6th Apr 1918. Women’s Work on the Land

WOMEN’S WORK ON THE LAND.

At the Empire, Rugby, on Tuesday and Wednesday afternoons, stirring appeals were made to women to volunteer for work on the land. As an introduction to brief addresses, a film was shown depicting the procession of Warwickshire land-workers at the Birmingham rally.

On Tuesday Mrs Neville, of Stratford-on-Avon, said the picture showed that a certain number of women had done what they all ought to have done—viz, to have come out from ease and comfort at home to work on the land, and thus take the place of men who had gone to fight for them. They must have more women to do this work. If they did not come forward, they were not worthy to be the mothers, wives, and sisters of those who fighting for them. She could not imagine during this critical period any man or woman, having good wages, and living at home in comfort, threatening to lay down tools in order to get more money or for some trivial cause. What was that compared with what those brave fellows at the front were doing for them ? Let them do their best for those heroes, and if they could not put in full time work, let them join a part-time gang, who could do a great deal. In Stratford about twenty of them put in three or four thousand hours on the land during a year by giving up their afternoons ; whilst others in business gave up their half-holidays and did good work. Did they think they had at this critical period any right to spare time for holidays ? To older people, like herself, she appealed to them to put enthusiasm to make up any loss in years.

The speaker on Wednesday was Miss Peers, travelling inspector to the Board of Agriculture. At the present time she said the Women’s Land Army consisted of between 7,000 and 8,000 whole-time workers ; but the need of the country was so great that they wanted another 30,000. Could the women of Rugby find any recruits for this army ? They knew how splendidly their Army was doing its duty at the Front, and they wanted another splendid army behind. They wanted the women of England to fight in the British fields. Women of 18 years and upwards who were not doing national work should come and fight for their country, if only for six months, although they would rather that they came for a year. They must fight in the English fields to keep off starvation, to feed the men at the Front and the little children, and to take the place of the men who had made the great sacrifice for their country. They should remember Kitchener’s Army and how the men came forward. They did not ask what the wage was ; they came to fight for their country, and chucked up their jobs, saving : “ Here I am ; I am ready.” They now wanted the women of England to do the same. It they were not doing anything particular in the national interest or for their country they should think twice before they refused to fight for England (applause).

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR.
SCHOOLBOYS AND HARVEST.
To the Editor of the Advertiser.

SIR.—I understand the Warwickshire County Council are desirous of making it as easy as possible for farmers to employ school children in the hay, corn and potato harvest, and with that object the Education Committee have asked the managers of all the schools in the county to fix the summer holidays at a period which will best suit the farmers in the locality of each school.

In writing to suggest to farmers that they should at once see the managers of their local schools, and let them know the date which will best suit their own interests, and therefore the interests of the country, to have the schools closed, so that the boys can help with the harvest. The holidays may be arranged to be taken at one time, or to be divided, as best suits the harvest operations.

I urge that farmers should take action in this matter without delay, as some time will be necessary to make suitable arrangements.—Yours faithfully,

R LEAN,
Secretary, Warwickshire Farmers’ Union.
27 Bridge Street, Stratford-on-Avon.

 

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Colonel H H Mulliner has this week returned from France.

We regret that news has come through that Capt G Gray, 1/5 Lancashire Fusiliers, is reported missing as from March 26th.

Sergt A T Barnett, 1 Temple Street, Rugby, was wounded in France on March 21st. Before joining up he worked as a painter for Messrs Linnell & Son for 15 years.

Lieut C K Steinberg, M.C, of the Machine Gun Corps who was before the war was a member of the B.T.H office staff, was killed in action on March 22nd.

Pte Fred Summers, 2/7 R.W.R, has been killed in the recent fighting. He had spent practically all his life at Clifton, and was formerly employed by Mr M R Trower, and afterwards by Mrs Twells, as a groom-gardener. He was 31 years of age, married, a Sunday School teacher, and member of the choir.

Sergt J Sacree, Rifle Brigade, who was taken prisoner of war a few weeks ago, writes to a friend in Rugby that now his food parcels are arriving from England he is able to have fairly decent meals, and is just beginning to feel himself again. His many friends in Rugby will be glad to know he has nearly recovered from his wounds.

The following New Bilton men have been wounded : Pte Oswald Sydney Houghton, Welsh Regt, son of Mr C Houghton, 6 Bridle Road, mustard gas and pneumonia ; Pte Stanley Williams, R Berks Regt. son of Mr J H Williams, 64 Pinfold Street, groin (severe) ; and Pte W T Kettle, Somerset Light Infantry, machine gun bullet in left leg.

An official telegram has been received by Mrs Pengelly, who resides in Leamington, that her husband, Captain E A Pengelly, M.C, 213th Army Troops Company, has died of gun shot wounds sustained in the recent severe fighting in France. Deceased had previously been a non-commissioned officer in the Warwickshire Yeomanry. He was several times mentioned in despatches, and short time ago was awarded the Military Cross. He was the eldest son of Mr W E Pengelly was extremely popular with his men, and held in high esteem by his superiors, and his speedy advancement was assured.

RUGBY POSTAL OFFICIALS HONOURED.

Major H Neeves, D.S.O, M.C, son of Mr S Neeves, 13 Murray Road, has been promoted Lieutenant-Colonel in the Northumberland Fusiliers.

Another employee at Rugby Post Office, Second-Lieut T H Healey, signalling officer of the 19th Royal Welsh Fusiliers, has been awarded the Military Cross.

Captain Eric Rose, only son of the former Vicar of Norton, Daventry, and grandson of Lieut-Col Rose, of Northampton, has been killed in action.

SECOND-LIEUT EDDIE WILSON KILLED.

