14th Mar 1919. The British Tommy, Humour in Face of Death

THE BRITISH TOMMY.
HUMOUR IN FACE OF DEATH.
Famous Actor’s Experience at the Front.

Sir F. R. Benton, England’s greatest Shakespearean actor, who has been serving as an ambulance driver with the French Army, gave a delightful lecture, entitled “ The French Poilu and the British Tommy,” to the members of Rugby School in the Temple Speech Room on Tuesday evening.

At the outset the Lecturer, who was in uniform, said khaki had now become synonymous with the mantle of the knights of the Round Table, or with the knightly mantle of any chivalry of the brave in any age, in any country in the world. This had been made so by the splendid selfless heroism and patient endurance of their soldiers, sailors, and airmen. The greatness of the British race, he said, was due to its love of poetry, and a nation’s character could be judged by the song words of its people. He traced the song words of the English race from the days of Alfred the Great, through the intervening centuries till the present day, when the song words of Tommy Atkins might be interpreted as
“ CARRY ON LADS ” ;
“ Carry on, never mind me.” This was the song word which Tommy Atkins had contributed to the song words of freedom and of service upon which their Empire was based. But the contribution of Tommy Atkins to the song words of the nations could only be adequately described by an appeal to the representative poet of the English, and Sir Frank recited, with intense dramatic effect, several soul-stirring epics from the treasures of Shakespeare, breathing in every line the deathless courage and stern resolve which has always characterised the British race. After drawing a vivid word picture of Passchendale,
“ A WILDERNESS OF DESOLATION,
absolutely blasted with the hot breath of hell,” the Lecturer recounted many incidents typical of the humour and splendid courage of our soldiers. “ The British soldier,” the French say, “ is the strongest fighter in the world.” “ And,” they add, “ he is also the gentlest.” This was a great compliment, a great national characteristic, and he hoped they would always possess it.
IN ANECDOTAL VEIN.
Sir Frank Benson has a rich fund of anecdote, and he gave of his best on Tuesday. “ When war broke out,” he said, “ I, in common with everybody else, went to the recruiting office, and I told the sergeant that I was 29 years of age, or rather that I hoped to be 29 if I escaped measles, whooping cough, bronchitis, and other childish ailments. I also descanted at some length on my fitness physically. The sergeant interrupted me, however, by quietly remarking, “ Excuse me, sir, but unfortunately I saw you trying to play ‘ Hamlet ‘ more than 29 years ago ’ ” (laughter). “ I should not have minded,” Sir Frank added, amid renewed laughter, “ had he not laid emphasis on the ‘ trying to play Hamlet.’ ”
Another delightful story concerned a friend of the Lecturer’s, who had a mania for being taken prisoner. He was made a prisoner in the Boer War, and when the European War broke out he enlisted and became a major, and again he was wounded and taken prisoner. He had previously, however, requested his man to write to his wife and break the news gently to her if anything happened to him. Fortunately she received a wire from her husband, stating that he was slightly wounded and a prisoner, but news reached the regiment that he was dead. On learning this the servant scratched his head, and, after an hour’s hard thinking, he wrote : “ Dear Mrs. Major,—Major says to me before he goes over the top : ‘ Jack,’ says he, ‘ if anything happens to me, you are to have my best pair of brown boots and my second best uniform. Well, ma’m, I have got ’em all on at this moment.—Yours, Tommy Atkins.’ ” (laughter). There was, after all, a sort of philosophic “ Carry on, lads, never mind me,” spirit about that letter.
Then, dealing with another phase of the British Tommy’s character, the Lecturer related a never-to-be-forgotten story of the smith of the Scots Greys, who, fired with indignation at the horrible stories of the devilish deeds of the Germans, picked up the biggest hammer he could find, and, with his leather apron on, his sleeves rolled up, and his shirt open to the chest, sprang on a hone and took part in a splendid charge of our cavalry, when they rode backwards and forwards through the German ranks. There was no parry known in the German text books for a heavy hammer wielded by an English smith, his heart ablaze with righteous anger. Surely Thor, the thunder god, with his heavy hammer, rode in the English ranks that day.
Then there was the epic story of the, 19-year-old public school boy, who, when all the officers were killed and the regiment reduced from 2,000 to only 200, held a position for 23 days. He was soon afterwards promoted to command a company, and was ordered to take a difficult position held by machine gun fire. While attempting to do so a rifle bullet shattered his jaw. He fell, and as he lay, half-way between life and death, to his dim consciousness there came a whisper that the attack was not going all right, that all the officers had been killed, and the men were wavering. So he struggled to his feet, held the shattered remnants of his jaw in his left hand, waved his sword with his right, and led his men on to victory, till death the healer came in the shape of a bullet through the brain and eased him of his sore anguish. It was, he concluded, such deeds as this, which were performed every hour of every day, which led a famous French General to say to General French : “ I and my division would esteem it a great honour and a great happiness to come here and die by your side.”

RUGBY SALVATION ARMY.
WELCOME TO DEMOBILISED BANDSMEN.

On Saturday evening the Rugby Salvation Army band welcomed the nine bandsmen who have been demobilised at a tea in the Citadel, the arrangements for which were in the hands of the wives of the band locals. At the close a presentation was made by Bandmaster Burton, on behalf of the band, to Bandsman Rupert Martin, who had acted as deputy bandmaster during the absence of Bro. P. Allen on service.

The week-end meetings were led by Deputy Bandmaster Allen, assisted by the other khaki men, and during the services each of them recounted their experiences on the battle-field. A march, “ The Brigade,” composed by the Deputy Bandmaster whilst on the Cambrai front, was played, and also arrangements he had composed for two hymns, “ Sun of my soul ” and “ Art thou weary.”

BRANDON, WOLSTON & BRETFORD.

WAR MEMORIAL : RESULT OF VOTING.—At a meeting held some time back it was decided to issue voting papers to all residents in the above three places, so that all over 21 could register their votes for the object they preferred. The following five proposals were placed before them :—(1) To repair and refurbish the south chapel in the church, and make it a war memorial chapel, with the names on the wall of those who have died and fought for us. Estimated cost, about £400. (2) To build a mission room and institute at Bretford ; cost £800 to £1,000. (3) To build a cottage for the pariah nurse ; cost £600.  (4) To put up a cross or monument of some kind on the Derry at Wolston. (5) To erect a clock tower on the Derry. Messrs. E. W. Ireson (Brandon), J. E. Wilkins (Bretford), F. Stevenson, F R. Butler, W.Chick, H. Walding, and G. Webb, jun. of Wolston, met at the Vicarage on Thursday in last week to count the votes. The following was the result :—No. 1, 204 votes : 2, 24 ; 3, 48 ; 4, 80 ; and 5, 191. Thus the war memorial chapel was carried. Thanks are due to the Vicar, the Rev. J. O. Gooch, for getting the voting papers, &c., printed.

