29th Sep 1917. Blackberry Picking

BLACKBERRY PICKING.-During the past fortnight the scholars of various schools in Rugby and the neighbouring villages have picked 2 tons of blackberries, to be used to make jam for the Army and Navy.

UTILITY POULTRY KEEPERS’ MEETING.-There was a satisfactory attendance at a meeting held at the Eagle Hotel on Saturday to consider the formation of a branch of the National Utility Poultry Society, which, in conjunction with the Agricultural Organisation Society, is seeking to put the poultry industry on a business footing. Mr Walter Barnett (Bilton) presided, supported by Mrs Barnett, Mr E B Covington, Mr W T Fischer, &c. Mr H Tarbox read letters from a number of interested poultry keepers ; from the Secretary of the N.U.P.S, and from Capt Peirson Webber, the County Council expert, regretting inability to be present that day. After discussion, it was resolved to form a society for Rugby and district, and to convene a further meeting when the experts can tend to give details of the working of similar existing branches.

THE FOOD ECONOMY CANTEENS.

It has been decided to close – at any rate, temporarily – the Food Economy Canteen opened at New Bilton in July last, and meals will not be obtainable there after today (Saturday). Although there is no doubt that if workers had been brought to realise that meals can be obtained there far cheaper than they could be prepared at home, the canteen has not been well patronised, and there has been a weekly loss since it opened. It is gratifying to note, on the other hand, that the Chester Street canteen continues to be a great success, and there are hopes of an extension in the accommodation. Not only is bread conserved, but, thanks to the willing aid of enthusiastic honorary helpers and to the hearty co-operation of an efficient paid staff, the prices as at New Bilton, rule low for very satisfying meals. The place is always full at meal times, and many people purchase cooked food to take home. Working expenses are being met, and a weekly profit, which will go to the liquidation of the debt incurred in setting up the canteen, is being made.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Bombardier Reg Covington, R.F.A, son of Mr Richard Covington, has been gassed during the recent fighting.

The latest list of war honours contains the name of Pte J French (Rugby), Royal Warwickshire Regiment, who has been awarded the Military Medal.

Pte George Ruddle, of James Street, Rugby, is reported missing, believed killed. From his comrades it was gathered that he was almost certainly killed. He was in the Royal Warwickshire Regiment.

Sergt L C Cox, elder son of Mr A G Cox, Kenilworth House, Popular Grove, Rugby, after much active service in France with the King’s Royal Rifles, during which time he was wounded four times has passed first class in a special course of instruction and sails for Africa this weekend to join the King’s African Rifles. His younger Brother Albert, also with experience of the fighting in France, being twice mentioned and awarded the Military Medal, has been presented as a second-lieutenant in the King’s Liverpool Regiment.

Official intimation has been received from the War Office, that Bombardier S G Smith, son of Mrs Smith, 28 Pinfold Street, New Bilton, was killed in action in France on August 18th. He was formerly a member of the of the Rugby Howitzer Battery, and was employed by the Rover Company, Coventry when called up. A letter from the officer commanding the battalion speaks in high terms of Bombardier Smith’s performance of his duties.

ASHBY ST. LEDGERS.

CAPT E G PASSMORE, of the Northamptonshire Regiment, son of Mr S A Passmore, is in hospital at Dieppe suffering from trench fever.

News has reached the village that Pte Stowe, who was reported missing, is now a prisoner of war. This is the second prisoner of war from this village, Pte Roberts having been wounded in the leg and taken prisoner a few months ago.

BRETFORD.

KILLED IN ACTION.-Mrs Archer College, Hill Farm, Bretford, has been notified that her husband, Pte Archer Colledge, Royal Warwicks, was killed in France on September 3rd. Pte College, who went to the front in June last, lost his life in his first engagement. He was educated at Pailton Church School and was employed at Coventry Ordnance Works until called up in March last. Pte College’s Company Officer, in a letter to Mrs College, writes :- “ Although he had recently joined us, by his cheeriness and courage he soon made himself liked, and his platoon feel his loss keenly, as I do myself.” A comrade of Pte College’s, who has been in continuous action for the last 16 months, writes that the present fighting is the bitterest he has yet experienced. Pte College was 29 years of age, and leaves a widow and one child.

TO HELP THE PRISONERS OF WAR FUND.

AN IMPORTANT EVENT.

To-day (Saturday) an attractive event will take place in Benn’s Field, North Street, Rugby, in aid of the Rugby Prisoners of War Fund, for which a continuous and increasing flow of money is needed. The effort will consist of a great show and sale of agricultural and horticultural produce, which is being freely given by generous donors in the town and district.

Mr J J McKinnell, C.C, chairman of the Urban District Council, is the chairman of the committee, and, supported by leading residents, will open the affair at 2.30 p.m.

In the horticultural section 26 prizes are offered for competition ; and, of course, contributions of produce merely for sale will be gladly received. Already a large number of sheep, lambs, pig, rabbits, and poultry have been promised for the agricultural department ; and the auctioneers of the town, who will sell the goods, are giving their services gratuitously, as well as all others who are working so energetically to ensure success, and it only remains for the public to give their attendance-and their money-for which there will be plenty of bargains.

A large marquee. which will be lighted by electricity in the evening, will be provided ; and apart from the exhibition and sale, there will be various competitions and side-shows of an attractive nature. These will include a fire brigade competition-always an interesting item-and four brigades from Coventry will be represented in this. There will be dancing also for the young people.

For a small admission fee of 6d the visitor will, therefore, get plenty of money.

The Committee consists of Messrs. A Bell, chairman ; J Cash, hon treasurer ; G Allford, J Reginald Barker, C Cockerel, F Dunkerley, J Harker, G Harrowing, G Henton, J P Lennon, C Mewis, J J   Scrivener, F Starmore, with J R Blyth and H Lovell, joint hon secretaries.

DEATHS.

