29th Sep 1917. Blackberry Picking

BLACKBERRY PICKING.-During the past fortnight the scholars of various schools in Rugby and the neighbouring villages have picked 2 tons of blackberries, to be used to make jam for the Army and Navy.

UTILITY POULTRY KEEPERS’ MEETING.-There was a satisfactory attendance at a meeting held at the Eagle Hotel on Saturday to consider the formation of a branch of the National Utility Poultry Society, which, in conjunction with the Agricultural Organisation Society, is seeking to put the poultry industry on a business footing. Mr Walter Barnett (Bilton) presided, supported by Mrs Barnett, Mr E B Covington, Mr W T Fischer, &c. Mr H Tarbox read letters from a number of interested poultry keepers ; from the Secretary of the N.U.P.S, and from Capt Peirson Webber, the County Council expert, regretting inability to be present that day. After discussion, it was resolved to form a society for Rugby and district, and to convene a further meeting when the experts can tend to give details of the working of similar existing branches.

THE FOOD ECONOMY CANTEENS.

It has been decided to close – at any rate, temporarily – the Food Economy Canteen opened at New Bilton in July last, and meals will not be obtainable there after today (Saturday). Although there is no doubt that if workers had been brought to realise that meals can be obtained there far cheaper than they could be prepared at home, the canteen has not been well patronised, and there has been a weekly loss since it opened. It is gratifying to note, on the other hand, that the Chester Street canteen continues to be a great success, and there are hopes of an extension in the accommodation. Not only is bread conserved, but, thanks to the willing aid of enthusiastic honorary helpers and to the hearty co-operation of an efficient paid staff, the prices as at New Bilton, rule low for very satisfying meals. The place is always full at meal times, and many people purchase cooked food to take home. Working expenses are being met, and a weekly profit, which will go to the liquidation of the debt incurred in setting up the canteen, is being made.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Bombardier Reg Covington, R.F.A, son of Mr Richard Covington, has been gassed during the recent fighting.

The latest list of war honours contains the name of Pte J French (Rugby), Royal Warwickshire Regiment, who has been awarded the Military Medal.

Pte George Ruddle, of James Street, Rugby, is reported missing, believed killed. From his comrades it was gathered that he was almost certainly killed. He was in the Royal Warwickshire Regiment.

Sergt L C Cox, elder son of Mr A G Cox, Kenilworth House, Popular Grove, Rugby, after much active service in France with the King’s Royal Rifles, during which time he was wounded four times has passed first class in a special course of instruction and sails for Africa this weekend to join the King’s African Rifles. His younger Brother Albert, also with experience of the fighting in France, being twice mentioned and awarded the Military Medal, has been presented as a second-lieutenant in the King’s Liverpool Regiment.

Official intimation has been received from the War Office, that Bombardier S G Smith, son of Mrs Smith, 28 Pinfold Street, New Bilton, was killed in action in France on August 18th. He was formerly a member of the of the Rugby Howitzer Battery, and was employed by the Rover Company, Coventry when called up. A letter from the officer commanding the battalion speaks in high terms of Bombardier Smith’s performance of his duties.

ASHBY ST. LEDGERS.

CAPT E G PASSMORE, of the Northamptonshire Regiment, son of Mr S A Passmore, is in hospital at Dieppe suffering from trench fever.

News has reached the village that Pte Stowe, who was reported missing, is now a prisoner of war. This is the second prisoner of war from this village, Pte Roberts having been wounded in the leg and taken prisoner a few months ago.

BRETFORD.

KILLED IN ACTION.-Mrs Archer College, Hill Farm, Bretford, has been notified that her husband, Pte Archer Colledge, Royal Warwicks, was killed in France on September 3rd. Pte College, who went to the front in June last, lost his life in his first engagement. He was educated at Pailton Church School and was employed at Coventry Ordnance Works until called up in March last. Pte College’s Company Officer, in a letter to Mrs College, writes :- “ Although he had recently joined us, by his cheeriness and courage he soon made himself liked, and his platoon feel his loss keenly, as I do myself.” A comrade of Pte College’s, who has been in continuous action for the last 16 months, writes that the present fighting is the bitterest he has yet experienced. Pte College was 29 years of age, and leaves a widow and one child.