A HERO’S RETURN.—Pte. Horace Watts has returned home after being a prisoner since the 21st of March last. He joined the West Kents in August, 1914, and went out in the spring of 1915. He was with the gallant West Kents when they were surrounded in Trones Wood for two days. Although many would have surrendered, they stuck to their guns, and eventually extracted themselves. He was wounded first at Hohenzolern Redout, and after a short time in England returned to France. He was again wounded in the left elbow, and taken prisoner at St. Quentin. The treatment meted out to the prisoners was in many instances of a most inhuman nature. Pte. Watts was himself neglected shamefully. For days together the dressings of his wounds were not touched. In one instance he was 14 days without having them removed. His ration was a portion of bread and barley leaf water. Pte. Watts is the son of Mr. & Mrs. G. Watts, of Brandon Wood. Mr. Watts has been head gamekeeper to Col. Beach for the last 26 years. Pte. Watts is an old Bablake boy. His arm is progressing fairly well, but it is feared it is permanently injured. He was offered promotion on several occasions, but preferred to stay as a private.

IN AND AROUND RUGBY.

INFLUENZA.—The death-rate locally from influenza and pneumonia is still declining, and during the past week nine deaths from these diseases have been registered, as against 16 and 20 in the two preceding weeks.

RE-OPENING OF A GARAGE.—Messrs. Sam Robbins’ Garage at Dunchurch, which was closed owing to shortage of labour during the war, has now been re-opened under the management of Mr. Gilbert.

RIFLEMAN HAROLD LEE, 8th K.R.R., son-in-law of Mr. & Mrs. G. H. Cave, 74 Windsor Street, Rugby, who was posted as missing on April 4th last, is now presumed to have been killed on that date.

WAR RELIC FOR THE O.T.C.—A captured German trench mortar, presented to Rugby School O.T.C, by the Army Council as a mark of appreciation of the work done by the Corps during the war, has been placed outside the Armoury in Lawrence Sheriffe Street.

DEATHS.

HARRISON.—On the 11th inst., in the Military Hospital, Leeds, from pneumonia, following influenza, Lieut.-Col. JAMES MOLYNEUX HARRISON, R.A.S.C., fourth son of Alfred Hyde Harrison, late of Dunchurch Hall, Warwickshire, aged 49.

IN MEMORIAM.

BOTTERILL.—In proud and loving memory of Pte. A. W. BOTTERILL (BERT), 2nd Coldstream Guards, Killed in France 18, 1918. Interred in Frampaux Cemetery, Arras, on March 20th (sonny’s birthday).
“ Loving and loved one, your race is won ;
Nobly and well hath your work been done.
Now you have found your great reward,
And we whom you loved are left to mourn.
Yet how I miss the hand-clasp and the loving smile.”
—Sadly missed and deeply mourned by Wife and little Bert, Church Cottages, Clifton.

SKINNER.—In loving memory of Pte. G. SKINNER, 19th Canadians, killed in Belgium on March 14, 1916.
“ There is a link death cannot sever,
Love and remembrance cling for ever.”
From his loving wife CHARLOTTE.

STEEL.—In loving memory of our dear son, EDWARD, who was killed in action “ somewhere in France ” on March 16, 1915.
“ ‘Tis only a little while longer.
If we march in the heavenly road,
We shall meet and be ever with Jesus,
Who will ease our hearts from its load.”
—Never forgotten by his loving Father, Mother, Sister and Brothers.

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15th Jun 1918. Selling Ham Without Taking Coupons

FOOD PROSECUTIONS.

SELLING HAM WITHOUT TAKING COUPONS.
Samuel C Duval, grocer, Gipsy Lane, Leicester, was summoned by F Burton for selling uncooked bacon and ham to Evan Evans without detaching the necessary coupons, at Rugby, on May 25th. A second charge was also brought of selling uncooked ham and bacon to the same individual, who was not one of his registered customers.—Evan Evans, 9 Melling Street, Longsight, Manchester, was also summoned by F Burton for unlawfully obtaining for a retailer named Duval a ham, and not producing his meat card to allow the retailer to detach the appropriate coupons on May 25th.—Mr Worthington prosecuted, and Mr Eaden defended ; and, on the suggestion of Mr Eaden, this was taken in conjunction with the charges against Duval.—Defendants pleaded guilty to all three charges.—Mr Worthington said that on the morning in question Mr Purchase saw Evans standing near a stall belonging to Duval in the Market Place. He heard Evans tell Duval that he could not get a supply of bacon where he was registered, and from what he saw he spoke to Duval, who admitted that he had sold some ham to Evans without a coupon.—Mr Worthington said the seriousness of the case lay in an entire stranger coming into the town and taking food away which might be required by someone who was registered in the town.—Mr Eaden said the case was not nearly so serious as his friend tried to make it. There was a distinction between a picnic ham and an ordinary one, the shank end of the former being allowed to be sold without coupons and to an unregistered customer.—Evans was a fireman on the L & N-W Railway, and arrived on a goods train at 9.30 a.m on Saturday. He had nothing with him to eat except bread. He was not due back home until 12.30 Sunday morning, and it was obvious he could not go all that time on bread. He asked Duval to sell him some ham, and Duval cut him the shank end of a picnic ham, which he was perfectly entitled to sell to him. Unfortunately, when Evans saw the amount of bone in it he said he should prefer the other end, and Duval, feeling sorry for Evans, did cut some from that end. With regard to his friend’s statement that food was being taken out of the town, he might state that some three hours later Duval was allowed to sell some 60lbs of bacon without coupons by permission of Mr Burton, so that anyone from Coventry, &c, could have taken it away if they wished.—The Chairman said that Duval knew he was doing wrong, and he would be fined 19s 6d in each case ; and Evans, knowing that he would be away for that length of time, should have brought his coupon with him, and he would also be fined 19s 6d.

THE PRICE OF WHISKY.
William Flint, wine merchant, Church Street, Rugby, was summoned for selling whisky at a price exceeding the maximum price allowed by the Spirits Order, 1918, on May 7th.—Mr Worthington appeared for the Food Control Committee, and Mr Eaden pleaded guilty on behalf of the defendant.—Mr Worthington said on May 7th a man named Richardson, a discharged soldier, went to Mr Flint’s Stores in Church Street, and asked for a bottle of whisky. He was supplied by the assistant, and was told the price was 11s. A few minutes afterwards, in consequence of what he was told or thought he went for a second bottle, and was charged 11s. He asked the assistant if she had not made a mistake. She replied that she could charge the old price, because the Government had not released the whisky in respect of the new prices from bond. He asked for a receipt, and received one for £1 2s. A day or two afterwards Mr Purchase (Enforcement Officer) saw Mr Flint, who said that the whisky was 35 per cent under proof. The whisky should have been sold at 8s instead of 11s.—Mr Flint told the Enforcement Officer that he went to London, but could not get any information. He could easily have gone to the Food Office at Rugby and received all information required.—Mr Eaden, for the defence, said Mr Flint wished to make perfectly clear that what was done was done in absolute ignorance and without any intention of profiteering or charging above the price. If they considered Glenlivet whisky was a proprietary article, then 9s 6d could have been charged under the new Order. Mr Eaden pointed out that the Order only came into force on May 1st, and though Mr Flint went to an advisory meeting in London, he heard nothing about the new prices.—The Chairman said the Bench felt there was some mitigation in that case, as proceedings were taken so soon after the Order came into force. Those orders were coming so frequently that the public could not very often get hold of them. They would only inflict a fine of £5, including costs.