COLLEDGE.—In ever-loving memory of Private ARCHER COLLEDGE, 20249 Royal Warwickshire Regt., killed in action on 3rd September, 1917, somewhere in France, aged 29 years.
A loving husband, true and kind,
A better father you’d never find ;
But He who orders all things best,
Has given to him eternal rest.
The end was bitter, the shock severe,
To part with one we loved most dear.
We did not see him die or hear him say goodbye ;
We miss him and mourn for him in silence unseen,
And dwell on the days is his young life has seen.
—Deeply mourned by his Wife and Child.

IN MEMORIAM.

BARNETT.—In loving memory of Lance-Corpl. GEORGE BARNETT, 5th Oxon and Bucks, killed at the battle of Loos, Sept. 25th, 1915, son of the late James Barnett and Mrs. Sansome, 5 Gas Street. Never forgotten by his sorrowing Mother, Step-father, Brothers, Winnie and May.
He bravely answered his country’s call,
He gave his life for one and all ;
But the unknown grave is the bitterest blow,
None but aching hearts can know.

BARNETT.—In loving memory of my pal, Lance-Corpl. GEORGE BARNETT, 5th Oxford and Bucks, killed in action September 25th, 1915.
Two years had passed, my heart’s still sore,
As time rolls by I miss him more ;
His loving smile and cheerful face
No pal on earth can fill his place.
BILLIE WEBB, somewhere in France.

BROWN.—In loving memory of our dear Son & Brother, PERCY EDWIN BROWN, who was killed in action on September 25th, 1915.
Sleep on dear son and brother in your far off grave,
A grave we may never see ;
But as long as life and memory lasts,
We will remember thee.
—From Father, Mother, Sisters and Brothers.

CASHMORE.—In loving memory of PRIVATE C. CASHMORE, Oxon & Bucks L.I., who was killed in action September 25, 1915.
Our hero gone, but not forgotten,
Never shall his memory fade ;
Our sad thoughts so often wonder
To that far-off land where he is laid.
Yes, we think of him in silence,
And his name we oft recall,
But there’s nothing left to answer,
But his photo on the wall.
—From his loving Wife and Children.

EMERY.—In loving memory of ERNEST HARRY EMERY, Bdr. R.F.A., accidentally killed whilst on active service with the Salonica Forces, Oct. 1st, 1916. Interred in Mekes Cemetery.

FRANKTON.—In loving memory of our dear brother, FRED, who was killed in France on Sept. 25th, 1915.
From POLLIE AND SARAH.

HINKS.—In loving memory of my dear son, JOHN HINKS, of 33 Essex Street, of the 5th Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, who fell asleep in action in France on September 25th, 1915.
“ The midnight star shines o’er the grave,
Of a dear son and soldier brave ;
How dear, how brave, we shall understand,
When we meet again in the better land.”
—Not for granted by his Mother, Father, Sisters and Brothers.

STENT.—In loving memory of my dear son, Corpl. P. V. STENT, who was killed in action at Loos, on September 25th, 1915.
“ Two years have passed and friends around us
Think, perhaps, the wound has healed ;
But they little know the sorrow,
Deep within our hearts concealed.”
—Silently mourned by his loving Mother, Father, Sisters, and Brother.

STENT.—In loving memory of PERCY VICTOR STENT, who was killed at Loos, Sept. 25th, 1915. “ Death divides, but memory lingers.”—From Mr. and Mrs. HARBAN and family.

STONE.—In loving memory of my dear husband, PTE. C. G. STONE, who was wounded 28th Sept., and died the 1st October, 1915.
“ They miss him most who loved him best.”
—From his loving wife Amy.

WHITBREAD.—2nd Lieut. BASIL, 14th Royal Warwickshire Regiment. Reported missing 22 July, 1916 ; now presumed to have been killed in action on that date.

WEST.—In proud and loving memory of FRANK WEST, Lieutenant-Colonel R.F.A. (T.), who was killed near Pozieres on September 28, 1916 ; aged 33.—“ We have found safety with all things undying.”

16th Jan 1917. Rugby Officer gains the Military Cross

RUGBY OFFICER GAINS THE MILITARY CROSS.

Capt H H Neeves, of the Northumberland Fusiliers, elder son of Mr and Mrs S Neeves, “ Langdal,” Murray Road, Rugby, has been awarded the Military Cross for bravery in the fighting on the Somme during July last. Capt Neeves was at the same time promoted to his present rank. In the early days of the War the gallant young officer, who had been on the staff at Rugby Post Office, went out to the Dardanelles as a corporal in the Warwickshire Yeomanry, and took part in the landing at Suvla Bay. He was afterwards invalided home, suffering from the effects of dysentery ; and then, securing a commission, he was attached as a second lieutenant to the Northumberland Fusiliers, and went out to France in June. The gratification at his quick promotion and the honour he has won will be shared by his many friends and acquaintances in Rugby and district.

LOCAL CASUALTIES.

Sergt A E Dodd, Leicestershire Regiment, one of the earliest recruits from the B.T.H Works, is in hospital at Ipswich suffering from wounds. Sergt Dodd has been wounded three times—at Monchy, Guillemont, and Combles, The last time he received four different wounds at once, and has undergone 14 operations. Before the War he was employed in the B.T.H Wiring Department.

DR RELTON’S SON WOUNDED.

Dr and Mrs Relton, of Rugby, have received intimation that their son, Second-Lieut B C Relton, of the Warwickshire Regiment, has been wounded. Before the War he showed promise as a footballer, he having played half-back both for Rugby School and the Town Club. As a cricketer, too, he gained his colours in the School XI., and later on assisted the Rugby Club, being a very useful fast bowler.

BRETFORD.

DEATH OF PTE TIMMS.—Mr Wm Timms, of Bretford, has received the sad news that his brother has succumbed to wounds in Rouen Hospital. He was injured rather dangerously in France, but it was thought at one time he would recover. He belonged to the Middlesex Regiment. Before joining the Colours he was employed on the railway dining cars. Mr Timms has another brother in the 2nd Leinsters, who has been on foreign service for a long time. Much sympathy is felt for the relatives.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Lieut Wilfred H Parker, son of the Hon E W Parker, Westfeild House, Rugby, has been awarded the Military Cross for distinguished service in the field.