TO HELP THE PRISONERS OF WAR FUND.

AN IMPORTANT EVENT.

To-day (Saturday) an attractive event will take place in Benn’s Field, North Street, Rugby, in aid of the Rugby Prisoners of War Fund, for which a continuous and increasing flow of money is needed. The effort will consist of a great show and sale of agricultural and horticultural produce, which is being freely given by generous donors in the town and district.

Mr J J McKinnell, C.C, chairman of the Urban District Council, is the chairman of the committee, and, supported by leading residents, will open the affair at 2.30 p.m.

In the horticultural section 26 prizes are offered for competition ; and, of course, contributions of produce merely for sale will be gladly received. Already a large number of sheep, lambs, pig, rabbits, and poultry have been promised for the agricultural department ; and the auctioneers of the town, who will sell the goods, are giving their services gratuitously, as well as all others who are working so energetically to ensure success, and it only remains for the public to give their attendance-and their money-for which there will be plenty of bargains.

A large marquee. which will be lighted by electricity in the evening, will be provided ; and apart from the exhibition and sale, there will be various competitions and side-shows of an attractive nature. These will include a fire brigade competition-always an interesting item-and four brigades from Coventry will be represented in this. There will be dancing also for the young people.

For a small admission fee of 6d the visitor will, therefore, get plenty of money.

The Committee consists of Messrs. A Bell, chairman ; J Cash, hon treasurer ; G Allford, J Reginald Barker, C Cockerel, F Dunkerley, J Harker, G Harrowing, G Henton, J P Lennon, C Mewis, J J   Scrivener, F Starmore, with J R Blyth and H Lovell, joint hon secretaries.

DEATHS.

COLLEDGE.—In ever-loving memory of Private ARCHER COLLEDGE, 20249 Royal Warwickshire Regt., killed in action on 3rd September, 1917, somewhere in France, aged 29 years.
A loving husband, true and kind,
A better father you’d never find ;
But He who orders all things best,
Has given to him eternal rest.
The end was bitter, the shock severe,
To part with one we loved most dear.
We did not see him die or hear him say goodbye ;
We miss him and mourn for him in silence unseen,
And dwell on the days is his young life has seen.
—Deeply mourned by his Wife and Child.

IN MEMORIAM.

BARNETT.—In loving memory of Lance-Corpl. GEORGE BARNETT, 5th Oxon and Bucks, killed at the battle of Loos, Sept. 25th, 1915, son of the late James Barnett and Mrs. Sansome, 5 Gas Street. Never forgotten by his sorrowing Mother, Step-father, Brothers, Winnie and May.
He bravely answered his country’s call,
He gave his life for one and all ;
But the unknown grave is the bitterest blow,
None but aching hearts can know.

BARNETT.—In loving memory of my pal, Lance-Corpl. GEORGE BARNETT, 5th Oxford and Bucks, killed in action September 25th, 1915.
Two years had passed, my heart’s still sore,
As time rolls by I miss him more ;
His loving smile and cheerful face
No pal on earth can fill his place.
BILLIE WEBB, somewhere in France.

BROWN.—In loving memory of our dear Son & Brother, PERCY EDWIN BROWN, who was killed in action on September 25th, 1915.
Sleep on dear son and brother in your far off grave,
A grave we may never see ;
But as long as life and memory lasts,
We will remember thee.
—From Father, Mother, Sisters and Brothers.

CASHMORE.—In loving memory of PRIVATE C. CASHMORE, Oxon & Bucks L.I., who was killed in action September 25, 1915.
Our hero gone, but not forgotten,
Never shall his memory fade ;
Our sad thoughts so often wonder
To that far-off land where he is laid.
Yes, we think of him in silence,
And his name we oft recall,
But there’s nothing left to answer,
But his photo on the wall.
—From his loving Wife and Children.

EMERY.—In loving memory of ERNEST HARRY EMERY, Bdr. R.F.A., accidentally killed whilst on active service with the Salonica Forces, Oct. 1st, 1916. Interred in Mekes Cemetery.

FRANKTON.—In loving memory of our dear brother, FRED, who was killed in France on Sept. 25th, 1915.
From POLLIE AND SARAH.