Mrs E Wilson, 41 Bridget Street, has received information that her youngest son, 2nd Lieut Edwin Thomas (Eddie) Wilson, Royal Warwickshire Regt, was killed in action during the heavy fighting on March 23. He was 23 years of age, and when he enlisted in the Hussars at the commencement of the war was an apprentice at the B.T.H. In 1915 he was given a commission, and shortly afterwards proceeded to the front. He was invalided home, suffering from trench fever, but returned to France early in 1918. Of a bright and cheerful disposition, he was a prime favourite with all who knew him. He was an old St Oswald’s boy and a member of St Oswald’s Tennis Club. Five of his brothers are still serving with the colours.

DUNCHURCH.

MR & MRS H PEARCE, Coventry Road, have received official news that their son, Sergt B Pearce, of the 10th Bedford Regiment, who was posted as missing on July 12th, is now reported killed on that date. This makes the third son they have lost in the War.

THE inhabitants of Dunchurch very much regret to hear of so many Dunchurch young men who are at the War being wounded. Among them are Pte W Collins, Pte T Shaw (seriously), Pte A Amos, Pte G Elkington, and Pte J Cleaver (who has his leg broken).

LONG ITCHINGTON.

WOUNDED.— Mrs Frank Lane has received news that her youngest son, Pte Herbert W Lane (R.W), is in a base hospital suffering from a badly fractured leg. Her second son, Lance-Corpl Sidney Lane (K.R.R), whose leg was amputated after a severe wound last November, is now in Leyton College Hospital.

FATAL AVIATION ACCIDENT AT RUGBY.
LOW FLYING OVER THE TOWN.

The inquest on Lieut H N Van Duzer, a Canadian attached to the Royal Flying Corps, who, as reported last week, died at, the Brookfield, Nursing Home at the result of a flying accident, was held at Rugby by Mr E F Hadow on Thursday in last week.—Mr [ ] Patchett was foreman of the jury.

Surgeon-Major Chester Collins deposed that deceased had been attached to the Royal Flying Corps for instruction about six weeks, and he was a very promising pupil. On Sunday afternoon he was called to a field off the Lower Hillmorton Road, where he saw deceased, who had received first aid from Dr Crookes and two other men. Deceased was quite unconscious and his breathing was heavy, showing that his brain was injured. At the Nursing Home afterwards he found the young officer had sustained a fracture of the skull, a compound fracture of the left leg, and a fracture of the left wrist. For twenty-four hours he appeared to do well, but early on Tuesday morning more serious symptoms suddenly developed, and he died within three hours. Death was due to meningitis caused by septic poisoning. The fracture of the skull was at the most vital part. He believed that these injuries were caused through the pilot being thrown against the bar or some other portion of the machine. Dr Collins explained how the accident was possible, and he recommended the use of a padded shield as some protection for this part of the head.

2nd Air Mechanic Pickering and 2nd Air Mechanic Leach, deposed that the engine and rigging of the machine were in good order before the deceased officer started on his flight, and this was confirmed by 2nd Lieut Francis Kenneth Laver, who had flown in the machine earlier in the afternoon.

Lieut Smallman deposed that he examined the machine shortly after the accident, but could find nothing to explain how the accident occurred. Deceased was seen spinning to the ground, and it was possible that he might have turned giddy ; but he was a strong young fellow, and he did not think this was probable. If this evolution was practised below a certain height it would be impossible for him to recover himself.

Dolf Farn, mechanic, deposed that he watched the deceased officer flying over the Eastlands Estate. He had been flying very low, but had commenced to climb. When he was about 1,000 feet up he commenced a spiral dive, and when he had come down about 500 feet the machine turned over. Deceased seemed to be trying to right himself, and had he had another dozen feet witness believed he would have done so, because by the time it cleared the hedge the machine was right side up.—By Captain King : Deceased did about six spins before reaching the ground.

In reply to the Coroner, Captain King, the Commanding Officer, said this evidence did not explain the accident, except that it suggested that deceased might have been spinning too low down and misjudged the height.—The Coroner expressed the opinion that the suggestion of Surgeon-Major Collins was a valuable one, and although he thought the jury could not include it in their verdict, Captain King and other commanding officers might take note of it.—Captain King expressed the opinion that a pad would obstruct the pilot’s view with the present goggles. He had had a pad placed on the machines.— The jury returned a verdict of “ Accidental death,” and associated themselves with the Coroner’s remarks concerning the pad. The Foreman also inquired of the Commanding Officer whether it was necessary for the pilots to fly so low over the town.—Captain King replied that it was not. Since he had heard of the practice he had issued instructions that it must be discontinued.—It was stated by jurymen that messages had been dropped to people in the town, and complaints had been made as to the low flying, which many people considered to be very dangerous.

COVENTRY APPEALS TRIBUNAL.

Held on Wednesday evening in last week. Present : Messrs H W Wale (chairman), P G Loveitt, W Johnson, jun. and S Dicksee. Col Moore was the National Service representative.

The Military appealed against the exemption till June 1st granted to Thomas White (single, 18, Grade I), blacksmith, employed by his father at Dunchurch.—It was contended that it was essential, if the business was to be maintained, that a strong young man should be employed. Two other sons were now serving, and a third had been killed.—Mr J E Cox, the agricultural representative, spoke as to the importance of the work— from an agricultural standpoint—which Mr White was doing ; but Col Moore expressed the opinion that a man of respondent’s age and fitness should be in the Army.— Adjourned for the War Agricultural Committee and the National Service Department to try to substitute the man.

Mr H Eaden represented Howard Harold Allkins, greengrocer and small-holder (39), Wolston, who exemption was appealed against.—Col Moore said this case was brought to relieve the National Service Department of a responsibility. They had promised the Miners’ Unions to comb out all post-war miners, but he supposed the man was as useful employed there as anywhere.—Mr Eaden said that Allkins was exempted to take up work of national importance. He went into the Binley Pit so that he could carry on his market garden after working hours.—The Chairman said the Tribunal were unanimously of opinion that the man could not be left in the mines and the case was adjourned for a month to see if he could be used to substitute the man in the previous case.

