27th Oct 1917. Ladies’ War Services

LADIES’ WAR SERVICES.
LOCAL HONOURS.

A list has just been published by the War Office of ladies who have been mentioned for valuable services during the War, and following are among the local names :—

NEWNHAM PADDOX HOSPITAL.—Sister Corley (in charge), Lady Clare Feilding and Miss G K Little (nurses).

“ TE HIRA,” RUGBY.—Mrs D Wharton (quartermaster), Miss A W Sargant, Mrs M K Thomas (sister-in-charge).

PAILTON.—Mrs Morris (Commandant).

BILTON HALL.—Mrs E Conington, Miss B Hackforth.

CLARENDON HOSPITAL, KINETON.—Mrs Peirson-Webber (Quartermaster), the Hon Miss Verney (Quartermaster), Mrs A Woodfield (Acting Quatermaster).

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Second-Lieut Arthur J Dukes, of the Welsh Regiment, B.E.F, son of Mr A J Dukes of Rugby has been gazetted First-Lieutenant, dated July 1, 1917.

Lieut H D W Sitwell, R.F.A, son of Mr. Hervey Sitwell, of Leamington Hastings, has been awarded the Military Cross. Lieut Sitwell received his commission on leaving Woolwich Military Academy in September, 1914.

Corpl W R Clark, aged 20, son of Mr R Clark, 35 Manor Road, has been awarded the Military Medal. He was an old Elborow boy, has been in the R.F.A over three years. Previously he was in the Howitzer Battery when mobilised. He was employed in the L & N-W Loco Shop.

Capt P W Nichalls, the well-known polo player, has received his majority in the Yeomanry.

Capt H H Neeves, D.S.O, M.C, has been transferred to another battalion of the Northumberland Fusiliers as second in command, with the acting rank of major.

Cadet W H Packwood, H.A.C (Infantry), son of Mr J C Packwood, has been given a commission and posted to the 6th Royal Warwicks.

Mrs Claridge, of 9 Jubilee Street, New Bilton, has received news that her husband, Pte A J Claridge, has been admitted into hospital in France suffering from wounds in the leg. Mrs W Claridge has also heard that her husband, Pte W S Claridge, is in hospital in France suffering from serious illness. They are the only sons of Mr John Claridge, of 53 New Street, New Bilton.

MILITARY MEDAL FOR LONG LAWFORD MAN.

Pte W J Boyce, of the Royal Warwickshire Regiments, who has been twice mentioned in dispatches, has been awarded the Military Medal for distinguished conduct in the field. He is a son of Mr J Boyce, a member of the Long Lawford Parish Council.

THE AVENUE ON THE LONDON ROAD.
PROMPT ACTION BY THE COUNTY COUNCIL.

The decision by the Duke of Buccleuch—announced in the Advertiser last week—to cut down all the elm trees forming Dunchurch Avenue was discussed at Wednesday’s meeting of the Warwickshire County Council at Warwick, with the result that the Council appointed a committee to act with a view to securing the preservation of the trees.

The matter was raised by the County Roads and Bridges Committee, who expressed their regret to learn the Dukes decision ; and Councillor James Johnson, who represents the Dunchurch division, was the first contributor to the discussion upon it.

Mr Johnson said that the news that the avenue was to be destroyed came as quite a shock to the residents of the neighbourhood, who looked upon it as rather an historical feature of the countryside. It would be a great calamity if the trees were cut down, and he wondered if the Council could take some steps that would have the effect of preserving them.

Councillor J J McKinnell supported this on behalf of the town of Rugby. He remarked that Rugby people would be grievously distressed if the avenue were cut down. There would undoubtedly be a great deal of feeling in the town if such a disaster could not be averted.

The following letter written by Councillor F R Davenport, of Dunchurch, on October 23rd, was read :— “ Notice this week-end in the local paper as to the probable fate of the avenue on the London road between Dunchurch and Coventry was, it appears, the first intimation that this neighbourhood received. It has naturally created much concern, and methods of averting such a loss to the county are already being discussed. I learn to-day that the subject has recently been before the Roads Committee, and that the prospect of the owner changing his decision was not very promising. Notwithstanding this, I beg to submit that this matter should, if possible, be re-considered, and that the Council should appoint a small deputation to approach the Duke of Buccleuch with a view to avoiding what would be a serious loss to the district both from a sentimental and ornamental point of view. I venture to think that some compromise, such as the removal of alternate trees, or that, combined with the lopping of others, might meet the case. I cannot think that war necessities call for such wholesale action as is foreshadowed. I hesitate, as a new member, to engage the Council’s time unduly ; but am convinced from the feeling expressed these last few days that the matter is one of no little, importance, and I am told that the residents of that district will readily petition on the subject if of any service.”