HINKS.—In loving memory of my dear son, JOHN HINKS, of 33 Essex Street, of the 5th Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, who fell asleep in action in France on September 25th, 1915.
“ The midnight star shines o’er the grave,
Of a dear son and soldier brave ;
How dear, how brave, we shall understand,
When we meet again in the better land.”
—Not for granted by his Mother, Father, Sisters and Brothers.

STENT.—In loving memory of my dear son, Corpl. P. V. STENT, who was killed in action at Loos, on September 25th, 1915.
“ Two years have passed and friends around us
Think, perhaps, the wound has healed ;
But they little know the sorrow,
Deep within our hearts concealed.”
—Silently mourned by his loving Mother, Father, Sisters, and Brother.

STENT.—In loving memory of PERCY VICTOR STENT, who was killed at Loos, Sept. 25th, 1915. “ Death divides, but memory lingers.”—From Mr. and Mrs. HARBAN and family.

STONE.—In loving memory of my dear husband, PTE. C. G. STONE, who was wounded 28th Sept., and died the 1st October, 1915.
“ They miss him most who loved him best.”
—From his loving wife Amy.

WHITBREAD.—2nd Lieut. BASIL, 14th Royal Warwickshire Regiment. Reported missing 22 July, 1916 ; now presumed to have been killed in action on that date.

WEST.—In proud and loving memory of FRANK WEST, Lieutenant-Colonel R.F.A. (T.), who was killed near Pozieres on September 28, 1916 ; aged 33.—“ We have found safety with all things undying.”

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Saville, Walter Stanley. Died 29th Sep 1917

Walter was born in Rugby in 1895 and christened at St Andrews Church on 13 July, the son of Walter John Saville and his wife Florence nee Cornah. His parents were married at the same church on 19 Aug 1890, he was 29, a builder’s clerk, son of Thomas Saville, also a builder’s clerk.   Florence was 24, living in Cambridge Terrace (now Cambridge Street) off Clifton Road, and daughter of William Cornah, a coachbuilder.

In 1901 Walter John born in London and Florence born in Rugby were living at “Mayfield” in Clifton Road with two children, Walter junior and Sidney Foster, born the previous year, and a servant. By 1911 they were at 93 Clifton Road (which may be the same as “Mayfield”), a large house with eight rooms. They had been married for 22 years, and had four children, all living.   By this time Walter senior was a builder and contractor and an employer. The Rugby Advertiser tells us that he was “of Foster & Dicksee”. Two daughters had been added to the family, Florence Eugenie aged 8 and Lilian Hall aged 5, there was also a servant.

Soldiers of the Great War tells us that Walter enlisted in London and joined the Honourable Artillery Company (HAC) as Gunner no 624146.

The account of his death in the Rugby Advertiser on 13 October 1917 gives a brief obituary of Walter. He was a very tall man, he attended Murray School and Lower School (Lawrence Sheriff), and was a keen golfer and cricketer. He joined the HAC in October 1914 at which time he was employed by Foster & Dicksee. He was stationed chiefly on the east coast for home defence, but went to France about four months before his death on 29 September 1917 when he was serving with the 2nd Artillery Battery. He died of wounds in the same dugout as Leo Lennon (qv) when it was hit by a German shell.

Walter is buried in Bard Cottage Cemetery near Ypres. He was awarded the Victory and British War medals, his mother received his back pay and a war gratuity of £13. His father had died in 1915.

He is remembered on his parents’ gravestone in Clifton Road Cemetery and on the Old Laurentians memorial plaque as well as on the Rugby Memorial Gates.

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

Lennon, Lionel Stewart. Died 29th Sep 1917

Lionel (Leo) Lennon was the youngest of the five sons of John Patrick and Mary Charlotte (nee Cornish) who were married in Chelmsford Registration District December Quarter 1887.   Their four eldest children were born there too, John William (1888), Ernest Patrick (1889), Edward James (1891), and William Thomas (1893). In 1891 John was a baker living with his wife and three oldest children at “The Bird in Hand” in Baker Street, Chelmsford. He was born in Hertfordshire and his wife in Sussex.