RABBITS FROM WALES.—Edith J Hardy, 45 Church Street, Rugby, was summoned by F Burton Executive Officer of the Food Control Committee, for unlawfully obtaining two rabbits, and not detaching from her meat card the coupons.—Defendant did not appear.—Mr Worthington, for the prosecution, said that from information received Mr Purchase visited defendant’s house, and she informed him that she was receiving a couple of rabbits per week from an uncle in Wales. He examined her meat card, and found that the coupons which should have been sent for these had not been forwarded. She thus obtained these rabbits and a meat ration with the coupons which should have been used for the former.—The Chairman : She “ received ” them, not “ obtained ” them ?—Mr Worthington : Quite so, and if it had been an isolated case perhaps nothing would have been said, but she had them for three consecutive weeks.—The Chairman : I did not know that if anyone sent me a couple of rabbits that I should have to send two coupons.—Mr Worthington said that probably he should have been the same himself. He believed Mrs Hardy had no idea of committing an offence, and the case was brought simply that the public should know of the Order.—The Chairman said there was no doubt an offence had been committed, but it might be taken as a first case, because the public did not know the law sufficiently, and they would dismiss the summons under the first Offenders’ Act. The public must understand that they could not receive presents of this kind from their friends without giving up the corresponding coupons.

THE NEW RATION BOOKS.

Ration books for the national system of rationing, which comes into operation on July 13th, are now being issued to local Food Control Committees. They contain vouchers for articles of food which are already rationed, with extra pages for commodities which it may be found necessary to ration, either generally or locally, at a later date.

The book is available for 16 weeks, after which a new volume will be distributed. Coupons will require to be surrendered for all rations, four being apportioned as at present to a week’s supply of meat and bacon, and one weekly to other articles. The pages are in distinctive colours for the various rationed foods. The coupons for sugar are yellow, for fats (i.e, butter, margarine and lard) blue, and for meat red. A page of spare coupons is coloured brown, and a page of spare spaces is printed in blue ink on white paper. There is a reference leaf coloured green, while the front and back covers are white. The pages are printed on specially engraved paper. The child’s ration book will be generally similar, except that it will contain two pages of meat coupons instead of four. Thus the meat coupon in the child’s book will be of the same value as is the meat coupon in the ordinary adult’s book.

Full instructions will be found upon the front and back covers of the book.

All applications for the rationing books must be sent to the Food Controller by to-day (June 15th).

SUGAR FOR JAM.
METHODS OF ALLOCATION CRITICISED AT RUGBY.

The methods adopted in allocating the supplies of sugar for jam-making were criticised by Mr W A Stevenson at a meeting of the Rugby Food Control Committee on Thursday last week. In many instances, he said, people had anticipated that the quantity asked for would be reduced, and, acting on this assumption, they had asked for more than they required. Others had played fair, and only asked for their bare requirements, but all had been cut down alike. He thought the basis on which they had worked was not a fair one. The sugar should have been allotted according to the number of persons in the household, irrespective of how much was asked for.—The Executive Officer (Mr Burton) pointed out that the allocation was made in accordance with a schedule issued by the Ministry of Food. They did not take into consideration the amount of sugar asked for, but simply the amount of fruit available. If there was any dissatisfaction it was the fault of the Food Ministry, and not of his office, because he only had to carry out the provisions of the schedule.

It was also stated that a large number of persons who had applied for sugar for jam had been refused a supply because they had failed to enclose a stamped addressed envelope for the return of the permit with their application form. The Chairman (Mr Wise) said he believed that in some cases stamped envelopes were enclosed, but owing to the great pressure under which the officials had had to work these had been lost. It would be very difficult to decide which cases were genuine, but he thought that where they were satisfied that the requirements had been complied with they should grant an allowance, if possible. The difficulty was, however, that there was not a large stock to draw from. The existing allowance had been made on the figures sent in on the application forms, and if a lot more people were to be supplied the allowances already made would have to be still further reduced. He had read that the gooseberry crop had failed, and it might be possible to get the permits granted to people for making gooseberry jam returned.—The Executive Officer said, considering the pressure under which the staff worked and the large mob of people invading the offices and the approaches daily waiting for the application forms, the wonder was that they did as well as they had done. With regard to granting fresh permits, he believed that they were helpless in the matter, because the allotment of sugar was made, and if they granted any other allowance some of the people with permits would have to go without sugar. The only way he could see out of the difficulty was to issue a circular asking people whose fruit had not come up to their expectations to return their permits, so that a reduction could be made.—It was decided to do this and also to write to the Ministry of Food asking whether, in any case in which the committee were satisfied that a stamped addressed envelope had been enclosed, they could make an allowance of sugar.

MUNITION WORKERS & THE CUP THAT CHEERS.

At their meeting on Thursday afternoon in last week the Rugby Food Control Committee considered a request from the Lodge Sparking Plug Company for permission to purchase 20lbs of tea weekly for their canteen.—Mr Stevenson reminded the committee that they had refused a request from the Railway Company, and if this was granted the two decisions would clash.—The Executive Officer (Mr F M Burton) : But this is a munition factory.—Mr Stevenson expressed the opinion that railways were as important as munition establishments, because they were the common carriers of both the raw material and the finished article.—Mrs Shelley said she thought the company were asking for an excessive quantity, because 1lb of tea was supposed to make 160 cups.—Mr Ewart : They are asking for 4lbs a day.—Mr Stevenson : A lot of ladies work there (laughter).—The question was referred to the Ration Committee with power to act, the Executive Officer being asked to get further information as to the actual requirements.

At a meeting on Thursday the committee reported that the company had since written stating that between 400 and 450 cups of would be required daily five days each week, and it was accordingly decided to allow the quantity asked for.

POTATOES IN BREAD.

The Order of the Ministry of Food requiring 10 per cent. of potatoes to be mixed with floor and other ingredients used in making bread came into force last week. Anticipating some such order, the Rugby bakers a few months ago commenced to mix potatoes with the flour, although the proportion was naturally not so great as that now made compulsory by the Order ; and they have thus gained some useful experience. A prominent local baker states that considerable additional work is entailed by the new regulation inasmuch as the potato’s have to be washed, scraped, boiled, mashed, and strained before they are fit to mix with the flour. Great care has to be taken both in the dough-making and the baking, and the difficulties are added to by the poor quality of the yeast now being supplied to the trade. When the bread is properly made, however, a distinct improvement in quality is noticeable, and the loaves are a better colour, much more moist and do not become dry so quickly.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Mrs Ingram, 21 Victoria Avenue, New Bilton, has received news that her son, Pte L Ingram, aged 20, was wounded on May 29th, and died the same day. He was an old Elborow School boy, and has been to the Army three years. Second time wounded.

Mr & Mrs Baskott, East Haddon (late of Rugby), have received news that their son, Pte E Baskott, 101st Labour Battalion, has died from gas poisoning in 1st Australian Hospital, Rouen. He was an old St Matthew’s boy. His brother, Lieut J E Baskott, was killed in action last December.

Dr R H Paramore, of this town, now in the Army, has been promoted to the rank of Major.