Harry Wallis (39, C2), boot maker and repairer, 117 Grosvenor Road, Rugby, who was represented by Mr H W Worthington, asked for a renewal of his exemption and, on the suggestion of Col Moore, he was given till July 1st.

George Francis Harris, licensed victualler, Newbold (C3, 41), asked for a variation of an order whereby he had been exempted upon working 30 hours a week in agriculture. He explained that it was very difficult for him to get agricultural work, and he asked for a full time munition order.—This was agreed to.

Mr H Eadon represented John Edward Pateman (C3), farmer, Monks Kirby, and said his client had been ordered to work 30 hours a week in agriculture, but his physical condition was such that this was impossible The man occupied 50 acres of land, and was feeding 30 beast and two milch cows.—Adjourned for the agricultural representative to inspect the farm. Col Moore stating that if the report was not an adverse one he had no objection to exemption.

RUGBY & DISTRICT FOOD CONTROL COMMITTEE AND MILK PRICES.

The rationing section of Rugby and District Food Committee, having conferred with representatives of the Retailer Dairymen’s Association on the question of the future price of milk, the Food Committee has accepted their recommendation that the April price shall be 2s 4d per gallon, and for May, June, July, August and September 1s 8d a gallon. There is also a proviso that if the retailers produce evidence that the price fixed for after April is unreasonable that price may be re-considered.—The Chairman of the Food Committee (Mr T A Wise) explained that the retailers brought no figures with them, and they thought that if they produce books they could satisfy the committee that they were not getting enough. It would, however, require very strong figures to convince the committee.—Mr W A Stevenson asked if it was not peculiar that the winter price of 2s 4d continue through April, and that there should then be the big drop of 2d a quart.—Mr T Ewart thought it quite consistent. April was as expensive a month to produce milk as any in the year. In May there was all the difference.—Mr G Cooke submitted that milk ought to be cheaper at Rugby in view of railway freightage being avoided.—The Chairman remarked that the producers’ price fixed by the Government was 1s 8d in April and 1s for May.—Mr J Cripps thought the retailers would be well off in May, June, and July with 8d a gallon for retailing.—The Chairman said he thought it a very fair bargain, and that there was not to much to complain of.—Mr A Appleby remarked that when it was admitted that on the figures the retailer was making a fairly large profit, his winter expenses had been exceptionally heavy.

Mr Cooke pointed out that on pre-war prices, if the retailer made 4d on a gallon it was reckoned he was making a very fair profit. They proposed now to give him 100 per cent. advance. The consuming element were only averaging 50 per cent. increase in wages, and some of them not that. There should be the same amount of sacrifice all round whilst we were at war, but the degree of sacrifice was not equal. He regarded 6d a quart for April as affording a very fair margin of profit, and he proposed as an amendment that that should be the price fixed.—Mr C Gay seconded.—Mr Cripps said that 4d a gallon margin would be too low.—Mr H Tarbox : You have to remember that they will get 8d next month.—Mr Ewart thought 100 per cent. Advance quite reasonable. He estimated that the cost of retailing had gone up 100 per cent.—Three votes were recorded for the amendment and 10 against.—The committee’s report was then adopted.

DEATHS.

BOTTERILL.—On March 18th, at Arras, Pte. A. W. BOTTERILL, 2nd Batt. Coldstream Guards, the very dearly beloved husband of Alice Botterill, also second beloved son of Henry and Mary Botterill.—“ O for the touch of a vanished hand and the sound of a dear voice that is still.”—Heart-broken wife, Alice Botterill.

WILSON.— Second-Lieut. E. T. WILSON, 10th Batt. R.W.R., son of the late Mr. Ellis Wilson and Mrs. Wilson, 41 Bridget Street, Rugby ; killed in action March 23, 1918.

IN MEMORIAM.

ASHWORTH.—In memory of Sergt. ASHWORTH, killed in action on April 9, 1917. B.E.F.
“ One sigh perchance for work unfinished here ;
Then a swift passing to a mightier sphere.”
—From All at Home.

COLLEDGE.—In affectionate remembrance of our dear son and brother, WALTER EDWARD COLLEDGE, who was killed at the Vimy Ridge on April 9, 1917, in France.
“ Somewhere in France there is a nameless grave,
Where sleeps our loved one among the brave ;
One of the rank and file, he heard the call,
And for the land he loved gave his all.”
—From his sorrowing Mother, Father, Sisters and Brothers.

16th Mar 1918. The Advertiser Passing on Scheme Works Smoothly

THE “ ADVERTISER ” PASSING ON SCHEME WORKS SMOOTHLY
THANKS TO SUBSCRIBERS & AGENTS.
ADVERTISEMENTS TO BE RATIONED.

We should like to take this opportunity of thanking our readers for the generous way in which they received the suggestion we made last week with regard to sharing copies of the Advertiser with their friends, and for the wholehearted co-operation of a very large number in giving effect to it ; and in this acknowledgment we desire to include our agents who are giving their loyal assistance in the practical working of the idea.

It may be useful to again remind all concerned that the object of the drastic reduction of paper supplies by the Government is to limit the importation of pulp and other materials from which news-paper is made in order to release shipping for the conveyance of food to our shores, and other purposes vital to the carrying on of the war. To make one copy of the paper serve as many readers as possible is, therefore, a distinctly patriotic action.

Our sincere apologies are due to our readers for so much space in our last issue being taken by advertisements and official notices. The change we had to make came upon us so suddenly that we had no time to re-arrange our advertising contracts, but we are now taking steps to ration the space allotted to this class of matter, as well as our output of papers.

It should not, however, be forgotten that a medium like the Advertiser for making public one’s announcements is of national importance to the commercial and social life of the community. This applies especially to auctioneers’ announcements of agricultural sales, which this time of the year are always very numerous.

