15th Jun 1918. Selling Ham Without Taking Coupons

FOOD PROSECUTIONS.

SELLING HAM WITHOUT TAKING COUPONS.
Samuel C Duval, grocer, Gipsy Lane, Leicester, was summoned by F Burton for selling uncooked bacon and ham to Evan Evans without detaching the necessary coupons, at Rugby, on May 25th. A second charge was also brought of selling uncooked ham and bacon to the same individual, who was not one of his registered customers.—Evan Evans, 9 Melling Street, Longsight, Manchester, was also summoned by F Burton for unlawfully obtaining for a retailer named Duval a ham, and not producing his meat card to allow the retailer to detach the appropriate coupons on May 25th.—Mr Worthington prosecuted, and Mr Eaden defended ; and, on the suggestion of Mr Eaden, this was taken in conjunction with the charges against Duval.—Defendants pleaded guilty to all three charges.—Mr Worthington said that on the morning in question Mr Purchase saw Evans standing near a stall belonging to Duval in the Market Place. He heard Evans tell Duval that he could not get a supply of bacon where he was registered, and from what he saw he spoke to Duval, who admitted that he had sold some ham to Evans without a coupon.—Mr Worthington said the seriousness of the case lay in an entire stranger coming into the town and taking food away which might be required by someone who was registered in the town.—Mr Eaden said the case was not nearly so serious as his friend tried to make it. There was a distinction between a picnic ham and an ordinary one, the shank end of the former being allowed to be sold without coupons and to an unregistered customer.—Evans was a fireman on the L & N-W Railway, and arrived on a goods train at 9.30 a.m on Saturday. He had nothing with him to eat except bread. He was not due back home until 12.30 Sunday morning, and it was obvious he could not go all that time on bread. He asked Duval to sell him some ham, and Duval cut him the shank end of a picnic ham, which he was perfectly entitled to sell to him. Unfortunately, when Evans saw the amount of bone in it he said he should prefer the other end, and Duval, feeling sorry for Evans, did cut some from that end. With regard to his friend’s statement that food was being taken out of the town, he might state that some three hours later Duval was allowed to sell some 60lbs of bacon without coupons by permission of Mr Burton, so that anyone from Coventry, &c, could have taken it away if they wished.—The Chairman said that Duval knew he was doing wrong, and he would be fined 19s 6d in each case ; and Evans, knowing that he would be away for that length of time, should have brought his coupon with him, and he would also be fined 19s 6d.

THE PRICE OF WHISKY.
William Flint, wine merchant, Church Street, Rugby, was summoned for selling whisky at a price exceeding the maximum price allowed by the Spirits Order, 1918, on May 7th.—Mr Worthington appeared for the Food Control Committee, and Mr Eaden pleaded guilty on behalf of the defendant.—Mr Worthington said on May 7th a man named Richardson, a discharged soldier, went to Mr Flint’s Stores in Church Street, and asked for a bottle of whisky. He was supplied by the assistant, and was told the price was 11s. A few minutes afterwards, in consequence of what he was told or thought he went for a second bottle, and was charged 11s. He asked the assistant if she had not made a mistake. She replied that she could charge the old price, because the Government had not released the whisky in respect of the new prices from bond. He asked for a receipt, and received one for £1 2s. A day or two afterwards Mr Purchase (Enforcement Officer) saw Mr Flint, who said that the whisky was 35 per cent under proof. The whisky should have been sold at 8s instead of 11s.—Mr Flint told the Enforcement Officer that he went to London, but could not get any information. He could easily have gone to the Food Office at Rugby and received all information required.—Mr Eaden, for the defence, said Mr Flint wished to make perfectly clear that what was done was done in absolute ignorance and without any intention of profiteering or charging above the price. If they considered Glenlivet whisky was a proprietary article, then 9s 6d could have been charged under the new Order. Mr Eaden pointed out that the Order only came into force on May 1st, and though Mr Flint went to an advisory meeting in London, he heard nothing about the new prices.—The Chairman said the Bench felt there was some mitigation in that case, as proceedings were taken so soon after the Order came into force. Those orders were coming so frequently that the public could not very often get hold of them. They would only inflict a fine of £5, including costs.