Mrs Rixon, Claremont Road, has received official news that her son, Second-Lieut E H Rixom, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, has been wounded in the right arm and chest.

Mrs Wilde, 5 Earl Street, has been officially notified that her husband, Pte John Wilde, 1st Royal Warwickshire Regiment, was killed in action on April 15th. He has been in the Army two years. Previous to joining up he worked for Mr F Hollowell, builder.

Mr J A Philips, St Aubyn, Hillmorton Road, received a telegram from the War Office on Sunday last, informing him that his third son, Kenneth Mc N Phillips, 2nd Lieut, Northumberland Fusiliers, attached Durham Light Infantry, has been missing since May 27th.

Mr C J Elkington, Hillmorton Road, Rugby, has received notification that his son, Lieut A J Elkington, of the North Staffordshire Regiment, has been slightly wounded in the foot, and is in hospital at Rouen.

Pte H Garner was accidentally drowned on May 22nd whilst bathing in a river in France. He was the first of the company to dive into the river, and was at once seized with cramp. His officer and comrades dived in to save him, but he was carried away by a strong current, and was drowned. Pte Garner was employed by the Rugby Co-operative Society as a motor lorry driver till he enlisted at the outbreak of the War.

Lieut Maurice V Eyden. younger son of Mr Alfred Eyden, 53 St Matthew’s Parade, Northampton, is reported missing on May 27th. He entered the Inns of Court, O.T.C, in autumn, 1915, on leaving Rugby School (where he was “ Head of the Town ”), and received his commission in the 2nd Northants Regiment in September, 1916. Two months later he went to France, where he had been twice wounded. His only brother, Corpl Clarence Eyden, R.E, was killed in action in France on May 19th.

Corpl J Norman Atkinson, M.G.C, who was officially reported wounded and missing, has written home stating that the is a prisoner of war at Altdamn, Pommern, Germany, and that his wound is not serious. He has been very kindly treated, and is quite cheerful. He is the son of Mr J H Atkinson, 37 Windsor Street, Rugby, and the second of four brothers who have joined H.M Forces.

Second-Lieut H H Metters, M.C, Leicestershire Regiment, aged 21, only son of Mr W H Metters, the Manor House, Stoneleigh, near Kenilworth, is reported missing since May 27th.

Lieut-Col H A Gray-Cheape, D.S.O, was commanded the brilliant charge of the Warwickshire and Worcestershire Yeomanry in Palestine on November 8, 1917, is reported missing, believed drowned. He was one of 13 officers and 79 other ranks who lost their lives when H.M transport “ Leasowe Castle ” was torpedoed and sunk on Mar 26th in the Mediterranean. The gallant officer was the well-known polo player. His eldest sister, who was married to Mr Albert Jaffray Cay, son of Mr & Mrs Cay, of Kenilworth, lost her life in the “ Empress of Ireland ” disaster in June, 1914. Her husband’s death has been presumed, as he has been missing ever since the reverse sustained by our arms at Katia on Easter Sunday, 1916.

LIEUT T W WALDING.
Mrs Walding, of The Limes, Rugby, has received information that her son, Lieut T W Walding, of the Machine Gun Corps, has been posted as missing since May 27th. A brother officer has written stating that Lieut Walding was with the guns in the forward area, and was completely surrounded, and the assumption was that he was made prisoner.

MILITARY FUNERAL AT RUGBY.
The death occurred, at the 1st Southern General Hospital, Birmingham (Dudley Road Section), on June 5th, of Pte W Lee, 1st Royal Warwicks, who was wounded on April 15th. Pte Lee, who was 41 years of age, was the son of the late Mr John Lee, of Rugby. He had served 3½ years in the War. The interment took place at Rugby Cemetery on Monday, when a firing party from Budbroke Barracks attended. The mourners included deceased’s two brother, Sergt R Lee and Sergt-Major Harry Lee, both of the Warwicks ; his sisters, Mrs Cements, Mrs Lisamer, Mrs Colledge, and Mrs Abbott ; his brothers-in-law, Sergt Arthur Clements, R.E (who had just arrived in England from Sierra Leone), and Mr Clements and Mr Lisamer (both of whom had served in the Boer War), Mrs R Lee (sister-in-law), Mr Jack Burns (cousin), &c.

AWARDS FOR GALLANTRY & DISTINGUISHED SERVICE.

Major P W Nickalls, Yeomanry, the well-known polo player, has been awarded the D.S.O.

The following have received the Meritorious Service Medal in connection with military operations in Salonika:—Sergt-Major D G Kinden, A.S.C (Rugby), and Staff Sergt-Major G H Sutton, A.S.C (Churchover, near Rugby).

The Military Medal has been awarded for gallantry and devotion to duty on April 30th to Driver F Calloway, R.F.A, son of Mr W Calloway, Sandown Road, Rugby.

The following men are included in the latest list of awards of the Distinguished Conduct Medal :—840139 Sergt H Battson, R.F.A, Rugby, and 22681 Sergt F H Marriott. M.G.C, Rugby.

AMPUTATION DURING RAID.—Miss Marian A Butler, a radiographer of the Scottish Women’s Hospitals, who has just returned from France, telling of experiences at the Hospital at Villers-Cotterets, said that during a German air raid Miss Frances Ivens, the chief medical officer, performed several operations, including amputations, by the light of two candles and with the instruments jumping about through the vibration caused by the explosions. Miss Ivens is a daughter of the late Mr W Ivens. of Harborough Parva.

RUGBY PETTY SESSIONS.

ABSENTEES.—Arthur Hill, painter, no fixed abode, was brought up in custody charged with being an absentee from the Army.—He pleaded not guilty.—Sergt Percival stated that he arrested prisoner in West Street, and asked him if he had any exemption from military service or any other documents ? He replied, “It is all right; I have been down to the Drill Hall.” Witness told him that he should take him to the Drill Hall, and on the way he said, “I have sent all my papers to the Minister of Munitions, Hay Lane, Coventry. I had exemption from military service while I was at work at Willans.” Witness telephoned to Coventry, and found that prisoner was an absentee. He also found that he was discharged from Willans & Robinson’s on July 2nd, 1917. Then he would be given 14 days to get other work.—Col Johnstone produced a copy of notice sent to Hill on June 28th, 1917, calling him up on July 12th. The notice was returned marked “ Unknown.” Witness also sent an absentee report.—Defendant claimed that no papers could be sent within eight weeks after his discharge from munitions. He said in June he registered at the Labour Exchange, and they advised him to get a note from the Drill Hall. At the latter place they said they could not help him ; he must paddle his own canoe. So he had paddled his own canoe since. If he was a wilful absentee he should not have remained in the town where he was known at the same address. He had written to the Ministry of Munitions at Coventry, giving his temporary address and all his papers.—Sergt Percival, in reply to the Bench, said no trace could be found of these papers at Coventry.—Col Johnstone said no notification had been received of any change of address.—The case was adjourned for a short time to enable the sergeant to make enquiries at the Labour Exchange.—On their return Sergt Percival said he had ascertained that prisoner last went to the Labour Exchange on June 27th, but his name was crossed off, as it was not renewed within seven days.—Fined £2, and handed over as a deserter.— Samuel Winfield, no fixed abode, was similarly charged.—Defendant pleaded guilty.—Sergt Hawkes deposed that he saw defendant in Gas Street, and asked him why he was not in the Army ? Defendant said he had dodged it. He had not been registered or medically examined.—Defendant had nothing to say.—Fined £2, and handed over to an escort.—Sergt Hawkes was complimented and awarded 10s.