From “ London Gazette ” of Monday, January 1st :—Gordon Highlanders, Sec Lt F Hunter resigns his commission on account of ill-health contracted on active service.

Capt R N O’Connor, of the Scottish Rifles, son of Mrs O’Connor, Overslade Manor, Rugby, has been mentioned in despatches by Sir Douglas Haig. This is the third time Capt O’Connor, who has already gained the Military Cross, has been mentioned in despatches, and he has recently been gazetted Brevet-Major.

The parcels sent this week on behalf of the Rugby Prisoners of War Help Committee to the local men in prison camps in Germany contained: ½-lb sugar, ½-lb milk, 1 tin herrings, ½-lb dripping in tin, ½ lb biscuits, 1 tin oxo cubes, 2ozs tobacco, pepper, salt, mustard, ½-lb cooked ham in tin, ¼-lb tin of cocoa, 1 tin sausages.

COUNTY COUNCIL CLERK’S SON HONOURED.

In Tuesday’s honours list is the name of Second-Lieut (temp Lieut) Edward Hubert Field, R.F.A, who has been awarded the Military Cross. He is the son of Mr Edward Field, clerk of the Peace for Warwickshire and clerk to the County Council.

MENTIONED IN DESPATCHES.

In special lists connected with his recent descriptive despatches on the operations on the Somme, General Sir Douglas Haig mentions :

Temporary Lieutenant-Colonel H J Nutt, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, who commands a Coventry Territorial Battalion, and has been associated with the Territorial Force for many years.

Temporary Major A Welch, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, who has already been decorated for his services as a Volunteer officer. He is serving with a Territorial Battalion, and was promoted to the rank of Major in October, 1914.

NEW RED CROSS HOSPITAL OPENED AT RUGBY.

The new Red Cross Hospital at the Rugby Union Infirmary was opened on Monday, when thirty wounded soldiers arrived from the First Southern Hospital, Birmingham. There was no formal opening, but on Friday the hospital and staff were inspected by General Quayle Jones, the Countess of Denbigh, and Mr E K Little, County Director of the Warwickshire British Red Cross. General satisfaction was expressed at the admirable equipment, etc. Mrs Brooke Michell, Vice-President of the Rugby V.A.D, was also present at the inspection.

The building, which was built for an infirmary, is a very commodious one, and admirably adapted for its present uses. It has accommodation for sixty men. There are three large wards, each capable of containing 18 beds, and two smaller ones. There is a surgical room, but not an operating theatre, and minor operations are performed in the wards. There is also a spacious day and recreation room. The staff is provided by Warwick 40 and Warwick 66 V.A.D, and the principals are :—Mrs H P Burdekin, commandant ; Miss M Townsend, assistant commandant ; Mrs C O Wharton, quartermaster ; Miss Townsend, assistant quartermaster. Mrs Thomas, who has worked at Te Hira for the past twelve months, is the matron, and the trained sister is Sister Gordon. Dr Crooks and Dr Wardrop comprise the medical staff.

The hospital staff is receiving instructions in fire drill, in order that they may be prepared for any eventuality. Visitors desirous of visiting the Hospital will be welcomed on Wednesday afternoons.

CHANGED TIMES.

Some of the many social changes which have been foreshadowed during the last few weeks came into operation with the New Year. The most noticeable changes were those affecting railway travel. Monday was the first day of the new order resulting in fewer and slower trains and a general increase of 50 per cent, in fares. The baking of standard bread also became general in accordance with the new Order. A separate Food Production Department has been set up at the Board of Agriculture to organise schemes for increasing the home-grown food supplies. It is understood rather under 10,000 German prisoners are available for work on the land. There is still too much evasion of the drink control regulations in some quarters, and the need of more stringent penalties for offences is under discussion. An Order was issued on Tuesday making it illegal to sell spirits unless reduced to 30 per cent. under proof, and a further reduction to 50 per cent. under proof is permissible.

DISTRICT APPEALS TRIBUNAL.

Held on Friday (Dec 29) at St Mary’s Hall, Coventry. Present : Messrs M K Pridmore (chairman), H W Wale, S J Dicksee, and K Rotherham. Military representative : Mr M E T Wratislaw. Agricultural representative : Mr F W Channing.

WELCOME TO RUGBY REPRESENTATIVE.

Before taking the Rugby cases the Chairman welcomed Mr Dicksee on behalf of the Tribunal. He said they felt from the first they were very much handicapped with the Rugby cases because they had no Rugby representative. It was not the fault of the Tribunal, because they strove very hard to get a Rugby representative, but could not find anybody to act ; but when the numbers were extended they asked for one, and were very pleased to have Mr Dicksee with them.—Mr Harold Eaden also offered a welcome to Mr Dicksee, and said he was sure his assistance would be of value to the Tribunal.

ALLEGED “ NOTORIOUS POACHER ” AS A SUBSTITUTE.

The substitute offered by the Military to John Smith Cockerill, Pailton, for his son, Thos John Cockerill (20, single), was described by Mr Harold Eaden, representing the farmer in question, as “ a notorious poacher in the district.” He added that on the first two days the man was ill, and when he presented himself on the third day and was called upon to do the ordinary work, for which he was there—that of a cowman and stockman—he could not milk a cow and understood nothing about stock. Mr Cockerill tolerated him for two days, but at the end of the fourth day gave him his week’s money. The Military seemed to have offered a substitute without satisfying themselves that he could do the work- They must send a man who could do the work, and not a man whose principal qualification was poaching.

Mr Wratislaw contradicted the statement that the substitution officer did not satisfy himself as to the man he was sending. Mr Livingston (who had tried the substitute) said he was a most capable man and a very willing worker. Mr John Harrison, of Pailton, described him, as “ a capable farm labourer and willing worker,” adding : “ I have employed him several times, and have always been satisfied with him ” ; whilst Mr Davy, who had also had the man in his employ, said if he had a man of Military age for whom he required a substitute he was exactly the man he would wish for. The man said he did some thatching and milked, and worked out the full week ; and, in the opinion of the local Tribunal, until young Cockerill was taken away his father was not going to have a substitute.