Then, too, space must be found for official announcements, and we were further handicapped last week by a heavy demand upon our already crowded columns by a lengthy notice under “ The Representation of the People Act,” which it was necessary to insert on that date.

Advertisements are generally read with interest, but our readers may feel assured that we shall do our best to keep them within reasonable limits, and that all important happenings in the town and district will be duly recorded in the Advertiser as heretofore.

MARKETING SURPLUS VEGETABLES.

The first general meeting of shareholders of the Warwickshire Fruit and Vegetable Collecting Society Ltd (registered under the Industrial and Provident Societies’ Act), was held at the County Hall, Warwick, last week. The primary business was to amend and pass the rules of the society. The report of the Provisional Committee was then read and adopted. Great interest was shown in the progress made towards establishing branch depots in the rural districts for the collection and marketing of surplus produce from cottage gardeners and allotment holders. It is probable that the neighbourhoods of Warwick, Rugby, Solihull, and Brailes will be the first to benefit under the scheme, and that the method of working these depots will be the same as those already found successful at Stratford-on-Avon, where a pioneer collecting and marketing depot was established last summer. The report of the Provisional Committee showed that already 6,63l shares had been applied for. The Provisional Committee was elected en bloc, with power to add to their number, as the Committee of the Warwickshire Fruit ans Vegetable Collecting Society. They comprise : Lord Leigh, Lady Ilkeston, Sir Michael Lakin, Bart, Mrs Arkwright, Mrs Melville, Mr A Allsebrook, Mr F Quartley, Mr J James, Mr H C Smith, Mr A Trafford. and Miss C Margesson.

RUGBY FOOD SUPPLY.

During the past few weeks the food problem has been much easier locally, and most people have been able to obtain provisions of one kind or another. The usual quantity of stock was sent to the Cattle Market on Monday ; and although the local butchers failed to secure their full quota of beef, mutton was fairly plentiful. Since Monday several beasts have been sent to the local butchers, so that there is every prospect of householders obtaining fair supplies this week-end.

The quantity of cheese has been very limited of late, but it is hoped that this state of affairs will now rapidly improve.

COVENTRY MUNITIONS TRIBUNAL.

Held at Rugby on Friday test week, before Messrs E M G Carmichael (chairman), J Findlay (assessor for the employers), and E G Evans (workmen’s assessor).

DISTURBANCE BY A DRUNKEN FITTER.
R. J. Skinner, 83 Abbey Street, pleaded not guilty to refusing to leave the workshop while the worse for liquor and creating a disturbance by persisting in remaining until he was ultimately carried out.—The foreman stated that on February 15th defendant was ordered to come back at seven o’clock and work all night. He did not turn up at seven o’clock, and at 10.15, while witness was at supper, he was fetched to Skinner, whom he found lying in the balance pit. Witness roused him, and he then appeared to be dazed. Witness told him he had better go home and come in in the morning, but he was mad drunk and commenced to use filthy language. He picked a hammer up and said, “ I will smash your brains out if you give me the sack.” Defendant produced a bottle of beer, and after drinking the beer he smashed the bottle on the wall. As witness could not persuade him to go home, he sent for the watchman.—Defendant : Perhaps he is the bloke who knocked me about.—Witness added that the watchman tried to persuade defendant to leave but he took his coat off and threatened to fight. They had to send for another watchman, and in the end to carry him out.—Defendant stated that he had been on the premises a quarter of an hour before he was accused of being drunk, and he also contended that he was entitled to sleep from 10 till 11, and should not have been disturbed—The night watchman deposed that defendant was very drunk and kept the other men from working. After he was put out he tried to get back, and was swearing and raving near the gate till two o’clock in the morning.—This was corroborated by another witness.—Defendant said the reason he would not go away was that someone said, “ Put him out.” He replied, “ There is not one amongst you can put me out.” They then started upon him and knocked him about.—In reply to the Chairman, he said he had been in the Army, and had been wounded and blown up. He had not been discharged, but lent to the firm.—The representative of the firm stated that Skinner had asked to be returned to the Colours. They had done so, and at the same time they sent a copy of the report to the Ministry of Munitions. He was a skilled fitter, and served his apprenticeship with them. They were very sorry the affair had happened, but defendant held up the whole shop.—Fined 60s in one case, and the other adjourned.

A QUIET NAP.
G Bailey, Daventry Road, Dunchurch, was summoned for sleeping during working hours.—It was stated that defendant was found lying on a table in the winding department fast asleep. The man who worked with him had complained that he had to do most of the work, and the foreman had remonstrated with him on the matter.—Defendant said he had a pain in his stomach ; he laid down to ease it, and he dropped off to sleep. He contended that he had always done his fair share of work.—Adjourned till May 17th.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Mr D H Hefford, stepson of Mr W F Wood, has recently been gazetted Second-Lieutenant and attached to the 5th Battalion Worcestershire Regiment.

Mr Arthur Morson (clerk to the Rugby Urban Council) and Mr A H Moseley (formerly of Rugby) attended an Investiture by the King of the Order of the British Empire at Buckingham Palace on Wednesday last.

PRISONERS OF WAR.

Pte P Mace, 2nd Oxford and Bucks L.I, of Hillmorton, who was recently transferred from his internment camp in Germany to Murren, Switzerland, writes : “ I can assure you it is quite a relief to be away from that wretched barbed wire. Everything here is so different to what it used to be in Germany. There you had a snarling Hun and a rifle following you everywhere.” After expressing his thanks for the splendid parcels sent to him, he adds : “ I suppose you know that all we have to live on was what you kind people sent from England. . . .”

Sergt Walter Kempton, Rifle Brigade, of Rugby, who has been a prisoner of war in Germany for exactly 3½ years, has been transferred to Holland. For 2½ years food parcels and bread have been regularly despatched to Sergt Kempton through the Rugby Committee, and grateful letters of thanks have been received from him.