RUGBY URBAN DISTRICT COUNCIL
WASTE OF WATER.

Notice is hereby given that no consumer is permitted to use WATER BY HOSE PIPE, without the permission of the Council, except when the supply is by meter.

Consumers are urgently requested to co-operate with the Council, in reducing waste of water as much as possible.

Consumer are requested to report all cases of waste at the Surveyor’s Office.

Persons taking and using water in contravention of the Water Regulations of this Council are liable to a penalty not exceeding five pounds for every such offence.

JNO. H. SHARP,
Water Engineer & Surveyor.
Benn Buildings, Hight Street, Rugby.
May 29th, 1918.

DEATHS.

INGRAM.—In ever loving memory of my dearest and youngest son, Pte. LEONARD INGRAM, 15th Royal Warwickshire Regiment, who died from wounds in France on May 29th ; son of the late Joseph and Mary Ingram, 61 Victoria Avenue, New Bilton ; aged 20 years
“ His sufferings here are ended,
His work on earth is done ;
He fought the fight with patience,
And now the victory’s won.
I loved him, oh, no tongue can tell
How much we loved him and how well.
God loved him, too, and thought it best
To take him home with Him to rest.”
“ Though lost from sight, to memory ever dear.”

IN MEMORIAM.

BAUM.—In ever-loving memory of Sergt. G. BAUM, 8th Leicesters, of Claybrook-Magna ; killed in action on June 11, 1917 ; aged 22 years.—Not forgotten by his, friends at Churchover.

WOOD.—In loving memory of Pte. ARTHUR WILLIAM WOOD, son of the late J. Wood, of 153 Grosvenor Road, Rugby ; killed in action on June 10, 1917, in France.—From Madge and Ernest.

WOOD.—In loving memory of Pte. ARTHUR WOOD, M.G.C, who was killed in action in France on June 10 1917.—From George and Ellen.

Lee, William Thomas. Died 5th Jun 1918

William was baptised on 15th Feb 1878 at St. Andrews Parish Church Rugby and was the 3rd child of John and Elizabeth Ann Lee nee Cooke. His father was a labourer in Drury Lane.

In 1881 William was age 3, living with parents John and Eliza Ann at 16 Cambridge Street Rugby and 3 siblings, Louisa (7),  Mary Jane (5) and Emma (1). The two lodgers these were his grandparents, Thomas Cooke (56) silk weaver born Coventry & Eliza Cooke (54) also born in Coventry.

By 1888 his parents had 8 children, 4 boys and 4 girls. and in 1891 William was aged 13, an errand boy living with parents at 14 Pennington Street Rugby. Three siblings, Emma (11), Richard (8) and Henry G (2)  were still at home plus lodger Elizabeth Edward (58), a widow and a tailoress, born Wolverton Bucks.

William’s father John Lee died at the end of 1892 in Rugby. He was aged 65.

Williams Short Service Attestation form tells us he joined up on 8th November 1899 and his regimental number was 7097 Royal Warwickshire Regiment 6th foot His age was given as was 19 years and 10 months although he was actually age 21. Why did he say he was younger? His occupation was a labourer. He was 5ft 4in tall, 115 lbs. His complexion was sallow and he had grey eyes and dark brown hair.

In 1901 his mother Elizabeth was living at 29 Gas Street Rugby and was a charwomen, living with her was her son Henry Lee aged 12 and 2 boarders George Lines (49) a groom domestic, born Lutterworth and Emvi Skeley (24), born Withybrook.

William served in South Africa from 28th Feb 1901 to 13th Oct 1902. He was awarded the South African Queen’s Medal with a clasp for the Transvaal. He then travelled to India with the RWR and was discharged as medically unfit on 6th Jun 1905.

His brother Henry Lee joined the Royal Warwickshire Regiment and in 1911 was age 22 and stationed at No.6 Regimental District of Whittington Barracks at Lichfield. We have been unable to find William in the 1911 census.

William must have been recalled to the RWR (Private, number 2386) soon after the war started as he arrived in France on 4th Jan 1915.This is confirmed by the fact that he received the 15 Star as well as the Victory and British Medals.

The 1st Bn, Royal Warwickshire Regiment fought in most of the major battles of WW1 and William was probably injured during the German Spring Offensive, Operation Michael.

William Thomas Lee died on 5th Jun 1918 and his age is given as 41, his death was at 21st Southern General Hospital Dudley Road in the All Saints District of Birmingham. He died of a Gun shot wound right ear and meningitis  the informant was M. Thomas, Matron of 21st Southern General Hospital Dudley Road and his death certificate gives his occupation as Number 2836 Private 1st Royal Warwick Regiment.

He is buried in Rugby Clifton Road Cemetery. The Graves Registration Report Form tells us he is buried in grave E47a.

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

18th Nov 1916. The Great Battle Pictures.

THE GREAT BATTLE PICTURES.—The official pictures of the battle of the Somme, which have been attracting vast audiences all over the country, will be shown at the Empire twice nightly, and at matinees every day next week. Already seats are being extensively booked, and those who wish to secure good seats should do so at once.

LOCAL WAR NOTES,

Jim Eaton-Shore, Queen’s Westminster Rifles, has been reported wounded and missing since September 10. He is the youngest son of the late Mr James Eaton-Shore, for many years Works manager at Messrs Willans and Robinson’s, of Rugby, and later on, in the same capacity, at Messrs Siemen’s of Stafford. The three other sons are also serving in the forces—Jack in the New Zealand Engineers, Robert in the Canadians, and Tom in the Oxford and Buck Light Infantry.

A neatly printed certificate has been received by Mr C Pegg, 1 Addison Bead, New Bilton, to the effect that the Major-General commanding the Division in which his son—Corpl H Pegg, of the Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry—is serving has received a report of the young soldier’s gallant conduct on October 7th. The card was presented to Corpl Pegg by the commanding officer, who congratulate him, and congratulated him, and expressed the hope that next time it would be something better.

B.T.H. EMPLOYEE HONOURED.

Sergt William Black, of the 60th Light Infantry Brigade, Headquarters Staff, has been awarded the Military Medal. Before the war Sergt Black was employed as a clerk in the Stores Department at the B.T.H.

MILITARY MEDAL FOR SERGT F TUCKER.

A recent issue of the Gazette announced that Sergt F Tucker, of the Royal Rifle Brigade, had been awarded the Military Medal for bravery in the field, Sergt Tucker was wounded in August in about thirty places, and after treatment at Lincoln Hospital, he was sent to a convalescent home at Blackpool, where he still remains. Before the war, Sergt Tucker was employed as a compositor by Messrs Frost & Sons, and his mother lives in Charlotte Street.

LOCAL CASUALTIES.

Mrs H Lee, of Clarence Road, New Bilton, has received a postcard from her husband, a private in the R.W.R, stating that he has been wounded, and is now in Glen Hospital, France. This is the second time that Pte Lee, who went out with the original Expeditionary Force, has been wounded.