The Lennons moved shortly after this to the “Six Bells Inn” in Cockfield Sussex where Lionel was born in 1894. His father was now termed a licensed victualler, and at last the couple produced a daughter, Mary Ann, born in 1897.

By 1904 the family was in Rugby where sadly their eldest son John William died at the age of 15. In 1911 they were living at “The Globe Hotel” in Railway Terrace with two servants. Ernest, Edward and William were employed as barmen by their father, Lionel at 17 was still at school at Lawrence Sheriff.

Lionel was one of the partners in the well-known local firm of Lennon Bros, tobacconists, which operated from adjacent premises and other sites in the town, and which many Rugby people will remember.

Lionel joined the Honourable Artillery Company (HAC) in January 1916 as Gunner 624555. The Rugby Advertiser of 13 October gives an account of his death on 29 September.   He was killed together with his fellow townsman Walter Stanley Saville (qv) while they were resting in a dugout after a heavy artillery engagement. A German shell landed on the dugout killing him instantly, Gunner Saville was seriously wounded and died half an hour later. Lionel’s brother William, who had also joined the HAC (no 624559), had shared the dugout with the two men, but shortly before had been sent up to the waggon lines, thus escaping their fate.

Lionel’s eldest brother Ernest also belonged to the HAC (no 625659) but was later transferred to the Royal Field Artillery. Brother Edward may be the Edward J Lennon who joined the Royal Army Medical Corps (no 42466) and was sent to France on 19 July 1915 (medal cards). All four brothers received the Victory and British War medals, Edward also had the 1915 Star. He died in 1922.

John Patrick died in 1927 and Mary Charlotte in 1944, both of Moultrie Road.

Lionel is buried in the Divisional Collecting Post Cemetery to the north east of Ypres, which was begun by field ambulances of the 48th and 58th Divisions in August 1917 and used until January 1918. The cemetery was extended in the early 1920s for burials brought from surrounding battlefields and small burial grounds in the area. On the grave register, his parents were of 15 Moultrie Road, Rugby.

He is also remembered on the Old Laurentians plaque at Lawrence Sheriff School, and on the Roll of Honour at St Marie’s Church.

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

Bradshaw, Ernest George. Died 24th Sep 1917

Ernest George Bradshaw was born in 1880 in Rugby. The family was living at 18 Round Street at the time and his father John was a carpenter. John Bradshaw had married Mary Ann E Farden in 1875. The wedding was registered in the Daventry RD. John came from Napton on the Hill , Warwickshire and Mary Ann from Byfield in Northants.

By 1891 the family had moved to 8 Newbold Road. Aged ten, Ernest was the middle of five children: John (15), Mary (12), Ada (8) and Frank (1). By 1901 Ernest was following in his father’s trade as a carpenter’s apprentice. He worked for Rugby builders, Foster and Dicksee.

On 20th May 1907 married Eliza Ellen Jones at Church Lawford Parish Church. He was aged 27 and Eliza was a 30 year old domestic servant. Their only child George Edward was born in late 1910. The family lived at 39 Wood Street.

Ernest George Bradshaw was working in Brownsover when he joined the army in June 1916. He enlisted in 2nd/6th Bn. Royal Warwickshire Regiment (Private, no. 242340) and arrived in France around October 1916. The RWR was in the final stages of the Battle of the Somme.

In 1917 the regiment was part of the 61st (2nd South Midland) Division in operations on the Ancre in March and The Battle of Langemarck in August 1917.

On 23rd September 1917, after several weeks of training, the Battalion relieved the 10th Bn Sherwood Foresters as right Battalion in the Chemical Works Sector (Ref. map Flouvain).

The following day (24th Sep):

At 4.30 a.m. the enemy attempted a raid on the trenches of our centre Company. An intense barrage composed of T. M. Shells of various calibres 77mm. 4.5 cm and 5.9 cm was put down on line CORFU AVENUE and thence along COLUMBO SWITCH.

An S.O.S. signal, which appeared to have been fired from our extreme right flank, was observed. The Artillery were informed and promptly fired on their S.O.S. lines. At the same time, movement was observed in front of our own wire at I.14.c.6.9., and rifle and Lewis Gun fire was opened. One of the enemy who succeeded in crawling through a recognised gap in our wire was hit by Lewis Gun fire and taken prisoner.

