18th Nov 1916. The Great Battle Pictures.

THE GREAT BATTLE PICTURES.—The official pictures of the battle of the Somme, which have been attracting vast audiences all over the country, will be shown at the Empire twice nightly, and at matinees every day next week. Already seats are being extensively booked, and those who wish to secure good seats should do so at once.

LOCAL WAR NOTES,

Jim Eaton-Shore, Queen’s Westminster Rifles, has been reported wounded and missing since September 10. He is the youngest son of the late Mr James Eaton-Shore, for many years Works manager at Messrs Willans and Robinson’s, of Rugby, and later on, in the same capacity, at Messrs Siemen’s of Stafford. The three other sons are also serving in the forces—Jack in the New Zealand Engineers, Robert in the Canadians, and Tom in the Oxford and Buck Light Infantry.

A neatly printed certificate has been received by Mr C Pegg, 1 Addison Bead, New Bilton, to the effect that the Major-General commanding the Division in which his son—Corpl H Pegg, of the Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry—is serving has received a report of the young soldier’s gallant conduct on October 7th. The card was presented to Corpl Pegg by the commanding officer, who congratulate him, and congratulated him, and expressed the hope that next time it would be something better.

B.T.H. EMPLOYEE HONOURED.

Sergt William Black, of the 60th Light Infantry Brigade, Headquarters Staff, has been awarded the Military Medal. Before the war Sergt Black was employed as a clerk in the Stores Department at the B.T.H.

MILITARY MEDAL FOR SERGT F TUCKER.

A recent issue of the Gazette announced that Sergt F Tucker, of the Royal Rifle Brigade, had been awarded the Military Medal for bravery in the field, Sergt Tucker was wounded in August in about thirty places, and after treatment at Lincoln Hospital, he was sent to a convalescent home at Blackpool, where he still remains. Before the war, Sergt Tucker was employed as a compositor by Messrs Frost & Sons, and his mother lives in Charlotte Street.

LOCAL CASUALTIES.

Mrs H Lee, of Clarence Road, New Bilton, has received a postcard from her husband, a private in the R.W.R, stating that he has been wounded, and is now in Glen Hospital, France. This is the second time that Pte Lee, who went out with the original Expeditionary Force, has been wounded.

PTE FRED CRIPPS DIES OF WOUNDS.

Pte Fred Cripps, R.E., died in hospital recently from wounds received early in October in France. Pte Cripps was 28 years of age, and married. Before the war, he was employed as a carpenter by Messrs Foster & Dicksee at Rugby. His home was at Winslow.

DISTRICT APPEALS TRIBUNAL.

At Wednesday’s sitting at St Mary’s Hall, Coventry, there were present : Messrs M K Pridmore (chairman), W Johnson, jun, K Rotherham. and P G Lovert ; Military representative, Mr M E T Wratislaw ; Agricultural representative, Mr F W Channing.

A substitute having been found for Wm Fredk Brooks, a general farm worker employed by Mr Butlin, of Flecknoe, an appeal made on his behalf was withdrawn.

On behalf of Thos Arthur Stephenson, woollen and cotton rag merchant, Newbold Road, Rugby, Mr Harold Eaden said his client was now employed at the Daimler Works, Coventry. Certificates were not now issued, as it was found they had been abused, but if the clerk to the Tribunal applied, the firm would give him one.—Adjourned till the next Court.

Mr Wratislaw stated that a discharged soldier of excellent character had been found for Thos Wm Durham, carter, 13 Campbell Street, New Bilton, but the man was not due to report till that day.—A fortnight’s adjournment was asked for and granted.

On two grounds—that of business and as a conscientious objector—Ernest Holliday, acting bank manager, 54[?] Newbold Road, Rugby, appealed for the renewal of his temporary exemption.-The Chairman asked Mr Wratislaw if appellant, as a conscientious objector, was not doing as good work now as he would be doing elsewhere ?—Mr Wratislaw : They are being treated differently now. They draw the pay of a soldier and the rest goes to charity.—Capt Thomas said on mobilisation he was called up, and three others who were in the bank had joined the army. Appellant was now assisted by one girl and one boy, and they were doing a great deal of work.—In reply to the Chairman, appellant said he was prepared to hand over £l a week from his salary to charity, but he would not like it to be thought he was buying himself out.—The Chairman : We are putting you in the same position as if you were in the army. You are not making a profit out of it.—Appellant : I don’t wish to do so.—The Chairman said he thought the sum should go to a local charity, and an order was made for £1 a week to be paid to the funds of the hospital, temporary exemption being granted so long as the conditions were observed.

Mr Worthington supported an application by John Basil Liggins, coal merchant and carter, 57 James Street, Rugby, claimed by his mother to be indispensable to the business. Mr Wratislaw suggested that the man might be used as a substitute, but the Chairman expressed the opinion that the carting of coal during the winter was very important, and exemption till February 28th was granted.

Conditional exemption was asked for by William George Essex, described as a dairy farmer and market gardener of West Street, Long Lawford.—The Clerk asked Mr Wratislaw if they had served the notice now necessary in such a case, and he replied in the negative.—Given till February 1st, and Mr Wratislaw was asked to then remember that notice must be served.

HILLMORTON.

A very successful and enjoyable concert was given on Friday last week by 55 Squadron R.F.C Pierrot Troop on behalf of the funds for sending Christmas parcels to the Hillmorton soldiers and sailors. As something out of the ordinary run was anticipated, the room was packed very soon after the doors were opened. The first part of the programme was taken entirely by the Pierrot Troop in costume, who rendered songs and jokes which kept the audience in roars of laughter. The second part consisted of songs, sword swinging display, dances and recitations, and loud and prolonged applause which followed each item was a proof of its excellence and of the appreciation of the audience ; particularly may this be said of the sword swinging display by Sergt-Major Rowland.

BOURTON-ON-DUNSMORE.

A start was made in November, 1915, to collect eggs for the wounded soldiers, and the villagers of Bourton and Draycote will be gratified to know that since that date to November, 1916, they have contributed a grand total of 1,792.

CHRISTMAS PARCELS FOR OUR SOLDIERS.—A house-to-house collection has been made in Bourton and Draycote, with the result that £7 18s 10d has been generously given for this good cause. Misses Hales and Davies undertook the collecting.

ANSTY.

SEC. LIEUT CADWALLER ADAMS KILLED.

The Adams family of Ansty Hall, near Nuneaton, have sustained a further bereavement by the death in action of Second lieutenant Geoffrey Henry Cadwaller Adams, Suffolk Regiment. Born in 1896, he was the second son of Mr Alfred Adams, barrister-at-law, and grandson of the Rev Henry Cadwaller Adams.

SOUTHAM.

A battle-plane had to descend at Southam on Wednesday afternoon, owing to engine trouble, and was guarded during its stay by members of the Volunteer Training Corps, to whom the officer afterwards expressed his thanks. The battle-plane aroused considerable interest, and was visited by hundreds of people from Southam and the neighbouring villages.

