23rd Nov 1918. Return of Repatriated Prisoners.

RETURN OF REPATRIATED PRISONERS.

Several Warwickshire and Northamptonshire prisoners of war, who have been repatriated under the terms of the Armistice, have returned to their homes during the past week.

We understand that one of the men was captured near La Bassee on August 9th. With a number of comrades he was taken to a camp six miles behind the lines, when they remained for several days, subsisting on a daily diet of a quarter of a loaf, a small portion of black sausage, and water. After refusing to give any information to the German Intelligence Officer, they were removed to Fort Macdonald at Lille, where they were kept in close confinement for six weeks, their sole exercise being a daily visit to the canteen to draw their nauseating rations. No tobacco was provided, and there were no facilities for washing—in fact, our informant was only allowed to wash once during the three months of his captivity. The Germans behaved with the uttermost brutality to the unfortunate men, and orders were in many cases quickly followed by blows with the butt-end of a rifle. Several of the prisoners died as a result of the scanty food and revolting conditions under which they were kept. When the German retirement began, the prisoners, numbering about 400, were ordered to “ man-handle ” the horse transport from Lillie to Tournai, and on arrival at this place they were placed in a camp near the Railway Station, which at that time was receiving constant attention from the Allied airmen. Unfortunately, a number of the prisoners were killed in some of the raids. At Tournai the midday meal consisted of boiled red cabbage, and the men considered themselves lucky if they were allowed a small portion of bread for tea. This diet, however, was little inferior to that served out to the German troops. The next move was to St Reneld, fifteen miles from Brussels, and while they were at that place they were thrilled with the news of the signing of the armistice. Apparently the news was motived as enthusiastically by the Germans as by their unfortunate victims, for the enemy troops immediately gave themselves over to orgies of drinking and pillaging, many of them also selling machine guns and other military equipment to the Belgium civilians. The day after the armistice was signed, the prisoners were ordered to pull the transports Brussels, but on the way they met a party of released British prisoners, whereupon they pulled the transports into a field and returned to the camp, where they were released and sent on their journey back to the British lines without any ration. On the way they subsisted on field turnips and food given to them by the Belgian civilians, and after walking for fifteen miles they fell in with a detachment of the British Army, by whom they were enthusiastically received. “ They only gave us ordinary army fare,” our informant added, “ but after the unappetising food we had been served so long, it seems quite a banquet.”

As an illustration of the callous nature of the Germans, it is sufficient to add that shortly before he was captured our informant was wounded by shrapnel in the leg and face ; these wounds were unattended by his captor—were simply left to heal naturally.

Two of the men, Gunner Harry Maule, R.G.A (captured during the Battle of Cambrai in November, 1917), Pte Francis Bailey, R.W.R, hail from Long Lawford.

During the next few weeks the remaining prisoners of war will probably be repatriated, and we shall be pleased if relatives and friends of any local prisoners will inform us of their return, together with any further particulars which may be of interest to our readers.

RUGBY PRISONERS OF WAR FUND.

A special meeting of the Rugby Prisoners of War Help Committee was held at the Benn Buildings on Monday last, Mr William Flint, C.C, presiding. There were also present : Mrs Wilson, Mrs Anderson, Mr A E Donkin, J.P, Mr F R Davenport. C.C, Mr R P Mason, Mr G W Walton, Mr C J Newman, Mr A W Shirley, and Mr J Reginald Barker (hon organising secretary).

Mr Barker said that the immediate repatriation of our prisoners of war being made one of the terms of the armistice, the committee would welcome the news that it no longer necessary to send individual parcels of food to our prisoners in Germany. It would, of course, be several weeks before all the men returned to England, and in the meantime the Central Prisoners of War Committee were despatching food in bulk for distribution, as opportunity occurred, through the British Red Cross Society Depot at Rotterdam. The work the Rugby Committee had undertaken during the past 3½ years had thus reached the end, and there was now no need to appeal for further subscriptions and donations, because the money they had in hand would provide for any outstanding liabilities with Regimental Care Committees and leave a substantial balance. The armistice news had resulted in an almost complete falling-off in financial support. During the first week of the current month over £100 was received, but the last nine days had produced only £11. The committee had provided all parcels necessary up to the end of November, and there was a deficit of £350 on the month, but it was fortunate they had sufficient funds in hand to meet this. Mr Barker gave the committee some interesting figures. He said they had raised nearly £7,000, not including a sum of more than £1,000 remitted direct to Care Committees by adopters of individual prisoners of war, which helped to relieve the strain on the local fund. Nearly £4,000 of this amount had been raised in the past twelve months, so that with the growth in the number of prisoners there had been an equal growth in the revenue. Twelve months ago there were 61 men on the Rugby list, costing £125 per month, and they concluded their efforts, with a list of 149 men, costing over £500 per month.