Nothing more was seen of the enemy and no attack developed.

The Barrage continued with intensity till 5.15 a.m., at which time it commenced to diminish slightly. At 7 a.m. all was reported quiet.

A patrol was sent out at dusk the same day, to the supposed place of assembly of the enemy raiding party, but no wounded or further identifications could be found.

Our casualties 8 other ranks killed, Capt. B. R. Saunders and 3 other ranks wounded.

Ernest George Bradshaw must have been one of the “other ranks killed)”. He was buried at Brown’s Copse Cemetery Roeux, a village about 8 kilometres east of Arras, plot number IV.B.50

Plots I to IV are composed almost entirely of graves cleared from the battlefield in the summer of 1917. The Germans re-entered the village at the end of March 1918, and it was finally retaken by the 51st Division on the following 26 August.

Eliza never remarried, dying in 1950. Their son George Edward Bradshaw was living with her at 76 Oxford Street, Rugby, in 1939.

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

Thompson, Levi. Died 23rd Sep 1917

Levi Thompson was born in 1884 at Newbold-on-Avon to Thomas Thompson (b 1852 in Newbold-on-Avon), railway worker, and his wife, JaneThompson, née Webb, (b 1847 in Dunchurch).

In 1906 Levi was married at Rugby to Ada Mary Curtlin (b 1888) of Thurlaston. They had 4 sons; Levi Frank (b 1907), Herbert William (b 1909), Walter S (b 1912) and Frederick L (b 1914). The 1911 census returns show that the family home was at 49 Union Street, Rugby and that he was employed by Rugby Council as a labourer.

During WW1 he enlisted in the 9th Battalion, Yorkshire Regiment, regimental number 235470. He was sent to the Belgian Flanders front about May 1917, where he died during the Third Battle of Ypres on 23 September 1917. He is one of the many United Kingdom servicemen with no known grave whose names appear on the Tyne Cot Memorial. A notice of his death appeared in the Birmingham Evening Despatch on 13 October 1917.

He was survived by his widow and 4 sons.

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

Worster, George John. Died 22nd Sep 1917

George John Worster was born in Aldershot Hants in 1892, the eldest son and third child of the ten children of George Worster, a blacksmith born in Barby Northants. He was baptised at Farnham, the birthplace of his mother Emma nee Goulden and eldest sister Maude, on 20 May 1892 (Farnham baptism register). His parents were also married there Dec Q 1887. His siblings were Maude (Harriet M), Elizabeth E, Jesse (Alfred J), Victoria, (Edward) Cecil, Dorothy, Cedric, and Aubrey. (census 1901 & 1911)

George senior was working as a blacksmith in an engineering works in Rugby in 1911, and living at 15 Manor Road, a house with seven rooms. He had moved to the town around 1899; his five youngest children were born here. He had travelled around quite a bit according to the birthplaces of his children, from Farnham in 1887 to Aldershot c 1893 where George jnr and Victoria were born, then to Flore Northants for a couple of years, and on to Weston by Welland for another couple of years before coming to Rugby. In 1901 the family with six children were living at 33 Arnold Street (RG13/2916/76).   This would have been in the early days of the engineering companies in Rugby, which would have recruited men with experience like George.

George John was a carpenter’s apprentice in 1911, working for a builder. His two older sisters (Harriet) Maude and Elizabeth were workers in a lamp factory, and a younger brother (Alfred) Jesse was an iron turner’s apprentice in an engineering works. Five of the six youngest children aged 4-13 were scholars, the youngest was an infant aged two.

George must have enlisted during the first year of the war as his medal card records that he was awarded the 1915 Star having entered France on 21 July 1915. He is buried in Spoilbank Cemetery five miles south of Ypres which contains 520 graves and commemorations of the fallen. His grave in Section I, row O is directly beside the path between the main gate and the Great Cross.

He married Doris M Meek in Mar Qr of 1917 in Rugby RD.

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

22nd Sep 1917. Seats for Soldiers.

SEATS FOR SOLDIERS.

To the Editor of the Advertiser.