A Dunchurch man, Rifleman W Pearce, K.R.R.C, who is a prisoner of war at Cassel, has this week been added to the Rugby list. Arrangements have been made for the regular despatch of his food parcels.

LONG ITCHINGTON.
A PIONEER AVIATOR.—One of our village lads, Joseph Henry Dell, though barely 17 years old, joined the R.F.C. nine weeks ago as a fitter. On Saturday last he ess[?]yed his first aerial voyage, and writes in glowing terms of his experiences. With Dell on board as his passenger, the pilot flew some 70 miles at a height of 2,000ft. and while in the air looped the loop twice and performed other revolutions. The embryo airman [illegeable] writes :—“ It made me feel nervous for a while, being so young, but I enjoyed it afterwards.”

DUNCHURCH.

A EWE belonging to Mrs Cosby, the Lodge Farm, has given birth to three fine lambs ; and Mr W Harker, Bilton Grange Farm, has a ewe which has followed suit.

DURING the last few weeks collections of eggs for the use of hospitals and the wounded soldiers have been made by the scholars. The boys collected no fewer than 335, and the girls and infants about 100—a splendid result, of which Dunchurch Schools may be proud.

THE COMMITTEE OF THE NURSING ASSOCIATION are very glad to state that Nurse Ridout having completed her training and successfully passed her examination in London, has returned to take up her duties as district nurse. She is most highly recommended by the matron under whom she has trained.

WATFORD.

SERIOUS DAMAGE BY A BOY.—At the Daventry Divisional Children’s Court on Tuesday, Walter Ernest West, aged 15, of Watford, was charged with maliciously maiming a bullock, the property of Wm Cullen, of Ashby St Ledgers. He inflicted such injuries with a stick that the bowels of the bullock were perforated, and it had to be slaughtered.—The father was ordered to whip the boy in the presence of the police, and also to pay a fine of £5 inflicted on the boy.

BRANDON & BRETFORD.

MR & MRS THOMAS BONEHAM, of Bretford, have been notified that their son, Francis Wm Boneham (Dorsets), has been wounded.

BUSINESS MEN’S WEEK.
RUGBY’S MAGNIFICENT RESPONSE.
£45,000 AIMED AT—£85,000 RAISED.

As was anticipated, Rugby played up well towards the end of last week. The £45,000 aimed at was easily surpassed, and when the list was closed on Saturday evening the amount reached was £75,000. Two other sums of £5,000 each arrived on Monday, thus bringing the total up to £85,000, or nearly double the figure required for the purchase of a squadron of aeroplanes, which was the object in view.

Satisfactory as this result was, however, there is little doubt but that, had the committee had longer notice, a considerably higher figure could have been fixed up ; and, in view of Rugby’s past achievements, this would, doubtless, have been forthcoming.

The suits on the first three days were very meagre, but on Thursday things began to improve, and a total of £19,921 was realised on that day ; Friday’s total was £29,965, and Saturday’s £20,431. Of the £85,000 subscribed £73,800 was invested in War Bonds and £11,000 in War Savings Certificates.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR.
SCRIBBLING ON WALLS.

SIR,—I am glad to see that attention has been drawn by a letter in your last issue to the growing nuisance in Rugby of scribbling with chalk upon wills and gates, and even on the doors of private houses. Quite apart from the more seriously objectionable nature of some of the writings and drawings, such disfigurement of our streets is a very great eyesore, and a source of annoyance to the more respectable inhabitants. Moreover, it is a step towards the hooliganism which is filling our principal streets any evening with yells and shrieks and forms of rowdiness on the part of youths and girls—suggesting pandemonium itself, and bringing discredit to our town in the eyes of visitors from elsewhere. Cannot the teachers in our elementary schools add their already valuable services by organising a crusade against this undesirable state of affairs, and so obviate the possible necessity of police action ?

I am, Sir, yours faithfully,
A HOUSEHOLDER.

IN MEMORIAM.

GIDDINGS.—In loving memory of Corpl. A. GIDDINGS, Hillmorton, who was killed in action on March 11, 1915.—Not forgotten by his loving Father, Mother, Brothers and Sisters.

SKINNER.—In ever-loving memory of Pte. G. SKINNER, 19th Canadians, who was killed in Belgium on March 15, 1916.
“ I do not forget him, nor do I intend ;
I think of him daily and will till the end.
I miss him and mourn him in silence unseen,
And dwell on the memory of days that have been.”
—From his loving wife, Charlotte.

STEEL.—In loving memory of our dear son, EDWARD, who was killed in action “ somewhere in France ” on March 16, 1915.
“ It’s hard, dear son, to lose you,
Who have filled your place so well ;
May God above now repay you
For your acts which but Him can tell.”
—From his loving Father, Mother, Brothers & Sister.

 

 

29th Dec 1917. Suggested Rationing Scheme for Rugby

SUGGESTED RATIONING SCHEME FOR RUGBY.

At a meeting of the Rugby Urban Food Control Committee on Thursday evening a sub-committee was appointed to formulate a rationing scheme for butter, margarine, lard, bacon, and cheese for the Urban and Rural Districts.

MARGARINE COMMANDEERED.

The Rugby Food Control Committee did not wait long before putting their new powers, enabling them to commandeer supplies of margarine, into force. The margarine queues on Friday and Saturday last were longer than ever, and there was every indication that similar scenes would experienced on Christmas Eve. Mr F M Burton, the Executive officer, however, ascertained that one of the multiple shops was expecting a consignment of four tons of margarine, and he immediately commandeered one and a-half tons, and distributed it among other grocers in the town. A notice to this effect was displayed in the window of the shop affected, and the police promptly broke up all attempts to form a queue. The action of the committee and the executive officer was greatly appreciated by many people, who were thus enabled to do their shopping with a degree of comfort which has been lacking for the past two months.

THE COLLECTION OF WASTE PAPER.

A meeting of the Rugby Waste Paper Committee was held on Thursday last week, Mr J J McKinnell, J.P, C.C, presiding. A grant of £10 was made to the Rugby Town Red Cross effort, and it was decided that at the next meeting the claims of the Prisoners of War Fund should have first consideration.—The Hon Secretary (Mr J Reginald Barker) reported that there had lately been an encouraging increase in the amount of waste paper collected by the boys of Elborow School and Murray School.—Mr McKinnell said that the Local Government Board had again urged the local authorities to collect all waste paper. Mr Barker had arranged to have every description of waste paper sorted and graded and sent to the paper mills for re-pulping, obtaining for the committee the maximum amount under the Government schedule of prices. They had, therefore, been able to devote considerable sums to local charities, and, in addition to the grant made at that meeting, had rendered substantial assistance to the Hospital of St Cross, St John’s Ambulance Brigade, the Hamilton Home, and the District Nursing Society. There were, however, other deserving objects which were in need of funds, and he trusted all who had waste paper of any kind would drop a postcard to Mr W T Simmonds, of Elborow School, or Mr W T Coles Hodges, of Murray School.

RAILWAY BOOKINGS.

During the days immediately preceding Christmas there was the usual exodus of workers from the town, and the number of travellers was well in excess of last year, when the Government’s exhortation to the people to avoid unnecessary travelling was loyally observed. At the L & N-W Railway Station bookings were very heavy to all parts of the United Kingdom ; and the Great Central Authorities also experienced exceptionally busy times. The majority of people travelling were munition workers and their families, and of the number of visitors to the town a large portion were soldiers home on leave.

CHRISTMAS ARRANGEMENTS AT THE POST OFFICE.

Owing to the scarcity of foodstuffs, the number of parcels despatched to the troops this year from the Rugby Post Office was not so large as usual ; but, nevertheless, during the busiest nights preceding December 14th—the last date for sending such parcels—as many as 80 odd mail sacks were sent off one night. There was, however, an enormous increase in the number of registered letters and small parcels of comforts. The labour question proved a great difficulty this year; but with the assistance of 28 extra postwomen and sorters and about a dozen spare-time workers, the rush was successfully dealt with. To relieve the counter pressure the Army allowances, amounting to over £1,000, were paid out for two weeks during the week preceding Christmas. On Saturday, Sunday, and Monday the counter staff was kept abnormally busy, and on Christmas Eve the number of parcels delivered in the town was unusually large, vis. 1,500 ; while the number on Christmas Day was 700. There was a falling-off this year in the number mainly confined to the residential quarters. In the working-class districts of the town the numbers were as large as ever.

Another unusual feature was the small quantity of poultry passing through the post, the customary ducks and geese giving places to more homely, but nowadays none the less welcome; piece of bacon.

For four days preceding Christmas the country mail motor vans were forced to make double journeys ; and although these ran rather late on several of the heaviest mornings, the times compared well with previous years.

SUNDAY POSTAL DELIVERY IN RUGBY.

To the Editor of the Advertiser

SIR,—Would it not be possible for Rugby to forego its delivery of letters on the Lord’s Day ? When we see so many women on the rounds we all know what it must mean in those homes, and they surely need their Sabbath rest as much as we do. In asking this I do not mean to ask that their pay shall be stopped for that day’s work, but that they should receive the same wage as now, and that we should forego our letters on that day.

London and many other large cities do without Sunday delivery, and so I think we should do the same. I believe it can only done by a resolution passed by the District Council. Will not some member propose such a resolution ? I believe he would find the whole Council ready to support him, and I am quite sure he would have the great majority of the townsmen with him. It is too much for a man to work seven days a week. What must it mean to these women ?—Believe me, sir, yours faithfully,

CYRIL T ASTON,
Vicar St Matthew’s Church.
St Matthew’s Vicarage, Rugby, Dec 24, 1917.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Dennis Over, youngest son of Mr Samuel Over, has passed out fifth in his company from the Royal Military College, Sandhurst, and has been gazetted to a commission in the Regular Army in the Royal Warwickshire Regiment.

Mr & Mrs C F Everett, 42 Claremont Road, have received news that their eldest son, Lance-Corpl Fredk Stanley Everett, of the Motor Transport, died from disease in the base hospital at Basra, Mesopotamia, on Sunday, December 16th. He was 21 years of age, and an Old Murrayian. Prior to joining the Army in January, 1916, he was employed as a goods clerk by the L & N-W Railway Company at Berkswell and Hampton. He was at one time a teacher in the Murray Sunday School and secretary of St Andrew’s Guild Cricket Club. He was also a member of St Peter’s Church Choir, and after the service on Sunday evening the “ Dead March ” in Saul was played to honour his memory.

MENTIONED DESPATCHES.

In Sir Douglas Haig’s despatches of November 7th appears the name of Sergt A W Hughes, Royal Engineers. Sergt Hughes was formerly employed at the B.T.H, and has been on the Western Front 2½ years. In July last he was the recipient of a “ card of recognition ” from the General commanding the Division for distinguished conduct.

ANOTHER ADDITION TO THE RUGBY PRISONERS OF WAR LIST.

Another prisoner of war has been added to the list of the Rugby Prisoners of War Committee, viz, Lance-Corpl W H Roberts, 2nd Machine Gun Company, who is interned at Lechfeld, Bavaria. This man was formerly employed at Messrs Bluemel Bros, Ltd, Wolston. Mr Barker has arranged for the standard food parcels and bread to be sent to him as from “ his former fellow employees,” as they have generously undertaken his adoption.

CHURCH LAWFORD.

MILITARY MEDAL.—This week Mrs F Cooke has received news that her brother, Corpl A Haynes, of the 28th Canadians, has been awarded the Military Medal.