RABBITS FROM WALES.—Edith J Hardy, 45 Church Street, Rugby, was summoned by F Burton Executive Officer of the Food Control Committee, for unlawfully obtaining two rabbits, and not detaching from her meat card the coupons.—Defendant did not appear.—Mr Worthington, for the prosecution, said that from information received Mr Purchase visited defendant’s house, and she informed him that she was receiving a couple of rabbits per week from an uncle in Wales. He examined her meat card, and found that the coupons which should have been sent for these had not been forwarded. She thus obtained these rabbits and a meat ration with the coupons which should have been used for the former.—The Chairman : She “ received ” them, not “ obtained ” them ?—Mr Worthington : Quite so, and if it had been an isolated case perhaps nothing would have been said, but she had them for three consecutive weeks.—The Chairman : I did not know that if anyone sent me a couple of rabbits that I should have to send two coupons.—Mr Worthington said that probably he should have been the same himself. He believed Mrs Hardy had no idea of committing an offence, and the case was brought simply that the public should know of the Order.—The Chairman said there was no doubt an offence had been committed, but it might be taken as a first case, because the public did not know the law sufficiently, and they would dismiss the summons under the first Offenders’ Act. The public must understand that they could not receive presents of this kind from their friends without giving up the corresponding coupons.

THE NEW RATION BOOKS.

Ration books for the national system of rationing, which comes into operation on July 13th, are now being issued to local Food Control Committees. They contain vouchers for articles of food which are already rationed, with extra pages for commodities which it may be found necessary to ration, either generally or locally, at a later date.

The book is available for 16 weeks, after which a new volume will be distributed. Coupons will require to be surrendered for all rations, four being apportioned as at present to a week’s supply of meat and bacon, and one weekly to other articles. The pages are in distinctive colours for the various rationed foods. The coupons for sugar are yellow, for fats (i.e, butter, margarine and lard) blue, and for meat red. A page of spare coupons is coloured brown, and a page of spare spaces is printed in blue ink on white paper. There is a reference leaf coloured green, while the front and back covers are white. The pages are printed on specially engraved paper. The child’s ration book will be generally similar, except that it will contain two pages of meat coupons instead of four. Thus the meat coupon in the child’s book will be of the same value as is the meat coupon in the ordinary adult’s book.

Full instructions will be found upon the front and back covers of the book.

All applications for the rationing books must be sent to the Food Controller by to-day (June 15th).

SUGAR FOR JAM.
METHODS OF ALLOCATION CRITICISED AT RUGBY.

The methods adopted in allocating the supplies of sugar for jam-making were criticised by Mr W A Stevenson at a meeting of the Rugby Food Control Committee on Thursday last week. In many instances, he said, people had anticipated that the quantity asked for would be reduced, and, acting on this assumption, they had asked for more than they required. Others had played fair, and only asked for their bare requirements, but all had been cut down alike. He thought the basis on which they had worked was not a fair one. The sugar should have been allotted according to the number of persons in the household, irrespective of how much was asked for.—The Executive Officer (Mr Burton) pointed out that the allocation was made in accordance with a schedule issued by the Ministry of Food. They did not take into consideration the amount of sugar asked for, but simply the amount of fruit available. If there was any dissatisfaction it was the fault of the Food Ministry, and not of his office, because he only had to carry out the provisions of the schedule.

It was also stated that a large number of persons who had applied for sugar for jam had been refused a supply because they had failed to enclose a stamped addressed envelope for the return of the permit with their application form. The Chairman (Mr Wise) said he believed that in some cases stamped envelopes were enclosed, but owing to the great pressure under which the officials had had to work these had been lost. It would be very difficult to decide which cases were genuine, but he thought that where they were satisfied that the requirements had been complied with they should grant an allowance, if possible. The difficulty was, however, that there was not a large stock to draw from. The existing allowance had been made on the figures sent in on the application forms, and if a lot more people were to be supplied the allowances already made would have to be still further reduced. He had read that the gooseberry crop had failed, and it might be possible to get the permits granted to people for making gooseberry jam returned.—The Executive Officer said, considering the pressure under which the staff worked and the large mob of people invading the offices and the approaches daily waiting for the application forms, the wonder was that they did as well as they had done. With regard to granting fresh permits, he believed that they were helpless in the matter, because the allotment of sugar was made, and if they granted any other allowance some of the people with permits would have to go without sugar. The only way he could see out of the difficulty was to issue a circular asking people whose fruit had not come up to their expectations to return their permits, so that a reduction could be made.—It was decided to do this and also to write to the Ministry of Food asking whether, in any case in which the committee were satisfied that a stamped addressed envelope had been enclosed, they could make an allowance of sugar.