Mr Eadon replied that Mr Cockerill was quite willing to let his son go if a reasonable substitute could be found.-The Chairman : This man does seem to be reasonable.—Mr Cockerill said it took the man half-an-hour to milk a cow, and he sat down on the wrong of the animal to milk her (laughter). He said he had never milked a cow in his life.

Mr Wale said he did not see any reason why an advocate should come into that Court and suggest that a substitute, whatever his previous character had been, was a poacher. He objected to that.—Mr Eaden said the man might be a very good labourer, but he was useless to Mr Cockerill, particularly in the winter.

The Chairman said in a case like this the man ought not to have been dismissed ; the employer should have first communicated with the Military.

Mr Eaden : If the man was no good the Military could not make him any good.—The Chairman : You know the whole point is : These men have got their sons, and do not want to part with them. They will take no substitute if they can help it.

The appeal was dismissed, and Mr Eaden said his client would try and find a substitute independently of the Military Authorities.

Mr Eadon asked for his client to be allowed 28 days, but Mr Wratislaw objected, and it was not granted.

“ CREATING SLAVERY.”

Chas Oakes, Kirby Lane Farm, Monks Kirby, appealed for Edwin Lowe, cowman and farm labourer, Monks Kirby.—Mr Wratislaw stated that conditional exemption was granted to Lowe whilst in the employ of Mr S Hodgetts, but the man left that employ, and the Monks Kirby Tribunal upheld the view that Mr Oakes could not possibly appeal for him.—Mr Wale : certainly he could. He claims as the employer. It does not mean that a man is to be bound for ever to that particular employer. You are creating slavery.—The Chairman said the Tribunal had to decide that the was in order ; and then, according to the new Army Regulations, adjourn the case sine die.—This course was adopted.—The Chairman (to Mr Wratislaw) : You had better pass on the poacher.—Mr Eaden : We do not want him again.

The appeals for John Bryson, stockman and shepherd, Manor Farm, The Grange, Wolston, and Geo Wilson, wagoner. Gate Farm, Bourton, were also adjourned sine die.

APPLICATION FOR LEAVE REFUSED.

Mr Worthington represented Ernest Jinks, grocer, clothier, and beer retailer, 104 Cambridge Street, Rugby, who asked for leave to appeal for an extension of the temporary exemption, to January 1st.-The appeal had been made on the ground of domestic hardship ; and Mr Worthington said the man had four young children.—The Chairman said they knew the position very well. They could not make a practice of granting leave to appeal, or they would have everybody coming back and asking for leave. There must be further facts.-The application was refused.—Appellant : Give me time to clear my stuff off ?—The Chairman : No ; there is no more.

SUBSTITUTION EFFECTED.

With respect to the appeal for Francis John Bucknill farmer and wagoner, Marton, Mr Wratislaw said they had effected a substitute, and Mr Bucknill, sen, expressed himself as satisfied, it transpired that a man from Broadwell, who had been passed in a low category was the substitute, and Mr Bucknill said his son was going into the Army on the following Monday.—The Chairman : I think you ought to be congratulated on the course you have taken.

WHEELWRIGHTS WANTED IN THE ARMY.

The case of John George Bennett, wheelwright, &c, 7 Gladstone Street, New Bilton, in the employ of Mr F Sharpe, of Rugby, had been adjourned for enquiries to be made to see if the man could still be enlisted in his trade, and Mr Wratislaw said their information was that the Royal Engineers were appealing for wheelwrights.-The employer’s appeal was, therefore, dismissed.

STILL HANDLING SUGAR.

The Home and Colonial Stores, Ltd, appealed for their Rugby manager, Alfred Wm Elsley, 70 King Edward Road, paused for garrison duty abroad.—Mr Wratislaw said the man was not in a certified occupation, because he was not a manager in the strict sense of the word. Whatever he required for the shop was supplied from the head office.—Mr Sharman, who represented the firm, said that point had been decided in their favour by the Central Tribunal.—Mr Wratislaw : You do not handle big sides of bacon, do you ?—Mr Sharman : We have 2½ cwts of sugar to handle.—The Chairman :   You are very lucky.—Given till May 1st.

ANXIOUS TO DO WAR WORK.

An appeal as a skilled man who wished to be placed on war work was made by Wm Thos Scrawley (28, married), general fitter, 15 James Street, Rugby.—The appeal was at first dismissed, the Chairman remarking that the man would be very useful in the Army ; but appellant then produced documentary evidence that he was badged ; and the Chairman remarked that the Military could not touch him ; and Mr Wale advised applicant, in his own interests, to get into a controlled establishment.

BUILDER’S APPEAL FOR AN ELECTRICIAN.

Messrs Linnell & Son, builders, Rugby, appealed (through Mr Worthington) for Horace Walter Gilbert, electrician, 56 New Street, New Bilton.—It was pointed out that this was the only man left in the electrical, department, and his going would mean closing the department, which had taken seven years to build up, and this would be a most serious financial loss to the firm.-Mr Wratislaw said Mr Linnell, jun. had gone into the Army ; and in the circumstances Col Johnstone suggested that Gilbert might remain till March 31st.—This course was approved.

ANOTHER CASE FOR SUBSTITUTION.

The Military appealed against the exemption that had been granted to George Mascord White (22, single), shoeing and general smith, Dunchurch, in the employ of his father.—Mr Wratislaw said they offered as a substitute a man named Loydall, of Long Lawford.—The Chairman informed Mr White, sen, that he could not keep a young man of 22, passed for general service, and told him he had better “ collar on ” to the substitute, and consider himself lucky.—Mr White said he was afraid the substitute named would not suit him, and asked for a month or two to try him, as he had very valuable horses to shoe.—The Chairman said they could not keep a young man of 22 back to shoe valuable horses, and the Military appeal was upheld.

QUITE OPPORTUNE.

“ All the pipes in the parish are burst,” said Mr Eaden, adding that it was an opportune moment for the appeal of Wm Walter Heap, (37, married), builder, plumber, and undertaker, Dunchurch.-The Tribunal offered till March 1st.-Mr Eaden said he should want to ask for further time. Mr Wale : You must pray for the frost to continue.-March 1st.