MEMORIAL SERVICE.—On Sunday evening last a memorial service was held the Parish Church for Sergt S Batchelor, when a good number of the parishioners attended. The service was impressively conducted by the Rector (Rev H Smith), and one or two of Sergt Batchelor’s favourite hymns were sung. In his sermon at the evening service the Rector made allusion to the loss the parents and family, the parish, and the church had sustained by the death of Sergt Batchelor, and said it was such men that our country can ill-afford to lose. Amongst the many letters of sympathy which Mr & Mrs Batchelor have received several have come from the front, from the chaplain, the nurse, and from his lieutenant. The latter wrote:—“ Everybody who knew him recognised in him a good N.C.O and a good soldier every way.”

DUNCHURCH.

ROLL OF HONOUR.—Mr & Mrs Pearce, Coventry Road Dunchurch, have received intimation that their son. Pte W Pearce, K.R.R, is missing. This is the fourth son Mr & Mrs Pearce have lost in the War.

WOLSTON.

PTE W BARKER KILLED.—Mr & Mrs N Barker received news on Sunday that their son, Pte W Barker, had died from wounds in France. Deceased volunteered early in the War for the Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, but was rejected owing chest measurement. Later on he joined the Royal Warwicks, and has been in the thick of the fighting. He was well known and respected in the district. His father has for many years been a member of the Wolston Parish Council, and occupied other public offices in the parish. Much sympathy is felt for Mr & Mrs Barker and family.

BRANDON & BRETFORD.

CORPL C DIPPLE WOUNDED.—Mr V Dipple has received news that his brother was wounded in the charge at Cambrai. Corpl Dipple was one of the Mons and Marne fighters, being attached to the 18th Hussars. His other brothers—Sergt F Dipple, R.F.A, is now stationed in Italy (he also was amongst the 1914 battles); while a third brother, Bombardier H Dipple, is also in Italy and a sister is a nursing sister in the Army.

WOUNDED SOLDIERS ENTERTAINED.

On Boxing Day the wounded soldiers at the Infirmary and “ Te Hira ” Red Cross Hospitals numbering about 120, were entertained by the Rugby V.T.C at the Howitzer Battery Drill Hall. Tea was provided by the Red Cross Society in the small rooms, which were nicely decorated and presented a warm and cosy appearance, and this was followed by an entertainment in the Large Drill Hall. Under the supervision of Sergt S H Weobley, the members of Corps had tastefully decorated the hall with flags and garlands. The stage was arranged in a series of arches, illuminated with coloured electric bulbs, and a large Christmas tree, upon which useful and suitable presents were hung, was also illuminated by movable electric lights, arranged by Sergt O H Watson. Quartermaster Alderson as Father Christmas presented each guest with a present from the tree. An excellent programme, consisting of instrumental and vocal items, was given ; and, in addition to members of the V.T.C and wounded soldiers, were songs by Quartermaster C Prior and Miss Phyllis Vann.

BILTON HALL RED CROSS HOSPITAL.

The wounded soldiers at this hospital has a very pleasant round of entertainment. On Thursday last week Corpl Hawkins and friends from Rugby gave a concert, and on Saturday Mr Giggs and party went over from Rugby for a similar purpose. Dinner on Christmas Day consisted of turkey, plum pudding, &c, given by friends ; and in the afternoon the soldiers and staff were entertained by a professional conjuror from London. On Boxing Day the Southam Amateur Dramatic Company attended, and gave a concert and theatricals. The Bilton Brass Band played carols at The Hall on Sunday, and again during dinner and tea on Christmas Day. The men enjoyed and appreciated everything immensely.

SEASONABLE WEATHER.

The weather during Christmas was, on the whole, bright and seasonable. In the previous week frost and snow gave promise of ideal conditions, but on Monday there was a considerable rise of temperature, with drizzling rain, which quickly converted the road surfaces into sticky mud, and the outlook was not at all promising. On Christmas Day, however, a keen wind from the North with spells of bright sunshine put the roads in good order again, and outdoor exercise was quite enjoyable, and the same may be said of Boxing Day.

DEATHS.

EVERETT.—On December 16th, at Basrah (Persian Gulf,) Lance-Corpl FREDERICK STANLEY EVERETT, of the Motor Transport, A.S.C., eldest and dearly loved son of Mr. and Mrs. Everett, aged 21. (Nature of illness not stated).—Rest in peace. Not lost, but gone before.
Father, in Thy gracious keeping,
Leave we now our dear one sleeping.

MATTHEWS.—In loving memory of PTE HARRY J. MATTHEWS, the only and beloved son of D. and M. A. MATTHEWS, of Napton, who died in hospital in France on Dec. 14th, 1917, aged 28 years.

 

5th Dec 1914. Local War Notes

Everything is in readiness now at 67 Albert Street for the reception of the Belgian refugees to be entertained by Holy Trinity congregation.

Arrangements are being made for the billeting of 4,000 troops in Leamington. The men have been under canvas on Salisbury Plain, and they are expected to arrive in a few days. They will remain at Leamington for two months. It is considered that the advent of such a large body of troops in a town like Leamington in the middle of the quiet winter season will do the tradespeople much good.

Colour-Sergt Winchcombe, who has been assisting in the recruiting in this district, and is training the Hinckley Home Defence Corps and other units, is thus referred to by a Hinckley journal :- “ In Colour-Sergeant P Winchcombe the corps is favoured with a man of remarkable vigour and determination, who as recruiter for Rugby has helped to obtain and pass into the army nearly 2,000 recruits, a feat which has raised Rugby to the first rank in the country. ”

WOUNDED SOLDIERS LEAVE RUGBY.

About 20 of the wounded Belgian heroes, who have been accommodated at Rugby School Sanatorium recently, left the town on Tuesday for Shipston-on-Stour, where they will remain for a time until they are completely recovered. The men went by the 1.15 train from the Great Central Station, a number of the Red Cross nurses and other friends assembling to see them off, and when the train steamed out of the station, the people on the platform gave the soldiers a hearty cheer, and a Belgian flag was waved. Mr Burdekin travelled with the soldiers, all of whom looked much better for the assiduous attention they have received at the hands of the nurses, and were loud in their expressions of gratitude for benefits and kindness received.

SOCKS FOR THE 7TH WARWICKSHIRE BATTALION.

To the Editor of the Advertiser.
SIR,—I should like to express through your paper my thanks to all those who have so kindly helped my wife in collecting socks and other comforts for the 7th Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment.
Over 2,000 pairs of socks have already been collected and distributed among the men, and it was entirely owing to the fact that my Battalion having proper socks during the long march soon after mobilisation we had so very few men fall out.
Mrs Freer Ash is still collecting warm clothes and comforts for the men of the 7th Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment, and will be very pleased to acknowledge any garments sent to the below address,
THOS. FREER ASH, Lieut.-Col.
“ Beaulieu,” Dyott Road, Moseley.

CHRISTMAS PARCELS FOR THE RUGBY TROOPS.

DEAR SIR,-Would any of your readers who are owners of large motor-cars be good enough to lend them for one day near Christmas to convey parcels from friends of the “E” Company and the Howitzer Battery to their camps in Essex. We think if these companies are then in England it would prove a boon to great many and ensure a quick and safe dispatch for presents. Arrangements would be made for parcels to be delivered at a central office and all despatched on a certain day. Nearly 100 Christmas puddings have already been promised us, and we shall be glad to receive any more for distribution among the Rugby Companies.-Yours faithfully,
AGATHA M WEST.
CLAUDE SEABROKE
“ Bawnmore,” Bilton, Rugby.

AN APPEAL TO THE WOMEN AND GIRLS OF RUGBY.

The men of this country are doing their duty splendidly by serving or making ready to serve, on the field of battle ; but the women and girls, who cannot go to the war have their duty to do at home. They, too, can support the empire ; they can help our sailors soldiers in the fight.

How?

(1) By working for them in their spare time. This will cost money and mean self-sacrifice ; but it is no hardship to give up something for the comfort of those who are risking everything for us.

(2) By praying for them morning and evening and when the Peace Bell rings. They need our prayers that they may be kept brave and strong and merciful, and that they may be brought safe home again.

(3) By helping them to keep straight and pure and sober.-Times of excitement and anxiety are times of temptation for all. Let the women and girls of this country make their own life so temperate, and their behaviour so modest, that our sailors and soldiers are not exposed to the risks of drink or vice, but that their last remembrance of home is associated with all that is pure and lovely and of good report.

There is a League of Honour, an association to uphold the duty and dignity of womanhood, which we hope that every woman and girl in Rugby will join. What is meant will be explained at a meeting to be held in the Co-operative Hall on Tuesday, December 8th, at 8.0 o’clock. Come if you can, and ask others to come with you.

E DAISY BLAGDEN (Mother’s Union), E HESTER DEWAR (Church League for Women’s Suffrage), MARY FRANCES FLINT (The Children of Mary), ANNIE LATHAM McCLURE (Girls’ Welcome Club and Hotel), E L MELLOR (Rugby Women’s Adult School), MARGARET J MERTTENS (Rugby Sisterhood), MIRIAM S SPORBORG (B.T.H Girls’ Club), MAUDE M THOMPSON (Girls’ Friendly Society).

November 30th, 1914.

MORE RECRUITS FROM RUGBY POST OFFICE STAFF.

J T Healey, a member of the Rugby P.O staff, who volunteered some time since for telegraph work with the Royal Engineers, was sent for last week and has now joined the colours.

A College, an ex-soldier, who has been employed as a postman in Rugby for several years, has again enlisted in the army.

F Burton, who was temporarily employed as a relief clerk at Rugby, and has since returned to his home at Market Harborough, has now, it is understood, joined one of the signalling units in the Royal Engineers.

ANOTHER FOOTBALLER JOINS THE COLOURS.

An appeal having been made to school teachers to enlist as drill instructors, Mr Joe Greenwood, of Eastlands Council School, son of the late Mr W Greenwood of Newbold, has offered his services and been accepted. He has left Rugby this week for the headquarters of the 7th Battalion, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, which he has joined. Mr Greenwood has been at Eastlands School rather more than a year, and his colleagues on the staff, whilst appreciating patriotism, are sorry, to have had to say “ good-bye ” to him for the time being. As all followers of Rugby football in the town are aware, Mr Joe Greenwood at one time assisted the Newbold F.C in the back division, and in more recent seasons has played as stand-off half for Rugby Çlub.

LOCAL MEN LOST ON THE BULWARK.

There were several local navy men on the Bulwark, which was blown up in Sheerness Harbour last week, and   as a result of which nearly 800 lives were lost.

One of them, Seaman Gunner W H Pearce, second son of Mr W H Pearce, London Road, Dunchurch, joined the navy eleven years last January. He served first on the Sutlege and then the Prince of Wales, and has received two medals—one for participation in the operations in Somaliland and the other for services rendered when his ship went to the rescue of people who suffered in the great earthquake at Messina. He had been on the Bulwark about two yeas, and in his last letter to his parents he expressed the hope that the war would be over soon and that he would be home to eat his Christmas dinner with them.

Another victim was Mr Frank Sidney Edmans, eldest son of Mr W Edmans, polisher, of 82 Lawford Road, New Bilton. The unfortunate young fellow, who was only 21 years of age, was a stoker, and had only been in the navy two years, the whole of which time had been spent on the Bulwark. Before leaving Rugby, he was employed at the B.T.H Works, and was well-known and very popular in the parish. Much sympathy is felt with the family, who received the official announcement from the Admiralty on Sunday morning. On Sunday evening special reference to the sad event was made at St Oswald’s Church. In Monday’s issue of the ” Daily Sketch” appears an excellent photo of Stoker Edmans, together with the other stokers of the ship.