PTE FRED CRIPPS DIES OF WOUNDS.

Pte Fred Cripps, R.E., died in hospital recently from wounds received early in October in France. Pte Cripps was 28 years of age, and married. Before the war, he was employed as a carpenter by Messrs Foster & Dicksee at Rugby. His home was at Winslow.

DISTRICT APPEALS TRIBUNAL.

At Wednesday’s sitting at St Mary’s Hall, Coventry, there were present : Messrs M K Pridmore (chairman), W Johnson, jun, K Rotherham. and P G Lovert ; Military representative, Mr M E T Wratislaw ; Agricultural representative, Mr F W Channing.

A substitute having been found for Wm Fredk Brooks, a general farm worker employed by Mr Butlin, of Flecknoe, an appeal made on his behalf was withdrawn.

On behalf of Thos Arthur Stephenson, woollen and cotton rag merchant, Newbold Road, Rugby, Mr Harold Eaden said his client was now employed at the Daimler Works, Coventry. Certificates were not now issued, as it was found they had been abused, but if the clerk to the Tribunal applied, the firm would give him one.—Adjourned till the next Court.

Mr Wratislaw stated that a discharged soldier of excellent character had been found for Thos Wm Durham, carter, 13 Campbell Street, New Bilton, but the man was not due to report till that day.—A fortnight’s adjournment was asked for and granted.

On two grounds—that of business and as a conscientious objector—Ernest Holliday, acting bank manager, 54[?] Newbold Road, Rugby, appealed for the renewal of his temporary exemption.-The Chairman asked Mr Wratislaw if appellant, as a conscientious objector, was not doing as good work now as he would be doing elsewhere ?—Mr Wratislaw : They are being treated differently now. They draw the pay of a soldier and the rest goes to charity.—Capt Thomas said on mobilisation he was called up, and three others who were in the bank had joined the army. Appellant was now assisted by one girl and one boy, and they were doing a great deal of work.—In reply to the Chairman, appellant said he was prepared to hand over £l a week from his salary to charity, but he would not like it to be thought he was buying himself out.—The Chairman : We are putting you in the same position as if you were in the army. You are not making a profit out of it.—Appellant : I don’t wish to do so.—The Chairman said he thought the sum should go to a local charity, and an order was made for £1 a week to be paid to the funds of the hospital, temporary exemption being granted so long as the conditions were observed.

Mr Worthington supported an application by John Basil Liggins, coal merchant and carter, 57 James Street, Rugby, claimed by his mother to be indispensable to the business. Mr Wratislaw suggested that the man might be used as a substitute, but the Chairman expressed the opinion that the carting of coal during the winter was very important, and exemption till February 28th was granted.

Conditional exemption was asked for by William George Essex, described as a dairy farmer and market gardener of West Street, Long Lawford.—The Clerk asked Mr Wratislaw if they had served the notice now necessary in such a case, and he replied in the negative.—Given till February 1st, and Mr Wratislaw was asked to then remember that notice must be served.

HILLMORTON.

A very successful and enjoyable concert was given on Friday last week by 55 Squadron R.F.C Pierrot Troop on behalf of the funds for sending Christmas parcels to the Hillmorton soldiers and sailors. As something out of the ordinary run was anticipated, the room was packed very soon after the doors were opened. The first part of the programme was taken entirely by the Pierrot Troop in costume, who rendered songs and jokes which kept the audience in roars of laughter. The second part consisted of songs, sword swinging display, dances and recitations, and loud and prolonged applause which followed each item was a proof of its excellence and of the appreciation of the audience ; particularly may this be said of the sword swinging display by Sergt-Major Rowland.

BOURTON-ON-DUNSMORE.

A start was made in November, 1915, to collect eggs for the wounded soldiers, and the villagers of Bourton and Draycote will be gratified to know that since that date to November, 1916, they have contributed a grand total of 1,792.

CHRISTMAS PARCELS FOR OUR SOLDIERS.—A house-to-house collection has been made in Bourton and Draycote, with the result that £7 18s 10d has been generously given for this good cause. Misses Hales and Davies undertook the collecting.

ANSTY.

SEC. LIEUT CADWALLER ADAMS KILLED.

The Adams family of Ansty Hall, near Nuneaton, have sustained a further bereavement by the death in action of Second lieutenant Geoffrey Henry Cadwaller Adams, Suffolk Regiment. Born in 1896, he was the second son of Mr Alfred Adams, barrister-at-law, and grandson of the Rev Henry Cadwaller Adams.

SOUTHAM.

A battle-plane had to descend at Southam on Wednesday afternoon, owing to engine trouble, and was guarded during its stay by members of the Volunteer Training Corps, to whom the officer afterwards expressed his thanks. The battle-plane aroused considerable interest, and was visited by hundreds of people from Southam and the neighbouring villages.

 

7th Oct 1916. Lieut-Colonel West Killed in Action

LIEUT-COLONEL WEST KILLED IN ACTION.

The news, which came to hand on Friday last week that Lieut.-Colonel F C B West, R.F.A, of Bawnmore, Bilton, had been killed in action was received with the deepest regret in Rugby and neighbourhood. The unfortunate event happened on September 29th. While riding, as he had often done before, down a section of road which was much subjected to the enemy’s artillery fire, a shell burst close to him, killing him instantly, and wounding his orderly, Driver Barlow, who had been with him since before Christmas, 1914. Both their horses were killed. Col West was buried in the cemetery in which the remains of Lieut Wyley, Major Brown, and Major Stone, who had been killed only a few days previously, were laid to rest.

When at Baddow, before going out to France, and also for some time afterwards, Col West, Capt Kidd—subsequently promoted Major—and Lieut Wyley were working together on the Head-Quarter Staff. Then they were separated, and it is a sad coincidence that all three of them were killed within a period of ten days in different parts of the line.

Lieut.-Colonel West was the only surviving son of the late Rev C F C West, Fellow of St John’s College, Oxford, and Vicar of Charlbury. He was educated at Cheltenham College & St John’s College, Oxford, where he rowed for his college in 1904 and 1905, both in Torpids and Eights. He took his degree in 1905, and was called to the Bar in 1907, but never practised. On the formation of the Territorial Force he received a commission in the R.F.A, and went to the front with his brigade as commanding officer in March, 1915. He married, in June, 1909. Agatha Mary, elder daughter of William Dewar, of Rugby. He leaves a widow and four daughters, to whom the deepest sympathy is extended.

Lieut-Col West took a very great interest in the Territorial movement, and always preferred to be regarded as a “ Territorial.” He did his utmost to prove that the term was synonomous with proficiency, and, being keen himself on gunnery, he spared no pains to ensure the effectiveness of the officers and men in his command and to explain technical details to them.

He was the first Captain of the Rugby Howitzer Battery, when it was formed some years ago through the instrumentality of Col Mulliner, and was afterwards promoted to Major and transferred to the Coventry Battery. In August, 1914, as Lieut-Colonel, he succeeded Col Mallock to the command of the Brigade.

Polo and hunting were his favourite sports and for a season he acted as master of a pack of hounds in the South of Ireland.