“ WOULD SOONER PUT KHAKI ON ”

Edwin Edwards, carter, &c, appealed for his son, Wm Edwards (24, married, and passed for general service), 56 Railway Terrace, Rugby, engaged in the delivery of parcels and helping in the business.-Mr Eaden said a substitute was offered, but when he looked at the job he admitted he was not strong enough for it.—Mr Wratislaw said the substitute refused the job because the wages offered were only 25s a week.-Mr Edwards : He said he would sooner put khaki on.—Mr Wale : I should say so. He would be better off.-The Chairman said it could not be suggested that the work was of high national importance.-Appeal dismissed.

A POSITION OF A FOREMAN BAKER.

An appeal by the Military was made with respect to George Brown (37, single), foreman baker, 32 James Street, Rugby, on the ground that, although the man was in a certified occupation, he spent only six hours a day in bread baking, and the other part in confectionery.—The employer said he used five sacks of flour a week for broad, and he was also under a contract to supply cake to the Military.—March 1st.

A CURIOUS CASE.

There were unusual circumstances connected with the case of John Frederick Woodford, slaughterman and butcher, 82 Craven Road, Rugby.—Mr Wratislaw said the Master Butchers met the Advisory Committee extremely fairly, and until they could substitute Woodford they thought he ought to stay ; but the moment they got a substitute the master butcher employing the man offered to release him for general service. They found a substitute, but when the case came before the Rugby Tribunal, who had given a certificate of exemption, they promptly refused to go into the matter, and said they would not interfere with their previous decision.—Mr Nelson (clerk to the Tribunal) said he had a letter from Mr Smith, the man’s employer, stating that he was quite prepared to assent to the question raised by the Military.—Appeal allowed.

INNKEEPER TO JOIN UP.

An application by Ernest Shepherd (38, married), Clifton Inn, Rugby, for a munitions order to enable him to keep his business together was opposed by Mr Wratislaw, who contended that the father, aged 75, who previously held the license, was quite capable of supervision.—Mr Worthington represented appellant, who was given till January 28th.

HORSE TRAINING FOR 23/- A WEEK.

John E Wilkins, horse trainer, Bretford, appealed for Arthur Edwin Taylor (28, married), assistant horse trainer and farm hand, stating that it was necessary in his business to have a young man used to the work, as a good many of the horses sent to be trained were spoilt, and of bad character.—Mr Wratislaw : It is rather a dangerous job.—A : Yes.—Mr Wratislaw : And for that risk and skill you only pay 23s a week, without a cottage ?—Mr Wilkins replied that he paid more than most of the farmers in the neighbourhood, and the man had a garden in which to grow potatoes and other vegetables. He would give him more wages if he stayed. Mr Wale : I do not think 23s a week constitutes indispensability.-Mr Wratislaw : Do you consider for a man to whom you pay that wage it is in the national interest he should be retained ?-Mr Wilkins : I am paying a good deal more than my father used to pay.—Mr Wratislaw : We say it is not in the national interest the man should be retained.—Applicant : Is is not in the national interest that horses should be trained ? Could not you find me a substitute ?—The Chairman : Not at 23s a week. They are not to be had.—Applicant : What wages do you think I ought to pay ?—The Chairman : That is for yourself to decide.-Appeal dismissed.

BIRDINGBURY SMALLHOLDER ALLOWED TIME.

A long letter was put in by Chas Barfoot (33, married), joint smallholder and carrier, Birdingbury, in support of his application.—He was given till March 31st, with the hint that he had better be ready to join up by then.

HELPING A NEIGHBOUR.

On the understanding that he helped a neighbouring farmer, who last week met with an accident, breaking his leg on the ice, Sidney Strong, farmer and wharf manager, Royal Oak Inn, Hillmorton Wharf, was given a temporary exemption till March 31st.

DEATHS.

DONALD.—On December 31, 1916, at Aldershot, of pneumonia, Bombardier CHAS. DONALD, the beloved husband of Alice Donald, 16 Wood Street ; aged 38.—“ Peace, perfect peace.”

2nd Sep 1916. The Recruiting Officer Asks For Information

Rugby Advertiser, 2 September, 1916.
THE RECRUITING OFFICER, RUGBY, ASKS For INFORMATION
regarding the following men, as to whether they
(a) Have joined the Army ;
(b) Are excepted from the provisions of the Military Service Acts, 1916 ;
(c) Are in possession of a definite certificate or badge exempting them from liability for Military Service
(d) Are in a reserved occupation ;
(e) Have moved to another district ;
or any other information concerning them.
The above information is required to complete records in Recruiting Offices, and any communication will be treated in strict confidence.

LIST OF MEN FROM THE RUGBY SUB-AREA UNDER THE FIRST MILITARY SERVICE ACT. 1916.
The following are their last-known addresses :-
O. PICKLES, Railway Hotel, Rugby, age 28.
F. SMITH, 18 Gas Street, Rugby, age 29.
W. HEWITT, “ Zotha House,” Park Road, Rugby, age 30.
J. W. WALKER, 37 Wood Street, Rugby, age 30.
J. ROSS, Spring Hill, Rugby, age 18.
O. JACKSON, White Lion, Warwick Street, Rugby, age 38.
H. FRANCIS [or HEENEY], 186 Murray Road, Rugby, age 39.
T. W. ELLERTON, Bridget Street, New Bilton, age 24.
A. E. CAPEWELL, Wharf Farm, Hillmorton, age 34.
G. COOPER, Radford, age 39.
W. FIELD, Mount Pleasant, Stockton, age 27.
J. H. CARTER, 16 Oxford Street, Rugby, age 29, married.
J. TOMSON, 8 Abbey Street, Rugby, age 31, married.
A. H. WEST, Bishops Itchington, age 31, married.
A. THOROGOOD, “ Alpina,” Banbury Road, Southam, aged 32, married.
W. POMFRET, 49 James Street, Rugby, age 21, married.
A. A. BALL, Whitnash, aged 38, married.
W. CALLODENE, Licensed Hawker, Dodson’s Field, Rugby, age 40, married.
F. C. BATES, Station Road. Rugby, age 40, Rugby, married.
J. E. CRAMP, 18 Gas Street, Rugby, age 24, married.
J. W. BOSTON, 40 Railway Terrace, Rugby, age 40, married.
WM GEORGE TRUSSLER, 14 Sheep Street, Rugby, age 31, married.
G. THOMAS, 2 Elborow Street, Rugby, age 34, single.
W. H. BRERETON, 11 Rowland Street, Rugby, age 25, single.
P. COWLEY, 91 Abbey Street, Rugby, age 22, married.
J. W. WILLIAMS, 21 Worcester Street, Rugby, age 22, married.
T. BOYLES, 18 Gas Street, Rugby, age 26, married.
P. JOHNSON, Long Itchington, age 28, single.
W. T. HARREN, Butlers Marston, Kineton, age 24, married.
JOHN FITZSIMMONS, 121 Oxford Street, Rugby, age 32, married.
A. ARTHUR, 51 Manor Road, Rugby, age 37, married.
A. K. FRAZER, 3 Castle Street, Rugby, age 36, married.
H. SMITH. 36 Poplar Grove, Rugby, age 37, married.
H. WILSON, 50 King Edward Road, Rugby, age 28, married.

LIST OF MEN FROM THE RUGBY SUB-AREA UNDER THE GROUP SYSTEM.
The following are their last-known addresses :-
H. E. TREECE, 17 Boughton Road, Brownsover, age 26, married.
WILLIAM HENRY WALKER, Westhorpe, Willoughby, age 25, single.

It must be clearly understood that Lists of Men who have failed to report themselves are compiled after every endeavour has been made to trace them, both by the Military Authorities and the Police, who furnish a written report on each individual case.
Under these circumstances any mistakes made are owing to the default either of the employers or men concerned or their relatives, who have failed to notify the change of address as required by the National Registration Act.

F. F. JOHNSTONE, Lieut.-Colonel, Recruiting Officer.
2nd September, 1916.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Sergt-Major James Ward, late of the Old Manor House, Kilsby, serving in the Ammunition Column Brigade, Canadian Artillery, who recently was awarded the D.C.M, has now been promoted to a lieutenancy in the Trench Mortar Battery of a Canadian Division.

LOCAL CASUALTIES.

Pte H Perrin, elder son of Mr J Perrin, Victor’s Street, Rugby, who was invalided to England on June 28th suffering from influenza and acute rheumatism, his numerous friends will be pleased to learn that a letter has been received from Sister Chell, of Seafield Hospital, Blackpool, stating that he is now well on the way to recovery. Bandsman G A Walden, of the Worcester Pioneers, whose parents reside at 20 Campbell Street, New Bilton, is in hospital in France suffering from shrapnel wounds ; but letters from two officers of the company to which Walden belongs state that he is progressing favourably.

Second-Lieut Eric P St George Cartwright, Leinster Regiment (Machine Gun Section), youngest son of Mr Arthur Cartwright, late H.M Inspector of Schools for Northamptonshire District, was killed on August 13th. He was educated at Bilton Grange, Rugby, and at Charterhouse, where he was a member of the O.T.C.

Pte John Waring, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, was killed in action on July 27th. The soldier, who was aged 28, and single, was the son of Mr James Waring, of Bubbenhall. For many years he was engaged under the Warwickshire County Council in superintending road repair work.

B.T.H. MEN KILLED.

Pte C Cashmore, of the Oxford and Bucks L.I, reported missing since September 25th last year, is now regarded by the Military Authorities as having been killed on or about that date. He formerly worked in the foundry at the B.T.H.

NEWBOLD-ON-AVON.

WOUNDED.—Mrs H Smith, of Newbold. was notified on Saturday last that her husband, Corpl Horace Smith, of the Royal Engineers, had been wounded in the back and arm. Corpl Smith enlisted soon after the war commenced. He is in hospital in France, and is progressing favourably.

BRETFORD.

CORPL WELLS WOUNDED AGAIN.—Mr George Wells has been notified that his son, Corpl F A Wells, has been wounded again. He belongs to the Royal Warwicks (T.F), and had been in France again for some time, having recovered from his previous wounds. Another brother, Harvey Wells, has been suffering from shell shock ; whilst another is at the front. Much sympathy is felt for Mr and Mrs Wells.

A BRAVE FELLOW.—Particulars have been received in the village of the bravery of the eldest son of Mr Fred White, who for many years resided at Bretford. Bert White as a boy attended Brandon School, and left there for agricultural work. He eventually emigrated to Canada, and when war broke out he returned to fight for the Old Country, He was eventually rejected because of a crooked toe. However, this did not quench his ardour, for he had the toe taken off, and is doing good work with the Royal Engineers. His father and mother now reside at St George’s Road, Coventry. The people of Bretford and the teachers and scholars of his old school feel proud of him.

DUNCHURCH.

CASUALTIES.—Second-Lieut J D Barnwell, of the R.W.R, second son of Mr W D Barnwell, is now seriously ill with blood poisoning, and Mrs Barnwell is still in France with him.—Mr and Mrs Bull, Mill Street, have received intimation that their son in the 3rd Dragoon Guards has been wounded ; and Mrs Richardson, Tail End, has received similar news in regard to Pte R Richardson, K.R.R. Pte E Walton, of Thurlaston, same regiment, has also been wounded.

BRINKLOW.

REFUGEES.-A meeting of the subscribers to the Refugees’ Fund was held in the Church Room on Friday evening in last week. The Rev G A Dawson presided, and Mr W E Brown presented the audited accounts, showing a balance in hand of £1 14s. It was also explained that the family had left the village, and the man had been at work for some time ; and was, therefore, independent of any further support from the subscribers. The balance in hand (£1 14s) was unanimously voted to the Prisoners of War Fund. A very hearty vote of thanks was accorded to Mr Brown for the admirable manner the arrangements in connection with their guests had been carried out. In response, Mr Brown expressed his readiness to further any good cause during this time of national stress.

AN UNCENSORED LETTER FROM A PRISONER OF WAR.

A letter has this week been received by Mr. J. Reginald Barker, Hon, Secretary of the Rugby Prisoners of War Help Committee, from Bandsman C. Rowe, 1st Royal Welsh Fusiliers, a British prisoner of war, who has had the good fortune to be sent from Germany to Switzerland. Bandsman Rowe has been receiving help for some months from the Rugby Fund, and his letter is additional proof that the parcels of food sent every week to the local men who are war prisoners in Germany do actually reach them. It also emphasises the fact that unless these parcels are continued the men will undoubtedly starve. It therefore, hoped that the special effort the committee is making to raise funds to ensure the continuance of the weekly parcels of food and clothing will meet with a very generous response, that everyone in Rugby and the surrounding villages will give all they can possibly spare on Saturday next, September 2nd. Donations toward the Fund should be sent to Mr. Barker at 9 Regent Street, and same will be gladly acknowledged.

LEYSIN, SWITZERLAND.

August 14th, 1916.

DEAR SIR,—Just a line to ask you to discontinue any parcels to Germany, as you will see by the above address that I have had the splendid luck to get into a civilised country. I received your parcels during my stay in Germany, and beg to tender my sincere thanks to your subscribers and Committee for the good they are doing.

No one at home can believe the great appreciation our boys in Germany have towards the kind people who send the parcels. They are very anxious to know whether the parcels will always continue, as otherwise THEY WON’T COME OUT OF GERMANY ALIVE.

I have been in Germany twenty-one months, and endured the terrible hardships of the first six or eight months when no packets came through.

Only just lately, at Mannheim, the parcels were delayed on account of shifting from different camps, and consequently nineteen men out of my room were in HOSPITAL ON ACCOUNT OF EATING THE GERMAN FOOD. Most of them were wounded and out of Cologne Hospital. I will be only too pleased to answer any enquiries regarding the parcels, &c.

With my sincere thanks, I am, Sir,
Yours sincerely,
C. ROWE.

Mr. J. Reginald Barker,
Hon. Secretary,
Prisoners of War Help Committee,
9 Regent Street, Rugby.

ACHIEVEMENTS by the WARWICKS
HOW THEY CAPTURED A STRONG POSITION AND 600 PRISONERS.

During July and August, the Warwickshire Territorials were in the thick of the fighting in France, and had a very hard time of it, and, that is to be regretted, had many casualties ; but they covered themselves with glory. Their brave deeds have been eulogized in unqualified turns by the Special Press Correspondents, who have been privileged to visit the area in which the fighting has been going on. These citizen soldiers have been drawn from Birmingham and all parts of the county of Warwick, and have left all kinds of peaceful occupations to voluntarily undertake the training necessary to fit them for such an arduous campaign. The unanimous verdict of all the correspondents is to the effect that now that fighting is their trade, our Warwickshire lads are more than a match the best professional soldiers Germany can put up against them.

Early in July they formed part of the attacking force upon Anere, a little later they were in at capture of Ovillers-la-Boiselle, and afterwards led the great push towards Thiepval. They meritoriously carried out the work allotted to them, and captured one of the Germans’ strongest points, which had hitherto successfully resisted our attacks ; and they captured 500 prisoners, which one correspondent says was the big bag of the week.

In this particular operation the Warwicks were ordered to attack at a certain time, and after the usual artillery preparation, which was violently returned by the Germans, who used gas and tear shells, they went forward with an irresistible rush—in some places having to traverse 200 or 300 yards of open ground swept by machine guns before they could come to grips with Fritz. But their own machine guns and snipers, meanwhile, played great havoc among the defenders, and so terrific was the onslaught of the Warwickshire men that many machine gun crews (who, by the way, are among the bravest of German soldiers, and most stubborn) surrendered with a freedom which had never been observed before. But, nevertheless, there were several instances of typical Hun treachery after the hoisting of white flags—but with the inevitable result to the treacherous ones.

When the Warwicks had cleared the Germans from their trenches and dug-outs, and had a little time to look round, they discovered in the dug-outs and luxuriously equipped funk holes no lack of evidence in the way of half-consumed meals and luxuries, also cigars and cigarettes which had been partly smoked, that the Germans had no idea of being “ outed ” in such a hurry.

In one dug-out there was in the midst of all the horror a comic episode, like that of a clown in tragedy. A curtain divided the dug-outs, and a Warwickshire man thrust his bayonet through it. Suddenly the curtain was drawn on one side and German soldier, yawning loudly and rubbing his eyes with the knuckles of one hand, stood there, as though to say, “ What’s up?” He had slept heavily through the bombardment and attack, and now, when he saw the English soldiers facing him believed he was dreaming. So the Warwicks took 400 yards of trenches along a front of 600 yards, and thrust the wedge closer to Thiepval.

The men were splendidly led, and the officers-among whom there were, unfortunately, many casualties—had nothing but praise for the fighting qualities of the rank and file.

Both the courage and skill of these Warwickshire troops (who have received official congratulations from Headquarters and most whole-hearted thanks from the Anzac troops fighting on their right) saved them from heavy casualties. Since then the Wilts and Gloucesters have had a similar opportunity, of distinguishing themselves and they rose to the occasion with equal success.

And these men are typical of our citizen army

COUNTY TRIBUNAL PUTTING ON PRESSURE.

Realising that men are still urgently required for the Army, the County Appeals Tribunal, sitting at the Benn Buildings, Rugby, on Friday last week, intimated, through the Chairman, that they had got to put on pressure. In several cases appeals were dismissed, and in others the period of exemption was reduced.

The members of the Tribunal present were : Messrs M K Pridmore, W Johnson, jun, P G Loveitt. Messrs M E T Wratislaw and F M Burton represented the Military Authorities, and Mr J E Cox watched the proceedings in the interests of agriculture.

A MUNITIONS ORDER.

The first case was that of Wm Tisot, scrap iron and metal merchant, 7 Lawford Road, New Bilton, whose appeal had been adjourned, and respecting whom a munitions order was now made.

OPPOSITION WITHDRAWN.