On the proposition of Mr Newman, seconded by Mr Walton, it was resolved that the committee postpone their final meeting for a few days to enable the Hon Secretary to have the accounts completed and present the balance-sheet to a public meeting of subscribers to the fund.

The Chairman said he could not let the committee depart without thanking them for the good work they had done and also to voice the thanks of the committee to the people of Rugby and district for the very loyal support they had given over a long period. He also paid a special tribute to the Hon Secretary for the very efficient manner in which he had organised and managed the whole of the affairs of the committee (applause).—Mr Donkin said he envied Mr Barker the success he had attained in his efforts on behalf of our prisoners in Germany. He felt Mr Barker would always be proud of his work and rewarded by the knowledge that the prisoners were grateful to him for all he had done.

Mr Walton proposed a vote of thanks to the Chairman for the courteous and generous manner in which he had conducted the meetings, remarking that he was always in his place, even on occasions when he was far from well.—Mr Donkin seconded, and the resolution was enthusiastically carried.

Mr Barker thanked the committee for their kind expressions. He had had their whole-hearted support all through, and had received much encouragement from the Chairman. He valued the many letters he had received from the men in their prison camps and the knowledge that the parcels were of such vital importance to the prisoners had determined him to continue to the end the work he had undertaken. Now that the end had come no one was more thankful in the knowledge that the men were now being released from their sufferings, and that the food sent had helped largely to relieve their distress.

LOCAL ENGINEERS AND THE CRUEL TREATMENT OF BRITISH PRISONERS.

The following communication baa been sent to the Prime Minister :—
“ SIR,—I have the honour to confirm a telegram sent you this evening, and which correctly represents the feeling amongst the engineering community employed at the different works at Rugby, reading as follows :—
“ The whole of the engineering community employed on munitions of war at Rugby is much concerned to learn the harrowing details of the manner British prisoners are endeavouring to reach our lines, and demand that some adequate and drastic measures be taken immediately to feed, clothe, and transport these men, irrespective of any difficulties or restrictions imposed by the armistice or the German authorities.
“ I have the honour to be, yours obediently,
“ (Signed) J P GREGORY.
“ c/o The British Thomson-Houston Co, Rugby.
“ November 20, 1918.”

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Lieut J H Clark, R.A.F, who before joining the Army was employed on the outside construction staff at the B.T.H, died on November 4th as the result of an aeroplane accident.

Mr J M Skinner, of 83 Abbey Street, received a message of sympathy from the King and Queen on November 6th on the loss of his son, Pte R J Skinner, of the West Yorkshire Regiment, who was officially reported to have been killed in action. However, Mr Skinner last week received a letter from his son, in which he says he is in good health and anxious to have a “ peep,” into Germany.

Trooper Frederick Farndon. of the Prince of Wales Inn, Rugby, has been awarded the Meritorious Service Medal for distinguished and gallant services rendered on the occasion of destruction or damage by enemy action to transports.

Mr C E and Mr Clements, 33 Winfield Street, have lost their son, Gunner E E Clements, R.F.A, from pneumonia, under sad circumstances, after seeing a lot of service in France. He worked as a fitter in the L & N-W Railway Sheds, and when war broke out he answered the first call, and joined Kitchener’s Army in August, 1914. He served three years in France, and was twice badly wounded. During the big German offensive in May this year he was gassed. On recovering he returned to his regiment, when he was called out of the ranks and told that he would have his discharge in two days’ time after good service. On the following day he was struck down with influenza, which developed into pneumonia, to which he succumbed on the 14th inst. The funeral took place at Rugby Cemetery on Saturday last. He was borne to the grave by six of his former workmates, and a large number of flowers testified to the esteem in which he was held.

THE INFLUENZA EPIDEMIC.

The influenza epidemic still shows signs of abating, although the death-rate continues alarmingly high. During the last week 16 deaths from this cause were registered locally, making a total of over 120 since October 14th. There is still a considerable amount of illness in the town and district, but fortunately in the majority of cases it is not of so virulent a nature as that experienced at the beginning of the epidemic.

DUNCHURCH

A SAD RECORD.- During the past week three military funerals have taken place – a record that has never been experienced previously in the parish. The deceased soldiers were: Pte L Howkins (6th Devons), Pte G Hughes (Oxford and Bucks L.I.), and Pte W Evans (Royal Warwicks), all of whom died from pneumonia. There have been four other deaths and a great deal of illness in the parish.

MR T BRAIN, postman, Mill Street, Dunchurch, has received official news that his son, Pte G Brain, R. W. R, was killed in action on November lst. Pte Brain, who had only been in the Army eight months, played three quarter back for the Dunchurch Football Club, and was also a member of the Dunchurch Brass Band and a ringer at the Parish Church.

BILTON PARISH COUNCIL.

THE NEW BILTON MORTUARY.

Several matters of more than usual importance from a parochial point of view were considered at a meeting of the Bilton Parish Council, held at New Bilton on Monday, when there were preset : Messrs J H Veasey, vice-chairman (who presided), F M Burton, J J Cripps, A J Askew, J H Lambert, R Lovegrove, A T Watson, F J Smith, F W Hunt, and F Fellows (clerk).

THE INFLUENZA MORTALITY.

The New Bilton Ward Committee reported that, whereas the yearly average of interments in the cemetery was only 40, no less than 20 funerals had taken place during the past month. . . . .

THE WAR MEMORIAL.

A letter was read from Capt M E T Wratislaw (chairman of the Council), in which, after apologising for his absence owing to military duties, he said : “ As regards the War Memorial, I have not been able to give the matter any lengthy consideration, as, of course, the armistice has only just been signed, and peace is not yet declared, so that I think a public meeting is a little premature. I hope New Bilton will not be forgotten. Any form of memorial should be, if possible, in both wards. The first thing would be to perpetuate the names of all fallen by a tablet in both wards. If a museum or reading room is built I have a nucleus in the Potter Bar Zeppelin frame and some shell noses for the former. I do not like the institution of a club for discharged men only. We still have the invested balance of King George’s Coronation Fund, and a drinking fountain might be erected in both wards, with the addition of the roll of all fallen men and a tablet of the Coronation. Again, the provision of open spaces in both wards would have my strongest support.”—Mr Lovegrove suggested that the Council build public baths or a free library. They had the power to do this by adopting certain Acts.—The Chairman, however, expressed the opinion that any memorial should be provided by voluntary subscriptions. Moreover, if they adopted Mr Lovegrove’s suggestion, it would mean higher rates in future for maintenance, and many of the smaller property owners in the parish were already hard put to it to raise the present rates.—After discussion, the further consideration of the question was referred to the respective Ward Committees, who will report to a subsequent meeting of the Council.

LONG ITCHINGTON.

DANCE—After the cessation of hostilities a dance was got up at the Schools to celebrate the happy event, and also to assist the Soldiers’ Christmas Parcels Fund. It proved very successful, and by its means £3 8s 6d has been netted for the fund. The Excelsior Band (leader, Mr W Priest) volunteered their services, and the refreshments were kindly provided by Mrs Henry Powell. The arrangements were made by Mrs G Wright, Misses O Powell, M Whitehead, A Whitehead, C Spraggett, M Spraggett, and N Lane, assisted by Mr H T Wright (late of R.W.R) and Pte Alex Askew (N.Z Medical Corps).

THE ROLL OF HONOUR.—The Long Itchington roll of honour contains 230 names. Of these 29 have given their lives for their country, five are missing, four are prisoners of war, eight have been decorated, one has been mentioned in despatches, 16 have been honourably discharged, and upwards of 50 are known to have been wounded.

FEEDING THE GUN.—In connection with the campaign to raise the money of War Bonds in this district, the gun arrived here at 10 o’clock on Tuesday morning, and remained until 1 p.m. The children welcomed it with cheers and waving flags, and a goodly number of people assembled round it when it was unlimbered on the village green. The demonstrations given by the genial corporal gunner in charge were much appreciated, and the shrapnel scars on the carriage were examined with a pathetic interest.

A VETERAN NATIVE.—The arrival here last week of Gunner Wm Salt, R.F.A, from Mesopotamia on a visit created no small interest, and he received a hearty welcome not only from his own family, but from many old friends. He enlisted 17 years ago, and it is now some 13 years since he last came home. He was located in India when the War broke out, and eventually proceeded to Mesopotamia, where he has for some time past been attached to General Maude’s staff.

BRANDON.

MILITARY CROSS FOR CAPT D C M BEECH.—News has reached Brandon that Capt D C M Beech has been awarded the Military Cross Captain Beech is the Second son of Colonel R J and Mrs Beech of Brandon Hall. He received his military training at Sandhurst, and before the war broke out was connected with the 20th Hussars. He was early in the fighting, and at the very beginning saw much service in France. He was afterwards sent to Egypt. Here he acted as Brigadier-Major (temporary), and did fine service. Capt Beech lost his elder brother at Ypres, and is now the sole surviving son of Colonel Beech. The news caused much pleasure amongst the residents at Brandon. His father, Colonel Beech, has also been much service in France, but recently has been very ill. The hard work in France told upon his constitution, but we are pleased to say that, although still confined to the house, his health is improving.

SCHOOL CLOSURE.—Brandon School has been closed by the Medical Officer of Health. Fifty per cent of the scholars were absent, through illness, on the last day of opening. The whole of several families are in bed through influenza.

SOUTHAM

FUNERALS.—The funeral took place in Southam churchyard on Monday . . . of a German prisoner, who died after a short illness at one of the local prison camps, in which many of the men have suffered from the prevailing epidemic. The coffin. covered with the German flag, was borne to the grave by deceased’s fellow prisoners, many others following. The English guard of four formed the firing party. Lieut Crawford was the officer in charge. The service was conducted by the local Roman Catholic priest.

RUGBY PETTY SESSIONS.
TUESDAY.—Before Dr Clement Dukes (in the chair), and Messrs A E Donkin and T A Wise.

SEQUEL TO NEW BILTON TRAGEDY.—On behalf of the Rugby Board of Guardians, Mr H Lupton Reddish applied for an order to be made committing a boy named Jack Ernest Hill, aged 13, to an Industrial School. He said the boy was an illegitimate child, and his mother committed suicide on November 4th while distracted with grief at the death of her husband, which took place the same evening from pneumonia. On November 6th the boy was taken to the Workhouse, and on the 10th inst he ran away. He was fetched back the same day, and subsequently was taken before the Guardians, when he promised Canon Mitchison to behave better in future. An hour later he ran away again, and was brought back at nine o’clock by his aunt. He was then seen by Mr Robotham (the vice-chairman of the Board), and after giving a further promise of amendment, he was cautioned that a repetition of the offence might result in him having to appear before the Justices. Early in the afternoon he ran away again, and was brought back by his aunt. Three years ago the boy was brought before the Bench on a charge of stealing apples.—In reply to the Chairman, Mr Reddish said the boy was not a suitable subject for a lunatic asylum, and there was as yet no means of dealing with him under the Mental Deficiency Act.—Continuing, Mr Reddish said in August last the boy had a sunstroke, and he suffered from partial paralysis of the left side. He was backward in his education, and it was thought that if he was sent to an Industrial School he would be under supervision and discipline, and would also be taught a trade. It was impossible for the officials of the Workhouse to keep a watch on him, and the Guardians could only punish him to a certain extent by locking him up—a procedure which was not advisable in a case of this kind.—The boy was sent to an Industrial School for three years. . . . .

DEATHS.

CHEESE.—On November 7th, in France, of pneumonia, following influenza, the Rev. WILLIAM GERARD CHEESE, M.A., Chaplain to the Forces, Vicar of Duddington, Northants., aged 35, youngest son of the late Rev. J. A. Cheese, Vicar of New Bilton, Rugby.

CLEMENTS.—On the 12th inst., at Horton War Hospital, Epsom, EUSTACE EDWIN, the dearly beloved eldest son of C. E. & M. F. Clements, Gunner, R.F.A., of “ flu ” and pneumonia ; aged 25 years.—Deeply mourned.

COLING.—In ever loving memory of Corpl. ARTHUR TOMPKINS, who was killed in action “ somewhere in France,” November 8th, aged 21 years.
“ We pictured his safe returning.
We longed to clasp his hand ;
But God has postponed our meeting
Till we meet in the Better land.”
—Deeply mourned by his sorrowing Parents, Brother, Sister, and Dorothy.

DAVENPORT.—At Queen Alexandra Military Hospital, Millbank, London, Pte. C. W. DAVENPORT, Coldstream Guards, the dear and only son of Charles and Maria Davenport, of Harborough Magna, died November 14, 1918 ; aged 24 years.—“ His end was peace.”
“ A light is from our household gone,
A voice we loved is still.”

HUGHES.—In loving memory of Pte. JAMES AMOS HUGHES, who passed away on November 11th at the Military Hospital, Dover, after a short illness, aged 22 years.
“ Father, in Thy gracious keeping,
Leave Thee now Thy servant sleeping.”
—From his sorrowing Father, Mother, Sisters and Brother, also Brother in France.

WEBSTER.—Killed in action in France on September 28th, ARTHUR, the dearly beloved grandson of Thomas Webster, of 71 Abbey Street, Rugby, aged 19 years.
“ A day of remembrance, sad to recall,
The loss of our dear one, loved by us all.
We think of him in silence, and his name we oft recall ;
But there is nothing left but his photo on the wall.
Fondly we loved him. he is as dear to us still,
But in grief we must bend to God’s Holy Will.
If we could have raised his dying head, or heard his last farewell,
The grief would not have been so hard for us that loved him well.”
—Too dearly loved to be forgotten by His loving Grandad, Aunt & Uncle, & cousins Eveline & Frances.

WILDMAN.—On November 2nd, in hospital in France, died from wounds received in action, JOSEPH WALTER WILDMAN.

15th Jun 1918. Selling Ham Without Taking Coupons

FOOD PROSECUTIONS.

SELLING HAM WITHOUT TAKING COUPONS.
Samuel C Duval, grocer, Gipsy Lane, Leicester, was summoned by F Burton for selling uncooked bacon and ham to Evan Evans without detaching the necessary coupons, at Rugby, on May 25th. A second charge was also brought of selling uncooked ham and bacon to the same individual, who was not one of his registered customers.—Evan Evans, 9 Melling Street, Longsight, Manchester, was also summoned by F Burton for unlawfully obtaining for a retailer named Duval a ham, and not producing his meat card to allow the retailer to detach the appropriate coupons on May 25th.—Mr Worthington prosecuted, and Mr Eaden defended ; and, on the suggestion of Mr Eaden, this was taken in conjunction with the charges against Duval.—Defendants pleaded guilty to all three charges.—Mr Worthington said that on the morning in question Mr Purchase saw Evans standing near a stall belonging to Duval in the Market Place. He heard Evans tell Duval that he could not get a supply of bacon where he was registered, and from what he saw he spoke to Duval, who admitted that he had sold some ham to Evans without a coupon.—Mr Worthington said the seriousness of the case lay in an entire stranger coming into the town and taking food away which might be required by someone who was registered in the town.—Mr Eaden said the case was not nearly so serious as his friend tried to make it. There was a distinction between a picnic ham and an ordinary one, the shank end of the former being allowed to be sold without coupons and to an unregistered customer.—Evans was a fireman on the L & N-W Railway, and arrived on a goods train at 9.30 a.m on Saturday. He had nothing with him to eat except bread. He was not due back home until 12.30 Sunday morning, and it was obvious he could not go all that time on bread. He asked Duval to sell him some ham, and Duval cut him the shank end of a picnic ham, which he was perfectly entitled to sell to him. Unfortunately, when Evans saw the amount of bone in it he said he should prefer the other end, and Duval, feeling sorry for Evans, did cut some from that end. With regard to his friend’s statement that food was being taken out of the town, he might state that some three hours later Duval was allowed to sell some 60lbs of bacon without coupons by permission of Mr Burton, so that anyone from Coventry, &c, could have taken it away if they wished.—The Chairman said that Duval knew he was doing wrong, and he would be fined 19s 6d in each case ; and Evans, knowing that he would be away for that length of time, should have brought his coupon with him, and he would also be fined 19s 6d.

THE PRICE OF WHISKY.
William Flint, wine merchant, Church Street, Rugby, was summoned for selling whisky at a price exceeding the maximum price allowed by the Spirits Order, 1918, on May 7th.—Mr Worthington appeared for the Food Control Committee, and Mr Eaden pleaded guilty on behalf of the defendant.—Mr Worthington said on May 7th a man named Richardson, a discharged soldier, went to Mr Flint’s Stores in Church Street, and asked for a bottle of whisky. He was supplied by the assistant, and was told the price was 11s. A few minutes afterwards, in consequence of what he was told or thought he went for a second bottle, and was charged 11s. He asked the assistant if she had not made a mistake. She replied that she could charge the old price, because the Government had not released the whisky in respect of the new prices from bond. He asked for a receipt, and received one for £1 2s. A day or two afterwards Mr Purchase (Enforcement Officer) saw Mr Flint, who said that the whisky was 35 per cent under proof. The whisky should have been sold at 8s instead of 11s.—Mr Flint told the Enforcement Officer that he went to London, but could not get any information. He could easily have gone to the Food Office at Rugby and received all information required.—Mr Eaden, for the defence, said Mr Flint wished to make perfectly clear that what was done was done in absolute ignorance and without any intention of profiteering or charging above the price. If they considered Glenlivet whisky was a proprietary article, then 9s 6d could have been charged under the new Order. Mr Eaden pointed out that the Order only came into force on May 1st, and though Mr Flint went to an advisory meeting in London, he heard nothing about the new prices.—The Chairman said the Bench felt there was some mitigation in that case, as proceedings were taken so soon after the Order came into force. Those orders were coming so frequently that the public could not very often get hold of them. They would only inflict a fine of £5, including costs.

RABBITS FROM WALES.—Edith J Hardy, 45 Church Street, Rugby, was summoned by F Burton Executive Officer of the Food Control Committee, for unlawfully obtaining two rabbits, and not detaching from her meat card the coupons.—Defendant did not appear.—Mr Worthington, for the prosecution, said that from information received Mr Purchase visited defendant’s house, and she informed him that she was receiving a couple of rabbits per week from an uncle in Wales. He examined her meat card, and found that the coupons which should have been sent for these had not been forwarded. She thus obtained these rabbits and a meat ration with the coupons which should have been used for the former.—The Chairman : She “ received ” them, not “ obtained ” them ?—Mr Worthington : Quite so, and if it had been an isolated case perhaps nothing would have been said, but she had them for three consecutive weeks.—The Chairman : I did not know that if anyone sent me a couple of rabbits that I should have to send two coupons.—Mr Worthington said that probably he should have been the same himself. He believed Mrs Hardy had no idea of committing an offence, and the case was brought simply that the public should know of the Order.—The Chairman said there was no doubt an offence had been committed, but it might be taken as a first case, because the public did not know the law sufficiently, and they would dismiss the summons under the first Offenders’ Act. The public must understand that they could not receive presents of this kind from their friends without giving up the corresponding coupons.

THE NEW RATION BOOKS.

Ration books for the national system of rationing, which comes into operation on July 13th, are now being issued to local Food Control Committees. They contain vouchers for articles of food which are already rationed, with extra pages for commodities which it may be found necessary to ration, either generally or locally, at a later date.

The book is available for 16 weeks, after which a new volume will be distributed. Coupons will require to be surrendered for all rations, four being apportioned as at present to a week’s supply of meat and bacon, and one weekly to other articles. The pages are in distinctive colours for the various rationed foods. The coupons for sugar are yellow, for fats (i.e, butter, margarine and lard) blue, and for meat red. A page of spare coupons is coloured brown, and a page of spare spaces is printed in blue ink on white paper. There is a reference leaf coloured green, while the front and back covers are white. The pages are printed on specially engraved paper. The child’s ration book will be generally similar, except that it will contain two pages of meat coupons instead of four. Thus the meat coupon in the child’s book will be of the same value as is the meat coupon in the ordinary adult’s book.

Full instructions will be found upon the front and back covers of the book.

All applications for the rationing books must be sent to the Food Controller by to-day (June 15th).

SUGAR FOR JAM.
METHODS OF ALLOCATION CRITICISED AT RUGBY.

The methods adopted in allocating the supplies of sugar for jam-making were criticised by Mr W A Stevenson at a meeting of the Rugby Food Control Committee on Thursday last week. In many instances, he said, people had anticipated that the quantity asked for would be reduced, and, acting on this assumption, they had asked for more than they required. Others had played fair, and only asked for their bare requirements, but all had been cut down alike. He thought the basis on which they had worked was not a fair one. The sugar should have been allotted according to the number of persons in the household, irrespective of how much was asked for.—The Executive Officer (Mr Burton) pointed out that the allocation was made in accordance with a schedule issued by the Ministry of Food. They did not take into consideration the amount of sugar asked for, but simply the amount of fruit available. If there was any dissatisfaction it was the fault of the Food Ministry, and not of his office, because he only had to carry out the provisions of the schedule.

It was also stated that a large number of persons who had applied for sugar for jam had been refused a supply because they had failed to enclose a stamped addressed envelope for the return of the permit with their application form. The Chairman (Mr Wise) said he believed that in some cases stamped envelopes were enclosed, but owing to the great pressure under which the officials had had to work these had been lost. It would be very difficult to decide which cases were genuine, but he thought that where they were satisfied that the requirements had been complied with they should grant an allowance, if possible. The difficulty was, however, that there was not a large stock to draw from. The existing allowance had been made on the figures sent in on the application forms, and if a lot more people were to be supplied the allowances already made would have to be still further reduced. He had read that the gooseberry crop had failed, and it might be possible to get the permits granted to people for making gooseberry jam returned.—The Executive Officer said, considering the pressure under which the staff worked and the large mob of people invading the offices and the approaches daily waiting for the application forms, the wonder was that they did as well as they had done. With regard to granting fresh permits, he believed that they were helpless in the matter, because the allotment of sugar was made, and if they granted any other allowance some of the people with permits would have to go without sugar. The only way he could see out of the difficulty was to issue a circular asking people whose fruit had not come up to their expectations to return their permits, so that a reduction could be made.—It was decided to do this and also to write to the Ministry of Food asking whether, in any case in which the committee were satisfied that a stamped addressed envelope had been enclosed, they could make an allowance of sugar.

MUNITION WORKERS & THE CUP THAT CHEERS.

At their meeting on Thursday afternoon in last week the Rugby Food Control Committee considered a request from the Lodge Sparking Plug Company for permission to purchase 20lbs of tea weekly for their canteen.—Mr Stevenson reminded the committee that they had refused a request from the Railway Company, and if this was granted the two decisions would clash.—The Executive Officer (Mr F M Burton) : But this is a munition factory.—Mr Stevenson expressed the opinion that railways were as important as munition establishments, because they were the common carriers of both the raw material and the finished article.—Mrs Shelley said she thought the company were asking for an excessive quantity, because 1lb of tea was supposed to make 160 cups.—Mr Ewart : They are asking for 4lbs a day.—Mr Stevenson : A lot of ladies work there (laughter).—The question was referred to the Ration Committee with power to act, the Executive Officer being asked to get further information as to the actual requirements.

At a meeting on Thursday the committee reported that the company had since written stating that between 400 and 450 cups of would be required daily five days each week, and it was accordingly decided to allow the quantity asked for.

POTATOES IN BREAD.