 

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7th Oct 1916. Lieut-Colonel West Killed in Action

LIEUT-COLONEL WEST KILLED IN ACTION.

The news, which came to hand on Friday last week that Lieut.-Colonel F C B West, R.F.A, of Bawnmore, Bilton, had been killed in action was received with the deepest regret in Rugby and neighbourhood. The unfortunate event happened on September 29th. While riding, as he had often done before, down a section of road which was much subjected to the enemy’s artillery fire, a shell burst close to him, killing him instantly, and wounding his orderly, Driver Barlow, who had been with him since before Christmas, 1914. Both their horses were killed. Col West was buried in the cemetery in which the remains of Lieut Wyley, Major Brown, and Major Stone, who had been killed only a few days previously, were laid to rest.

When at Baddow, before going out to France, and also for some time afterwards, Col West, Capt Kidd—subsequently promoted Major—and Lieut Wyley were working together on the Head-Quarter Staff. Then they were separated, and it is a sad coincidence that all three of them were killed within a period of ten days in different parts of the line.

Lieut.-Colonel West was the only surviving son of the late Rev C F C West, Fellow of St John’s College, Oxford, and Vicar of Charlbury. He was educated at Cheltenham College & St John’s College, Oxford, where he rowed for his college in 1904 and 1905, both in Torpids and Eights. He took his degree in 1905, and was called to the Bar in 1907, but never practised. On the formation of the Territorial Force he received a commission in the R.F.A, and went to the front with his brigade as commanding officer in March, 1915. He married, in June, 1909. Agatha Mary, elder daughter of William Dewar, of Rugby. He leaves a widow and four daughters, to whom the deepest sympathy is extended.

Lieut-Col West took a very great interest in the Territorial movement, and always preferred to be regarded as a “ Territorial.” He did his utmost to prove that the term was synonomous with proficiency, and, being keen himself on gunnery, he spared no pains to ensure the effectiveness of the officers and men in his command and to explain technical details to them.

He was the first Captain of the Rugby Howitzer Battery, when it was formed some years ago through the instrumentality of Col Mulliner, and was afterwards promoted to Major and transferred to the Coventry Battery. In August, 1914, as Lieut-Colonel, he succeeded Col Mallock to the command of the Brigade.

Polo and hunting were his favourite sports and for a season he acted as master of a pack of hounds in the South of Ireland.

Col West was a member of the Lawrence Sherriff Lodge of Freemasons, and for a time served on the House and Finance Committee of the Hospital of St Cross. He took the greatest interest in the Working Men’s Club at Bilton (of which he was a vice-president), and generously assisted in the provision of the new Club premises a few years ago.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Captain Charles Edward Anderson (Gordon Highlanders), of Rokeby House, Rugby, who was killed in France on July 20th, has left estate of the value of £8,929, the whole of which he gave to his mother, Mrs. Anne Rose Anderson.

SECOND-LIEUT HORACE NEEVES PROMOTED.

Second-Lieut Horace Neeves, of the Northumberland Fusiliers (the Old Fighting 5th), son of Mr and Mrs S Neeves, of Murray Road, Rugby, has been promoted to the rank of captain. The gallant young officer was formerly in the Warwickshire Yeomanry, and took part in the landing at Suvla Bay. On returning home he received a commission with the Northumberland Fusiliers, has been at the front since June, and has seen a lot of fighting.
The second son of Mr and Mrs Neeves is serving with the Australian Light Horse.

INTERNATIONAL O.R KILLED BY A BURSTING SHELL.

The Rev R E Inglis (Rugby and Oxford), whose death occurred, at the age of 53, from shell-burst while tending wounded, was an old English Rugby International. After getting his XI and XV colours at Rugby, he played against Cambridge in 1883 and 1884. He played for England in all three matches of 1886. His club football was identified with that of Blackheath. Mr Inglis was the youngest son of the defender of Lucknow, Major-General Sir John Inglis, and we believe we are correct in stating that his son was the googlie bowler of this year’s Rugby XI. Mr Inglis volunteered to join the Forces as a chaplain, and went to the front in July, 1915. During the time he was at Rugby School as a Town boy, his mother, Lady Inglis, lived at The Lawn, Newbold Road.

LOCAL CASUALTIES.

Mr T Reynolds, builder, Dunchurch Road, Rugby, received official intimation on Thursday that another of his soldier sons, Corpl J Reynolds, of the Grenadier Guards, had been seriously wounded and was in Chichester Hospital. Prior to joining the army Corpl Reynolds was in the Metropolitan Police Force, and was expecting early promotion. Mr Reynolds had four sons in the army. Two have been killed and two wounded.

PTE J R BRADLEY.

Pte J R Bradley, of the Northumberland, Fusiliers, who was killed in action on September 1st, was prior to the War employed by the B.T.H Company on the outside construction staff.

PTE H LEE KILLED.

Mrs Lee, of 34 Sandown Road, Rugby, received a letter from Sergt Burton, of Hillmorton, this week, informing her that her son, Pte H Lee, of the R.W.R, was killed in action on September 3rd. The writer said he was in command of the platoon, and saw him struck by a piece of shell in the head, and he died in a very short time. He was a brave and noble soldier, and highly respected by all N.C.O’s and men of his Company, for he always did his duty well, “ and feared nothing.” Deceased was 25 years of age, and before, the war was employed as a labourer in the Test Department. He was in the reserve, and was mobilised at the commencement of the war. He had already been wounded. Mrs Lee has four other sons at the front, two of whom have been wounded, and a son-in-law was killed 12 months ago.

HILLMORTON.

MEMORIAL SERVICE.—On Sunday evening a memorial Service was held in the Parish Church for Reginald Bartlett and Joseph Barnett, who have fallen in France. The Vicar preached an impressive and comforting sermon from St John xiv 27.

Mr J W Barnett, 264 Western Road, Leicester, has received official information that her husband, Pte J W Barnett, Queen’s Royal West Surrey Regiment, was killed in action on September 11th. Deceased was the second son of Mr and Mrs J Barnett, Rossmount, Hillmorton Paddox. He was 27 years of age, was called up in February, and sent to France early in July. Prior to his enlistment he was employed by the Leicester Tramway Company.

CHURCHOVER.

KILLED IN ACTION.—Quite a gloom was cast over this village on Friday when it was known that Pte Frank Sutton, of the Grenadier Guards was killed in action on September 15th. Frank was liked and respected by all who knew him. He was working in Coton House gardens when he answered his country’s call. Mrs Sutton’s three sons have all joined the colours, and the deepest sympathy of the parish is extended to her in the great loss that she has sustained. A memorial service was held in the church an Saturday by. the Rev L J Berrington. All the parish was represented. The xe Psalm and Hymns 536 and 537 were sung, and the service was very impressive.

DUNCHURCH.