Col West was a member of the Lawrence Sherriff Lodge of Freemasons, and for a time served on the House and Finance Committee of the Hospital of St Cross. He took the greatest interest in the Working Men’s Club at Bilton (of which he was a vice-president), and generously assisted in the provision of the new Club premises a few years ago.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Captain Charles Edward Anderson (Gordon Highlanders), of Rokeby House, Rugby, who was killed in France on July 20th, has left estate of the value of £8,929, the whole of which he gave to his mother, Mrs. Anne Rose Anderson.

SECOND-LIEUT HORACE NEEVES PROMOTED.

Second-Lieut Horace Neeves, of the Northumberland Fusiliers (the Old Fighting 5th), son of Mr and Mrs S Neeves, of Murray Road, Rugby, has been promoted to the rank of captain. The gallant young officer was formerly in the Warwickshire Yeomanry, and took part in the landing at Suvla Bay. On returning home he received a commission with the Northumberland Fusiliers, has been at the front since June, and has seen a lot of fighting.
The second son of Mr and Mrs Neeves is serving with the Australian Light Horse.

INTERNATIONAL O.R KILLED BY A BURSTING SHELL.

The Rev R E Inglis (Rugby and Oxford), whose death occurred, at the age of 53, from shell-burst while tending wounded, was an old English Rugby International. After getting his XI and XV colours at Rugby, he played against Cambridge in 1883 and 1884. He played for England in all three matches of 1886. His club football was identified with that of Blackheath. Mr Inglis was the youngest son of the defender of Lucknow, Major-General Sir John Inglis, and we believe we are correct in stating that his son was the googlie bowler of this year’s Rugby XI. Mr Inglis volunteered to join the Forces as a chaplain, and went to the front in July, 1915. During the time he was at Rugby School as a Town boy, his mother, Lady Inglis, lived at The Lawn, Newbold Road.

LOCAL CASUALTIES.

Mr T Reynolds, builder, Dunchurch Road, Rugby, received official intimation on Thursday that another of his soldier sons, Corpl J Reynolds, of the Grenadier Guards, had been seriously wounded and was in Chichester Hospital. Prior to joining the army Corpl Reynolds was in the Metropolitan Police Force, and was expecting early promotion. Mr Reynolds had four sons in the army. Two have been killed and two wounded.

PTE J R BRADLEY.

Pte J R Bradley, of the Northumberland, Fusiliers, who was killed in action on September 1st, was prior to the War employed by the B.T.H Company on the outside construction staff.

PTE H LEE KILLED.

Mrs Lee, of 34 Sandown Road, Rugby, received a letter from Sergt Burton, of Hillmorton, this week, informing her that her son, Pte H Lee, of the R.W.R, was killed in action on September 3rd. The writer said he was in command of the platoon, and saw him struck by a piece of shell in the head, and he died in a very short time. He was a brave and noble soldier, and highly respected by all N.C.O’s and men of his Company, for he always did his duty well, “ and feared nothing.” Deceased was 25 years of age, and before, the war was employed as a labourer in the Test Department. He was in the reserve, and was mobilised at the commencement of the war. He had already been wounded. Mrs Lee has four other sons at the front, two of whom have been wounded, and a son-in-law was killed 12 months ago.

HILLMORTON.

MEMORIAL SERVICE.—On Sunday evening a memorial Service was held in the Parish Church for Reginald Bartlett and Joseph Barnett, who have fallen in France. The Vicar preached an impressive and comforting sermon from St John xiv 27.

Mr J W Barnett, 264 Western Road, Leicester, has received official information that her husband, Pte J W Barnett, Queen’s Royal West Surrey Regiment, was killed in action on September 11th. Deceased was the second son of Mr and Mrs J Barnett, Rossmount, Hillmorton Paddox. He was 27 years of age, was called up in February, and sent to France early in July. Prior to his enlistment he was employed by the Leicester Tramway Company.

CHURCHOVER.

KILLED IN ACTION.—Quite a gloom was cast over this village on Friday when it was known that Pte Frank Sutton, of the Grenadier Guards was killed in action on September 15th. Frank was liked and respected by all who knew him. He was working in Coton House gardens when he answered his country’s call. Mrs Sutton’s three sons have all joined the colours, and the deepest sympathy of the parish is extended to her in the great loss that she has sustained. A memorial service was held in the church an Saturday by. the Rev L J Berrington. All the parish was represented. The xe Psalm and Hymns 536 and 537 were sung, and the service was very impressive.

DUNCHURCH.

On Sunday, Sept 10, the collections at both Dunchurch and Thurlaston Churches were devoted to the Lord Kitchener National Memorial Fund. The satisfactory sum of £32 7s 6d was sent up to headquarters.

Sergt W J Constable, R.E, youngest son of Mr and Mrs John Constable, late of Dunchurch, has gained the Military Medal for bravery.—Private Fissard, of the R.E, who has been home on sick leave, has gone to Bletchley to a rest camp for three months.

The Dunchurch Girls’ and Infants’ School have sent £2 to St Dunstan’s Hostel for Blind Soldiers, £2 to the Jack Cornwell Ward in the Star and Garter Home, £1 to Bilton Red Cross Hospital, and 11s to Mrs Neilsen for egg fund. The money was the proceeds of the entertainment held in the spring, and also includes contributions by the children for the Jack Cornwell Memorial Fund during the month.

STRETTON-ON-DUNSMORE.

News has been received by Mr and Mrs J Nicholas, of Lime Kiln Farm, Stretton-on-Dunsmore, that their youngest son, Percy, was wounded in action at the Battle of Thievpal. He received shrapnel wounds in both arms and hands. He is going on well in hospital in Cambridge. This is the second son wounded in action.

WEARING NAVAL UNIFORM WITHOUT AUTHORITY.

Claude Henry Hammond, aged 21, formerly of New Bilton, and of Rugby, charged at Lancaster with giving false information to Morecambe boarding-house keepers and wearing a naval uniform at Morecambe without authority, was committed for six months. Accused stayed at three places in Morecambe, and registered in false names. He described himself as a graduate of Pembroke College, Cambridge, and gave the name of a relative at Nottingham. All the statements were false. He was a deserter, and was wanted at Sheffield and Blackpool for false pretences.

DEATHS.

BARNETT.—Killed in action, September 11th, 1916, Pte. J. W. BARNETT, 6399, Queen’s London Regiment, second son of Mr. & Mrs. J. Barnett, Rossmount, Hillmorton Paddox.
“ Oh ! just to clasp your hand once more,
Just to hear your voice again ;
Here life to us without you
Is nought but grief and pain.
Could we have raised your dying head,
Or heard your last farewell ;
The grief would not have been so hard
For us who loved you well.”
—From his sorrowing WIFE, FATHER, MOTHER, BROTHERS and SISTERS.

GREEN.—On September 7th, RFN. FREDERICK JOHN GREEN, King’s Royal Rifles, died of wounds in France, the dear son of Frederick and the late Louisa Greenfield Green, of 4 Gladstone Street, New Bilton, aged 25.—Sadly mourned by his Father, Brothers, Sisters, and Minnie.