MUNITION WORKERS & THE CUP THAT CHEERS.

At their meeting on Thursday afternoon in last week the Rugby Food Control Committee considered a request from the Lodge Sparking Plug Company for permission to purchase 20lbs of tea weekly for their canteen.—Mr Stevenson reminded the committee that they had refused a request from the Railway Company, and if this was granted the two decisions would clash.—The Executive Officer (Mr F M Burton) : But this is a munition factory.—Mr Stevenson expressed the opinion that railways were as important as munition establishments, because they were the common carriers of both the raw material and the finished article.—Mrs Shelley said she thought the company were asking for an excessive quantity, because 1lb of tea was supposed to make 160 cups.—Mr Ewart : They are asking for 4lbs a day.—Mr Stevenson : A lot of ladies work there (laughter).—The question was referred to the Ration Committee with power to act, the Executive Officer being asked to get further information as to the actual requirements.

At a meeting on Thursday the committee reported that the company had since written stating that between 400 and 450 cups of would be required daily five days each week, and it was accordingly decided to allow the quantity asked for.

POTATOES IN BREAD.

The Order of the Ministry of Food requiring 10 per cent. of potatoes to be mixed with floor and other ingredients used in making bread came into force last week. Anticipating some such order, the Rugby bakers a few months ago commenced to mix potatoes with the flour, although the proportion was naturally not so great as that now made compulsory by the Order ; and they have thus gained some useful experience. A prominent local baker states that considerable additional work is entailed by the new regulation inasmuch as the potato’s have to be washed, scraped, boiled, mashed, and strained before they are fit to mix with the flour. Great care has to be taken both in the dough-making and the baking, and the difficulties are added to by the poor quality of the yeast now being supplied to the trade. When the bread is properly made, however, a distinct improvement in quality is noticeable, and the loaves are a better colour, much more moist and do not become dry so quickly.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Mrs Ingram, 21 Victoria Avenue, New Bilton, has received news that her son, Pte L Ingram, aged 20, was wounded on May 29th, and died the same day. He was an old Elborow School boy, and has been to the Army three years. Second time wounded.

Mr & Mrs Baskott, East Haddon (late of Rugby), have received news that their son, Pte E Baskott, 101st Labour Battalion, has died from gas poisoning in 1st Australian Hospital, Rouen. He was an old St Matthew’s boy. His brother, Lieut J E Baskott, was killed in action last December.

Dr R H Paramore, of this town, now in the Army, has been promoted to the rank of Major.

Mrs Rixon, Claremont Road, has received official news that her son, Second-Lieut E H Rixom, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, has been wounded in the right arm and chest.

Mrs Wilde, 5 Earl Street, has been officially notified that her husband, Pte John Wilde, 1st Royal Warwickshire Regiment, was killed in action on April 15th. He has been in the Army two years. Previous to joining up he worked for Mr F Hollowell, builder.

Mr J A Philips, St Aubyn, Hillmorton Road, received a telegram from the War Office on Sunday last, informing him that his third son, Kenneth Mc N Phillips, 2nd Lieut, Northumberland Fusiliers, attached Durham Light Infantry, has been missing since May 27th.

Mr C J Elkington, Hillmorton Road, Rugby, has received notification that his son, Lieut A J Elkington, of the North Staffordshire Regiment, has been slightly wounded in the foot, and is in hospital at Rouen.

Pte H Garner was accidentally drowned on May 22nd whilst bathing in a river in France. He was the first of the company to dive into the river, and was at once seized with cramp. His officer and comrades dived in to save him, but he was carried away by a strong current, and was drowned. Pte Garner was employed by the Rugby Co-operative Society as a motor lorry driver till he enlisted at the outbreak of the War.

Lieut Maurice V Eyden. younger son of Mr Alfred Eyden, 53 St Matthew’s Parade, Northampton, is reported missing on May 27th. He entered the Inns of Court, O.T.C, in autumn, 1915, on leaving Rugby School (where he was “ Head of the Town ”), and received his commission in the 2nd Northants Regiment in September, 1916. Two months later he went to France, where he had been twice wounded. His only brother, Corpl Clarence Eyden, R.E, was killed in action in France on May 19th.

Corpl J Norman Atkinson, M.G.C, who was officially reported wounded and missing, has written home stating that the is a prisoner of war at Altdamn, Pommern, Germany, and that his wound is not serious. He has been very kindly treated, and is quite cheerful. He is the son of Mr J H Atkinson, 37 Windsor Street, Rugby, and the second of four brothers who have joined H.M Forces.

Second-Lieut H H Metters, M.C, Leicestershire Regiment, aged 21, only son of Mr W H Metters, the Manor House, Stoneleigh, near Kenilworth, is reported missing since May 27th.

Lieut-Col H A Gray-Cheape, D.S.O, was commanded the brilliant charge of the Warwickshire and Worcestershire Yeomanry in Palestine on November 8, 1917, is reported missing, believed drowned. He was one of 13 officers and 79 other ranks who lost their lives when H.M transport “ Leasowe Castle ” was torpedoed and sunk on Mar 26th in the Mediterranean. The gallant officer was the well-known polo player. His eldest sister, who was married to Mr Albert Jaffray Cay, son of Mr & Mrs Cay, of Kenilworth, lost her life in the “ Empress of Ireland ” disaster in June, 1914. Her husband’s death has been presumed, as he has been missing ever since the reverse sustained by our arms at Katia on Easter Sunday, 1916.

LIEUT T W WALDING.
Mrs Walding, of The Limes, Rugby, has received information that her son, Lieut T W Walding, of the Machine Gun Corps, has been posted as missing since May 27th. A brother officer has written stating that Lieut Walding was with the guns in the forward area, and was completely surrounded, and the assumption was that he was made prisoner.

MILITARY FUNERAL AT RUGBY.
The death occurred, at the 1st Southern General Hospital, Birmingham (Dudley Road Section), on June 5th, of Pte W Lee, 1st Royal Warwicks, who was wounded on April 15th. Pte Lee, who was 41 years of age, was the son of the late Mr John Lee, of Rugby. He had served 3½ years in the War. The interment took place at Rugby Cemetery on Monday, when a firing party from Budbroke Barracks attended. The mourners included deceased’s two brother, Sergt R Lee and Sergt-Major Harry Lee, both of the Warwicks ; his sisters, Mrs Cements, Mrs Lisamer, Mrs Colledge, and Mrs Abbott ; his brothers-in-law, Sergt Arthur Clements, R.E (who had just arrived in England from Sierra Leone), and Mr Clements and Mr Lisamer (both of whom had served in the Boer War), Mrs R Lee (sister-in-law), Mr Jack Burns (cousin), &c.

AWARDS FOR GALLANTRY & DISTINGUISHED SERVICE.

Major P W Nickalls, Yeomanry, the well-known polo player, has been awarded the D.S.O.

The following have received the Meritorious Service Medal in connection with military operations in Salonika:—Sergt-Major D G Kinden, A.S.C (Rugby), and Staff Sergt-Major G H Sutton, A.S.C (Churchover, near Rugby).

The Military Medal has been awarded for gallantry and devotion to duty on April 30th to Driver F Calloway, R.F.A, son of Mr W Calloway, Sandown Road, Rugby.

The following men are included in the latest list of awards of the Distinguished Conduct Medal :—840139 Sergt H Battson, R.F.A, Rugby, and 22681 Sergt F H Marriott. M.G.C, Rugby.

AMPUTATION DURING RAID.—Miss Marian A Butler, a radiographer of the Scottish Women’s Hospitals, who has just returned from France, telling of experiences at the Hospital at Villers-Cotterets, said that during a German air raid Miss Frances Ivens, the chief medical officer, performed several operations, including amputations, by the light of two candles and with the instruments jumping about through the vibration caused by the explosions. Miss Ivens is a daughter of the late Mr W Ivens. of Harborough Parva.

RUGBY PETTY SESSIONS.

ABSENTEES.—Arthur Hill, painter, no fixed abode, was brought up in custody charged with being an absentee from the Army.—He pleaded not guilty.—Sergt Percival stated that he arrested prisoner in West Street, and asked him if he had any exemption from military service or any other documents ? He replied, “It is all right; I have been down to the Drill Hall.” Witness told him that he should take him to the Drill Hall, and on the way he said, “I have sent all my papers to the Minister of Munitions, Hay Lane, Coventry. I had exemption from military service while I was at work at Willans.” Witness telephoned to Coventry, and found that prisoner was an absentee. He also found that he was discharged from Willans & Robinson’s on July 2nd, 1917. Then he would be given 14 days to get other work.—Col Johnstone produced a copy of notice sent to Hill on June 28th, 1917, calling him up on July 12th. The notice was returned marked “ Unknown.” Witness also sent an absentee report.—Defendant claimed that no papers could be sent within eight weeks after his discharge from munitions. He said in June he registered at the Labour Exchange, and they advised him to get a note from the Drill Hall. At the latter place they said they could not help him ; he must paddle his own canoe. So he had paddled his own canoe since. If he was a wilful absentee he should not have remained in the town where he was known at the same address. He had written to the Ministry of Munitions at Coventry, giving his temporary address and all his papers.—Sergt Percival, in reply to the Bench, said no trace could be found of these papers at Coventry.—Col Johnstone said no notification had been received of any change of address.—The case was adjourned for a short time to enable the sergeant to make enquiries at the Labour Exchange.—On their return Sergt Percival said he had ascertained that prisoner last went to the Labour Exchange on June 27th, but his name was crossed off, as it was not renewed within seven days.—Fined £2, and handed over as a deserter.— Samuel Winfield, no fixed abode, was similarly charged.—Defendant pleaded guilty.—Sergt Hawkes deposed that he saw defendant in Gas Street, and asked him why he was not in the Army ? Defendant said he had dodged it. He had not been registered or medically examined.—Defendant had nothing to say.—Fined £2, and handed over to an escort.—Sergt Hawkes was complimented and awarded 10s.

RUGBY URBAN DISTRICT COUNCIL
WASTE OF WATER.

Notice is hereby given that no consumer is permitted to use WATER BY HOSE PIPE, without the permission of the Council, except when the supply is by meter.

Consumers are urgently requested to co-operate with the Council, in reducing waste of water as much as possible.

Consumer are requested to report all cases of waste at the Surveyor’s Office.

Persons taking and using water in contravention of the Water Regulations of this Council are liable to a penalty not exceeding five pounds for every such offence.

JNO. H. SHARP,
Water Engineer & Surveyor.
Benn Buildings, Hight Street, Rugby.
May 29th, 1918.

DEATHS.

INGRAM.—In ever loving memory of my dearest and youngest son, Pte. LEONARD INGRAM, 15th Royal Warwickshire Regiment, who died from wounds in France on May 29th ; son of the late Joseph and Mary Ingram, 61 Victoria Avenue, New Bilton ; aged 20 years
“ His sufferings here are ended,
His work on earth is done ;
He fought the fight with patience,
And now the victory’s won.
I loved him, oh, no tongue can tell
How much we loved him and how well.
God loved him, too, and thought it best
To take him home with Him to rest.”
“ Though lost from sight, to memory ever dear.”

IN MEMORIAM.

BAUM.—In ever-loving memory of Sergt. G. BAUM, 8th Leicesters, of Claybrook-Magna ; killed in action on June 11, 1917 ; aged 22 years.—Not forgotten by his, friends at Churchover.

WOOD.—In loving memory of Pte. ARTHUR WILLIAM WOOD, son of the late J. Wood, of 153 Grosvenor Road, Rugby ; killed in action on June 10, 1917, in France.—From Madge and Ernest.

WOOD.—In loving memory of Pte. ARTHUR WOOD, M.G.C, who was killed in action in France on June 10 1917.—From George and Ellen.

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1 thought on “15th Jun 1918. Selling Ham Without Taking Coupons

  1. Pingback: Garner, Henry. Died 22nd May 1918 | Rugby Remembers

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