On Sunday, Sept 10, the collections at both Dunchurch and Thurlaston Churches were devoted to the Lord Kitchener National Memorial Fund. The satisfactory sum of £32 7s 6d was sent up to headquarters.

Sergt W J Constable, R.E, youngest son of Mr and Mrs John Constable, late of Dunchurch, has gained the Military Medal for bravery.—Private Fissard, of the R.E, who has been home on sick leave, has gone to Bletchley to a rest camp for three months.

The Dunchurch Girls’ and Infants’ School have sent £2 to St Dunstan’s Hostel for Blind Soldiers, £2 to the Jack Cornwell Ward in the Star and Garter Home, £1 to Bilton Red Cross Hospital, and 11s to Mrs Neilsen for egg fund. The money was the proceeds of the entertainment held in the spring, and also includes contributions by the children for the Jack Cornwell Memorial Fund during the month.

STRETTON-ON-DUNSMORE.

News has been received by Mr and Mrs J Nicholas, of Lime Kiln Farm, Stretton-on-Dunsmore, that their youngest son, Percy, was wounded in action at the Battle of Thievpal. He received shrapnel wounds in both arms and hands. He is going on well in hospital in Cambridge. This is the second son wounded in action.

WEARING NAVAL UNIFORM WITHOUT AUTHORITY.

Claude Henry Hammond, aged 21, formerly of New Bilton, and of Rugby, charged at Lancaster with giving false information to Morecambe boarding-house keepers and wearing a naval uniform at Morecambe without authority, was committed for six months. Accused stayed at three places in Morecambe, and registered in false names. He described himself as a graduate of Pembroke College, Cambridge, and gave the name of a relative at Nottingham. All the statements were false. He was a deserter, and was wanted at Sheffield and Blackpool for false pretences.

DEATHS.

BARNETT.—Killed in action, September 11th, 1916, Pte. J. W. BARNETT, 6399, Queen’s London Regiment, second son of Mr. & Mrs. J. Barnett, Rossmount, Hillmorton Paddox.
“ Oh ! just to clasp your hand once more,
Just to hear your voice again ;
Here life to us without you
Is nought but grief and pain.
Could we have raised your dying head,
Or heard your last farewell ;
The grief would not have been so hard
For us who loved you well.”
—From his sorrowing WIFE, FATHER, MOTHER, BROTHERS and SISTERS.

GREEN.—On September 7th, RFN. FREDERICK JOHN GREEN, King’s Royal Rifles, died of wounds in France, the dear son of Frederick and the late Louisa Greenfield Green, of 4 Gladstone Street, New Bilton, aged 25.—Sadly mourned by his Father, Brothers, Sisters, and Minnie.

WARD.—On September 3rd, Rifleman C. WARD, 10th Rifle Brigade, second son of Thomas and Mary Ward, of Brandon. Killed in action in France.
“ We often sit and think of him,
And tenderly breathe his name ;
Nothing left for us to look at
But his photo in the frame.
Some day our eyes shall see
That dear face still kept in memory.”

IN MEMORIAM.

FRANKTON.—In loving memory of Pte. Frederick Frankton, Grenadier Guards, of Lawford Road, Rugby, killed on 27th September, 1915, at Loos.
“ Could we have raised his dying head,
Or heard his last farewell ;
The grief would not have been so hard,
For us who loved him well.
A light is from the household gone,
The voice we loved is still’d.
A vacant place is in our home,
Which never can be filled.”
—From his loving Wife, Children, and Mr. and Mrs. Reynolds.

RUSSELL.—In loving memory of Gunner PERCY EDGAR RUSSELL, R.F.A., who was killed in action, October 3, 1915.—“ He gave his life that others may live.”— Never forgotten by FATHER, MOTHER, SISTERS and BROTHERS.

Lee, Charles Robert. Died 6th Sep 1916

Charles Robert Lee was born in 1879 in Rugby and was baptised 20th Feb 1880 at St Andrews Church Rugby. He was the son of Mary Ann Lee (nee) Batchelor who was born in Rugby in 1859 and Henry Lee who was born 1857 in Derby and died circa 1880.

In 1881 he lived at 34 Railway Terrace Rugby, the home of his grandparents John Batchelor and Sarah Jane Batchelor (nee Brooks). Also at this address were his mother Mary Ann Lee and his brother Thomas Henry (who was born in 1877 in Derby), together with six of Mary Ann’s siblings.

In 1891 he lived at 18 Gas Street together with his mother Mary Ann who had now remarried James Barnett, a bricklayers labourer. His brother Thomas was living there too, together with two sons of James Barnett aged 3 and 3 months and Mary Ann.

Charles enlisted in the Coldstream Guards and served as Private No 876 in the 5th Battalion in the South Africa War. He served at the Belmont and Modder River and was wounded in eight places in his arm in the 2nd Boer War at Magersfontein on 11th Feb 1899. Following this he was partially disabled and received a pension.

In 1901 His mother Mary Ann was widowed again and a laundress. They lived at 11 Gas Street Rugby together with his brother Thomas (a brickmaker’s labourer and three step brothers, James Barnett born 1889, Frances Barnett born 1894 and Samuel Barnett born 1895. They had a lodger too, Walter Sansom born 1880 in Thornton Heath Surrey, a groom. Charles’ mother Mary Ann married Walter Sansom later that year.

On 13th August 1904 Charles married Elsie Rose Maltby, born in Daventry in 1882 and died in Rugby in 1944. The marriage was at St Andrews Church Rugby. They went on to have five children: Henry Thomas Lee born 1905, Winifred Lee born 1907, Rose Ann Lee born 1908, Daisy Lee born 1911 and Francis James Lee born 1912, all in Rugby.

He was a well known Rugby footballer and played for the Star New Bilton, Britannia, Rugby First, Northampton, Coventry and represented the Midland Counties.

He offered to rejoin his old regiment again in the First World War and served with the Coldstream Guards for eighteen months. He was admitted to the Hospital of St Cross in Rugby and died there following an operation on 6th September 1916. He is buried in Grave K279 at Clifton Road Cemetery Rugby together with his stepfather James Barnett. His stepbrother Samuel Barnett who died in the First World War on 25th September 1915.

Charles was awarded the Victory & British War Medals.

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

 

Lee, Herbert Charles. Died 3rd Sep 1916

Herbert Charles Lee’s birth was registered in Rugby between Jul and Sept 1891 Vol 6d page 550.

His parents were Thomas or Tom Lee born Yelvertoft about 1853 and Elizabeth nee Pinder born about 1855 Belmesthorpe,  Rutland they married in 1877 in Rugby and by 1881 they were living in New Street near the vicarage in New Bilton. Thomas was a railway Fireman and they had 1 child Albert age 1, other relatives including boarders were also living with them. Interestingly Caroline age 2 and born 1879 is not mentioned in this census she is living 19 Lawford Road Rugby with grandparents Thomas and Ann Pinder.

