Garner, Henry. Died 22nd May 1918

Being listed on the Memorial Gates as ‘H GARNER’, and with no obvious Rugby connections, it seemed that this soldier would remain unidentified, until a report in the Rugby Advertiser[1] was found showing that whilst he was from a Northampton family, before the war he was working as a driver for the Co-op in Rugby.

For this reason this biography could not be posted on the 100th Anniversary of his death, but is posted now, a month later, and will be placed in order in the record in due course, so that he can be remembered.

Henry Garner was born in Harlestone, near Daventry, Northamptonshire in about 1889.  He was the son of John Garner, a ‘horse waggoner’ born in about 1853 in Thurleigh, Bedfordshire, and his first wife, Elizabeth, who was also born there in about 1857.

They had seven children, born between 1879 and 1891: their approximate dates of birth being: Mary Anne Garner, 1879; Thomas Garner, 1880; John E Garner, 1882; Amy Garner, 1884; Nellie Garner, 1886; Henry/Harry Garner, 1889  and Herbert ‘Bertie’ Garner, 1891.

Over this period the family moved to Bolnhurst in about 1880 and then to Harlestone about two years later.  They were in the Brixworth registration district and an eighth child, a girl, Elizabeth Agnes Garner, was registered in early 1894, and it seems that her mother, aged 37, died during, or as a result of childbirth; and baby Elizabeth Agnes also died a short while later, her death being registered before the end of 1894.

The widower father, Henry Garner, married again with another Elizabeth – Elizabeth Butler – in later 1896.  She was born in Haresfield, Gloucestershire in about 1869, and was thus some twelve years younger than the first Elizabeth Garner.  By 1901 there were three more younger children in the house from this second marriage, although the two eldest children were no longer at home.  In 1901, Henry – known as Harry – was 12 and working as a ‘stable boy – groom’.  His father was a ‘farm carter’.

At some date between 1901 and 1911, although no record has been found, it seems that Henry’s father died, leaving his second wife a widow.

By 1911, Henry’s widowed [step] mother was working as a ‘laundress’.  She was still living at ‘Harleston’, at 85 Upper Harlestone, Harlestone, with four children.  However, with his father now dead, Henry was correctly listed as a ‘step-son’, which was the initial confirmation that his father had married twice; that there were two separate ‘Elizabeths’; and that Henry was a son from his father’s first marriage.  Henry was now 22, the oldest sibling still at home and listed as an ‘Estate labourer’.

Although the information was not needed of a widow, and had been deleted by ‘officials’, his step-mother stated that she had been married 14 years and three of her four children were still living.  This also confirmed the second marriage date in about 1896 or 1897.  When the child who died had been born is unknown at present.

As noted, just before the war, Henry ‘… was employed by the Rugby Co-operative Society as a motor lorry driver’.[2]  It also appears that between 1911 and his death, he had married, as his gratuities after the war were paid to his widow, Emma.  That marriage has not yet been found nor any trace of Emma.

With the outbreak of war, Henry Garner enlisted in Rugby,[3]

Employees of the Rugby Co-operative Society who have enlisted are: … H Garner, …’.[4]

He enlisted initially as a Private, No: 40945, in the Worcestershire Regiment, ‘early in the war’,[5] indeed in September 1914.  With no surviving military Service Record, it is impossible to outline his early service, but at some later date he was transferred or posted as No: 18071, or 4/18071, in the Corps of Hussars and was, at the time of his death, in the 8th Hussars (The King’s Royal Irish) Regiment.[6]

The 8th Hussars entered the trenches on the Western Front for the first time on 9 December 1914, not having arrived in time to take any part in the Retreat from Mons.  The first action that the 8th encountered was in December 1914 at the Battle of Givenchy.  The majority of their time was spent sending large parties forward to dig trenches and this continued for the whole of the war.  In May 1915, they took part in the Second battle of Ypres where the Germans first used chlorine gas.  In September 1915 the 8th Hussars transferred to the 2nd Indian Cavalry Division.  The majority of the casualties occurred from the unsanitary conditions of the trenches, the cavalry being held almost exclusively in reserve, waiting for ‘the gap’ constantly warned off, but never used.  In July 1916, the King’s Royal Irish Hussars fought at Bazentin, then Flers-Courcelette the following month, both battles being in the Somme area.  They returned to the Somme area in March 1917 to clear the small pockets of machine guns left by the retreating Germans.  They took part in what would be the Regiment’s last mounted charge at Villers-Faucon when B and D Squadrons, supported by a howitzer battery and two armoured cars, attacked a heavily defended German position.  B Squadron charged, then attacked on foot (the armoured cars were quickly put out of action) and drew the enemy’s fire.  D Squadron charged and captured the village with few casualties.  The Squadron Commander, Major Van der Byl was awarded the Distinguished Service Order for the action.  Two Maxim machine guns were captured in this action and have been used as guardroom adornments by the 8th Hussars and successor regiments since 1918.  During the German spring offensive of 1918, C Squadron under Captain Adlercron, defended the village of Hervilly until being forced to retreat, only to recapture it later that day at the loss of sixty-six casualties.

In March 1918, the 8th (Kings Royal Irish) Hussars were transferred to the 9th Cavalry Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division.  … The Germans began to collapse soon after the allies began their final offensive in August, the 8th fighting at St Quentin, Beaurevoir and Cambrai and the Pursuit to Mons.  On 11 November 1918 whilst camped at Maffles, the regiment heard that the Armistice had been signed.  The 8th Hussars had 105 soldiers killed and countless wounded throughout the four years of the war.

It is not known when Henry joined the 8th Hussars, but their War Diary is in the records of the 1st Cavalry Division.[7]  It seems that as cavalry, they were mainly ‘in reserve’ waiting to exploit a ‘breakthrough’.  They were much used in labouring, and digging trenches, and thus suffered far fewer casualties than the front line infantry.

From 16 May, they had been at FEBVIN PALFART and the weather had been fine and hot and the Squadrons exercised, and took part in a Regimental scheme in BOMY and received orders to move on 21 May.  This move from Bomy to Boufflers was of some 60kms – about 35 miles – just over an hour today by car, but some four days’ march in 1918.  They were well behind the front-lines, as they moved south-west, approximately midway between the main Allied headquarters at Montreuil, south of Boulogne-sur-Mer, and Arras and the front line.

21/5/18 – Marched at 9.0am [from FEBVIN PAFART] via ANVIN to WAVRANS.  Arrived 1.0pm.  Very hot.

22/5/18 – Marched at 9.0am via PIERREMONT-FILLIEVRES to BOUFFLERS.  Very hot march.  Arrived 3.0pm.  Accomodation not very good.

Having suffered the ‘very hot march’, it appears that the opportunity was taken to bathe in the river.  The incident was described in the Rugby Advertiser,
‘Pte H Garner was accidentally drowned on May 22nd whilst bathing in a river in France.  He was the first of the company to dive into the river, and was at once seized with cramp.  His officer and comrades dived in to save him, but he was carried away by a strong current, and was drowned.  Pte Garner was employed by the Rugby Co-operative Society as a motor lorry driver till he enlisted at the outbreak of the War.’[8]

There was no record of this incident in the War Diary, but as noted, Henry died on Wednesday, 22 May 1918, aged 29, drowned in the river L’Authie, at Boufflers.  He was buried in the nearby Boufflers Churchyard, near the north wall of the church.  Boufflers is a village some 17 miles from Abbeville.

When the temporary marker was replaced after the war by a CWGC gravestone, the inscription ‘Fond Memories Cling’ was added at his family’s request.  The CWGC record reads,

Boufflers Churchyard.  GARNER, Pte. Henry, 10871. 8th K.R.I. Hussars.  Drowned 22nd May 1918.  Age 29.  Husband of Emma Garner, of 15, St. James Square, St. James St., Northampton.  Near North wall of Church.

Henry’s grave is the only Commonwealth burial of the First World War in Boufflers churchyard.[9]

The Army ‘Register of Soldiers’ Effects’ suggests that a third payment of £17-10s, being his War Gratuity, was made to his Widow, Emma, on 5 June 1919, although any earlier ‘back pay’ payments are not specifically noted, although an item ‘A/C £2-2-11’ was included although not in the payments column.

Henry Garner was awarded the British War and Victory Medals and is also commemorated on the Rugby Memorial Gates in Hillmorton Road, Rugby.

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

– – – – – –

 

This article on Henry GARNER was researched and written for the Rugby Family History Group [RFHG] project, by John P H Frearson and is © John P H Frearson and the RFHG, June 2018.

[1]      Rugby Advertiser, 15 June 1918, also, https://rugbyremembers.wordpress.com/2018/06/15/15th-jun-1918-selling-ham-without-taking-coupons/.  Thanks to Christine Hancock for noticing that he was one of the ‘missing’ soldiers.

[2]      Rugby Advertiser, 15 June 1918, – and see above.

[3]      Ireland, Casualties of World War I, 1914-1922, The Committee of the Irish National War Memorial, Ireland’s Memorial Records, 1914-1918, 8 volumes, Dublin, Maunsel and Roberts, 1923.

[4]      Rugby Advertiser, 12 September 1914, and https://rugbyremembers.wordpress.com/2014/09/12/12th-sep-1914-rugby-residents-sons/.

[5]      Rugby Advertiser, 15 June 1918, – and see above.

[6]      Ireland, Casualties of World War I, 1914-1922, The Committee of the Irish National War Memorial, Ireland’s Memorial Records, 1914-1918, 8 volumes, Dublin, Maunsel and Roberts, 1923.

[7]      The National Archives, UK, WWI War Diaries (France, Belgium and Germany), 1914-1920, Household Cavalry and Cavalry of the Line, 1st Cavalry Division, Piece 1115: 9 Cavalry Brigade (1915 – 1919).

[8]      Rugby Advertiser, 15 June 1918, also, https://rugbyremembers.wordpress.com/2018/06/15/15th-jun-1918-selling-ham-without-taking-coupons/.

[9]      Image from: https://www.ww1cemeteries.com/boufflers-churchyard.html. [Picture © Barry Cuttell].

 

15th Jun 1918. Selling Ham Without Taking Coupons

FOOD PROSECUTIONS.

SELLING HAM WITHOUT TAKING COUPONS.
Samuel C Duval, grocer, Gipsy Lane, Leicester, was summoned by F Burton for selling uncooked bacon and ham to Evan Evans without detaching the necessary coupons, at Rugby, on May 25th. A second charge was also brought of selling uncooked ham and bacon to the same individual, who was not one of his registered customers.—Evan Evans, 9 Melling Street, Longsight, Manchester, was also summoned by F Burton for unlawfully obtaining for a retailer named Duval a ham, and not producing his meat card to allow the retailer to detach the appropriate coupons on May 25th.—Mr Worthington prosecuted, and Mr Eaden defended ; and, on the suggestion of Mr Eaden, this was taken in conjunction with the charges against Duval.—Defendants pleaded guilty to all three charges.—Mr Worthington said that on the morning in question Mr Purchase saw Evans standing near a stall belonging to Duval in the Market Place. He heard Evans tell Duval that he could not get a supply of bacon where he was registered, and from what he saw he spoke to Duval, who admitted that he had sold some ham to Evans without a coupon.—Mr Worthington said the seriousness of the case lay in an entire stranger coming into the town and taking food away which might be required by someone who was registered in the town.—Mr Eaden said the case was not nearly so serious as his friend tried to make it. There was a distinction between a picnic ham and an ordinary one, the shank end of the former being allowed to be sold without coupons and to an unregistered customer.—Evans was a fireman on the L & N-W Railway, and arrived on a goods train at 9.30 a.m on Saturday. He had nothing with him to eat except bread. He was not due back home until 12.30 Sunday morning, and it was obvious he could not go all that time on bread. He asked Duval to sell him some ham, and Duval cut him the shank end of a picnic ham, which he was perfectly entitled to sell to him. Unfortunately, when Evans saw the amount of bone in it he said he should prefer the other end, and Duval, feeling sorry for Evans, did cut some from that end. With regard to his friend’s statement that food was being taken out of the town, he might state that some three hours later Duval was allowed to sell some 60lbs of bacon without coupons by permission of Mr Burton, so that anyone from Coventry, &c, could have taken it away if they wished.—The Chairman said that Duval knew he was doing wrong, and he would be fined 19s 6d in each case ; and Evans, knowing that he would be away for that length of time, should have brought his coupon with him, and he would also be fined 19s 6d.

THE PRICE OF WHISKY.
William Flint, wine merchant, Church Street, Rugby, was summoned for selling whisky at a price exceeding the maximum price allowed by the Spirits Order, 1918, on May 7th.—Mr Worthington appeared for the Food Control Committee, and Mr Eaden pleaded guilty on behalf of the defendant.—Mr Worthington said on May 7th a man named Richardson, a discharged soldier, went to Mr Flint’s Stores in Church Street, and asked for a bottle of whisky. He was supplied by the assistant, and was told the price was 11s. A few minutes afterwards, in consequence of what he was told or thought he went for a second bottle, and was charged 11s. He asked the assistant if she had not made a mistake. She replied that she could charge the old price, because the Government had not released the whisky in respect of the new prices from bond. He asked for a receipt, and received one for £1 2s. A day or two afterwards Mr Purchase (Enforcement Officer) saw Mr Flint, who said that the whisky was 35 per cent under proof. The whisky should have been sold at 8s instead of 11s.—Mr Flint told the Enforcement Officer that he went to London, but could not get any information. He could easily have gone to the Food Office at Rugby and received all information required.—Mr Eaden, for the defence, said Mr Flint wished to make perfectly clear that what was done was done in absolute ignorance and without any intention of profiteering or charging above the price. If they considered Glenlivet whisky was a proprietary article, then 9s 6d could have been charged under the new Order. Mr Eaden pointed out that the Order only came into force on May 1st, and though Mr Flint went to an advisory meeting in London, he heard nothing about the new prices.—The Chairman said the Bench felt there was some mitigation in that case, as proceedings were taken so soon after the Order came into force. Those orders were coming so frequently that the public could not very often get hold of them. They would only inflict a fine of £5, including costs.

RABBITS FROM WALES.—Edith J Hardy, 45 Church Street, Rugby, was summoned by F Burton Executive Officer of the Food Control Committee, for unlawfully obtaining two rabbits, and not detaching from her meat card the coupons.—Defendant did not appear.—Mr Worthington, for the prosecution, said that from information received Mr Purchase visited defendant’s house, and she informed him that she was receiving a couple of rabbits per week from an uncle in Wales. He examined her meat card, and found that the coupons which should have been sent for these had not been forwarded. She thus obtained these rabbits and a meat ration with the coupons which should have been used for the former.—The Chairman : She “ received ” them, not “ obtained ” them ?—Mr Worthington : Quite so, and if it had been an isolated case perhaps nothing would have been said, but she had them for three consecutive weeks.—The Chairman : I did not know that if anyone sent me a couple of rabbits that I should have to send two coupons.—Mr Worthington said that probably he should have been the same himself. He believed Mrs Hardy had no idea of committing an offence, and the case was brought simply that the public should know of the Order.—The Chairman said there was no doubt an offence had been committed, but it might be taken as a first case, because the public did not know the law sufficiently, and they would dismiss the summons under the first Offenders’ Act. The public must understand that they could not receive presents of this kind from their friends without giving up the corresponding coupons.

THE NEW RATION BOOKS.

Ration books for the national system of rationing, which comes into operation on July 13th, are now being issued to local Food Control Committees. They contain vouchers for articles of food which are already rationed, with extra pages for commodities which it may be found necessary to ration, either generally or locally, at a later date.

The book is available for 16 weeks, after which a new volume will be distributed. Coupons will require to be surrendered for all rations, four being apportioned as at present to a week’s supply of meat and bacon, and one weekly to other articles. The pages are in distinctive colours for the various rationed foods. The coupons for sugar are yellow, for fats (i.e, butter, margarine and lard) blue, and for meat red. A page of spare coupons is coloured brown, and a page of spare spaces is printed in blue ink on white paper. There is a reference leaf coloured green, while the front and back covers are white. The pages are printed on specially engraved paper. The child’s ration book will be generally similar, except that it will contain two pages of meat coupons instead of four. Thus the meat coupon in the child’s book will be of the same value as is the meat coupon in the ordinary adult’s book.

Full instructions will be found upon the front and back covers of the book.

All applications for the rationing books must be sent to the Food Controller by to-day (June 15th).

SUGAR FOR JAM.
METHODS OF ALLOCATION CRITICISED AT RUGBY.

The methods adopted in allocating the supplies of sugar for jam-making were criticised by Mr W A Stevenson at a meeting of the Rugby Food Control Committee on Thursday last week. In many instances, he said, people had anticipated that the quantity asked for would be reduced, and, acting on this assumption, they had asked for more than they required. Others had played fair, and only asked for their bare requirements, but all had been cut down alike. He thought the basis on which they had worked was not a fair one. The sugar should have been allotted according to the number of persons in the household, irrespective of how much was asked for.—The Executive Officer (Mr Burton) pointed out that the allocation was made in accordance with a schedule issued by the Ministry of Food. They did not take into consideration the amount of sugar asked for, but simply the amount of fruit available. If there was any dissatisfaction it was the fault of the Food Ministry, and not of his office, because he only had to carry out the provisions of the schedule.

It was also stated that a large number of persons who had applied for sugar for jam had been refused a supply because they had failed to enclose a stamped addressed envelope for the return of the permit with their application form. The Chairman (Mr Wise) said he believed that in some cases stamped envelopes were enclosed, but owing to the great pressure under which the officials had had to work these had been lost. It would be very difficult to decide which cases were genuine, but he thought that where they were satisfied that the requirements had been complied with they should grant an allowance, if possible. The difficulty was, however, that there was not a large stock to draw from. The existing allowance had been made on the figures sent in on the application forms, and if a lot more people were to be supplied the allowances already made would have to be still further reduced. He had read that the gooseberry crop had failed, and it might be possible to get the permits granted to people for making gooseberry jam returned.—The Executive Officer said, considering the pressure under which the staff worked and the large mob of people invading the offices and the approaches daily waiting for the application forms, the wonder was that they did as well as they had done. With regard to granting fresh permits, he believed that they were helpless in the matter, because the allotment of sugar was made, and if they granted any other allowance some of the people with permits would have to go without sugar. The only way he could see out of the difficulty was to issue a circular asking people whose fruit had not come up to their expectations to return their permits, so that a reduction could be made.—It was decided to do this and also to write to the Ministry of Food asking whether, in any case in which the committee were satisfied that a stamped addressed envelope had been enclosed, they could make an allowance of sugar.

MUNITION WORKERS & THE CUP THAT CHEERS.

At their meeting on Thursday afternoon in last week the Rugby Food Control Committee considered a request from the Lodge Sparking Plug Company for permission to purchase 20lbs of tea weekly for their canteen.—Mr Stevenson reminded the committee that they had refused a request from the Railway Company, and if this was granted the two decisions would clash.—The Executive Officer (Mr F M Burton) : But this is a munition factory.—Mr Stevenson expressed the opinion that railways were as important as munition establishments, because they were the common carriers of both the raw material and the finished article.—Mrs Shelley said she thought the company were asking for an excessive quantity, because 1lb of tea was supposed to make 160 cups.—Mr Ewart : They are asking for 4lbs a day.—Mr Stevenson : A lot of ladies work there (laughter).—The question was referred to the Ration Committee with power to act, the Executive Officer being asked to get further information as to the actual requirements.

At a meeting on Thursday the committee reported that the company had since written stating that between 400 and 450 cups of would be required daily five days each week, and it was accordingly decided to allow the quantity asked for.

POTATOES IN BREAD.

The Order of the Ministry of Food requiring 10 per cent. of potatoes to be mixed with floor and other ingredients used in making bread came into force last week. Anticipating some such order, the Rugby bakers a few months ago commenced to mix potatoes with the flour, although the proportion was naturally not so great as that now made compulsory by the Order ; and they have thus gained some useful experience. A prominent local baker states that considerable additional work is entailed by the new regulation inasmuch as the potato’s have to be washed, scraped, boiled, mashed, and strained before they are fit to mix with the flour. Great care has to be taken both in the dough-making and the baking, and the difficulties are added to by the poor quality of the yeast now being supplied to the trade. When the bread is properly made, however, a distinct improvement in quality is noticeable, and the loaves are a better colour, much more moist and do not become dry so quickly.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Mrs Ingram, 21 Victoria Avenue, New Bilton, has received news that her son, Pte L Ingram, aged 20, was wounded on May 29th, and died the same day. He was an old Elborow School boy, and has been to the Army three years. Second time wounded.

Mr & Mrs Baskott, East Haddon (late of Rugby), have received news that their son, Pte E Baskott, 101st Labour Battalion, has died from gas poisoning in 1st Australian Hospital, Rouen. He was an old St Matthew’s boy. His brother, Lieut J E Baskott, was killed in action last December.

Dr R H Paramore, of this town, now in the Army, has been promoted to the rank of Major.

Mrs Rixon, Claremont Road, has received official news that her son, Second-Lieut E H Rixom, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, has been wounded in the right arm and chest.

Mrs Wilde, 5 Earl Street, has been officially notified that her husband, Pte John Wilde, 1st Royal Warwickshire Regiment, was killed in action on April 15th. He has been in the Army two years. Previous to joining up he worked for Mr F Hollowell, builder.

Mr J A Philips, St Aubyn, Hillmorton Road, received a telegram from the War Office on Sunday last, informing him that his third son, Kenneth Mc N Phillips, 2nd Lieut, Northumberland Fusiliers, attached Durham Light Infantry, has been missing since May 27th.

Mr C J Elkington, Hillmorton Road, Rugby, has received notification that his son, Lieut A J Elkington, of the North Staffordshire Regiment, has been slightly wounded in the foot, and is in hospital at Rouen.

Pte H Garner was accidentally drowned on May 22nd whilst bathing in a river in France. He was the first of the company to dive into the river, and was at once seized with cramp. His officer and comrades dived in to save him, but he was carried away by a strong current, and was drowned. Pte Garner was employed by the Rugby Co-operative Society as a motor lorry driver till he enlisted at the outbreak of the War.

Lieut Maurice V Eyden. younger son of Mr Alfred Eyden, 53 St Matthew’s Parade, Northampton, is reported missing on May 27th. He entered the Inns of Court, O.T.C, in autumn, 1915, on leaving Rugby School (where he was “ Head of the Town ”), and received his commission in the 2nd Northants Regiment in September, 1916. Two months later he went to France, where he had been twice wounded. His only brother, Corpl Clarence Eyden, R.E, was killed in action in France on May 19th.

Corpl J Norman Atkinson, M.G.C, who was officially reported wounded and missing, has written home stating that the is a prisoner of war at Altdamn, Pommern, Germany, and that his wound is not serious. He has been very kindly treated, and is quite cheerful. He is the son of Mr J H Atkinson, 37 Windsor Street, Rugby, and the second of four brothers who have joined H.M Forces.

Second-Lieut H H Metters, M.C, Leicestershire Regiment, aged 21, only son of Mr W H Metters, the Manor House, Stoneleigh, near Kenilworth, is reported missing since May 27th.

Lieut-Col H A Gray-Cheape, D.S.O, was commanded the brilliant charge of the Warwickshire and Worcestershire Yeomanry in Palestine on November 8, 1917, is reported missing, believed drowned. He was one of 13 officers and 79 other ranks who lost their lives when H.M transport “ Leasowe Castle ” was torpedoed and sunk on Mar 26th in the Mediterranean. The gallant officer was the well-known polo player. His eldest sister, who was married to Mr Albert Jaffray Cay, son of Mr & Mrs Cay, of Kenilworth, lost her life in the “ Empress of Ireland ” disaster in June, 1914. Her husband’s death has been presumed, as he has been missing ever since the reverse sustained by our arms at Katia on Easter Sunday, 1916.

LIEUT T W WALDING.
Mrs Walding, of The Limes, Rugby, has received information that her son, Lieut T W Walding, of the Machine Gun Corps, has been posted as missing since May 27th. A brother officer has written stating that Lieut Walding was with the guns in the forward area, and was completely surrounded, and the assumption was that he was made prisoner.

MILITARY FUNERAL AT RUGBY.
The death occurred, at the 1st Southern General Hospital, Birmingham (Dudley Road Section), on June 5th, of Pte W Lee, 1st Royal Warwicks, who was wounded on April 15th. Pte Lee, who was 41 years of age, was the son of the late Mr John Lee, of Rugby. He had served 3½ years in the War. The interment took place at Rugby Cemetery on Monday, when a firing party from Budbroke Barracks attended. The mourners included deceased’s two brother, Sergt R Lee and Sergt-Major Harry Lee, both of the Warwicks ; his sisters, Mrs Cements, Mrs Lisamer, Mrs Colledge, and Mrs Abbott ; his brothers-in-law, Sergt Arthur Clements, R.E (who had just arrived in England from Sierra Leone), and Mr Clements and Mr Lisamer (both of whom had served in the Boer War), Mrs R Lee (sister-in-law), Mr Jack Burns (cousin), &c.

AWARDS FOR GALLANTRY & DISTINGUISHED SERVICE.

Major P W Nickalls, Yeomanry, the well-known polo player, has been awarded the D.S.O.

The following have received the Meritorious Service Medal in connection with military operations in Salonika:—Sergt-Major D G Kinden, A.S.C (Rugby), and Staff Sergt-Major G H Sutton, A.S.C (Churchover, near Rugby).

The Military Medal has been awarded for gallantry and devotion to duty on April 30th to Driver F Calloway, R.F.A, son of Mr W Calloway, Sandown Road, Rugby.

The following men are included in the latest list of awards of the Distinguished Conduct Medal :—840139 Sergt H Battson, R.F.A, Rugby, and 22681 Sergt F H Marriott. M.G.C, Rugby.

AMPUTATION DURING RAID.—Miss Marian A Butler, a radiographer of the Scottish Women’s Hospitals, who has just returned from France, telling of experiences at the Hospital at Villers-Cotterets, said that during a German air raid Miss Frances Ivens, the chief medical officer, performed several operations, including amputations, by the light of two candles and with the instruments jumping about through the vibration caused by the explosions. Miss Ivens is a daughter of the late Mr W Ivens. of Harborough Parva.

RUGBY PETTY SESSIONS.

ABSENTEES.—Arthur Hill, painter, no fixed abode, was brought up in custody charged with being an absentee from the Army.—He pleaded not guilty.—Sergt Percival stated that he arrested prisoner in West Street, and asked him if he had any exemption from military service or any other documents ? He replied, “It is all right; I have been down to the Drill Hall.” Witness told him that he should take him to the Drill Hall, and on the way he said, “I have sent all my papers to the Minister of Munitions, Hay Lane, Coventry. I had exemption from military service while I was at work at Willans.” Witness telephoned to Coventry, and found that prisoner was an absentee. He also found that he was discharged from Willans & Robinson’s on July 2nd, 1917. Then he would be given 14 days to get other work.—Col Johnstone produced a copy of notice sent to Hill on June 28th, 1917, calling him up on July 12th. The notice was returned marked “ Unknown.” Witness also sent an absentee report.—Defendant claimed that no papers could be sent within eight weeks after his discharge from munitions. He said in June he registered at the Labour Exchange, and they advised him to get a note from the Drill Hall. At the latter place they said they could not help him ; he must paddle his own canoe. So he had paddled his own canoe since. If he was a wilful absentee he should not have remained in the town where he was known at the same address. He had written to the Ministry of Munitions at Coventry, giving his temporary address and all his papers.—Sergt Percival, in reply to the Bench, said no trace could be found of these papers at Coventry.—Col Johnstone said no notification had been received of any change of address.—The case was adjourned for a short time to enable the sergeant to make enquiries at the Labour Exchange.—On their return Sergt Percival said he had ascertained that prisoner last went to the Labour Exchange on June 27th, but his name was crossed off, as it was not renewed within seven days.—Fined £2, and handed over as a deserter.— Samuel Winfield, no fixed abode, was similarly charged.—Defendant pleaded guilty.—Sergt Hawkes deposed that he saw defendant in Gas Street, and asked him why he was not in the Army ? Defendant said he had dodged it. He had not been registered or medically examined.—Defendant had nothing to say.—Fined £2, and handed over to an escort.—Sergt Hawkes was complimented and awarded 10s.

RUGBY URBAN DISTRICT COUNCIL
WASTE OF WATER.

Notice is hereby given that no consumer is permitted to use WATER BY HOSE PIPE, without the permission of the Council, except when the supply is by meter.

Consumers are urgently requested to co-operate with the Council, in reducing waste of water as much as possible.

Consumer are requested to report all cases of waste at the Surveyor’s Office.

Persons taking and using water in contravention of the Water Regulations of this Council are liable to a penalty not exceeding five pounds for every such offence.

JNO. H. SHARP,
Water Engineer & Surveyor.
Benn Buildings, Hight Street, Rugby.
May 29th, 1918.

DEATHS.

INGRAM.—In ever loving memory of my dearest and youngest son, Pte. LEONARD INGRAM, 15th Royal Warwickshire Regiment, who died from wounds in France on May 29th ; son of the late Joseph and Mary Ingram, 61 Victoria Avenue, New Bilton ; aged 20 years
“ His sufferings here are ended,
His work on earth is done ;
He fought the fight with patience,
And now the victory’s won.
I loved him, oh, no tongue can tell
How much we loved him and how well.
God loved him, too, and thought it best
To take him home with Him to rest.”
“ Though lost from sight, to memory ever dear.”

IN MEMORIAM.

BAUM.—In ever-loving memory of Sergt. G. BAUM, 8th Leicesters, of Claybrook-Magna ; killed in action on June 11, 1917 ; aged 22 years.—Not forgotten by his, friends at Churchover.

WOOD.—In loving memory of Pte. ARTHUR WILLIAM WOOD, son of the late J. Wood, of 153 Grosvenor Road, Rugby ; killed in action on June 10, 1917, in France.—From Madge and Ernest.

WOOD.—In loving memory of Pte. ARTHUR WOOD, M.G.C, who was killed in action in France on June 10 1917.—From George and Ellen.

8th Jun 1918. More Prisoners of War

MORE PRISONERS OF WAR.

The list of local war prisoners is still increasing, and the number has now grown to 110, so that increased subscriptions are needed to ensure that they are supplied with food parcels. It will be seen by an appeal from the committee in another column that the sum of £330 is required every month.

Mr J R Barker, the hon organising secretary, has received the badge of the British Red Cross Society and Order of St. John for his work in connection with the relief for local prisoners of war.

The following Rugby men have been reported prisoners of war :—Pte T W Florendine, Hants Regiment, son of Mr James Florendine, 19 Bridget Street (Limburg) ; Rifleman Arthur Lee, K.R.R, son of Mrs E Lee, 34 Sandown Road (Limburg) ; Pte Percy Prior, R.W.R, 20 Wood Street, Rugby, employed at the B.T.H as millwright (Soltau), and Pte W Edwards, Wilts Regt, son of Mr T Edwards, 99 Railway Terrace (Limburg).

£330 EVERY MONTH it now required to Feed the 110 Local War Prisoners.

Proofs are abundant in the assurances of exchanged prisoners that the parcels stood between them and starvation, and they speak not only for themselves but for their comrades who are still in captivity.

READ THESE EXTRACTS FROM SOME OF THEIR LETTERS :—

L.-Crpl. HARWOOD HANCOX (New Bilton), transferred to Switzerland, says : “ If it had not been for the help in food and clothing there would not be many of us alive to-day.”

Pte. A. KING (Napton), repatriated, says he “owes his life to the food you sent.”

Pte. P. G. DAVIS (Dunchurch) transferred to Switzerland, says : “ I do not know how I should have got on without your parcels ; I certainly should not have been in Switzerland now.”

Pte. P. MACE (Hillmorton), transferred to Switzerland, says “ I suppose you know that all we had to live on was the food that you sent us from England.”

FUNDS ARE URGENTLY NEEDED

Will you arrange a Flower and Vegetable Show, Fete, or other effort to raise funds this summer ?

Will you organise Weekly Collections at your place of Employment or amongst your friends ?

DONATIONS or promises of regular weekly or monthly subscriptions, which will be gladly acknowledged, should be sent to Mr. J. REGINALD BARKER, Hon. Organising Secretary,

RUGBY PRIS0NERS OF WAR HELP COMMITTEE,
9 REGENT STREET, RUGBY (Registered under the War Charities Act, 1916)

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Lieut F G Greenhill has been promoted Captain.

Driver F Calloway, 3rd Battery, 45th Brigade, an Old Murrayian, has been awarded the Military Medal for gallantry and devotion to duty on April 30th last.

Pte J Donovan, of the Gloucester Regiment, who, prior to joining the Army was employed in the carpenters’ shop at the B.T.H, was killed in action on April 26th.

Rifleman H Corbett, 1st Rifle Brigade, who was recently officially reported as having been killed in action on March 26th, is now reported as wounded and missing. He was formerly employed at the B.T.H.

Mr John Jones, of Cosford, has received news that his youngest son, Pte W R Jones, Machine Gun Corps, has been gassed in France—whether seriously or not has not transpired at present. Only recently Mr Jones lost his second son, Lieut E H Jones, who was killed in action.

Capt E G Passmore, son of Mr Passmore, of Ashby St Ledgers, has been awarded the Military Cross. Capt Passmore is Adjutant in the 7th Northants. He was wounded in June, 1916, and again in April, 1917. He was slightly gassed recently, and was granted leave on account of health. He returned to France the week.

Pte Will Clarke, of the Royal Mariners, who took part in the first raid on Zeebrugge, has written a cheery letter to his old schoolmaster, Mr W T Coles-Hodges, in which he states that although the injury to his spine is making slow progress, he hopes in time to regain the use of his legs and back.

Lieut A J Harris, R.E. now with the Mesopotamian force, has been recently promoted Captain. He is the third son of Mr A Harris, of Dunchurch Road, Rugby. When at Rugby School he gained a place (half-back) in the Football XV ; and in a regimental football competition, which took place last month, his side won the cup.

THE LATE LIEUT G W BARNWELL.

The widow of Second-Lieut G W Barnwell, formerly of Grosvenor Road, who was reported killed a few weeks ago, has received letters from officer friends in reference to the sad event. In one of them Lieut-Col Frurn, K.O.Y,L.I., who conveys the very deep sympathy of every officer and man in the Battalion, adds : “ He died leading his men, who love the ground he trod on.”—A fellow-officer writes :— “ Although I was not with the Battalion at the time of your husband’s death, I can give you certain details which I heard from those who were there. On the 13th of April the enemy attacked our Battalion, which was in the front line near Neuve Eglise, not far from Ypres. Your husband showed a magnificent example of coolness and courage to his men, repeatedly cheering and encouraging them during a short withdrawal. He exposed himself in throwing a field dressing to a wounded man. and received a machine-gun bullet wound in the chest, which proved almost instantly fatal. His body was subsequently carried down to Battalion Headquarters, and was almost certainly accorded there a proper burial. During the whole time I have known your husband, which is ever since he joined the Battalion, he has been a friend whom I respected most highly, and in whom I had the greatest confidence. His perpetual cheerfulness at all times, and his disregard of danger, won the respect of everyone, and he was most sincerely loved by both the officers and men of the whole Battalion. I can assure you that all of us share your loss with feelings of deep personal sorrow. His magnificent example in the field would undoubtedly have won him a decoration had he lived. Only a few days before he died, when some troops of another Battalion during an enemy attack were becoming disorganised, and beginning to retire, he rushed up and rallied them at a critical moment. We are proud of the memory of such a one. . . I am proud to have been considered his friend ; may we profit by the example he showed to us in his life, and in his death alike. We mourn a gallant comrade, and myself personally a close and trusted friend.”

BRAUNSTON.
PRISONERS OF WAR.—Gunner W H Noble, R.H.A, who was officially reported killed about two months ago, has written to say he was wounded in the right shoulder by shrapnel, and is a prisoner of War at Guben, and asks for parcels to be sent. The Rugby Prisoners of War Committee has made arrangements for a parcel to be sent at once.—Pte R G Green, Cheshire Regiment who was reported as missing last week, is now reported as a prisoner of war, sound, and at present at Limberg.

WEST HADDON.
SAILOR’S FUNERAL.—The funeral took place on Thursday last week of Painter Tom Osborne, H.M.S Fisgard, eldest son of Mr & Mrs George Osborne, West Haddon. The fatal illness was due to a long exposure in the water when torpedoed in the Atlantic. Osborne had volunteered in the special service to combat U boats. He was a brave lad, and had performed many gallant deeds. For five days he and several others were at the mercy of the waves on a raft they made out of odds and ends. They encountered some terrible weather, and were without food five days. He died in Haslar Naval Hospital. The body was brought by rail to Long Buckby Station. Twelve sailors, in charge of the Chief Painter, Mr W H Shergold. H.MS Fisgard, came at their own expense to attend the funeral and to carry deceased to his last resting place. The coffin, borne on the shoulders of six of his mates, was covered with the Union Jack. Deceased had just passed his test for P.O, and had been recommended for award for bravery and devotion to duty.

STOCKTON.
SERGT WILLS is home on leave. He has been offered a commission, and will go shortly into training. The honour conferred on the sergeant is greatly appreciated by his many friends in Stockton. A most interesting letter has been received from George Wilks, who is serving on a motor launch in the Mediterranean. He has had the opportunity of visiting Tunis and other spots in North Africa—an enjoyable experience of strange places and people.—Albert Redgrave, who is an R.A.M.C orderly in the hospital at Etaples, had an unpleasant Whit-Sunday, when the hospital was bombed by the enemy. He fortunately escaped injury himself, but one of his chums was killed.—Cyril Sheasby was posted as missing on March 21st, since which date nothing has been heard of him. This is the third man from the village of whom no news has been received, the other two being L Wincott and Lewis Wall.— Bob Bates has been home on leave this week.
THE CHURCH.—So many flowers and wreaths being placed by the war shrine that their disposal has become a difficulty, Mr Knight generously offered to place a shelf in front of the shrine, on which the flowers could be well arranged. The work has been carried out, and is not only a great convenience, but also improves the appearance of the memorial considerably. Owing to the fact that the Rector is taking charge of the parish of Shuckburgh during Mr MacLaren’s absence as Army chaplain, the services at the Parish Church are fewer in number, and the hours have undergone some modification.

EASENHALL.
Mr and Mrs F Varney of Easenhall have received news that their second son, Pte Frank Varney, Coldstream Guards, who was officially reported as missing on April 13, is now wounded and a prisoner in Germany. This is the second time he has been wounded. They have another son, Sergt C Varney, who also belongs to the Coldstream Guards, and has been wounded three times. He is now Instructor of Musketry at the Guards headquarters in France. It may be added that he was in the retreat from Mons, and has seen much active service.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR.
THE BURIAL OF SOLDIERS AT RUGBY.
DEAR SIR,—It may be that there are rules and regulations, but the need for some arrangement for the burial of men dying here in the service of their country was pointed out in these columns long ago, and the wish expressed—and it is the wish of the townspeople—that a free burying plot should be provided for those who are giving their lives for this country. I can assure you Rugby residents are feeling very sore about the way these are being treated.

There are at the present time scattered, unkept (because nameless) graves of men about our cemetery. Were they in France they would be well-kept, with at least a wooden cross inscribed with their name.

The “opening ” fee here again debars us from doing this small service. These minor details are of far more consequence to the bereaved away than some monuments erected afterwards.—Yours truly,
May 27th.
A CITIZEN.

MAGISTERIAL.—At Rugby Police Court on Friday in last week—before Mr A E Donkin—Pte Arthur Williams, Royal Defence Corps, Rugby, and Lance-Corpl John Craig, Scottish Rifles, Invergordon, Scotland, pleaded guilty to drunkenness.—P C Holl deposed that both men were very drunk, and Williams was trying to take care of Craig.—Williams, who was given a bad character by his officer, was fined 3s, and Craig 1s 6d. —For a similar offence William Jennings, 4 West Leyes, Rugby, was fined 1s 6d.

ABSENTEE.—At Rugby Police Court on Wednesday—before Mr A E Donkin—Samuel Winfield, no fixed abode, was charged with being an absentee from the Army—P.S Hawkes deposed that the previous afternoon he saw defendant enter a common lodging house. He followed him, and enquired whether he had any Army discharge papers or other documents. To this defendant replied, “ No ; I have not been in the Army yet. I have dodged it, and I intend to.”—Defendant informed the magistrate that he had neither been registered or medically examined, and he was remanded for the Recruiting Authorities to be communicated with.

STRUCK BY DESCENDING AEROPLANE.

While working on his garden plot at Lilbourne on Friday evening last week, John Garner, labourer, of Yelvertoft, was struck by a descending aeroplane. He was badly bruised on the left shoulder and arm, and was taken to the Hospital of St Cross at Rugby, where he is making good progress.

THE NEW RATION BOOKS.

On the first of next month the present ration cards will be superseded by ration books, the application forms for which have already been sent to many householders in the district, and the remainder will be delivered by the end of the week. These forms are returnable to the Ration Officer by June 15th, but already a number—many of which have been incorrectly filled in—have been returned to the Food Office.

Anyone experiencing difficulty in filling in the forms should attend at any of the Elementary schools in Rugby or New Bilton on Monday or Tuesday afternoon next, where the teachers will be in attendance to give advice and assistance.

At a meeting of the Food Control Committee on Thursday Mr H Tarbox drew attention to the paragraph at the back of the application forms with reference to the term “Self-suppliers.” He said a large number of persons were concerned as to whether they ought to describe themselves as self-suppliers, inasmuch as in many cases a householder would kill a pig and cure his own bacon. This, however, in many cases did not last the whole year. Could such a man describe himself as a self-supplier? This, of course, applied not only to bacon, but to people who kept their own poultry.

The Executive Officer (Mr F M Burton) said he could not answer this, because he had not received any instructions on the point.—The Chairman said he thought the only thing to be done was for everyone to use his own discretion, and if they were prosecuted to trust to the magistrates dealing leniently with them.—Mr Tarbox said he could understand the position with regard to a case where a man had a country establishment and a town house, and where supplies were sent regularly from the country place in the town residence.—Mrs Dewar asked if they could get a ruling from the Commissioner?

The Executive Officer said his opinion was that a farmer who made his own butter, or who killed a lot of rabbits on his farm, should describe himself as a self-suppler.—Mrs Dewar enquired as to the position of a person who kept sufficient rabbits to kill one per month.—The Executive Officer replied that such a man would not be considered as a self-supplier.

It was decided that an inquiry should be addressed to the Commissioner on the subject.

NEWBOLD-ON-AVON.

THROUGH the efforts of the Food Economy Committee a second instalment of vegetables has been despatched to the Warwickshire Collecting Society, and this week there is a considerable increase in the supply from the villagers—64 eggs, as well as a quantity of cabbages, onions, mint, and rhubarb, being among the contributions.

IN MEMORIAM.

EVANS.—In affectionate remembrance of WILLIAM, the beloved son of W. E, & A. M. Evans (late of Crick), who was killed in action on June 10, 1917. He will never be forgotten by Father, Mother, Sisters and Brothers.
“ Who through the fiery gates,
Enter thy rest.
Greet them as conquerors,
Bravest and best.
Every white soul of them,
Ransomed and blest.”

GREEN.—In loving memory of Sergt CHARLES GREEN, the dearly beloved son of James and Flora May Green, of Calcutt Farm, Stockton, who was killed in action in France on June 9, 1917.
“ His sufferings here are ended,
His work on earth is done ;
He fought the fight with patience,
And now the victory’s won.
We loved him— ah ! no tongue can tell
How much we loved him and how well.
God loved him too, and thought it best
To take him home with Him to rest.”

HIPWELL.—In loving memory of Gunner EDWARD WALLACE HIPWELL, second son of George Hipwell, Clifton-on-Dunsmore, who died of wounds in France. Buried at Merville, June 7, 1917.
“ Behind the guns our brave lads stand
To answer for the Motherland.”
—From his loving Father and Mother, Arthur, Fred and Reg.

TERRY.—In loving memory of our dear son, AMBROSE JOSEPH TERRY, R.W.R., who died of wounds on June 7, 1917.
“ In a hero’s grave our loved one sleeps ;
Never will we forge t our noble dead.
—From Mother and Father.

4th May 1918. Local Heroes in the Zeebrugge Raid

LOCAL HEROES IN THE ZEEBRUGGE RAID.

Chief Motor Mechanic W Gilbert, who as stated in our last issue, was one of those who volunteered and took part in the naval raid on Zeebrugge, is the son of Mr T Gilbert, who resides at the picturesque old cottages near Bilton Church. He was one of the first Bilton lads to volunteer for Kitchener’s Army, but when in training he unfortunately received injuries while trench digging, in consequence of which he was, much to his disappointment, eventually discharges. He came home, and worked at Messrs Robbins’ Motor Garage, Warwick Street, as motor mechanic, and was one of the first to drive the Southam mail van when the motor was adopted by the Postal Authorities in lieu of the old horse-driven vehicle. But his desire to get back into active service was keen, and his skill as a mechanic and driver enabled him to find his way into the Navy. After passing his examination at Southampton promotion soon followed, and ultimately, he was appointed chief motor mechanic on one of the motor launches engaged in the important work of patrolling the Channel off Dover. He had taken part in several hazardous runs, and when the Zeebrugge business came along it afforded him an opportunity he could not resist. On a postcard to his parents afterwards he briefly wrote :—“ I have been and come back again O.K. Zeebrugge is a hot place. We had a shell through the deck, but no one was hit. We were more lucky than some. It was hell. Got back at 12 o’clock—just 24 hours’ run.” In a subsequent letter he says :—“ I am pleased I was there on Monday night. It was worth seeing. We ‘smoked’ for the Vindictive, so you can guess how far we were in. I think it is the finest bit of work that has been done in this War ;” and he winds up humorously : “ Talk about ——’s birthday and the fireworks—that’s washed out now.”

Mr W T Coles Hodges, headmaster of the Murray School, has received a cheery postcard from Pte Will Clark, R.M.L.I, now an inmate of a military hospital at Dover, who took part in the Zeebrugge Raid. He writes :—“ As you see by my address, I am ‘ in dock’ again once more, and, by the way, having a grand time. The last time I told you I told you I should have another go before long. Well, I volunteered to be one of the landing party at Zeebrugge, and we visited the Huns on Monday last (midnight). We had rather a warm time while it lasted, but they did not like the look of when we got on the Mole. Do you think it was my face that frightened them? My sister said it was. Anyhow, I know what it was—so many of us had had a good schooling like you always gave us. We had several Rugger players of note aboard us, including Lieut-Commander Harrison and Lieut Walker. I am pleased to say I have played against both. Really, sir, I am a very lucky man, as my wounds are quite light—a few small pieces in the head, slight concussion, and sprained back. I am looking forward to seeing you and the school again very soon.”

Pte Clerk is a grandson of the late Mr E Allen, for many years stationmaster at Rugby.

Pte Clerk, who is a son of Mr H Clark, 8 Winfield Street, Rugby, and an Old Murrayian, joined the R.M.L.I eight years ago. In a letter his sister, who has visited him at the hospital, says :—“ He has got shrapnel wounds about the head and face, and has hurt his back ; a shell exploded and blew him off a scaling ladder. There were 40 killed round him, but he was lucky. Unfortunately he any on the deck all night soaked in blood and rain, as they were all mixed up anyhow—dead, dying and wounded. . . . They had a dreadful time, but did what they set out to do.”

FATAL AEROPLANE ACCIDENT AT RUGBY.

While flying near Rugby on Thursday evening last week Second-Lieut David Percival McIntyre (19), of the Royal Air Force, whose home is at Broughton Ferry, Scotland, collided with some telegraph wires, and received injuries from which he died shortly afterwards in the Brookfield Nursing Home.

At the inquest, which was held on Monday by Mr E F Hadow, Second-Lieut Norman Maximilian Smith said his attention was attracted to the deceased officer by the fact that he was flying very low down and diving over hedges and trees. He then turned towards the sun, and came down lower, apparently trying to fly under the telegraph wires which were set back a considerable distance from the road. He crashed into the wires and the machine toppled over.

The Coroner : Have you ever seen this done before ?—Answer : No. but I have heard some wild stories about it, and I have heard of pilots who have flown under the wires and have lived to tell the tale. He added that there should have been 2ft of space under the wheels and 2ft between the top of the plane and the wires had deceased been flying straight.—The Coroner : That is cutting things very fine.—Witness expressed the  opinion that deceased made a mistake in judgment. He was not flying right in the face of the sun at the time of the accident.

Major Leslie Frederick Forbes deposed that the deceased officer had graduated as a pilot and was very competent.

The Coroner enquired whether trick flying low down was necessary.—Witness said not altogether, but overseas a pilot is supposed to do a certain amount of low flying. He added that when a pilot was competent he was allowed to fly rather low. After the accident he visited the spot and concluded that deceased had fallen from a height of 20 to 30 feet, while travelling at 100 miles an hour. He must have been going very fast because some parts of the machine were found some distance away. The top part of the plane struck the under part of the wires and deceased was evidently trying to fly underneath them. This was often done by pilots, but in this case he was not sufficiently competent. Deceased was flying against the sun and might not have seen the wires.

The Coroner enquired whether there were any restrictions on young officers playing such tricks.—A : We have restrictions for officers who have not completed their time, but others have rather more latitude, and are sent up to do as they like. It is strictly against the regulations to fly at low altitudes over towns.

Air Mechanics Coles and Muir deposed that the engine and rigging were in good condition before the ascent.—Surgeon Major Cester Collins deposed that deceased was found 20 yards away from the machine. He had a fracture at the base of the skull, partial dislocation of the vertebrae of the neck, fracture of the left leg, and rupture of the internal organs. His machine must have struck the wires with a tremendous impact.

The jury returned a verdict of “Accidental death.”

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Gunner W E Wellens, R.F.A, who removed from an ambulance train in a dying condition, died at the Hospital of Cross on Wednesday.

Pte Alfred Charles Williams, R.W.R, son of Mr A Williams, 29 William Street, has written home stating that he was taken prisoner by the Germans during the heavy fighting of March 22nd.

Pte C W Oakley, R.W.R, only son of Mr & Mrs Oakley, 21 Sandown Road, Rugby, has been wounded in three places. Before joining up in 1917 he worked at Rainsbrook.

Pte T H Bosworth, Lancashire Fusiliers, youngest son of Mr Samuel Bosworth, Lutterworth, of whom nothing had been heard since March 17th, has now written to say that he is a prisoner of war in Germany. He has served in Egypt and France for three years.

Mr A D Stocks, formerly of Misterton, Lutterworth, and later with Messrs Seabroke & Son, solicitors, of Rugby, has for some time been in training at Bushey in the Officers’ Cadet Battalion in preparation for joining the Coldstream Guards.

Mrs J Lee, Regent Street, Lutterworth, received news last Saturday that her brother, Pte H W Lee, Royal Berkshire Regiment, has been missing since March 21st. He is 19 years of age, and had only been in France five weeks. Any news of him will be gratefully received by his brother and sister at the above address.

Second-Lieut C Pridmore Dunn, son of Mr F Dunn, at one time on the staff of the National Provincial Bank, Rugby, and later with the Cement Company, is reported missing. In a letter to his parents the Colonel says that he had fought well, and that he had recommended him for his gallantry.

Mr & Mrs Cowley, of 17 James Street, Rugby, have received a postcard from their only son, Pte W F Cowley, of the Wiltshire Regiment, saying that he is a prisoner of war in Germany, and is slightly wounded by a bullet in the stomach. He is 19 years of age, and was before joining up employed at Messrs Badham’s, High Street.

News been received by Mrs Joseph E Walker, 41 Pinfold Street, New Bilton, that her husband, a lance corporal in the Royal Warwickshire Regiment, was killed action on March 30th. Lance-Corpl Walker, who was 29 years of age and joined the Army in January, 1916, formerly carried on business as a greengrocer in Bridget Street.

Pte T Eaton-Shore, son of the late Mr J Eaton-Shore, formerly works manager for Messrs Willans & Robinson, who been out in France for two years and seven months with the Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, has recently been offered a commission. He is now in training with the 18th Officers’ Cadet Battalion at Bath. Before the War he was well-known in Rugby, especially in cricket and hockey circles.

In their report to the Warwickshire County on Wednesday the General Purposes Committee reported :—“ We regret to learn that Lieut J Greenwood, formerly assistant master at Rugby Eastlands Boys’ School, has been invalided out of the Army, and that he will never able to resume work as a teacher. We regret to find that the Local Government (Emergency Provisions) Act, 1916, makes no provision for the Council to pay any allowance in such a case. We understand that Mr Greenwood will receive a pension.”

Miss E G M Bryant, daughter of Mr William Bryant, of Rugby, who was appointed matron of the Queen Victoria Memorial Hospital, Mont Boron, Nice, A.M. In 1908, has been decorated with the French Medaille d’Argent des Epidemics, the hospital having during the War been taken over by the French Government for military purposes. Last year, when dressing wounds, Miss Bryant contracted blood poisoning in the right hand, and in consequence had to have the little finger amputated and thumb shortened. It is now hoped that she will ultimately regain the use the remaining portion, which at one time it was feared she would lose altogether.

SERGT J. FREEMAN.

Sergt John Freemen, R.W.R, Bennett Cottage, Bennett Street, a son of Mrs Freeman, Lancaster Road, has been reported missing since March 22nd. He had been a member of “ E ” Company for 12 years when war broke out, and held several shooting cups which he had won. He was formerly employed at the B.T.H. as a carpenter. He had been in France a little over twelve months.

B.T.H MEN KILLED.

News has been received at the B.T.H that Rifleman H Corbett, Rifle Brigade, late of the Works Stores, was killed in action on March 28th, and that Pte J E Garner, Leicestershire Regiment, formerly employed in the Pattern Shop, died from wounds on April 24th.

DUNCHURCH.
MRS H EDMONDS, The Heath, Dunchurch, who received official news on April 18th that her husband had been wounded, has since received a card from him saying he is a prisoner of war in Badam, Germany, with bullet wounds in shoulder and face. He writes very cheerfully, and says he is going on all right, and being treated well. Pte H Edmonds has served 18 months in France, and has been through some hard fighting on the Western front. He was in the Cambrai attack in November, 1917. Before joining up he was employed at Messrs Alcock & Sons, tailors, Dunchurch.

BRANDON & BRETFORD.
SIGNALLER A L IRESON WOUNDED.—Mr and Mrs E W Ireson have received news that their son, Signaller A L Ireson, of the R.F.A, has received a shrapnel wound in the head. Before volunteering, at the age of 17¼ years, he was a draughtsman at the Drawing Office of Coventry Ordnance Works. He had been in France for nearly two years, where he had seen much fighting. His elder brother, who was similarly wounded, has now got his discharge and returned to Canada, from whence he came to fight  for the Old Country.

STRETTON-ON-DUNSMORE.
On Sunday, which happened to be Hospital Sunday in the parish, a Memorial Service was held at the Parish Church in the afternoon for Gunner Henry Howkins, of the Royal Garrison Artillery, the eldest son of Mr and Mrs Chas Howkins, who was officially reported as having died in hospital in France on March 30th. The family being members of the Primitive Methodist body, the memorial was really a joint service of the two congregations, and the Rev W Vaughan, of the Primitive Methodist Church, Rugby, attended it and took part by reading the Lesson, the Service used being the one authorised in the Diocese, and the Vicar giving an address. A very large congregation assembled to show their sympathy with and respect for the family, including a numerous deputation from the Village Benefit Club. A substantial addition to the Hospital Fund was collected, in view of its work amongst wounded soldiers.

GRANDBOROUGH.
ROLL OF HONOUR.—Mr & Mrs W Coling have received official notice that their eldest son, Sergt P Coling, has died from wounds received on April 10th. He joined the Army on the outbreak of war, and had participated in much of the fighting, and had had some very narrow escapes. This is the second son Mr & Mrs Coling have lost in the War, and much sympathy is felt for them locally.

REMARKABLE REDUCTION OF VAGRANTS IN WARWICKSHIRE.

At the annual meeting of the Warwickshire County Vagrancy Committee it was reported that during the quarter ended March 31st the number of casual poor relieved in the county was 2,581 men, 604 women, and 6 children, making a total 3,191, as compared with a total of 7,086 for the corresponding quarter of last year. The total number of food tickets issued by the unions during the quarter was 2,256, of which 1,938 were produced to tradesmen.—The Chairman moved the approval of the statistics, saying that they revealed a healthy reduction in the number of admissions.—The annual report, which was approved, recorded a pronounced reduction in vagrancy in the county.

DEATHS.

BENFIELD.—Died at 39 Stationary Hospital, Aire, France, from wounds received in action on April 16th, 1918, Pte. BERTRAM GEORGE BENFIELD, of the D.C.L.I., eldest son of Mr. & Mrs. Ernest Benfield, Northend.
“ God takes our loved ones from our homes,
But never from our hearts.”
—Deeply mourned by his Father (in France), Mother, Brothers and Sisters.

CHANT.—In loving memory of my dear husband, who fell in action on March 22, 1918 ; aged 37 years.
“ There is a link death cannot sever ;
Love and remembrance last for ever.”
—From his loving Wife and Baby.

COLING.—In ever-loving memory of Sergt. P. Coling, who died of wounds received in action on April 10th ; aged 24 years. Deeply lamented.

HALL.—In ever-loving memory of SYDNEY GEORGE, only dearly beloved son of Mr. & Mrs. G. Hall, 31 Alexandra Road, Rugby, who killed in action on April 12th ; aged 21 years.

JONES.—E. H. JONES, Second-Lieut., R.F.A., 87th Brigade, killed in action on April 25th ; son of Mr. John Jones, Cosford.

PACKWOOD.—In loving remembrance of WILLIE, the very dearly beloved son of Mr. & Mrs. C. J. Packwood, St. Matthew’s Street, who was killed in action on April 12, 1918.

TABOR.—In loving memory of ALICK JOHN TABOR, aged 19, of the Durham Light Infantry, killed in action on March 25, 1918 ; youngest son of Mr. G. Tabor, of Woolscott.—Deeply mourned by his Father, Mother, Brothers and Sisters.

IN MEMORIAM.

DEMPSEY.—In loving memory of Sergt. P. DEMPSEY, K.O.S.B., who died of wounds in France on April 30th, 1916.

HOPCRAFT.— In loving memory of JOHN ANDREW HOPCRAFT, who was accidentally killed whilst on duty on May 3, 1915.
“ We pictured your safe returning,
And longed to clasp your hand ;
But God postponed that meeting
Till we meet in the Better Land.
Some may think that we forget him
When at times they see us smile ;
But they little know the sorrow
Which is hid behind that smile.”
—From his devoted Wife and Children.

STEBBING—In loving memory of Gunner SYDNEY REGINALD STEBBING, Motor Machine Gun Section, R.F.A., who died of wounds received in action at Zonnebeke on May 4, 1915.—From his sorrowing Father, Mother, Sisters and Brothers.—R.I.P.