Alderman Oliver Bellasis, Chairman of the Roads and Bridges Committee, said that he did not think the council was in a position to do anything in the way of buying the trees, or anything of that kind. It was for the local authorities to get up a public subscription, or see what else they could do.

Alderman Hunter : What is everybody’s business is no one’s business, and I think that even if the Council has no legal position in the matter if it might give a lead, which would be of very great value, in the interests of the whole county. I came along that avenue this morning. The autumn tints are just turning the trees, and it was a delightful sight. The avenue is one of the amenities of the whole county, and indeed of the whole country ; and I would do anything myself—subscribe or sit on a committee, or approach to Duke, or anything else—rather than see that avenue lost to the county. I really think that if we can get a representative deputation to see the Duke’s agent, or the Duke himself if necessary, and ask on what conditions and terms—monetary or other—he would allow the avenue to remain, we might, perhaps, do something. In the first instance, I believe, the Duke said the trees were a danger. Well, they have been there over a hundred years, and I have never heard of anyone being killed or injured, so I do not think there is much risk. The trees are on the Highway, and are of great beauty ; and I think that, in the interests of the public, we ought not to sit still and do nothing simply because we may have no legal power to buy.

The Chairman (Mr J S Dugdale, K.C) : What is the reason for the decision ?

Alderman Hunter : I think one reason pleaded is that trees are now wanted as timber for the country. But there is any amount in the country without touching an avenue on a main road (hear, hear). Another reason is that the trees are of great value at the present moment, and I think that may be the real reason. I am not blaming the Duke or any other timber owner for cutting down timber now, because its value is three or four times the pre-war value ; but the question is whether it is really necessary or desirable that such an avenue as this should be cut.

The chairman : If what you say is the reason, if it is a very bad reason for a man like the Duke of Buccleuch.

Alderman Hunter : I feel that, too, although I thought I dared not say it (laughter),
and I am glad to hear you say it. I do not want to say anything that might be prejudicial to the object we have in view, and if we could get the Duke to surrender the trees for some nominal sum—and I believe he would if properly approached—it would be better in the interests of all parties. But the trees would have to be transferred to some authority. I do not know what the position would be if a subscription were raised and the trees were bought. They would still remain on the Duke’s land, and if we did buy them I am wondering who would claim them in 20 years’ time.

A member : You would have title.

Alderman Hunter : If we could secure a title to the trees it would be all right ; but the Duke is lord of the manor of several parishes, and some future duke might claim the trees as lord of the manor. There are difficulties of that sort, and I think we ought to have a good committee and try to prevent the disaster of such trees being cut down. I do hope the Council will try to help our district, if they can.

The Chairman said that he knew the road very well, and thought that nothing more dreadful to the neighbourhood than the materialisation of the Duke’s proposal could be scarcely conceived. He felt sure that if a proper representation were made to the Duke he would not think further carrying of carrying out his decision. It would not be a question of money with a man like the Duke. The council did not know what was the real reason, and who was really the promoter of the scheme ; but the Council ought certainly to take some action in the way that had been suggested.

Other members from widely distant parts of the county joined in the assertion that the cutting down of all these fine trees would be loss not only to the county but to the country.

Names were proposed of members who might form a deputation to the Duke or his representative, and Lord Algernon Percy was suggested. He remarked, however, that he would rather not serve. As a matter of fact, he explained, he had approached the Duke privately on the matter, and it did not appear that he had altered his opinion.

Eventually the Council passed a resolution expressing its regret that the Duke had decided to cut down the trees, and appointed a committee—consisting of the Chairman of the Roads and Bridges Committee (alderman Oliver Bellasis), Alderman T Hunter, Councillors J Johnson, F R Davenport, and J J   McKinnell, with power to add to their number—to approach the Duke with a view to securing the preservation of the avenue.

Alderman Evans : I take it that this committee will create an atmosphere that will prevent what is proposed from being done.

Colonel Dibley : That’s right—public opinion.

Details of other business at the meeting are held over.

DEATHS.

 

GULLIVER.—In ever-loving memory of Arthur, youngest son of Mr. & Mrs. T. A. Gulliver, Broadwell, killed in action on October 6th ; aged 21.
“ We loved him—oh ! No tongue can tell
How much we loved him, and how well
His fresh young life could not be saved,
And now he sleeps in a soldier’s grave.”
—From his loving Father and Mother, Brothers and Sisters.

HILL.—In loving memory of our dear son, Pte. ALFRED HILL, who fell in action on October 4, 1917. “ Some day we shall meet again in the Better Land.”—From his sorrowing Parents, Brothers and Sisters.

RUDDLE.—Killed in action in France on September 3rd, Pte. GEORGE RUDDLE, Royal Warwickshire Regiment.
We loved you—oh ! So dearly George ;
But God’s ways are always best.
Beside your brother comrades
Sleep on and take your rest.”
—Brother, you are not forgotten, FLO and ARCH.

SEATON.—In loving memory of our dear son, Corpl. W. R. SEATON, 1st Battalion Welsh Guards, who was killed in action in Flanders on October 12, 1917.
“ Had we been asked, how well we know
We should say, ‘ Oh, spare this blow.’
Yes, with streaming tears, would say,
‘Lord, we love him—let him stay.’
He bravely answer duty’s call,
He gave his life for one and all ;
But the unknown grave is the bitterest blow,
None but his loved ones ever know.”
—From his sorrowing Mother, Father, Sisters, Brothers, and Walter.

SEATON.—In loving memory of my dear husband, Corpl. W. R. SEATON, 1st Battalion Welsh Guards, who was killed in action in Flanders on October 12, 1917.
“ He heard the call ; he came not back—
He came not back, but in our hearts he lives.
His name may fade ; his deeds will never die.
His bright, pure flame of sacrifice will give
Fresh inspiration as years go by.
While England stands his high renown shall last,
For he has joined the heroes of the past.”
—From his sorrowing Wife and Children.

TRACY.—In loving memory of Lance-Corpl. J. TRACY, 1st K.O.S.B., who was killed on October 4th “ somewhere in France.”—Deeply mourned. From Mabel.

Advertisements

22nd Sep 1917. Seats for Soldiers.

SEATS FOR SOLDIERS.

To the Editor of the Advertiser.

DEAR SIR,—As a visitor to the town, I learn that Rugby has already done a good deal for wounded soldiers, so that it must be from want of thought, and not from want of heart, that one arrangement has not been made that I have seen in many towns. I refer to the placing of garden seats and chairs in the public streets for the use of soldiers. One sees these poor fellows sitting on the kerbs and other uncomfortable positions. There are many patriotic-spirited inhabitants who might loan their garden seats ; also probably many who would see their way to put a notice on their garden gate, inviting the men enter the garden and use the seat therein, and thus confer both rest and pleasure. Surely these men have done enough for their country to deserve these little attentions.—Yours sincerely, VISITOR.
September 13, 1917.

 

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Sergt A Goode, of the Machine Gun Company, son of Detective-Insp Goode, of Rugby, who was recently reported missing, has written to his father stating that he is a prisoner and at a Red Cross Hospital at Neuminster, in Germany.

Pte W J Boyce, Royal Warwicks. son of Mr J E Boyce, a member of Long Lawford Parish Council, has sent to his father a certificate from his Colonel to the effect that he “ has been specially noted for gallantry and good work in the trenches during the last tour, and notice has been inserted in the battalion orders to that effect. This is the second mention has received within the last week.”

RUGBY FOOD CONTROL COMMITTEE.

APPOINTMENT OF AN EXECUTIVE OFFICER.

At a meeting of the Rugby Food Control Committee on Wednesday evening Mr Frank Middleton Burton was appointed executive officer at a salary of £200 a year. Mr Burton is secretary of the Rugby Liberal Association, and also clerk to the Military Advisory Committee. In the latter capacity he has done much to forward recruiting locally. He is also a member of the Rugby Board of Guardians and Rural District Council, the Rural District Food Control Committee, and Bilton Parish Council.

WILL OF THE LATE LIEUT HART-DAVIES.—Lieut Ivan Beauclerk Hart-Davies, of Rugby, Warwick, late of the R.F.C, son of the late Rev John Hart-Davies and Mrs. Hart-Davies, of Southam Rectory, Warwickshire, aged 39, who was killed in an aeroplane accident in England on July 27th, left estate valued at £8,679. Testator leaves £500, his dog Jock, effects in his office and residence, and motor-cycle to his late clerk, Arthur Douglas Miller ; £20 to his cashier, John Griffin ; £10 each to other persons in his employ ; and the residue to his sister, Blanche Violet Hart-Davies, if a spinster, or should she be married, then to Arthur Douglas Miller.

RED INDIAN PAGEANT AT HILLMORTON.

Arranged primarily for the amusement of the patients of the local V.A.D Hospitals, a unique entertainment, taking the form of a Red Indian pageant, was given in a field kindly lent by Mr Busby, near Hillmorton Wharf, on Saturday afternoon last. The entertainment was arranged by Mrs Price, with whom the idea originated, and she was assisted by an enthusiastic company of ladies and gentlemen of the district. The weather was all that could be desired, and there was a good number of the general public present at the hour the entertainment was timed to begin. Unfortunately, however, an inspection of the V.A.D Hospitals was also fixed for Saturday, and none of the soldier guests had arrived at this time. The commencement was postponed until four o’clock ; but as none of the soldiers had arrived then a start was made. The first brake load of soldiers arrived half-way through the performance, and others at brief intervals until some time after the entertainment had concluded, and in consequence the performers kindly agreed to repeat the entertainment after tea.

The pageant was admirably enacted, and was full of humorous as well as blood curdling incidents. . . .

A ventriloquial entertainment was also given by Mr Wal Sutton, of Rugby, and this proved very popular among the juvenile members of the company.

Horses were kindly sent for the pageant by Mrs Balding, Mr Crane, and Mr Kendal. The treasurers were Col F F Johnstone and Mr Tom Lever, and if there is a balance after paying expenses it will be devoted to the local Nursing Fund. Valuable assistance was rendered by the Hillmorton Scouts, under the direction of Mr Tom Lever.

WITHYBROOK.

SCENE IN A GIPSY CAMP NEAR COVENTRY.—Coventry county magistrates on Friday last week had before them a gipsy hawker, Hugh Fury, on a charge of obstructing the police. P.C’s Knight and Walker having reason to suppose there were two young men liable for military service in prisoner’s camp at Withybrook, went there. They found a couple of youths, but difficulties were put in the officers’ way of obtaining information as to who the young men were, and prisoners and others appeared with various weapons and assumed a threatening attitude. The result was that the lads got away.—Prisoner pleaded guilty, and said he had “ about 16 children,” of whom some were the Army, and both he and his wife promised to give information to the police if and when the wanted sons were heard of.—The Bench imposed a fine of £5 on the prisoner.

 

IN MEMORIAM.

BURTON.—In loving memory of EDWIN THOMAS BURTON, New Bilton, who died September 20,1916.
“ We have lost one earthly treasure ;
Death has snatched him from our side.
Life has been so sad and dreary
Since that day our loved one died.”
—From his loving Wife and Daughter.

COURSE.—In loving memory of our dear son and brother, Sergt. A. L. COURSE, who was killed in action on September 16, 1916.
“ Farewell, dear son, in a soldier’s grave
A grave we shall never see ;
But as long as life and memory lasts
We will remember thee.”

DRAKE.—In loving memory of ALFRED HURST DRAKE, who was killed in action in France on September 25, 1916 ; eldest son of Mr. & Mrs. B. Drake, Lutterworth.
“ Sleep on, dear son, in a far-off grave :
A grave we may never see ;
But as long as life and memory lasts
We will remember thee.”

FRANKTON.—In loving memory of Pte. FREDERICK FRANKTON ; killed at Loos, September 27, 1915. —“ They miss him most that loved him best.”—From his loving Wife and Children.

GREEN.—In ever-loving memory of EDWARD (BERT) GREEN, who fell at Battle of Loos, 25th—27th September, 1915.—From is ever-loving Wife and Children.

GRIFFITH.—In ever-loving memory of our dear brother, Rifleman L. GRIFFITH, K.R.R., who died of wounds September 18, 1916.—“ Gone from sight, but to memory ever dear.”—From ever-loving Brothers and Sisters, 74 South Street.

JEFFS.—In loving memory of my dear husband, HENRY EDWARD JEFFS, who died September 16, 1915.
“ I miss and mourn him in silence unseen,
And dwell on the memories of days that have been ;
Not thought of or forgotten by some he may be ;
But the grave that contains him is sacred to me.
Those that loved him best miss him most.”
—From his loving Wife and Children.

MEADOWS.—In loving memory of our dear son, Gunner C. H. MEADOWS, R.F.A., who died on September 4th, 1917, at 11th Stationary Hospital, Rouen, of wounds received in action on July 17th, and was buried in St. Seven Cemetery, Rouen, after much suffering, borne patiently ; aged 26 years.—At rest.
“ Had we been asked, how well we know
We should say, ‘ Oh, spare this blow ‘
Yes, with streaming tears would say,
‘ Lord, we love him, let him stay.’
He bravely answered duty’s call,
He gave his life for one and all ;
But the unknown grave is the bitterest blow,
None but his loved ones ever know.”
—From his sorrowing Mother and Father, Brothers and Sister, and Fiancé.

NEAL.—In loving memory of my pal, Bombardier F. G. NEAL (Birdingbury), of D Battery, 46th Brigade, who was killed in action September 9, 1916.
“ One year has passed, my heart still sore,
As time rolls by I miss him more ;
His loving smile and cheerful face,
No pal on earth can fill his place.”
—FRED REEVE (somewhere in France).

NEAL.—In ever-loving memory of Bombardier FRANK NEAL, R.F.A., who was killed in action on September 19, 1916.
“ He sleeps, not in his native land,
But ‘neath some foreign skies,
And far from those that loved him best :
In a hero’s grave he lies.”
—From his Sister.

SHONE.—In loving memory of Rifleman TOM SHONE, who was killed in action at Loos on Sept. 25, 1915.
“ Two years have passed, and friends around us
Think perhaps the wound has healed ;
But they little know the sorrow
Deep within our hearts concealed.”
—From Father, Mother, and Sisters.

SHONE.—In loving memory of our dear brother TOM, who was killed in action September 25, 1915.
“ Sleep on, dear brother, in your far-off grave :
A grave we may never see ;
But as long as life and memory lasts
We will remember thee.”
—From FLO & HORACE.

Boyce, Arthur Cecil. Died 10th Aug 1917

Arthur Cecil Boyce was not a Rugby lad, although he appears on the Rugby Memorial Gates.

He was born June 1889 in London (Wandsworth), to Arthur and Isabel Boyce. He appears on the census for 1891 and 1901 living with his parents Arthur and Isabel Boyce. On the 1891 Census the family is living in 70 Bellevue Battersea London and in 1901 at 2 Henderson Road Wandsworth London. Arthur’s father was working for the Railways in 1891 as a clerk, in 1901 as an Assistant Railway Superintendent and in 1911 he is a Railway Manager, living at 2 Fitzroy Gardens, Rugby.

Arthur Cecil is not with his parents on the 1911 Census but in at Birkenhead, Cheshire as an Engineering Student at University where he took a first class B.Eng. in 1912 and in the same year was awarded the Burroughs prize for drawing and design.

He went out to Canada as a civil engineer and returned at the outbreak of war as a sapper with the Canadian contingent. He served from February to September 1915 in France and Belgium – in April he was slightly gassed at Ypres, the first time gas was used by the Germans. He came home and was posted with the Royal Engineers at Netley

It was during this time, on 4th January 1916, that he married Kathleen Eve Limrick at St Margaret’s Church, Toxteth Park, in Liverpool. He gave his address as 283 Clifton Road, Rugby, his parents home.

2nd Lieutenant Boyce returned to France with the Royal Engineers and to the Front in July 1916.

He was invalided home from France suffering from an affliction of the throat, nose and teeth. He was on the hospital ship Gloucester Castle which was torpedoed on 31st March 1917 and spent three hours in an open boat.

He returned to Liverpool where he received treatment for his teeth and travelled to Maidenhead for the removal of two troublesome roots. The operation was successful but Arthur collapsed and the attending doctor could not revive him. A later post-mortem discovered his heart had been weakened by the gas and exposure on the open sea

Arthur Cecil Boyce, Lieutenant R.E. 397th Field Coy, died on August 10th 1917. His body was placed on a gun carriage and returned to his home.

The funeral, with full military honours took place at West Norwood Cemetery.

His parents Arthur and Isabel later lived at Malvern, and his wife in Camberwell London.

He left a will and probate was granted to Arthur Boyce, railway district manager at Oxford 29″` September 1917 leaving £47.

A daughter, Joan I K Boyce was born in Liverpool in the second quarter of 1917, She died in Croydon in 1924 at the age of seven. It is not known what happened to his wife.

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM