9th Mar 1918. The Paper Famine – Share Your Advertiser with Others

THE PAPER FAMINE.
SHARE YOUR ADVERTISER with OTHERS.

It is a very unusual experience in the history of a local newspaper to have to stem the tide of an increasing circulation, and our readers may feel assured it goes very much against the grain of the proprietors of the Advertiser to announce that, owing to further drastic reductions in the weight of paper they are allowed by the Government to purchase, it is impossible to satisfy the increasing demand for copies of the paper. We are rationing the supplies sent out to our agents, and it may be the increase of the price of the paper to 2d, which we find it necessary to adopt with this issue because of the enormous advance in the cost of production, will automatically assist them in the difficult task of apportioning the papers they have for sale satisfactorily among their customers.

Some will certainly have to go without—particularly those who have been in the habit of making casual purchases ; others will voluntarily relinquish the paper for the time being, but it does not follow that the actual number of readers need be reduced. On the contrary, we do not wish our friends to sever their association with their favourite journal altogether. If will be quite possible and easy for relatives or neighbours to arrange to make one copy serve for two or more households, and this is a system which “ The Times ” (London) proposes to force upon its patrons if the rationing system which they, like the Advertiser, have been compelled to adopt, does not limit the demand sufficiently. They intimate that in such an event they will only supply those people who will agree to share their copies with others.

For our part we prefer to rely upon the indulgence and voluntary co-operation of our readers to assist us in tiding over this unprecedented crisis, which we hope will only be temporary.

We have no doubt the agents for the Advertiser will be glad to assist in such a scheme by re-purchasing papers and passing them on to others who cannot otherwise be supplied. On our part, we are prepared to do this by purchasing at a penny each, clean copies brought to the Advertiser Office while it is open from 9 a.m till mid-day on Saturdays ; and in this way it should still be possible for a great many to have an opportunity peruse the Advertiser at no greater cost than before.

Newspapers are recognised as a national necessity, but further tonnage has to be saved, and food and the raw materials for munitions must come first. It is urgently necessary to release more tonnage for food supplies, and for that reason paper imports have had to be cut down.

THE FOOD RATIONING SCHEME.
POSTPONED TILL APRIL 7TH.

The National Food Rationing Scheme, which was to have come into force on March 25th, has been postponed a fortnight—to April 7th. But there are certain duties to be performed by the people as a preliminary to getting their cards, and all applications for food cards must be in by to-day (Saturday). In our advertisement columns will be found the official time table relating to these duties, which must be strictly observed.

ENFORCED CULTIVATION OF FARMS.

We understand the Warwickshire Agricultural Committee are, under the powers given to them, entering upon four farms in the vicinity of Knightlow Hill for the purpose of seeing that they are properly cultivated. The occupiers have had to turn out at a month’s notice.

ALLOTMENT-HOLDERS AND A WILD RUMOUR.

In several districts, including Birmingham, credence appears still to be given by a few people in the recent rumour that the Food Controller would take over compulsorily the produce of allotments and gardens this year. Three weeks ago the Food Production Department denied the truth of this rumour, and stated that there was no foundation for it whatever. A fortnight ago the Department renewed this assurance, and it now emphasises the denial in view of the persistence of the rumour.

RUGBY RURAL FOOD CONTROL COMMITTEE.

At the weekly meeting on Thursday in last week there were present : Mr H Tarbox (chairman), Rev R S Mitchison, Mrs Draper, Mrs Neilson, Mrs Anderson, Mrs Townsend, Mrs Peet, Messrs   J C Harrison, W Woodward, A Appleby, J Cripps, A T Watson, and T E Smart.

It was reported that 200 lbs of sugar had been deducted from the monthly allotment in respect of a school, the housekeeper of which had reported having this quantity left over from the amount alloted them for jam-making last year.

A long discussion took place as to the system by which the new sets of sugar coupons were being issued by the Postal Authorities.—It was stated that some the sub-postmasters in the district had received books of coupons, but no instructions as to how they were to be issued, and in some cases they were being handed out without regard to the question of whether the first set of coupons had been issued.—The Executive Officer was directed to write to the Postmaster, and ask that proper instructions be given to sub-postmasters in the district.

The Executive Officer read a letter from the Ministry of Food, stating that the position with regard to cheese will improve rapidly within the next two months.

The Executive Officer reported that Mr J T Clarke had been appointed to take charge of the preliminary arrangements for the rationing scheme. The period of his employment would be six weeks, and the salary £3 weekly.

This being the last meeting of the committee as then constituted, the Chairman briefly thanked the retiring members for their assistance, and also expressed his gratitude to the committee as a whole for the manner in which they had applied themselves to their duties. He mentioned that it was unique for the sole representative of organised labour to be elected chairman, and he was very grateful for the support they had accorded him.—On the motion of the Rev R S Mitchison, seconded by Mr Smart, a hearty vote of thanks was accorded Mr Tarbox for his services as chairman.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Lance-Corpl G S Taylor (OL), of the 1st H.A.C, has been given a commission in that regiment.

In the Ministry of Munitions Estimates an extra grant is included of £300 a year to the widow and children of the late Mr L S Robertson, formerly a Director of Messrs Willans and Robinson, who was drowned with Lord Kitchener when the “ Hampshire ” was torpedoed.

News has come to hand that Acting-Sergt T G H Buxton, A.T.C, R.E, has been mentioned in despatches, and promoted to the rank of Second-Lieutenant. His home is at 10 Frederick Street, Rugby. He joined up in May, 1915, and has been serving in Egypt two years.

Pte H Addison, 3rd Royal Warwickshire Regiment, who was posted as missing on May 13th last, has now been reported to have been killed in action on that date. Prior to enlisting he was employed in the B.T.H Lamp Works.

Corpl A E Lamb, 18th Middlesex Regt, has been awarded the Military Medal for bravery in the field. Corpl Lamb has seen service in China and South Africa during his twelve years with the colours. He was employed in the B.T.H controlling department previous to his joining up at Rugby in November, 1915.

HILLMORTON.

THE death of Lance-Corpl W A Blockley, D.C.L.I, took place at Fargo Military Hospital, Salisbury Plain, on February 27th. The remains were interred at Hillmorton on the 3rd Inst, with military honours, a party from Budbroke being sent at the instigation of Col Johnstone. There were many wreaths, and a large number of parishioners paid their last tribute of respect. Before joining the Army he was in the employ of a firm of chemists in Rugby. By his perseverance he gained the confidence of his employers, and was soon promoted to the position of assistant. He was the chairman of the Junior League of the Conservative Club. He joined up in December, 1916, and soon gained promotion, but his health began to fail, and consumption developed. He leaves a widow and two children. The widow desires to thank all who have so kindly shown sympathy in her sad bereavement.

HARBOROUGH MAGNA.

WAR SAVINGS.—Since its formation m January. 1917, the Harborough War Savings Association has purchased 482 15s 6d certificates.

SAPPER R BAYNES, whose parents live in this village, asks us to state that he is conversant with most of the burial grounds on the Somme, and if any relatives of soldiers who have fallen and have been buried in any of the cemeteries out there will communicate with him he will take the first opportunity of visiting the graves indicated to see if they are being attended to.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR.
WRITING ON WALLS.

To the Editor of the Advertiser.
DEAR SIR,—I would like to be allowed to protest vigorously against the growing nuisance of marking and writing with chalk on hoardings and walls in the town. Some of it may be done by thoughtless schoolboys, but more appears to be the work of youths of low and degraded intelligence, and is both disgraceful and disgusting. It is sad to think that when England should be striving to aspire to a purer life and service of God the young people can find no better thoughts or occupation than this.—Yours faithfully.
OBSERVANT.

DEATH OF A CRIMEAN VETERAN.

The death look place, at the Rugby Institution Infirmary, on Saturday, of Thomas Brown, of Lawrence Sheriffe Almshouses. He was 82 years of age, and was born near Watlington, Oxfordshire. As a young man he joined the 16th Army Battalion of the Oxfordshire Regiment, and served in the Crimea War, subsequently leaving the Army with the rank of corporal. He was very reticent concerning his early days, and left no record of the engagements in which he participated, although on occasions he favoured his personal friends with accounts of the terrible experiences through which our soldiers passed in the dark days of that war. He came to Rugby about 40 years ago, and was well known as a jobbing gardener.

The funeral took place with military honours on Wednesday afternoon, and was witnessed by a large crowd of sightseers. A firing party from Budbroke attended, together with a detachment from the Rugby Company of the Volunteer Corps, under Capt C H Fuller. The deceased was a member of the Salvation Army, and the local band attended and played the “ Dead March ” on the way to the cemetery, and also led the singing of the hymns, “ O God, our help in ages past,” and “ Rock of ages ” at the graveside, where the service was conducted Major Vickers, of Northampton, assisted by Adjutant Tickner. The Rugby Board of Guardians was represented by Messrs J W Pendred, W Dickens, Mrs Dickens, and Nurse Gordon, and amongst others present were several old soldiers, including Lance-Corpl Joe Norman, late R.F.A, another veteran, who also served through the Crimean War.

IN MEMORIAM.

BENCH.—In ever-loving memory of our dear brother, Pte J. BENCH, who passed away in a hospital at Puchevillers, France, on March 5, 1917.
“ He left us and home like a soldier brave,
Wounded though he had been ;
But now he lies in a warrior’s grave,
Dearest Joe, we should loved to have seen.
It breaks our hearts to think of him,
Of how our boy has died ;
Not one of us went near him,
Not even by his side.
And yet some time there’ll come a day
When our loved ones we shall meet,
To be together for ever and aye,
Kneeling Jesus’ feet.”
—From his loving Father, Sisters and Brothers.

FIDLER.—In loving memory of W. G. FIDLER, who died March 7, 1916, in France.
“ He sleeps not in his native land,
But under foreign skies ;
Far from his friends who loved him best,
In a hero’s grave he lies.”
—From his Father and Mother.

FIDLER.—In loving memory of my dear brother, Pte. W. G. FIDLER, of Harborough Magna, who was accidentally killed in France on March 7, 1916.
“ Rest on, dear brother, in a far-off grave ;
A grave we may never see ;
But as long life and memory lasts
We will remember thee.”
—From your loving sister, Nell.

REEVE.—In loving memory of Pte. ARTHUR KIMBELL REEVE, Royal Berkshire Regiment, who died in Queen Alexandra Hospital, Dunkirk, France, on March 4th, 1917.
“ Oh ! just to clasp your hand once more,
Just to hear your voice again.
Here life to me without you
Is nought but grief and pain.
Could I have raised your dying head,
Or heard your last farewell,
The grief would not have been so hard
For me who loves you well.”
—Sadly missed by his sorrowing Wife & Daughters.

REEVE.—In loving memory of my dear son, Pte. ARTHUR KIMBELL REEVE, who died in France on March 4th, 1917.
“ One year has passed since that sad day,
When one we loved was called away.
God took him home, it was His will,
But in our hearts he liveth still.”
—Deeply mourned by his sorrowing Mother, Brothers and Sisters.

18th Aug 1917. Fatal Accident to an Aviator

FATAL ACCIDENT TO AN AVIATOR.

A shocking aeroplane accident, resulting in the instant death of a pilot, Lieut William Alexander Taylor, of the Royal Flying Corps, occurred near Rugby early on Friday evening last week. Lieut Taylor, who was only 21 years of age, and the son of Mr William Taylor, of Mary Hill Park, Glasgow, was flying at a height of about 3,000 feet, when one of the plane collapsed, and the machine fell to the earth. The engine was deeply embedded in the pound, and the unfortunate aviator was badly mangled. His skull and practically every bone in his body were broken, and Dr Wardrop, who was quickly on the spot, was only able to state that death had been instantaneous.

The inquest was held by Mr C H Davis, Northampton, on Saturday evening. Mr J G Harper was foreman of the jury.

Second-Lieut Frank William Balls, R.F.C, identified the body, and said deceased was 22 years old. He had been in the Flying Corps at least 18 months.

Captain Kenneth Graeme Leask, R.F.C, said the accident happened about 5.53 p.m on Friday last week. Witness was in the air at the time testing a new machine, and saw the accident. Deceased’s machine was the only other one a in the air. It went up vertically at great speed. Witness than saw the left-hand wing collapse. The machine spun upwards one turn, and then fell to the earth with a spinning nose dive. There were no flames about the machine. When deceased went up vertically witness thought he was trying to loop the loop, and probably he pulled the control back too suddenly, pausing a great strain on the planes and the left-hand plane to collapse. The machine was in order, and had been used the same day by Lieut Park, while witness had used it the night before, when he looped and spun it, and everything was all right. The speed must have been very great for the machine to speed upwards as it did. Witness was about half-a-mile away when deceased went up. Deceased had done observing in France, and also acted as a pilot. In witness’s opinion deceased was very capable pilot for the time he had flown, and on one occasion witness saw him show great presence of mind in saving two machines from clashing together. Deceased had only been in witness’s flight about ten days. Immediately witness saw the occurrence he came down.

A verdict of “ Accidental death ” was returned.

A REMARKABLE COINCIDENCE.

This is only the second fatal mishap that has occurred at the aerodrome since its institution, and when we take into account the number of aeroplanes that go up daily year in and year out, this immunity from more numerous accidents is quite re-assuring.

But there was a remarkable co-incidence about the two accidents. The records kept by Surgeon-Major Collins, the Medical Officer of the Flying Corps, show that both happened on the same day of the month, August 10th, within a few minutes of the same time of the evening, and at a spot which might be said to be identical. The other fatality was twelve months ago, when two officers came into collision.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Corpl W Hyam, Lincolnshire Regiment, son of Mr H Hyam, Drury Lane, was wounded in the last big push. He is going on well. He ia an “ Old boy ” of St Matthew’s School.

Mr P F Fullard, R.F.C., son of Mr A H Fullard, of West Haddon, who recently received his captaincy, has just been awarded the Military Cross for services at the front.

Mrs May, 8 Ringrose Court, North Street, has received information from the War Office that her youngest son, Joe, who is in the Rugby Howitzer Battery, was wounded in action on July 18th, and is now making satisfactory progress. Before the War he was an apprentice at Willans & Robinson’s.

Captain Alan Greenshields-Leadbetter, R.H.A, who was killed last week, was an Old Rugby boy. He served in Gallipoli with the 29th Division until January 8, 1916 — the night of the evacuation of Helles.

Quarter-Master-Sergt Painter, of the Rugby Howitzer Battery, has been injured in action by his horse falling upon him.. His foot was fractured.

Mrs John French, of 3 Bridge Street, Rugby, has received news that her husband, Pte J French, R.W.R., has won the Military Medal in France. He has been wounded three times, and has returned to the trenches for the fourth time. He also won the Queen’s Medal in the South African War. He is the son of Mr and Mrs James French, Long Itchngton.

REV. F. B. HARBORD KILLED IN FRANCE.

General regret was occasioned in Dunchurch and Thurlaston and the district around at the news, which arrived on Sunday morning, of the death from wounds while serving as chaplain with the R.F.A of the Rev F R Harbord, vicar of Dunchurch. Mr Harbord was 49 years of age, and was the youngest son of the late W Engledow Harbord, of the Manor House, Stutton. He was preparing for Cambridge when he had a breakdown in health, and was ordered to South Africa, where he took Holy Orders. For many years he was stationed in the Orange Free State, and for two years was an acting chaplain with the Forces in the Boer War. On returning to England he was curate of Yorktown and Camberley, Surrey, 1909-10, and then rector of Pershore till his subsequent appointment to Dunchurch. On the outbreak of the present War he volunteered for service, but was not called up until August, 1916, and had completed exactly a year of service abroad on the day of his death, August 8th. He had just arranged for a further extension of leave from his parish, and in one of his last letters home wrote :- “ I cannot leave the Army when the hardest fighting is to take place.” Mr Harbord succeeded the Rev C T Bernard McNulty, Leamington, as vicar of Dunchurch five years ago, and he was exceedingly popular in the parish. He was a true friend to the poor, taking a keen interest in all matters appertaining to the welfare of his parishioners. He was one of the governors of the Boughton Trust, chairman and correspondent to the Managers of the Schools, chairman of the Almshouse Trustees, a trustee of the Poor’s Plot Charity, and a member of the Committee of the Dunchurch Working Men’s Club. He is the 19th man from Dunchurch to fall in they present War. Until recently the vicarial work at Dunchurch was undertaken by the Rev B B Carter, who relinquished duty about a fortnight ago, and has been succeeded temporarily by the Rev A F G Wardell.

In a letter to Mrs Harbord, an officer of the R.A.M.C. Writes :—“ I have just come back from a little military cemetery, where we laid to rest this afternoon, at three o’clock, the body of your husband—and to all of us—our Padre. We got the sad news this evening. I went down to the dressing station after breakfast this morning to see the arrangements carried out, and we took him back a few miles to our wagon lines. At the dressing station there was a Church of England chaplain, who saw him when they brought him in, and the end was peaceful and quiet. The doctor there assured me that he was beyond human aid. He had a billet on the main road, and, as was his custom, he used to give a cheery word to the men as they passed. It was while talking to a sergeant and one or two men that the fatal shell came. I do not think he could have suffered much pain—the shock would be so great. There were five officers and five men at the funeral, and Major Dickinson, the senior chaplain, conducted the Burial Service. How much we miss him I cannot say. We had known him now since August of last year, and had lived with him, and out here a constant friendship of a year means a great deal. We, the officers of the staff, are having a cross made to mark the spot where he is laid, and as long as we are in his area you can rest assured that the grave will be looked after. He was a personal friend to everyone, and in that degree the loss to us is a personal one. How vividly some of his great thoughts stand out-thoughts that had helped many of us to bear these hard things in the past and to look forward with some hope to the future. He used to say to us in his service and in the mess that whosoever made the supreme sacrifice out here made it as it was made two thousand years ago. It is a fine thought.”

Another officer writes :—“ I cannot possibly tell you how terribly grieved we are at the death of our Padre. He was a friend of every single man in the Divisional Artillery, and especially in this Brigade, with whom he had lived since he came out last August, and there were very few whom he did not know personally. I should think the greatest consolation you could possibly have must be the knowledge that he died as he himself would have wished—talking to some of the men outside his billet on the road where the infantry pass on their way down from the trenches, and the gunners bring their guns and ammunition wagons.”

The Commanding Officer has written :—“ I regret to have the sad task of informing you of the death of your husband in action. The best consolation I can offer you is that he suffered no pain, and that he has been tireless in his efforts throughout this trying time in cheering and looking after the men of this brigade. My staff and the whole Brigade feel his loss very deeply, and we offer you our very heartfelt sympathy in your great loss. It may comfort you to know that he performed his duties often under severe fire with cheerfulness and personal bravery. The Brigade, one and all, are deeply grieved.”

[Memorial Service also reported in this issue]

WOUNDED ENTERTAINMENT.—On Wednesday last Mr Smith and friends entertained the wounded at “ Te Hira ” with a musical programme. A sergeant acted as chairman. During the concert cigarettes were passed round, and the soldiers were very appreciative.

RUGBY SCHOOL NOTTING HILL MISSION.—Following the visit of the girl members of this Mission which is supported by past and present members of Rugby School, about 60 boys, all employed in munition work in the east end of London, have had a week’s holiday at Rugby. They arrived on Saturday, and were accommodated at the School Gymnasium. On Tuesday they played a team of wounded soldiers at cricket, and they were entertained by the R.F.C. Officers at Lilbourne on another day this week.

VARIETY OF FOOD IN WAR TIME.

In the pursuit of national economy, the daily round of mealtime is apt to become a little monotonous in these days. Any suggestions which provide change, without adding to the cost, and also show the way to use up in the form of tasty dishes such commonplace items as left-over rice pudding and stale bread , will be more than welcome to our readers.

The well-known firm of Messrs Alfred Bird & Sons, Ltd. Have sent us a copy of their very useful and well-produced cookery booklet, entitled “ Pastry and Sweets.” This contains about 120 well-tried household recipes of great interest to every housewife. They have placed a limited number of these books at our disposal. Any reader, therefore, of the Rugby Advertiser who would like to have a copy sent to them post free can obtain same by writing on a post-card to Alfred Bird & Sons, Ltd, Birmingham, and mentioning the name of this paper. As the number available is strictly limited, early application is necessary.

DEATHS.

PARNELL.—On July 23rd, 1917, Corpl. JAMES PARNELL, of Withybrook, 1st Batt. R.W.R., killed in action in France ; aged 22 years.
“ So ready to answer the call to the brave,
Although you now rest in a far-distant grave ;
More or better could any man give
Than die for his country that others might live.”

IN MEMORIAM.

LEACH.—In loving memory of our dear son, PERCY JOHN LEACH, who died at Sulva Bay, August 4th, 1915.
Two years have passed—our hearts still sore.
Day by day we miss him more ;
His welcome smile, his dear sweet face,
Never on earth can we replace.
We often sit and think of him,
And think of how he died ;
To think he could not say “ Good bye ”
Before closed his eyes.
Still sadly missed by his loving Mother and Father, Sisters and Brothers.

19th Aug 1916. The Fatal Flying Accident.

THE FATAL FLYING ACCIDENT.

The inquest on Lieut Geo S Rogers and Second-Lieut Cyril de Frece, of the R.F.C, who were killed by the collision of two aeroplanes on Thursday in last week, was opened on Saturday by Mr E F Hadow. Mr J Lord was chosen foreman of the jury.

Alfred de Frece, solicitor, 155 Abbey Road, West Hampstead, and 2 Devonshire Square, identified his son’s body, and said he was 18 years of age. He had been associated with the Royal Flying Corps a little over two months ; previous to that he was in the Middlesex Yeomanry. He was a strong lad, with full possession of his sight and hearing.

Capt McEwen, R.F.C, identified the body of Lieut Rogers, who was 23 years of age. He was a Canadian, and belonged to the Canadian Expeditionary Force. His family resided at Barrie, Ontario. He had been attached to the corps for some time, and was a fully qualified pilot, and had full possession of his sight and hearing.

Dr William Chester Collins, attached to the R.F.C, said he saw the bodies a few minutes after the accident. Life was quite extinct in both cases. The bodies had been removed from under the wrecked aeroplane when he saw them. He accompanied and superintended their removal to the mortuary. He had that morning examined the bodies, and found that both officers had sustained fracture of the skull and dislocation of the vertebrae, either of which, apart from their other injuries, would be sufficient to cause instant death.

The Coroner explained that no other evidence was available at that date, and the inquest would be adjourned till Wednesday, August 23rd.

The Foreman, on behalf of the jury, expressed their sympathy with the relatives, in which the Coroner concurred.—Mr de Frece briefly acknowledged this.

Second-Lieut Cyril de Frece was the only son of Mr Alfred de Frece, a London solicitor. He was educated at the Haberdashers’ School, Taplow Grammar School, and in Brussels. His intention was to become an electrical engineer. He also studied under Professor Thompson at the City and Guilds School, London. He joined the Army in October, 1915, and was appointed to the R.F.C and given a commission in the first week in June.

Lieut Rogers, the pilot, was a remarkably skilful aviator.

MEMORIAL SERVICE FOR LIEUT ROGERS.

The funeral of Lieut G S Rogers was arranged for Saturday, but on Friday evening a cablegram was received from his relatives, asking that he might be buried in Canada. The arrangements for the funeral were accordingly cancelled, and a memorial service was held instead. The members of the squadron to which the unfortunate officers were attached marched to the church, headed by the B.T.H Band, which played martial airs on the way to and from the service. The small village church was crowded to its fullest capacity, this being the first service of the kind ever held in the parish. The service, which was very brief, was conducted by the Vicar, and opened with the hymn, “ Peace, perfect peace,” the singing of which was led by the band. A short and sympathetic address was given by the Vicar. The “ Dead March ” from Saul and the sounding of the “ Last Post ” proved a fitting termination to an impressive service.

A number of beautiful floral tributes were sent by the officers of the Squadron, the men of the, Squadron, Capt McEwen, Mrs Balding and Vandy, a model floral aeroplane by the Staff of the Officers’ Mess, Mr and Mrs Richardson, and Mr Hayter ; and these were placed on a large Union Jack in front of the altar during the service.

The coffin containing the remains of Lieut Rogers was put on the train on route for Liverpool on Wednesday evening. A number of deceased’s colleagues were present, and as the train steamed out of the station the “ Last Post ” was sounded.

The funeral of Lieut de Frece took place at the Liberal Jewish Cemetery, Willesden, on Monday.

LOCAL WAR NOTES,

Mr W College, of 48 Church Street, Rugby, has this week received a postcard from his son, Pte W F College—who was reported missing—stating that he is now a prisoner in Germany.

From further information to hand it appears that Pte Sidney H Dicken, of the 14th Gloucester Battalion, son of Mr and Mrs W Dicken, of 131 Claremont Road, died from laceration of the abdomen, and that the officer of the regiment was killed outright by the same shell.

Mrs S Reynolds, of 26 West Leyes, received official notification that her son, Pte Arthur Reynolds, of the Royal Warwickshires, had been posted, as missing after the engagement on July 19th. She has since received a postcard from him to say he is a prisoner at Gefanenlager, Dulmen Camp, Germany. He enlisted on July 22, 1915, and went abroad to May 22, 1916.

MR FRED STAINES IN EGYPT.

Pte Fred Staines, of the Midland Battalion of the Rifle Brigade, 2nd officer of the Rugby Fire Brigade, has for some time past been ill in hospital in Egypt. From a letter, dictated by him, and received by relatives, it appears he has been down with typhoid fever, but he speaks very cheerfully of the satisfactory progress he is making, adding that he is in good hands, and that his friends have no need to worry about him.

AN OFFICER’S APPRECIATION OF PTE R ALAND.

Mr W Aland, of 30 Arnold Street, whose son, Pte Roy Aland, of the Royal Warwicks, has been badly wounded in France, has received a letter from Lieut Hubbard, attached to that regiment, in which he says :—“ Your boy was my orderly, and I always found him cool, collected, and resourceful. He was much liked and sought after by his comrades, and his loss has been keenly felt by us all. At the time he was wounded I was just posting the company along some trenches we had just taken over, and he was just behind me. A very severe bombardment was going on, and when the shell pitched the trench was instantly filled with smoke. It was difficult to see anything owing to the darkness ; but young Aland was master of himself, although so badly wounded. A stretcher was brought in about five minutes, and when he was placed on it and the bearers were about to lift he called out : ‘ Mr Hubbard, just a minute. Down the trench about five yards, in a bunk hole on the right, you will find a bag ; it’s your grub bag. I put it there for safety.’ I recite this incident to show the pluck and unselfishness and thought for others, which was truly admirable, coming from a man who was so badly wounded as your poor boy was. You have every reason to be proud of him. He was a splendid soldier, and in him we have suffered the loss of a good comrade. . . . Will you please remember me to him. I know he will put up a plucky fight, and do his best to carry out his watchword, ‘ Keep smiling.’

LOCAL CASUALTIES.

Second-Lieut N Edyean-Walker (Royal Fusiliers), nephew of Mr C H Fuller, solicitor, Rugby, and to whom he is articled, has been wounded in France, and is now in hospital in London.

News has been received that Pte James Pitham, of the Royal Warwicks, has been wounded in the thigh by shrapnel. He is a native of Rugby, and as a youth worked at the Rugby Lamp Factory, but joined the Army from Bedworth. Pte Pitham has two brothers serving with the colours.

PTE G H WRIGHT, of WILLEY.

News has been received that Pte G H Wright, R.W.R, of Church Gate, Willey, died in hospital from wounds on August 11th. Prior to his enlistment, Pte Wright was employed in the Winding Department at the B.T.H.

RUGBY BRICKLAYER KILLED.

Pte J Shaw, of the Royal Warwicks, is reported to have been killed by the bursting of a shell on August 1st. He had only been at the front a fortnight. He was a bricklayer, whose home was at Dunchurch, and worked for Mr Cobley, of Rugby.

Deceased was buried behind the lines by the Army Chaplain. In a letter to Mrs Shaw, who is left with two little children, the O.C the Company says :- “ Although your husband had been with us fora short time only, he had shown a soldierly spirit, and his loss will be felt in the Company.”

SERGT J W MILNER LOSES A LEG.

The many friends of Sergt J W Milner, R.W.R, son of Mrs Milner, of 7 Bath Street, will regret to hear that he has been seriously wounded. His right knee was smashed, and the limb has since been amputated. Sergt Milner, who was a member of “ E ” Company, and was employed in the Accounts Office at the B.T.H before mobilisation, is still in a French hospital, and is doing well.

SERGT HAROLD LEE, of DUNSMORE.

Sergt Harold Lee, R.W.R, who, as we reported last week, was seriously wounded on July 23rd, died in the Canadian Hospital, France, on August 6th, in the presence of his parents. Sergt Lee, who was 26 years of age, enlisted at the beginning of the War, and had been in France over twelve months. His home was at Cubbington, near Leamington, but between five and six years ago he took up work in the gardens of Dunsmore, and was employed there when war broke out. He was of a bright disposition, and was very popular with all whom he came in contact with.

IZAAK WALTONIAN’S SON BADLY WOUNDED.

Probably no member of the Isaak Walton Angling Association is better known, than Mr Fred Taylor, of 59 Abbey Street. Mr Taylor has two sons at the War, the elder of whom—Pte Wm Taylor, of the 6th Leicesters-has been severely wounded. He was shot through the arm and neck, and had his head badly hurt by shrapnel, his injuries including a broken jaw. He staggered some distance before being taken in hand by a member of the R.A.M.C, whose aid was very timely. Pte Taylor being much exhausted from loss of blood, and without prompt attention would probably have died. He is now in hospital in Surrey, where his parents have visited him. They found their son quite cheerful, in spite of numerous wounds, and he is reported to be making good progress towards recovery.

 

DUNCHURCH.

CORPL B PEARCE, of the Bedfords, one of the twin sons of Mr and Mrs Pearce, Coventry Road, has been made sergeant. He is the youngest soldier from Dunchurch who has attained that rank, and he has only been in the Army 18 months.

The people of this parish always take a great pride in the flower borders in front of their houses. Mr H Pearce and Mr W Busby have a fine lot of stocks ; and Mr J Cleaver, The Heath, makes a good show of all kinds of flowers not often seen at a cottage. Mr H Burrows, Mr F Stanton, and Mrs Burton, all of Mill Street, have excellent displays ; Mr Jennings bas a good show of stocks. The flowers on the front of the Dun Cow Hotel make quite an attractive display.

Second-Lieut J D Barnwell, of the R.W.R, second son of Mr W D Barnwell, farmer, who was wounded a short time ago in the foot, has had to have all the toes amputated. He is going on favourably.

DEATHS.

DEVONPORT.—In loving memory of Alfred William, Royal Garrison Artillery, who died of wounds, July 7, 1916 (in France), aged 28 years. Also Arthur John, 6th Leicestershire Regiment, killed in action, July 17, 1916 (in France), aged 22 years.—Beloved sons of Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Devenport, Napton Road, Southam.

DUNCUFF.—On August 3, 1916 (died of wounds in France), Arthur Francis, 6th Oxon and Bucks L.I., dearly beloved husband of Mildred G. Duncuff, Benn Street, aged 22 years.
“ Lord, ere I join the deadly strife,
And battles terrors dare ;
Fain would I render heart and life
To Thine Almighty care.
And when grim death in smoke wreaths robed
Comes thundering, o’er the scene,
What fear can reach a soldier’s heart
Whose trust in Thee has been.”

HOWKINS.—Killed in action on August 4th, in Egypt, Lieut. Maurice Howkins, West Riding R.H.A., elder son of Mr. and Mrs. William Howkins, of Hillmorton Grounds, Rugby ; aged 22 years. “ One of the brave boys, when shall their glory fade.”

ILIFF.—Killed in action, July 26th, Corpl. E. Iliff, Royal Warwicks, second and only surviving son of Mr. and Mrs. E. Iliff, Dunchurch.

LOVEROCK.-Died of wounds received in action, Second-Lieut, Harold George Loverock, second son of Lewis Loverock, of Greylands, Hillmorton Road, Rugby, aged 25.

SHAW.—Killed in action “ somewhere in France,” August 1, 1916, Pte. J. C. Shaw (Jack), 11th Batt. R.W.R., aged 26 years 11 months, the dearly beloved husband of Edith Annie Shaw (nee Harris).
“ We often sit and think of you,
And tenderly breathe your name ;
Nothing left of you to look at
But your photo in a frame.”