The Military representatives had appealed against the granting by the local Tribunal of temporary exemption till February 1st to Francis T H Oldham, art student, The Cedars, Long Lawford ; but, in view of a recent Army order, that youths are not to be called up before attaining the age of 18 years 8 months, they withdrew their appeal.

MAKING UP FOR LOST TIME.

“ I do as much work now in a day as I used to do in a fortnight,” said Wm Frank Holloway, (36, married), stud groom, Toft House, Dunchurch. Whose exemption to October 1st to enable his employer to make other arrangements was appealed against by the Military Authorities.—Mr Wratislaw said there were two other men on Mr Rodoconachi’s farm of less than 100 acres.—Mr Holloway said, in addition to attending to the hunter stud, he helped on the farm and assisted at any job that wanted doing.—Given to September 25th, with the warning that it was very improbable that further time would be granted.

A PROBLEM FOR OLD AGE PENSIONERS.

Fredk Ernest Wm Lowe (36, married), 112 Lawford Road, New Bilton, claimed exemption on various grounds, including that of being sub-postmaster, as which he paid on Fridays 37 old age pensions.-Mr Harold Eaden pointed out the serious inconvenience it would be to these aged people to have to walk up to the General Post Office at Rugby.—The Chairman : Which concerns them most—the Germans coming or having to go a few yards extra to get their pensions ? In his statement, Mr Lowe said it would mean absolute ruin to him to join the Army, as he would have to sell everything at a sacrifice.-Given till September 25th, the Chairman remarking that men were very urgently needed, and they had got to put on pressure.

DATE AGREED UPON.

Being only passed for Labour A, John Harry Clowes, stationary engine driver for Messrs Parnell & Son, 4 Chester Street, Rugby, asked for the renewal of a certificate of exemption granted by the local Tribunal.-Mr Eadon said the firm would be content with exemption till October 1st, and this date was agreed upon.

A MATTER OF OPINION.

As William Leslie Morgan (24, single), dentist, 5a Regent Street, Rugby, did not, for the second time, attend personally to support his claim (although represented by Mr Eaden), Mr Wratislaw intimated that he considered the man was a shirker.—Mr Eaden : I should be sorry to say that. On the other hand, he is a very busy man.—Appellant had been passed for home garrison duty only, and asked for either a substantial period of exemption, or for the liberty to withdraw his appeal and renew it when he received his papers calling him up.—The Clerk to the Tribunal pointed out that as appellant was an unattested man, the Tribunal could not take the latter course.—Appeal dismissed.

COAL MERCHANT TO JOIN THE COLOURS.

Temporary exemption till October 1st had been given to William Fredk Perrin (30, single), haulier and coal merchant, 177 Oxford Street, Rugby ; but the Military lodged an appeal, which was upheld on their promising not to serve the papers for a month.

BADGED.

Another Military appeal was that in respect of Thos Wm Harrowing, boysman at a school boarding house, 26 Manor Road, Rugby, who had been given till September 1st to find work of national importance.—Mr Worthington said the man was now working at the B.T.H, and was badged.—The Chairman : As long as he is badged he is all right.

THE SHIFTING OF ORANGE BOXES.

Asserting that he supplied vegetable food for over three-quarters of Rugby, Mr J Craze asked to be allowed to retain his foreman, Harry Hyde (27, married), 16 York Street, whose exemption till November 1st did not meet with military approval.

Mr Craze said a man not used to the business and over military age was not able to lift orange boxes. Both his sons and another man had gone into the Army, and he should be hopelessly at sea (in case of illness) without his foreman.—The Chairman said we had got into such a position that we could not help ourselves, and he told applicant that he would have to see if two girls could shift his orange cases.

The foreman appealed on domestic grounds, he having a mother to support ; but the Chairman assured him his case was nothing like so hard as some others.—Exempted till October 25th, and the Chairman told Mr Craze they were rather stretching the point because he had such a good record as to his sons.

BROWNSOVER FARMER AND HIS SON.

Daniel Lloyd, farmer, Brownsover, had claimed temporary exemption on behalf of his son, Evan Harrison Lloyd (23, and single), but neither attended the Tribunal.—Appellant, in a written statement, said if his son did not obtain exemption he should have no alternative to selling the stock and giving up the farm.—The appeal was dismissed.

ANOTHER DENTISTRY CASE.

John Gardner Hall, dentist and manufacturer of artificial teeth, 20a High Street, Rugby, who had been granted time to complete his business contracts, &c, was also absent when his case was called on, and his appeal was likewise dismissed.

DEATHS.

HUGHES.—On August 16, 1916, Rifleman John Hughes, aged 18, son of the late Arthur William Hughes, late storekeeper of Rugby Sheds. Killed in action. Rifleman John Hughes is a cousin of Driver W. Chadburn, in France.—“ He gave his young life for his King, and country.”-From MOTHER, SISTER and BROTHER.

MESSENGER.—Killed in action on August 5, 1916, in France, Private John Thomas Messenger, of the Australian Imperial Force, son of Mr. T. T. Messenger, Barby.

SHAW.—In loving memory of Pte J. C. Shaw, of the R.W.R., second son of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Shaw, of the Coventry Road, Dunchurch, who was killed in action in France on August 1, 1916 ; aged 26 years and 11 months.

“ No loved one stood beside him
To hear his last farewell ;
But we hope to meet in heaven,
And there for ever dwell.”
—From his loving MOTHER, FATHER, BROTHERS and SISTERS.

IN MEMORIAM.

LINES.—Killed in action, “ somewhere in France ,” Henry, the dearly beloved son of Mr. and Mrs. C. Lines, Napton ; aged 27 years.

“ We often sit and think of you,
And tenderly breathe your name ;
Nothing left of you to look at
But your photo in a frame.”
—Deeply mourned by his FATHER, MOTHER, BROTHER, SISTERS, and MAY.

OSBORN.—In loving remembrance of George Osborn, who died in the Dardanelles on August 30,1915.

“ I often sit and think of him,
And think of how he died ;
To think he could not say ‘ Good-bye ‘
Before he closed his eyes.”
BESSIE.