DEAR SIR,—As a visitor to the town, I learn that Rugby has already done a good deal for wounded soldiers, so that it must be from want of thought, and not from want of heart, that one arrangement has not been made that I have seen in many towns. I refer to the placing of garden seats and chairs in the public streets for the use of soldiers. One sees these poor fellows sitting on the kerbs and other uncomfortable positions. There are many patriotic-spirited inhabitants who might loan their garden seats ; also probably many who would see their way to put a notice on their garden gate, inviting the men enter the garden and use the seat therein, and thus confer both rest and pleasure. Surely these men have done enough for their country to deserve these little attentions.—Yours sincerely, VISITOR.
September 13, 1917.

 

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Sergt A Goode, of the Machine Gun Company, son of Detective-Insp Goode, of Rugby, who was recently reported missing, has written to his father stating that he is a prisoner and at a Red Cross Hospital at Neuminster, in Germany.

Pte W J Boyce, Royal Warwicks. son of Mr J E Boyce, a member of Long Lawford Parish Council, has sent to his father a certificate from his Colonel to the effect that he “ has been specially noted for gallantry and good work in the trenches during the last tour, and notice has been inserted in the battalion orders to that effect. This is the second mention has received within the last week.”

RUGBY FOOD CONTROL COMMITTEE.

APPOINTMENT OF AN EXECUTIVE OFFICER.

At a meeting of the Rugby Food Control Committee on Wednesday evening Mr Frank Middleton Burton was appointed executive officer at a salary of £200 a year. Mr Burton is secretary of the Rugby Liberal Association, and also clerk to the Military Advisory Committee. In the latter capacity he has done much to forward recruiting locally. He is also a member of the Rugby Board of Guardians and Rural District Council, the Rural District Food Control Committee, and Bilton Parish Council.

WILL OF THE LATE LIEUT HART-DAVIES.—Lieut Ivan Beauclerk Hart-Davies, of Rugby, Warwick, late of the R.F.C, son of the late Rev John Hart-Davies and Mrs. Hart-Davies, of Southam Rectory, Warwickshire, aged 39, who was killed in an aeroplane accident in England on July 27th, left estate valued at £8,679. Testator leaves £500, his dog Jock, effects in his office and residence, and motor-cycle to his late clerk, Arthur Douglas Miller ; £20 to his cashier, John Griffin ; £10 each to other persons in his employ ; and the residue to his sister, Blanche Violet Hart-Davies, if a spinster, or should she be married, then to Arthur Douglas Miller.

RED INDIAN PAGEANT AT HILLMORTON.

Arranged primarily for the amusement of the patients of the local V.A.D Hospitals, a unique entertainment, taking the form of a Red Indian pageant, was given in a field kindly lent by Mr Busby, near Hillmorton Wharf, on Saturday afternoon last. The entertainment was arranged by Mrs Price, with whom the idea originated, and she was assisted by an enthusiastic company of ladies and gentlemen of the district. The weather was all that could be desired, and there was a good number of the general public present at the hour the entertainment was timed to begin. Unfortunately, however, an inspection of the V.A.D Hospitals was also fixed for Saturday, and none of the soldier guests had arrived at this time. The commencement was postponed until four o’clock ; but as none of the soldiers had arrived then a start was made. The first brake load of soldiers arrived half-way through the performance, and others at brief intervals until some time after the entertainment had concluded, and in consequence the performers kindly agreed to repeat the entertainment after tea.

The pageant was admirably enacted, and was full of humorous as well as blood curdling incidents. . . .

A ventriloquial entertainment was also given by Mr Wal Sutton, of Rugby, and this proved very popular among the juvenile members of the company.

Horses were kindly sent for the pageant by Mrs Balding, Mr Crane, and Mr Kendal. The treasurers were Col F F Johnstone and Mr Tom Lever, and if there is a balance after paying expenses it will be devoted to the local Nursing Fund. Valuable assistance was rendered by the Hillmorton Scouts, under the direction of Mr Tom Lever.

WITHYBROOK.

SCENE IN A GIPSY CAMP NEAR COVENTRY.—Coventry county magistrates on Friday last week had before them a gipsy hawker, Hugh Fury, on a charge of obstructing the police. P.C’s Knight and Walker having reason to suppose there were two young men liable for military service in prisoner’s camp at Withybrook, went there. They found a couple of youths, but difficulties were put in the officers’ way of obtaining information as to who the young men were, and prisoners and others appeared with various weapons and assumed a threatening attitude. The result was that the lads got away.—Prisoner pleaded guilty, and said he had “ about 16 children,” of whom some were the Army, and both he and his wife promised to give information to the police if and when the wanted sons were heard of.—The Bench imposed a fine of £5 on the prisoner.

 

IN MEMORIAM.

BURTON.—In loving memory of EDWIN THOMAS BURTON, New Bilton, who died September 20,1916.
“ We have lost one earthly treasure ;
Death has snatched him from our side.
Life has been so sad and dreary
Since that day our loved one died.”
—From his loving Wife and Daughter.

COURSE.—In loving memory of our dear son and brother, Sergt. A. L. COURSE, who was killed in action on September 16, 1916.
“ Farewell, dear son, in a soldier’s grave
A grave we shall never see ;
But as long as life and memory lasts
We will remember thee.”

DRAKE.—In loving memory of ALFRED HURST DRAKE, who was killed in action in France on September 25, 1916 ; eldest son of Mr. & Mrs. B. Drake, Lutterworth.
“ Sleep on, dear son, in a far-off grave :
A grave we may never see ;
But as long as life and memory lasts
We will remember thee.”

FRANKTON.—In loving memory of Pte. FREDERICK FRANKTON ; killed at Loos, September 27, 1915. —“ They miss him most that loved him best.”—From his loving Wife and Children.

GREEN.—In ever-loving memory of EDWARD (BERT) GREEN, who fell at Battle of Loos, 25th—27th September, 1915.—From is ever-loving Wife and Children.

GRIFFITH.—In ever-loving memory of our dear brother, Rifleman L. GRIFFITH, K.R.R., who died of wounds September 18, 1916.—“ Gone from sight, but to memory ever dear.”—From ever-loving Brothers and Sisters, 74 South Street.

JEFFS.—In loving memory of my dear husband, HENRY EDWARD JEFFS, who died September 16, 1915.
“ I miss and mourn him in silence unseen,
And dwell on the memories of days that have been ;
Not thought of or forgotten by some he may be ;
But the grave that contains him is sacred to me.
Those that loved him best miss him most.”
—From his loving Wife and Children.

MEADOWS.—In loving memory of our dear son, Gunner C. H. MEADOWS, R.F.A., who died on September 4th, 1917, at 11th Stationary Hospital, Rouen, of wounds received in action on July 17th, and was buried in St. Seven Cemetery, Rouen, after much suffering, borne patiently ; aged 26 years.—At rest.
“ Had we been asked, how well we know
We should say, ‘ Oh, spare this blow ‘
Yes, with streaming tears would say,
‘ Lord, we love him, let him stay.’
He bravely answered duty’s call,
He gave his life for one and all ;
But the unknown grave is the bitterest blow,
None but his loved ones ever know.”
—From his sorrowing Mother and Father, Brothers and Sister, and Fiancé.

NEAL.—In loving memory of my pal, Bombardier F. G. NEAL (Birdingbury), of D Battery, 46th Brigade, who was killed in action September 9, 1916.
“ One year has passed, my heart still sore,
As time rolls by I miss him more ;
His loving smile and cheerful face,
No pal on earth can fill his place.”
—FRED REEVE (somewhere in France).

NEAL.—In ever-loving memory of Bombardier FRANK NEAL, R.F.A., who was killed in action on September 19, 1916.
“ He sleeps, not in his native land,
But ‘neath some foreign skies,
And far from those that loved him best :
In a hero’s grave he lies.”
—From his Sister.

SHONE.—In loving memory of Rifleman TOM SHONE, who was killed in action at Loos on Sept. 25, 1915.
“ Two years have passed, and friends around us
Think perhaps the wound has healed ;
But they little know the sorrow
Deep within our hearts concealed.”
—From Father, Mother, and Sisters.

SHONE.—In loving memory of our dear brother TOM, who was killed in action September 25, 1915.
“ Sleep on, dear brother, in your far-off grave :
A grave we may never see ;
But as long as life and memory lasts
We will remember thee.”
—From FLO & HORACE.