18th Nov 1916. The Great Battle Pictures.

THE GREAT BATTLE PICTURES.—The official pictures of the battle of the Somme, which have been attracting vast audiences all over the country, will be shown at the Empire twice nightly, and at matinees every day next week. Already seats are being extensively booked, and those who wish to secure good seats should do so at once.

LOCAL WAR NOTES,

Jim Eaton-Shore, Queen’s Westminster Rifles, has been reported wounded and missing since September 10. He is the youngest son of the late Mr James Eaton-Shore, for many years Works manager at Messrs Willans and Robinson’s, of Rugby, and later on, in the same capacity, at Messrs Siemen’s of Stafford. The three other sons are also serving in the forces—Jack in the New Zealand Engineers, Robert in the Canadians, and Tom in the Oxford and Buck Light Infantry.

A neatly printed certificate has been received by Mr C Pegg, 1 Addison Bead, New Bilton, to the effect that the Major-General commanding the Division in which his son—Corpl H Pegg, of the Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry—is serving has received a report of the young soldier’s gallant conduct on October 7th. The card was presented to Corpl Pegg by the commanding officer, who congratulate him, and congratulated him, and expressed the hope that next time it would be something better.

B.T.H. EMPLOYEE HONOURED.

Sergt William Black, of the 60th Light Infantry Brigade, Headquarters Staff, has been awarded the Military Medal. Before the war Sergt Black was employed as a clerk in the Stores Department at the B.T.H.

MILITARY MEDAL FOR SERGT F TUCKER.

A recent issue of the Gazette announced that Sergt F Tucker, of the Royal Rifle Brigade, had been awarded the Military Medal for bravery in the field, Sergt Tucker was wounded in August in about thirty places, and after treatment at Lincoln Hospital, he was sent to a convalescent home at Blackpool, where he still remains. Before the war, Sergt Tucker was employed as a compositor by Messrs Frost & Sons, and his mother lives in Charlotte Street.

LOCAL CASUALTIES.

Mrs H Lee, of Clarence Road, New Bilton, has received a postcard from her husband, a private in the R.W.R, stating that he has been wounded, and is now in Glen Hospital, France. This is the second time that Pte Lee, who went out with the original Expeditionary Force, has been wounded.

PTE FRED CRIPPS DIES OF WOUNDS.

Pte Fred Cripps, R.E., died in hospital recently from wounds received early in October in France. Pte Cripps was 28 years of age, and married. Before the war, he was employed as a carpenter by Messrs Foster & Dicksee at Rugby. His home was at Winslow.

DISTRICT APPEALS TRIBUNAL.

At Wednesday’s sitting at St Mary’s Hall, Coventry, there were present : Messrs M K Pridmore (chairman), W Johnson, jun, K Rotherham. and P G Lovert ; Military representative, Mr M E T Wratislaw ; Agricultural representative, Mr F W Channing.

A substitute having been found for Wm Fredk Brooks, a general farm worker employed by Mr Butlin, of Flecknoe, an appeal made on his behalf was withdrawn.

On behalf of Thos Arthur Stephenson, woollen and cotton rag merchant, Newbold Road, Rugby, Mr Harold Eaden said his client was now employed at the Daimler Works, Coventry. Certificates were not now issued, as it was found they had been abused, but if the clerk to the Tribunal applied, the firm would give him one.—Adjourned till the next Court.

Mr Wratislaw stated that a discharged soldier of excellent character had been found for Thos Wm Durham, carter, 13 Campbell Street, New Bilton, but the man was not due to report till that day.—A fortnight’s adjournment was asked for and granted.

On two grounds—that of business and as a conscientious objector—Ernest Holliday, acting bank manager, 54[?] Newbold Road, Rugby, appealed for the renewal of his temporary exemption.-The Chairman asked Mr Wratislaw if appellant, as a conscientious objector, was not doing as good work now as he would be doing elsewhere ?—Mr Wratislaw : They are being treated differently now. They draw the pay of a soldier and the rest goes to charity.—Capt Thomas said on mobilisation he was called up, and three others who were in the bank had joined the army. Appellant was now assisted by one girl and one boy, and they were doing a great deal of work.—In reply to the Chairman, appellant said he was prepared to hand over £l a week from his salary to charity, but he would not like it to be thought he was buying himself out.—The Chairman : We are putting you in the same position as if you were in the army. You are not making a profit out of it.—Appellant : I don’t wish to do so.—The Chairman said he thought the sum should go to a local charity, and an order was made for £1 a week to be paid to the funds of the hospital, temporary exemption being granted so long as the conditions were observed.

Mr Worthington supported an application by John Basil Liggins, coal merchant and carter, 57 James Street, Rugby, claimed by his mother to be indispensable to the business. Mr Wratislaw suggested that the man might be used as a substitute, but the Chairman expressed the opinion that the carting of coal during the winter was very important, and exemption till February 28th was granted.

Conditional exemption was asked for by William George Essex, described as a dairy farmer and market gardener of West Street, Long Lawford.—The Clerk asked Mr Wratislaw if they had served the notice now necessary in such a case, and he replied in the negative.—Given till February 1st, and Mr Wratislaw was asked to then remember that notice must be served.

HILLMORTON.

A very successful and enjoyable concert was given on Friday last week by 55 Squadron R.F.C Pierrot Troop on behalf of the funds for sending Christmas parcels to the Hillmorton soldiers and sailors. As something out of the ordinary run was anticipated, the room was packed very soon after the doors were opened. The first part of the programme was taken entirely by the Pierrot Troop in costume, who rendered songs and jokes which kept the audience in roars of laughter. The second part consisted of songs, sword swinging display, dances and recitations, and loud and prolonged applause which followed each item was a proof of its excellence and of the appreciation of the audience ; particularly may this be said of the sword swinging display by Sergt-Major Rowland.

BOURTON-ON-DUNSMORE.

A start was made in November, 1915, to collect eggs for the wounded soldiers, and the villagers of Bourton and Draycote will be gratified to know that since that date to November, 1916, they have contributed a grand total of 1,792.

CHRISTMAS PARCELS FOR OUR SOLDIERS.—A house-to-house collection has been made in Bourton and Draycote, with the result that £7 18s 10d has been generously given for this good cause. Misses Hales and Davies undertook the collecting.

ANSTY.

SEC. LIEUT CADWALLER ADAMS KILLED.

The Adams family of Ansty Hall, near Nuneaton, have sustained a further bereavement by the death in action of Second lieutenant Geoffrey Henry Cadwaller Adams, Suffolk Regiment. Born in 1896, he was the second son of Mr Alfred Adams, barrister-at-law, and grandson of the Rev Henry Cadwaller Adams.

SOUTHAM.

A battle-plane had to descend at Southam on Wednesday afternoon, owing to engine trouble, and was guarded during its stay by members of the Volunteer Training Corps, to whom the officer afterwards expressed his thanks. The battle-plane aroused considerable interest, and was visited by hundreds of people from Southam and the neighbouring villages.

 

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