Some 10 years later in 1891 Census the family were living at 114 Oxford Street Rugby and had 6 children Caroline born 1879 New Bilton,   Albert born 1881 New Bilton,   Ethel aged 6 born Rugby, Harold age 4 born Rugby, Ernest age 2 born Rugby and Arthur T age 1 month born Rugby.

Herbert Charles Lee was baptised at St. Andrews Church Rugby on Wednesday 5th May 1897, his brother Leonard and his sister Amy were also baptised on the same day, it tells us that the family were living at Abbey Street Rugby and his father Thomas Lee was a driver this we assume to be a train driver on the railway, his mother was Elizabeth Lee. Amy Harriet Wright was also baptised on the same day. The Reverend W. E. Philpotts assistant curate carried out the service.

Interestingly when his sister Ivy May Lee was baptised on 11th September 1896 at St.Andrews Church Rugby it said that Ivy’s parents were Tom and Elizabeth Lee and in the column of trade or profession of father the words single women is crossed out and the word “widow” is written.

There is no record for Thomas or Tom Lees death in Rugby or in Warwickshire just prior to 1896, and with Thomas Lee being common name in England we have no way of confirming date of death.

Some 4 years later Herbert age 9 appears on the 1901 UK Census living 126 Abbey Street Rugby together with his widowed mother Elizabeth Lee age 46 a charwomen and 5 siblings:-   Harold Lee age 14 an errand boy, Ethel Lee age 16 laundry maid, Amy Lee age 7, Leonard Lee age 5 and Ivy Lee age 4 + 2 boarders Morris Silvaman age 20 born Romania and a tailor journeyman, and Charles Ludlow age 21 born Warwick who is an engine cleaner.

1911 census Herbert Charles Lee age 19 and Iron Moulder out of work living 94 Winfield Street Rugby with mother Elizabeth Lee age 56 a widow, brother Arthur Thomas Lee age 20 locomotive engine cleaner, sister Amy Lee age 17 laundress, brother Leonard Lee age 15 locomotive engine cleaner, and sister Ivy May Lee age 14 a mica cutter in Electrical Engineers, all these family were living with married sister Caroline Jones nee Lee age 32 and her husband Charles Jones age 35 and their 5 children living in 6 rooms.

Herbert Lee joined the 2nd Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment his regimental number was 1095 his attestation papers are missing. He arrived in France on 4th May 1915.

Private Herbert Lee died 3 September 1916 age 25 and is remembered with Honour on the Thiepval Memorial Pier 9 column 9a, 9b & 10b, and by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission he was the son of Elizabeth Lee of 24 Sandown Road Rugby.

H. Lee is on Rugby Memorial and his name sits between, C. R. Lee and W. Lee.

Herbert Lee pension/effects details Record No. 377975 registry No. 293738 he had Credits of £21.   8s. 2d. + £8. 10s. 0d, his mother Elizabeth received a total 14 payments which included payments to his siblings during 1917 totalling £29. 18s. 2d.

His mother Elizabeth death is registered 1930 Q3 Rugby age 76.

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

 

 

19th Aug 1916. The Fatal Flying Accident.

THE FATAL FLYING ACCIDENT.

The inquest on Lieut Geo S Rogers and Second-Lieut Cyril de Frece, of the R.F.C, who were killed by the collision of two aeroplanes on Thursday in last week, was opened on Saturday by Mr E F Hadow. Mr J Lord was chosen foreman of the jury.

Alfred de Frece, solicitor, 155 Abbey Road, West Hampstead, and 2 Devonshire Square, identified his son’s body, and said he was 18 years of age. He had been associated with the Royal Flying Corps a little over two months ; previous to that he was in the Middlesex Yeomanry. He was a strong lad, with full possession of his sight and hearing.

Capt McEwen, R.F.C, identified the body of Lieut Rogers, who was 23 years of age. He was a Canadian, and belonged to the Canadian Expeditionary Force. His family resided at Barrie, Ontario. He had been attached to the corps for some time, and was a fully qualified pilot, and had full possession of his sight and hearing.

Dr William Chester Collins, attached to the R.F.C, said he saw the bodies a few minutes after the accident. Life was quite extinct in both cases. The bodies had been removed from under the wrecked aeroplane when he saw them. He accompanied and superintended their removal to the mortuary. He had that morning examined the bodies, and found that both officers had sustained fracture of the skull and dislocation of the vertebrae, either of which, apart from their other injuries, would be sufficient to cause instant death.

The Coroner explained that no other evidence was available at that date, and the inquest would be adjourned till Wednesday, August 23rd.

The Foreman, on behalf of the jury, expressed their sympathy with the relatives, in which the Coroner concurred.—Mr de Frece briefly acknowledged this.

Second-Lieut Cyril de Frece was the only son of Mr Alfred de Frece, a London solicitor. He was educated at the Haberdashers’ School, Taplow Grammar School, and in Brussels. His intention was to become an electrical engineer. He also studied under Professor Thompson at the City and Guilds School, London. He joined the Army in October, 1915, and was appointed to the R.F.C and given a commission in the first week in June.

Lieut Rogers, the pilot, was a remarkably skilful aviator.

MEMORIAL SERVICE FOR LIEUT ROGERS.

The funeral of Lieut G S Rogers was arranged for Saturday, but on Friday evening a cablegram was received from his relatives, asking that he might be buried in Canada. The arrangements for the funeral were accordingly cancelled, and a memorial service was held instead. The members of the squadron to which the unfortunate officers were attached marched to the church, headed by the B.T.H Band, which played martial airs on the way to and from the service. The small village church was crowded to its fullest capacity, this being the first service of the kind ever held in the parish. The service, which was very brief, was conducted by the Vicar, and opened with the hymn, “ Peace, perfect peace,” the singing of which was led by the band. A short and sympathetic address was given by the Vicar. The “ Dead March ” from Saul and the sounding of the “ Last Post ” proved a fitting termination to an impressive service.

A number of beautiful floral tributes were sent by the officers of the Squadron, the men of the, Squadron, Capt McEwen, Mrs Balding and Vandy, a model floral aeroplane by the Staff of the Officers’ Mess, Mr and Mrs Richardson, and Mr Hayter ; and these were placed on a large Union Jack in front of the altar during the service.

The coffin containing the remains of Lieut Rogers was put on the train on route for Liverpool on Wednesday evening. A number of deceased’s colleagues were present, and as the train steamed out of the station the “ Last Post ” was sounded.

The funeral of Lieut de Frece took place at the Liberal Jewish Cemetery, Willesden, on Monday.

LOCAL WAR NOTES,

Mr W College, of 48 Church Street, Rugby, has this week received a postcard from his son, Pte W F College—who was reported missing—stating that he is now a prisoner in Germany.

From further information to hand it appears that Pte Sidney H Dicken, of the 14th Gloucester Battalion, son of Mr and Mrs W Dicken, of 131 Claremont Road, died from laceration of the abdomen, and that the officer of the regiment was killed outright by the same shell.

Mrs S Reynolds, of 26 West Leyes, received official notification that her son, Pte Arthur Reynolds, of the Royal Warwickshires, had been posted, as missing after the engagement on July 19th. She has since received a postcard from him to say he is a prisoner at Gefanenlager, Dulmen Camp, Germany. He enlisted on July 22, 1915, and went abroad to May 22, 1916.

MR FRED STAINES IN EGYPT.

Pte Fred Staines, of the Midland Battalion of the Rifle Brigade, 2nd officer of the Rugby Fire Brigade, has for some time past been ill in hospital in Egypt. From a letter, dictated by him, and received by relatives, it appears he has been down with typhoid fever, but he speaks very cheerfully of the satisfactory progress he is making, adding that he is in good hands, and that his friends have no need to worry about him.

AN OFFICER’S APPRECIATION OF PTE R ALAND.

Mr W Aland, of 30 Arnold Street, whose son, Pte Roy Aland, of the Royal Warwicks, has been badly wounded in France, has received a letter from Lieut Hubbard, attached to that regiment, in which he says :—“ Your boy was my orderly, and I always found him cool, collected, and resourceful. He was much liked and sought after by his comrades, and his loss has been keenly felt by us all. At the time he was wounded I was just posting the company along some trenches we had just taken over, and he was just behind me. A very severe bombardment was going on, and when the shell pitched the trench was instantly filled with smoke. It was difficult to see anything owing to the darkness ; but young Aland was master of himself, although so badly wounded. A stretcher was brought in about five minutes, and when he was placed on it and the bearers were about to lift he called out : ‘ Mr Hubbard, just a minute. Down the trench about five yards, in a bunk hole on the right, you will find a bag ; it’s your grub bag. I put it there for safety.’ I recite this incident to show the pluck and unselfishness and thought for others, which was truly admirable, coming from a man who was so badly wounded as your poor boy was. You have every reason to be proud of him. He was a splendid soldier, and in him we have suffered the loss of a good comrade. . . . Will you please remember me to him. I know he will put up a plucky fight, and do his best to carry out his watchword, ‘ Keep smiling.’

LOCAL CASUALTIES.

Second-Lieut N Edyean-Walker (Royal Fusiliers), nephew of Mr C H Fuller, solicitor, Rugby, and to whom he is articled, has been wounded in France, and is now in hospital in London.

News has been received that Pte James Pitham, of the Royal Warwicks, has been wounded in the thigh by shrapnel. He is a native of Rugby, and as a youth worked at the Rugby Lamp Factory, but joined the Army from Bedworth. Pte Pitham has two brothers serving with the colours.

PTE G H WRIGHT, of WILLEY.

News has been received that Pte G H Wright, R.W.R, of Church Gate, Willey, died in hospital from wounds on August 11th. Prior to his enlistment, Pte Wright was employed in the Winding Department at the B.T.H.

RUGBY BRICKLAYER KILLED.

Pte J Shaw, of the Royal Warwicks, is reported to have been killed by the bursting of a shell on August 1st. He had only been at the front a fortnight. He was a bricklayer, whose home was at Dunchurch, and worked for Mr Cobley, of Rugby.

Deceased was buried behind the lines by the Army Chaplain. In a letter to Mrs Shaw, who is left with two little children, the O.C the Company says :- “ Although your husband had been with us fora short time only, he had shown a soldierly spirit, and his loss will be felt in the Company.”

SERGT J W MILNER LOSES A LEG.

The many friends of Sergt J W Milner, R.W.R, son of Mrs Milner, of 7 Bath Street, will regret to hear that he has been seriously wounded. His right knee was smashed, and the limb has since been amputated. Sergt Milner, who was a member of “ E ” Company, and was employed in the Accounts Office at the B.T.H before mobilisation, is still in a French hospital, and is doing well.

SERGT HAROLD LEE, of DUNSMORE.

Sergt Harold Lee, R.W.R, who, as we reported last week, was seriously wounded on July 23rd, died in the Canadian Hospital, France, on August 6th, in the presence of his parents. Sergt Lee, who was 26 years of age, enlisted at the beginning of the War, and had been in France over twelve months. His home was at Cubbington, near Leamington, but between five and six years ago he took up work in the gardens of Dunsmore, and was employed there when war broke out. He was of a bright disposition, and was very popular with all whom he came in contact with.

IZAAK WALTONIAN’S SON BADLY WOUNDED.

Probably no member of the Isaak Walton Angling Association is better known, than Mr Fred Taylor, of 59 Abbey Street. Mr Taylor has two sons at the War, the elder of whom—Pte Wm Taylor, of the 6th Leicesters-has been severely wounded. He was shot through the arm and neck, and had his head badly hurt by shrapnel, his injuries including a broken jaw. He staggered some distance before being taken in hand by a member of the R.A.M.C, whose aid was very timely. Pte Taylor being much exhausted from loss of blood, and without prompt attention would probably have died. He is now in hospital in Surrey, where his parents have visited him. They found their son quite cheerful, in spite of numerous wounds, and he is reported to be making good progress towards recovery.

 

DUNCHURCH.

CORPL B PEARCE, of the Bedfords, one of the twin sons of Mr and Mrs Pearce, Coventry Road, has been made sergeant. He is the youngest soldier from Dunchurch who has attained that rank, and he has only been in the Army 18 months.

The people of this parish always take a great pride in the flower borders in front of their houses. Mr H Pearce and Mr W Busby have a fine lot of stocks ; and Mr J Cleaver, The Heath, makes a good show of all kinds of flowers not often seen at a cottage. Mr H Burrows, Mr F Stanton, and Mrs Burton, all of Mill Street, have excellent displays ; Mr Jennings bas a good show of stocks. The flowers on the front of the Dun Cow Hotel make quite an attractive display.

Second-Lieut J D Barnwell, of the R.W.R, second son of Mr W D Barnwell, farmer, who was wounded a short time ago in the foot, has had to have all the toes amputated. He is going on favourably.

DEATHS.

DEVONPORT.—In loving memory of Alfred William, Royal Garrison Artillery, who died of wounds, July 7, 1916 (in France), aged 28 years. Also Arthur John, 6th Leicestershire Regiment, killed in action, July 17, 1916 (in France), aged 22 years.—Beloved sons of Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Devenport, Napton Road, Southam.

DUNCUFF.—On August 3, 1916 (died of wounds in France), Arthur Francis, 6th Oxon and Bucks L.I., dearly beloved husband of Mildred G. Duncuff, Benn Street, aged 22 years.
“ Lord, ere I join the deadly strife,
And battles terrors dare ;
Fain would I render heart and life
To Thine Almighty care.
And when grim death in smoke wreaths robed
Comes thundering, o’er the scene,
What fear can reach a soldier’s heart
Whose trust in Thee has been.”

HOWKINS.—Killed in action on August 4th, in Egypt, Lieut. Maurice Howkins, West Riding R.H.A., elder son of Mr. and Mrs. William Howkins, of Hillmorton Grounds, Rugby ; aged 22 years. “ One of the brave boys, when shall their glory fade.”

ILIFF.—Killed in action, July 26th, Corpl. E. Iliff, Royal Warwicks, second and only surviving son of Mr. and Mrs. E. Iliff, Dunchurch.

LOVEROCK.-Died of wounds received in action, Second-Lieut, Harold George Loverock, second son of Lewis Loverock, of Greylands, Hillmorton Road, Rugby, aged 25.

SHAW.—Killed in action “ somewhere in France,” August 1, 1916, Pte. J. C. Shaw (Jack), 11th Batt. R.W.R., aged 26 years 11 months, the dearly beloved husband of Edith Annie Shaw (nee Harris).
“ We often sit and think of you,
And tenderly breathe your name ;
Nothing left of you to look at
But your photo in a frame.”

28th Aug 1915. Inspection of Rugby Fortress Company

RUGBY FORTRESS COMPANY.

INSPECTION BY CHAIRMAN OF URBAN DISTRICT COUNCIL.

Members of the Rugby Fortress Company, together with many of those who have been specially interested in its formation, spent a very enjoyable afternoon at the residence of Mr and Mrs J J McKinnell on Monday afternoon. Invitations had been extended to members and officials of the Rugby Urban District Council and their wives ; to Colonel Johnstone, the recruiting officer at Rugby ; to members of the Recruiting Committee and to others who had helped Mr McKinnell in his successful efforts to raise a company of Royal Engineers for the town.

Amongst those able to attend were : The Rector of Rugby and Mrs Blagden, Mr and Mrs A E Donkin, Mr and Mrs L Loverock, Mr W Flint (vice-chairman of the Urban District Council), Mr G M Seabroke, Mr T A Wise, Mr W H Linnell, Mr Sam Robbins, Mr and Mrs J G Satchell, Miss Cook, Mr and Mrs W J Saville, Mr Allan Hand, Mr J H Sharp, Mr and Mrs Frank Hollowell, Mr James Darby, Mr and Mrs W H W Parsons, Mr Harry Tarbox, Mr J Walker, etc, etc.

The Fortress Company marched over from Rugby and arrived at Mr McKinnell’s residence four o’clock. They looked very smart and soldier-like, and a distinct credit to the town. Mr McKinnell, accompanied by Capt Kempson, inspected the Company, and then addressed the men. He said :-Officers, N.C.O’s and men of the Rugby Fortress Company of Engineers. I need not say how great an honour I take it to be allowed to make this inspection this afternoon. Of course, I am only a civilian ; but even I can see the excellent spirit and soldier-like bearing that the Company has on parade. This good result has not been achieved without a great deal of very hard and very interesting work, as you all know very well. You have been working very hard during the past few months, and Capt Kempson from time to time has expressed to me his very great gratification at the way his men were sticking to it and really trying to make themselves efficient ; and I am sure this afternoon you are all very much to be congratulated on the result of your efforts, self-denial and energy.

When I was asked some months ago to raise a Company of Engineers in Rugby, I must confess my heart failed me. But they had done it in other towns round Rugby, and I thought it would not do for us not to follow their example and not to do as well as any of our neighbours. We had then a very good reputation for recruiting in Rugby, and there were not so many men left ; and as we had to keep to particular trades it made the task still harder. But we had a most excellent Recruiting Committee and a very able secretary in Mr Hand. We owe very much indeed to Mr Hand for the work he has put into this business—and, further, from the outside, we were particularly fortunate in securing as our commander, Captain Kempson, who was given up by Dr David, and it is to him very largely the success of his Company is due. Also, we were extremely fortunate in having such efficient non-commissioned officers as instructors. Then we have to thank a good many people in the town. The builders have helped us with the loan of various portions of their plant ; and we have to thank all the inhabitants of the town, who have helped us whenever we asked them, as they have done through this trying twelve months. Whenever we asked them to come to our aid, they have given us their help continuously.

I now have only to wish you, when you go away from Rugby to do your duty to your country, God speed and the best of luck. I am quite sure you will always take pains to do credit to the good old town of Rugby. I express my great pleasure at seeing you all this afternoon, and I hope you will enjoy yourselves very much (applause).

Photographic groups were taken of the Company by Mr George A Dean, of High Street, and then tea was dispensed, during which gramophone selections were given. Following tea, cigars were handed round, Miss Dickinson contributed two enjoyable songs, and Mr Arthur Eckersley told amusing stories. Bowls and clock golf were provided, and were evidently appreciated, and in the evening Capt KEMPSON, on behalf of the Fortress Company, thanked Mr and Mrs McKinnell for their hospitality.

LETTERS FROM REMNANTS OF THE 29th DIVISION.

Driver Biddles, of the R.A.M.C, writing to the friends he was billeted with in Rugby, speaks of several narrow escapes he and his comrade have had from shells. One day they were out with two waggons when a shell burst about ten yards in front of the mules. He thought he was in for it, and hoped he would be lucky enough to be sent to a Rugby hospital, but he got between the mules, and except for being hit by some lumps of dirt, everything was all serene. He adds : “ I suppose you read the number of our casualties in the Advertiser. Aren’t they terrible, but in comparison with the enemies’ losses they are small.” The writer goes on : “ By the way, we notice articles in the Advertiser about all the different regiments that were billeted in Rugby, except the R.A.M.C. I wonder why this is, because in our own work we have done equally as much as any infantry regiment, and have been highly praised by the General. But I think we must be like the navy. We do our duty silently, but nevertheless efficiently.

Drummer P W Jeffery, of the 1st K.O.S.B, sends a letter to the Editor, under date August 5th, from the Greek hospital at Alexandria. He states that he was in the landing on April 25th, and was wounded on May 1st. On recovering he was sent back to the front and was wounded again on July 27th—so he thinks he has had his share of fighting. It is worse ten times than France. “Our poor old regiment has suffered heavily. My best chums have all been killed or wounded. Their thoughts were always of dear old Rugby and the time the people of Rugby gave us when we were there. We think there is no town in England more patriotic than Rugby. I notice the trenches and dug-outs are named after some of the streets in Rugby : ‘Worcester Square ’ or ‘ Wood Street Cave,’ as two of them were called. We are having a good time in the Greek Hospital. They can’t do enough for you, but give me ‘ Ashlawn ’ for two months. All the wounded who were in the 87th Brigade who were in Rugby send their best wishes,” He concludes : “ If one of your readers has a musical instrument-an old one-stringed violin-I should be glad of it. My address is : Drummer P Jeffery, 1st K.O.S.B, 87th Brigade, 29th Division, Greek Hospital, Alexandria, Egypt.”

NEWBOLD-ON-AVON.

MR AND MRS DODSON, of Newbold, received news on Thursday that their son, Private Horace Dodson, of the 7th South Staffordshire Regiment (Infantry) was wounded in action at the Dardanelles on August 15th. Private Dodson is the youngest son of Mr Dodson, and joined the army soon after the war commenced. His older brother (William Dodson) was killed in France a short time ago. Much sympathy is felt for Mr and Mrs Dodson.

FROM A RUGBY MAN WITH THE R.E. AT THE FRONT.

“ I have just found a moment or so in which I will try to describe the course of things on the 30th and till Sunday evening, when we returned to our dug-outs about eight miles from the firing-line. We had just got into a very refreshing sleep after some tiring days preceding Friday, when we were woke up by an awful noise, as if all the guns in the world were at work. We rushed out of our dug-outs, when we joined an officer, and then to business. The devils were pouring burning liquid on our fellows, who had to retire into the supports, but not without a fight for it. This started at 2.30 a.m. Our section was carrying ammunition and bombs, and it was hell while it lasted. But it is curious while you are in it, you get so excited, and then you would like to rush over the parapet at them. This lot lasted till about 9 a.m. and a few had gone west but a few thousand Germans had paid the price. We had lost the crater but our General was determined to retake it that day, and we disposed of many of the enemy that afternoon with our artillery. Then the infantry charged, but to no purpose, as they found it too hot, as Fitz poured thousands of shells on them. We drove them out, but could not take the trench, because of shell fire. Just after midnight the same thing began again, and we were held in support, which is the proper thing for R.E’s. After the inferno had quietened down we had to go and repair parapets and carry wounded out. I don’t mind fighting at night, but it is rotten on a nice day, because it does not seem natural. What do you think of the Rugby D.C.M’s ; Stent deserved his, and he will be getting a V.C yet, if he does not stop a bullet.

We have some fine little dug-outs, and I have a nice canvas bed, and a couple of blankets. We live A1 in camp ; Fresh meat every day and plum duff ; fresh butter and bacon. The only thing they don’t supply is N.B stout.”

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

A recruiting campaign has been commenced on behalf of the Warwickshire Yeomanry, which is materially below strength.

Lieut-Col Viscount Hampden, C.M.G, who is well-known in Warwickshire hunting circles, has been attached to headquarter units as Brigade Commander.

Lieut S A Hunter, second son of Mr and Mrs T Hunter, of “ Elmhurst,” Hillmorton Road, was last week gazetted captain and appointed adjutant in the 4th West Riding Howitzer Brigade.

On Sunday, August 22nd, the Bilton Brass Band played selections in the Caldecott Park, and collected in aid of the local Red Cross Hospital the sum of £1 3s, which has been duly forwarded to the hospital.

Rifleman J Bird, of the K.R.R, who has recently been drafted to the front, has written to his mother, Mrs Harris, of 41 New Street, New Bilton, and, referring to life in the trenches, says : ” It is not half so dangerous as you would think. All you have to do is to keep your head down and your eyes open, and everything in the garden is lovely.”

In our issue last week we stated that Lce-Corpl Howard, of the Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, had been killed in action. It should have been Lce-Corpl Aris. His photograph appears on page 2 of this issue.

COMMISSION FOR MR McMURTRIE.

Mr B F McMurtrie. chief engineer for the Export Department of the B.T.H, has this week left Rugby to take up a commission in the R.F.A. Mr McMurtrie has been with the Company for a number of years, and has represented them in Japan.

NEW BILTON SOLDIER KILLED.

Mrs Fredk Lee, who is residing with Mr and Mrs Turner, 22 Campbell Street, New Bilton, has received official intimation from the War Office that her husband, Rifleman Fredk Lee, of the 8th Battalion Rifle Brigade, was killed in action on July 30th. Rifleman Lee, who was 22 years of age, was a native of Walton-on-the-Naze, Essex ; had resided at New Bilton for several years, and was employed by Messrs Willans & Robinson as a moulder. He enlisted on September 7th, and was married on April 28th last, proceeding to the front a few weeks afterwards. Much sympathy is expressed with his young widow.

FOUR SONS WITH THE COLOURS.

Mrs Iliffe, of 3 Lodge Road, Rugby, has now four sons serving with H.M Forces either by land or sea. The eldest, William, is in the Sherwood Foresters. He came home with his regiment from India in September, and has been at the front since November last. Herbert, the second son, is a sergeant in the Royal Garrison Artillery, and went out to Gibraltar in January. Arthur, the third son, has joined the Rifle Brigade, and is at the headquarters in Essex ; whilst Albert, the youngest, who is only 17, enlisted in the Royal Marines on Friday last week.

HOME ON SICK LEAVE.

Corpl Cecil Wood, of the 1st Royal Warwicks, has this week been spending a few days at his home in Campbell Street, New Bilton. He is by trade a printer, and was one of Messrs Frost & Sons’ employees who enlisted. About two months ago he was wounded in the chest by shrapnel. He spent a month in hospital in France and three weeks at a hospital in Essex, and is now nearly fit to return to active service. He was promoted to the rank of corporal at the front as the result, it is understood, of a bit of good work he accomplished ; but Corpl Wood is a modest soldier, and declines to say anything about it.

LCE-CORPL F KEELY, of the 1st Battalion King’s Royal Rifles, who was before the war employed in the pattern shop at the B.T.H Works, has been commended in their reports by his Commanding Officer and Brigade Commander to the Major-General commanding the 27th Division for distinguished conduct in the field.

RECRUITING AT RUGBY.

AGRICULTURAL SHOW DRAWN BLANK.

Recruiting has been very slack in Rugby during the past week. Despite the fact that there where no less than seven recruiting sergeants at the Warwickshire Show on Wednesday, not a single recruit was obtained, although there were present hundreds of eligible young men of fine physique, quite a number of whom treated the sergeants with very scant courtesy.

A pleasant contrast to this was the patriotism shown by a young man named E G Dodwell (a native of Buckinghamshire), who travelled from the Argentine Republic, where he held a good position as traffic inspector on the railway, to join the K.R.R Corps at Rugby. Other recruits during the week were :—J G Bromwich, S J Parker, and J Pursglove, R.W.R ; J Walker, Army Ordnance Corps ; and R Baines (band boy), Royal Scott Fusiliers.

 

5th Dec 1914. News From The Front

Mr John Wicks, Long Itchington, of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment, who signs himself “One of the Kaiser’s contemptible little army,” in a letter from the front to a friend, says :-“We are doing fairly well here for food, but the worst of it is we can’t get much sleep. It is like being in hell at times. When “ Jack Johnson’s ” are flying about it is like a big thunderstorm with vivid lightning. . . . It is shameful the way they (the Germans) treat some of the people here in the villages. We found one man, woman, and daughters tied up outside a house naked. It makes you feel mad with them.”

LETTER FROM LIEUT C HART.

Many Rugby people who have attended hospital fetes will remember with pleasure Staff-Sergt-Major Hart, who was in charge of the Lancers, whose displays were such a popular features of the holiday. Since the war Staff-Sergt-Major Hart has been promoted to the rank of Second Lieutenant. He has also been mentioned in dispatches. Mr C J Newman, secretary to the Children’s Ward Committee, received the following brief but characteristic letter from him a few days ago :-

“ DEAR MR NEWMAN,-Thanks ever so much for you kind and welcome letter. I am afraid we shall be unable to give you a display in Rugby for some time to come, but if you could make a pilgrimage out here there is no doubt you would see some much more interesting items than those performed by us at your fete. Nevertheless, I hope the time is not too for distant when some of us will have the pleasure of participating in much more peaceful pastimes than are at present available. We haven’t fared too badly. A few of the Rugby performers helped to pay the price of this war, but our heaviest losses are amongst the officers. We do very well indeed in the way of food, clothing, etc, which is a great blessing. I thank you very much for offer of cigarettes, which I will be very grateful for. I also thank you for congratulations, and I trust we shall meet again soon, when all is peaceful. Remember me to all old friends.-I remain, Yours sincerely, C Hart.”

EXTRACTS FROM A BILTON ARTILLERY-MANS DIARY.

Sergt Woolgar, of the 51st Battery, R.F.A, paid a flying visit to his wife (formerly Miss Rainbow), at Old Bilton last week, he having been granted five days’ leave of absence. Sergt Woolgar has been at the front from the commencement of the war, and participated in the Retreat from Mons, the Battle of of the Aisne, and the recent heavy fighting round Ypres, and naturally he has some exciting experiences to recount. Despite the fact that he has been in several hot corners and had more than one narrow escape, he has so far received no injury. A week or so ago his battery suffered severely, and they were withdrawn from the firing line and sent to a rest camp to refit, he being the lucky man from his battery to be allowed leave of absence. He returned to the front last Saturday. While he was at the front Sergt Woolgar kept a diary, which contains a number of interesting incidents, several of which we reproduce :—

August 23rd.—Ordered up to the assistance of the —–, who were at Mons. The Germans, dressed as civilians, shot down the —– (171 out of 1,126) from the windows. They had civilians in front of them waving handkerchiefs. Hard pushed at about 6.0 p.m, and went straight into action and entrenched. . . . The German scouts were very near to us on the night of 22nd 23rd August as near as 2½ miles, and we saw the village, which they had burnt, smouldering and in ruins, and the homeless villagers, as we went into action. . . . Very heartrending to see the little children and sick women being assisted along the road.

September 14th.—Marched at 7.0 a.m, and immediately went into action at —–. A terrible action ; our troops were simply mown down. Saw hundreds of German prisoners, and the village was full of dead and dying [Mention is made under this date of several British regiments which lost severely owing to the German abuse of the white flag.]

October 21st.-Moved off at 3.30 p.m as advance guard, and marched to the village of —–, where we came into action against the enemy. Fired l28 rounds per gun, and saw all the village on fire. We had rather a lively time. A Company of —– was properly wiped out in taking a large mill and building. Remained in action all day-22nd October. Up at day-break and started firing. Later on my gun was ordered “percussion,” and fired at 2,200 yards at a windmill, which was being used by the enemy as an observing station. Anyhow, we succeeded in hitting it eight times and smashed it up. . . Was congratulated on the good firing of my gun, and saw the mill in flames.

October 29th.-Revielle at 5.0 a.m, and opened fire to support infantry attack. About 8.30 a.m had a very close shave, a “ Black Maria ” burst under my wagon limber, and blew it up, setting fire to the ammunition, etc. In fact it got so warm that we had to leave our guns for a time.

November 1st.-Opened fire about 10 a.m, but got a very hot reception. In return was absolutely bombarded by the enemy’s big guns for about two hours.

November 2nd.-Had a narrow squeak in the night ; shelled all night. Had to move bed three times.

November 20th.-To-day was a very bad day for us. We were shelled all day, and had 17 killed and 19 wounded.

Some idea of the conditions under which the fighting has been conducted is contained in the following entry under October 18th :- Went straight to the guns for the fifth day in succession. Got clothes dry this morning. As yesterday it simply poured in torrents all day; no shelter. We were simply drowned rats and smothered in mud and gun grease. Stayed in action until dark then bivouacked. Had a night attack about 1.30, which was repulsed. Raining hard; wet through again.

HOME FROM THE WAR.

Rifleman Ernest Shaw, of the 1st King’s Royal Rifles, who was wounded in the fighting near Ypres, returned to his home at 6 Union Street, Rugby, early on Monday morning, after spending three weeks in a hospital at Belfast. As we reported in a previous issue, he was wounded in the cheek, the bullet penetrating just below the eye and passing out at the back of the neck, so that he really had a very narrow escape from death. Rifleman Shaw went out to the front at the commencement of the war, and had seen a fair amount of active service before he received his wound. He was in the open at the time he received a bullet coming from the direction of a house 200 yards away, from which Germans had been expelled, though obviously some of their marksmen had returned. The rifle fire became so persistent that the Englishmen deemed it expedient to retire from the locality. The sight of Pte Shaw’s right eye has been so affected by the wound that he cannot see distinctly with it, and although he is due to report himself at the depot on the 12th inst, he does not expect that he will ever be again fit for service at the front.

B.T.H MAN’S EXPERIENCES.

Pte H R Lee, of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment, an employee of the B.T.H, has written from the front to his wife, and states :—We are just finishing our three days’ rest, after having five weeks in the trenches, in all that snow and rain. We have had to sleep and lie down in three inches of water, besides having to stand up in it all day long. One day, while we were in the trenches, I was boiling three fowls, and the Germans were sending “ Jack Johnson’s ” all round us, but they could not hit us. We took cover, but did not mean to miss having the fowls, so I and my two mates had a good dinner after all. The Germans are a dirty cowardly lot. Last week they shelled a town and set it on fire and killed 200 poor innocent women and children. How would English people got on if it was them. They (the Germans) run like mad when they see our bayonets. It is that that frightens them. I            have had one on my bayonet, and hope to have more before long. I don’t think it will last much longer.—Pte Lee mentioned that some cigarettes which his wife sent to him were spoilt through not being put in a tin, and added : “ I received a parcel from Miss —–, (a Rugby Lady) containing a pair of mitts, a bottle of meat lozenges, a tin of vaseline and four bars of chocolate.”

MADE COMFORTABLE AT THE FRONT.

Private W H Tidey, a shoeing-smith attached to the 5th Division, Army Corps in the Field, writing to Mr Hipwell at the Portland Cement Works, New Bilton, says :-“ Although the weather is horribly rotten out here, under no circumstances is one of us allowed to be uncomfortable. I am sure we find it more a pleasure to soldier under our officers. They all “muck in” with the rest. If any man gets into trouble out here, it is entirely his own fault. . . . As you say, things are going on fairly well, but we all hope that the Germans will see their folly in keeping up such a struggle. . . . I haven’t much time to write, for there’s plenty do out here in my line, especially since the snow and frost came, but the cold is better by far than the mud and slush we have bean staggering through lately.