WARD.—On September 3rd, Rifleman C. WARD, 10th Rifle Brigade, second son of Thomas and Mary Ward, of Brandon. Killed in action in France.
“ We often sit and think of him,
And tenderly breathe his name ;
Nothing left for us to look at
But his photo in the frame.
Some day our eyes shall see
That dear face still kept in memory.”

IN MEMORIAM.

FRANKTON.—In loving memory of Pte. Frederick Frankton, Grenadier Guards, of Lawford Road, Rugby, killed on 27th September, 1915, at Loos.
“ Could we have raised his dying head,
Or heard his last farewell ;
The grief would not have been so hard,
For us who loved him well.
A light is from the household gone,
The voice we loved is still’d.
A vacant place is in our home,
Which never can be filled.”
—From his loving Wife, Children, and Mr. and Mrs. Reynolds.

RUSSELL.—In loving memory of Gunner PERCY EDGAR RUSSELL, R.F.A., who was killed in action, October 3, 1915.—“ He gave his life that others may live.”— Never forgotten by FATHER, MOTHER, SISTERS and BROTHERS.

Lee, Charles Robert. Died 6th Sep 1916

Charles Robert Lee was born in 1879 in Rugby and was baptised 20th Feb 1880 at St Andrews Church Rugby. He was the son of Mary Ann Lee (nee) Batchelor who was born in Rugby in 1859 and Henry Lee who was born 1857 in Derby and died circa 1880.

In 1881 he lived at 34 Railway Terrace Rugby, the home of his grandparents John Batchelor and Sarah Jane Batchelor (nee Brooks). Also at this address were his mother Mary Ann Lee and his brother Thomas Henry (who was born in 1877 in Derby), together with six of Mary Ann’s siblings.

In 1891 he lived at 18 Gas Street together with his mother Mary Ann who had now remarried James Barnett, a bricklayers labourer. His brother Thomas was living there too, together with two sons of James Barnett aged 3 and 3 months and Mary Ann.

Charles enlisted in the Coldstream Guards and served as Private No 876 in the 5th Battalion in the South Africa War. He served at the Belmont and Modder River and was wounded in eight places in his arm in the 2nd Boer War at Magersfontein on 11th Feb 1899. Following this he was partially disabled and received a pension.

In 1901 His mother Mary Ann was widowed again and a laundress. They lived at 11 Gas Street Rugby together with his brother Thomas (a brickmaker’s labourer and three step brothers, James Barnett born 1889, Frances Barnett born 1894 and Samuel Barnett born 1895. They had a lodger too, Walter Sansom born 1880 in Thornton Heath Surrey, a groom. Charles’ mother Mary Ann married Walter Sansom later that year.

On 13th August 1904 Charles married Elsie Rose Maltby, born in Daventry in 1882 and died in Rugby in 1944. The marriage was at St Andrews Church Rugby. They went on to have five children: Henry Thomas Lee born 1905, Winifred Lee born 1907, Rose Ann Lee born 1908, Daisy Lee born 1911 and Francis James Lee born 1912, all in Rugby.

He was a well known Rugby footballer and played for the Star New Bilton, Britannia, Rugby First, Northampton, Coventry and represented the Midland Counties.

He offered to rejoin his old regiment again in the First World War and served with the Coldstream Guards for eighteen months. He was admitted to the Hospital of St Cross in Rugby and died there following an operation on 6th September 1916. He is buried in Grave K279 at Clifton Road Cemetery Rugby together with his stepfather James Barnett. His stepbrother Samuel Barnett who died in the First World War on 25th September 1915.

Charles was awarded the Victory & British War Medals.

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

 

Lee, Herbert Charles. Died 3rd Sep 1916

Herbert Charles Lee’s birth was registered in Rugby between Jul and Sept 1891 Vol 6d page 550.

His parents were Thomas or Tom Lee born Yelvertoft about 1853 and Elizabeth nee Pinder born about 1855 Belmesthorpe,  Rutland they married in 1877 in Rugby and by 1881 they were living in New Street near the vicarage in New Bilton. Thomas was a railway Fireman and they had 1 child Albert age 1, other relatives including boarders were also living with them. Interestingly Caroline age 2 and born 1879 is not mentioned in this census she is living 19 Lawford Road Rugby with grandparents Thomas and Ann Pinder.

Some 10 years later in 1891 Census the family were living at 114 Oxford Street Rugby and had 6 children Caroline born 1879 New Bilton,   Albert born 1881 New Bilton,   Ethel aged 6 born Rugby, Harold age 4 born Rugby, Ernest age 2 born Rugby and Arthur T age 1 month born Rugby.

Herbert Charles Lee was baptised at St. Andrews Church Rugby on Wednesday 5th May 1897, his brother Leonard and his sister Amy were also baptised on the same day, it tells us that the family were living at Abbey Street Rugby and his father Thomas Lee was a driver this we assume to be a train driver on the railway, his mother was Elizabeth Lee. Amy Harriet Wright was also baptised on the same day. The Reverend W. E. Philpotts assistant curate carried out the service.

Interestingly when his sister Ivy May Lee was baptised on 11th September 1896 at St.Andrews Church Rugby it said that Ivy’s parents were Tom and Elizabeth Lee and in the column of trade or profession of father the words single women is crossed out and the word “widow” is written.

There is no record for Thomas or Tom Lees death in Rugby or in Warwickshire just prior to 1896, and with Thomas Lee being common name in England we have no way of confirming date of death.

Some 4 years later Herbert age 9 appears on the 1901 UK Census living 126 Abbey Street Rugby together with his widowed mother Elizabeth Lee age 46 a charwomen and 5 siblings:-   Harold Lee age 14 an errand boy, Ethel Lee age 16 laundry maid, Amy Lee age 7, Leonard Lee age 5 and Ivy Lee age 4 + 2 boarders Morris Silvaman age 20 born Romania and a tailor journeyman, and Charles Ludlow age 21 born Warwick who is an engine cleaner.

1911 census Herbert Charles Lee age 19 and Iron Moulder out of work living 94 Winfield Street Rugby with mother Elizabeth Lee age 56 a widow, brother Arthur Thomas Lee age 20 locomotive engine cleaner, sister Amy Lee age 17 laundress, brother Leonard Lee age 15 locomotive engine cleaner, and sister Ivy May Lee age 14 a mica cutter in Electrical Engineers, all these family were living with married sister Caroline Jones nee Lee age 32 and her husband Charles Jones age 35 and their 5 children living in 6 rooms.

Herbert Lee joined the 2nd Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment his regimental number was 1095 his attestation papers are missing. He arrived in France on 4th May 1915.

Private Herbert Lee died 3 September 1916 age 25 and is remembered with Honour on the Thiepval Memorial Pier 9 column 9a, 9b & 10b, and by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission he was the son of Elizabeth Lee of 24 Sandown Road Rugby.

H. Lee is on Rugby Memorial and his name sits between, C. R. Lee and W. Lee.

Herbert Lee pension/effects details Record No. 377975 registry No. 293738 he had Credits of £21.   8s. 2d. + £8. 10s. 0d, his mother Elizabeth received a total 14 payments which included payments to his siblings during 1917 totalling £29. 18s. 2d.

His mother Elizabeth death is registered 1930 Q3 Rugby age 76.

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM