progressing favourably and to be comfortable and cheerful. Before he enlisted Pte Luthwaite was a glass blower in the Mazda Lamp Factory at the B.T.H Works. He joined the Army on the outbreak of the war, and has been in France about two months. When in Rugby he became a member of the Park Albions, and played at half-back for that club.

NEW BILTON MEN WOUNDED.

Mr E T Burton, of 35 Avenue Road, New Bilton has received an intimation from the War Office that his son, Pte M Burton, of the King’s Royal Rifles, was wounded (shot wound in right leg) on the 8th inst., “ somewhere in France.” He was taken to the 1st Canadian Hospital at Etaples, and has since been removed to the Military Hospital at Edmonton, Middlesex. Before enlisting in September he was engaged in the core-making department at Willans & Robinson’s Works. We understand that he is progressing favourably.

Mrs C H Wood, of 11 Campbell Street, New Bilton, has received intimation from the War Office that her husband, Pte Wood, of the 1st Royal Warwickshire Regiment, was wounded in the thorax by shrapnel on July 8th. Pte Wood, who joined the Army in January, and was previous to that time employed by Messrs Frost as a compositor, has written to his wife stating that he is going on well. He is at present in a General Hospital in France.

LANCE-CORPL. F. H. BOTTERILL WOUNDED.

“ A BULLET STRAIGHT IN THE EYE.”

Capt W F Wood, of the 1st Rugby Company Boys Brigade, has received a letter, dated County Hospital, Huntingdon, July 21st, from Lce-Corpl F H Botterill, of the 1st Royal Warwicks, announcing that he has been wounded, and giving some account of his experiences. We make the following extract from the letter:—“ As an old boy of your Company, I feel I am only doing my duty in writing to my Commanding Officer, and the one who first taught me the duties of a soldier. I have now been connected with the army for 12 years, but there has been far more stirring times this last twelve months than all the other, for I went to France last August. I have been with my old regiment, the 1st Royal Warwickshire, and I am proud to belong to it, for it has seen a lot of service, and we have always done our duty. I have seen very many of my old comrades go never to return, and my life has been spared on several occasions ; but they caught me at last, with a bullet straight in the eye. I am thankful it came out near my ear instead of going through my brain. I have lost my left eye, and it has been very hard to take my food, for I couldn’t open my mouth, but I am pleased to tell you I have had a wonderful recovery. My hearing has got normal also ; I can open my mouth much wider, and can see nicely to write a letter with my sound eye. I have seen a few exciting times, and the work was very hard last August and September. I went through the winter in the trenches, but they gave me a decent “ Easter Egg.” Still, I am very thankful my life has been spared, for the doctors all tell me I must have a “ strong spot,” but I am about “fed up.” This makes the fourth hospital I have been in, and it is rather monotonous after the life I have been leading, for I have never had anything worse than a cold. Still, I mustn’t worry, for I have always been in charge of a section, and I have seen many come and go, and some never to see the dear old home again.”

CAPTAIN OF RUGBY FOOTBALL CLUB BUSY IN FRANCE.

George Renshaw, captain of Rugby F.C, has had a busy time since he enlisted seven months ago in the Army Service Corps. He has been in France six months, and is engaged in clerical work. In a communication received by his brother on Thursday he states that he is working daily from 4 a.m till 8 p.m, so has little time for letter-writing. The popular Rugby full back is cheerful and well, in spite of the fact that he has not slept in a bed for several months.

COMMENDATION FOR A B.T.H RECRUIT.

Lance-Corpl F Keeley, 4th Battalion of the King’s Royal Rifle Corps has received commendation from his Commanding Officer and Brigade Commander for his conduct in the field with the British Expeditionary Force. Corpl Keeley enlisted in August at Rugby, where he was working as a pattern-maker for the British Thomson-Houston Company. He gained his promotion to corporal, and was transferred from B Company to C Company for his conduct in the second battle of Ypres.

A REQUEST FOR RAZORS.

Pte H Holmes, 1664 B Company, 1st Royal Warwicks, serving with the British Expeditionary Force, whose home is at 47 Wood Street, Rugby, has written us stating that there are twelve or more men in the regiment to his knowledge without razors, and if any of our readers have old razors that will shave the men referred to would be glad of them. We understand that all men have razors served out to them as part of their equipment, but apparently the men Pte Holmes refers to have lost theirs. Our correspondent informs us that he went out to France on November 11th last year, and has been in hospital twice. He adds:” We are out of the trenches now for a longer rest. Our regiment took part in that affair on July 6th. We were called up on the night we were going to be relieved, but had to stop owing to the Germans keeping on counter-attacking. The Old Warwicks helped to hold them back well.”

CREDITABLE RECORD OF A HILL FAMILY.

For a father, three sons, and a son-in-law to be serving with the colours is a record of which any family might well be proud. The hamlet of Hill, near Leamington Hastings, has a household that claims this distinction. Mr Wm Cleaver, the father, is in the 7th Battalion of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment, and is engaged in guarding bridges at Rugby. His eldest son is Sergt W H Cleaver, of the 19th Hussars, who went out to the front last August. He was slightly wounded in the foot, and has been home for a short time, but is now back again at the war. His injury was caused by shrapnel, and another piece of the shell became embedded in his cap. Both bits of metal are being retained as souvenirs. The other two sons, Privates A H Cleaver and B J Cleaver, are in the 3rd Gloucester Regiment, to which they have been transferred from the 19th Hussars. They are expecting to leave for the front this week. The son-in-law, Pte John Prestidge,is serving with the South Staffordshire Regiment at the Dardanelles.

RECRUITING AT RUGBY.

The following men have been attested at the Rugby Drill Hall this week :—J A Bryan, Royal Engineers ; Thos Hellier Edward, T H Johnson, and F Proctor, A.S.C ; A Hill and E Brown, A.V.C ; T Stewart, R.A.M.C ; C Denton and T Smith, R.F.A ; M A Adnitt, D Smith, and R Redding, R.W.R ; J Myers, K.O.Y.L.I ; J O’Donnell, 14th Gloucesters (Bantams) ; A Brown, Rifle Brigade.

FURTHER TIDINGS OF THE RUGBY HOWITZERS.

Sergt-Major Hopewell, of the Rugby Howitzer Brigade, has written to Mr W F Wood, of Market Place, Rugby, giving an account of recent fighting, in which the local Howitzers took part. The letter is dated, July 4th. Referring to the Boys’ Brigade, he says:—

“ I think it is a splendid organization, and the large number of men that we have who are past members of your Company show that the patriotic instinct instilled in them in youth grows up with them in after life. We all hope you will have an excellent camp and the very best of weather to enable you to enjoy it to the full.”

He then proceeds: “ I will just briefly relate what has occurred since I wrote to you last. We did our usual amount of firing up till Sunday, June 6th, 1915, when we had a good day’s “ sport,” which commenced by the Engineers exploding two mines under the German trenches. This was a signal for our artillery and machine-guns being turned on the enemy’s position, which was a network of trenches. In the report of the day’s action, which was issued by the General of our Army Corps, our battery was very favourably mentioned. The enemy made three different attacks since them, each preceded by the explosion of a mine, but in every case the saps were short, resulting in the mines exploding between the trenches instead of under our’s, so the damage to our people was practically nil. They sent over 400 shells in one of these spasms in about an hour, and we also had eight rounds in and about our gun position—one coming through a dug-out and another bursting it the edge of a gun platform. Luckily, no one was hurt, as all the men were at the other end of the gun position. We also had several close to the billet, but with nil results, and another farm near by was burnt down by their incendiary shells. Our observing party were shelled out of their station the other day, about 30 falling all round the place in the morning, and one hit the building in the afternoon, but they were all in the dug-out by then, so no harm was done. The village near to where we were also had a bad gruelling for about three weeks, but it didn’t make the civilians clear out, although a good many of them were wounded. The Germans attacked, very heavily for about two hours a week last Thursday night, and some of their infantry got as far as our trenches, but were repulsed, leaving twenty or thirty dead behind them. We have had a little recreation in the form of a ‘smoker’ now and again, and we also played another battalion at footer and beat them 1—0, and another battalion at cricket, and beat them by 11 runs, so you will see it is not all fighting here. We have very little fear from the gases now, as every man is supplied with a new pattern smoke helmet and respirator, and both have been proved very efficient by actual experiment. We moved from our position a week last Saturday for an alleged rest, so had our final hate in the morning by putting 15 rounds into their trenches, and started on trek in the evening, arriving at our present destination Tuesday night. The march was very interesting, as we saw a good deal of the country, marching from about 6 p.m until midnight each day, and having the days to ourselves except for stables and harness cleaning. We are at present staying in a mining village, which is very pretty, as it is so thickly wooded, and has evidently been part of a large estate at some time or other.

5th Jun 1915. Casualties from the villages

BARBY.

RIFLEMAN BERRIDGE KILLED IN ACTION.

The Rector has received the following letter :-“ Reverend Sir,-To-day the enclosed card arrived from you for No 419 Rifleman G Berridge, of my Company, who, I deeply regret to inform you, was killed in action on the 13th inst, while serving in the Company in the trenches. I shall be grateful if you will inform his relatives and convey to them the deepest sympathy of the N.C.O’s and riflemen of C Company. We can only hope that the knowledge of his death in the service of his country will afford them some little consolation in their sorrow.-Yours very truly, T Sherwood, C.G.M.S, C Company, R.B.

On Sunday afternoon a memorial service was held in conjunction with the afternoon service in the Parish Church. Special psalms and hymns were sung, the lesson in the Burial Service was read, and the sentences and prayers in the service were used. In front of the pulpit was hung the picture, “ The Great Sacrifice,” representing the   soldier dying for his country, trusting in Christ.-The Rector took as his text Rev iv, 1, “ After this I looked, and behold a door was opened in heaven,” The Rector said something like this : There were times in the lives of all people and countries when in their sorrows and losses and anxieties they scarcely knew where to go for help. Worldly things seemed to crumble away and fail, and the world’s hollowness was seen by the world’s incapacity to help in time of need. At such times the Church teaches us to lift up our eyes and look not to this earth for help, but to heaven. Then, as we pray in the Saviour’s Name and look upwards, the door of heaven seems to open to us, and we see the vision which St John saw, the glory there, the great throne, and the vision of Him who sat on the throne. There we get comfort, there we get help. This terrible war has claimed one more noble young man from among us-George Berridge. He had seen a very great deal of fighting, having been at the front and in the trenches a long time. Everybody liked him. No one could say a word against him ; one felt it was the best who were going first. He has gone, but as he goes he leaves behind him this message to all who knew him, and others as well : “ Go and do as I have done, I have trusted in my God, I have given my all for my country. You go and do the same.” His mother, overwhelmed with sorrow at her loss, must feel proud she had reared such a son, and we who have known him feel proud. The Rector asked everyone to pray to the Heavenly Father to comfort her. George Berridge would be much missed by his many friends. In the future, if God gave us the victory and preserved our Church, when a painted window or tablet was placed in the Church and the names of those who had fought and died for their country were inscribed, the second name would be Rifleman George Berridge.

There was a very large congregation, and the great number of people showed the esteem in which he was held.

CHURCHOVER.

Mr and Mrs W Webb, of Churchover, on Thursday last week received intimation from the Chaplain of the South Midland Casualty Clearing Station to the effect that their younger son, Corpl J W Webb, of the 4th Battalion Rifle Brigade, had been wounded in the groin. The wound is not dangerous. The battalion to which Corpl Webb belongs has been engaged in heavy fighting of late, and his friends have received some very interesting letters from him. In one, dated May 9th, he says :-” I expect you have heard from Mrs Matthews (Churchover) that John was wounded this week. I must say he was very lucky. Tell him the last battle we had was a thousand times worse than the one he was in. They shelled us with shrapnel, and I had my rifle smashed, my pack cut open, and my overcoat was torn all to pieces. I escaped myself with only a scratch on the face.”

On May 16th he wrote:-“ We went up to reinforce a battalion of another regiment that was being shelled all to pieces. We went up in broad daylights across an open ploughed field, and I   have only to thank God that I am alive to tell you of it. We were enfiladed with rifle fire, shell fire, machine gun fire, and that dreadful shrapnel. Shells were bursting all around, over, and in front, and still we went on. It lasted about half-an-hour. You can’t imagine what war is like. . . . We have had 36 days in the trenches straight off. We can beat them (the Germans) on the open ground, but they are masters at trench work.”

In a third letter, dated May 21st, Corpl Webb says:-“ We were inspected by General French yesterday, and he praised our brigade wonderfully. This big battle that we have been in will rank as one of the biggest in history, and our losses were heavy. I got through myself with only a few scratches. We have had five weeks of hard work, never out of shell fire the whole time, and I shall never forget it.” Corpl Webb , and his brother joined the Army at the outbreak of war.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Pte Webb, 4th Rifle Brigade, of Churchover, who, as we announced last week, has been wounded, has been sent to England, and is now in hospital at Reading.

NEWBOLD TERRITORIAL KILLED IN ACTION.

Another member of “ E ” Company, 7th R.W.R, Pte Lewis Hill, second son of Mr E I Hill, of Newbold, has been killed. The sad news was contained in a letter sent from a friend, who stated that Pte Hill was killed by a sniper while on patrol duty on May 29th. The writer added that a comrade had since accounted for the sniper, and had his coat as a memento. Pte Hill, who was 19 years of age, had been a member of “ E ” Company for several years, and previous to the war was employed at the Newbold Cement Works.

BRANDON.

PRIVATE F WEBB.—Some short time back Mr and Mrs Webb, of the Railway Cottages, were notified from the headquarters at Warwick, that their son had been wounded in the left arm and was in hospital. Since that date his parents have heard from him on two occasions, and were delighted to find that the report was not correct. He had been in hospital suffering from his legs, but had not been injured. He is now quite convalescent, and has re-joined his regiment—the 1st Warwicks. As his two cousins—Lee-Corpl T Webb and Pte W Webb, of Wolston, had both been wounded in the arm, it is thought that is how the error occurred. They all belong to the 1st Royal Warwickshire.

BRINKLOW.

ROLL OF HONOUR.—We regret to announce that Private Thomas Clifton, of the Worcestershire Regiment, was killed in action on May 9th. Joining the army immediately after the outbreak of the war, he soon became popular among his new comrades, and showed his ability at the regimental sports. His love of sport, however, did not eclipse his devotion to the sterner side of his soldier life, and although but a few months in the ranks he was very successful with the rifle, and he volunteered to go to France to strengthen his regiment. Prior to the war he was a member of the local Football Club, and was greatly esteemed. The village people sympathise most deeply with his parents in their loss.