The Order of the Ministry of Food requiring 10 per cent. of potatoes to be mixed with floor and other ingredients used in making bread came into force last week. Anticipating some such order, the Rugby bakers a few months ago commenced to mix potatoes with the flour, although the proportion was naturally not so great as that now made compulsory by the Order ; and they have thus gained some useful experience. A prominent local baker states that considerable additional work is entailed by the new regulation inasmuch as the potato’s have to be washed, scraped, boiled, mashed, and strained before they are fit to mix with the flour. Great care has to be taken both in the dough-making and the baking, and the difficulties are added to by the poor quality of the yeast now being supplied to the trade. When the bread is properly made, however, a distinct improvement in quality is noticeable, and the loaves are a better colour, much more moist and do not become dry so quickly.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Mrs Ingram, 21 Victoria Avenue, New Bilton, has received news that her son, Pte L Ingram, aged 20, was wounded on May 29th, and died the same day. He was an old Elborow School boy, and has been to the Army three years. Second time wounded.

Mr & Mrs Baskott, East Haddon (late of Rugby), have received news that their son, Pte E Baskott, 101st Labour Battalion, has died from gas poisoning in 1st Australian Hospital, Rouen. He was an old St Matthew’s boy. His brother, Lieut J E Baskott, was killed in action last December.

Dr R H Paramore, of this town, now in the Army, has been promoted to the rank of Major.

Mrs Rixon, Claremont Road, has received official news that her son, Second-Lieut E H Rixom, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, has been wounded in the right arm and chest.

Mrs Wilde, 5 Earl Street, has been officially notified that her husband, Pte John Wilde, 1st Royal Warwickshire Regiment, was killed in action on April 15th. He has been in the Army two years. Previous to joining up he worked for Mr F Hollowell, builder.

Mr J A Philips, St Aubyn, Hillmorton Road, received a telegram from the War Office on Sunday last, informing him that his third son, Kenneth Mc N Phillips, 2nd Lieut, Northumberland Fusiliers, attached Durham Light Infantry, has been missing since May 27th.

Mr C J Elkington, Hillmorton Road, Rugby, has received notification that his son, Lieut A J Elkington, of the North Staffordshire Regiment, has been slightly wounded in the foot, and is in hospital at Rouen.

Pte H Garner was accidentally drowned on May 22nd whilst bathing in a river in France. He was the first of the company to dive into the river, and was at once seized with cramp. His officer and comrades dived in to save him, but he was carried away by a strong current, and was drowned. Pte Garner was employed by the Rugby Co-operative Society as a motor lorry driver till he enlisted at the outbreak of the War.

Lieut Maurice V Eyden. younger son of Mr Alfred Eyden, 53 St Matthew’s Parade, Northampton, is reported missing on May 27th. He entered the Inns of Court, O.T.C, in autumn, 1915, on leaving Rugby School (where he was “ Head of the Town ”), and received his commission in the 2nd Northants Regiment in September, 1916. Two months later he went to France, where he had been twice wounded. His only brother, Corpl Clarence Eyden, R.E, was killed in action in France on May 19th.

Corpl J Norman Atkinson, M.G.C, who was officially reported wounded and missing, has written home stating that the is a prisoner of war at Altdamn, Pommern, Germany, and that his wound is not serious. He has been very kindly treated, and is quite cheerful. He is the son of Mr J H Atkinson, 37 Windsor Street, Rugby, and the second of four brothers who have joined H.M Forces.

Second-Lieut H H Metters, M.C, Leicestershire Regiment, aged 21, only son of Mr W H Metters, the Manor House, Stoneleigh, near Kenilworth, is reported missing since May 27th.

Lieut-Col H A Gray-Cheape, D.S.O, was commanded the brilliant charge of the Warwickshire and Worcestershire Yeomanry in Palestine on November 8, 1917, is reported missing, believed drowned. He was one of 13 officers and 79 other ranks who lost their lives when H.M transport “ Leasowe Castle ” was torpedoed and sunk on Mar 26th in the Mediterranean. The gallant officer was the well-known polo player. His eldest sister, who was married to Mr Albert Jaffray Cay, son of Mr & Mrs Cay, of Kenilworth, lost her life in the “ Empress of Ireland ” disaster in June, 1914. Her husband’s death has been presumed, as he has been missing ever since the reverse sustained by our arms at Katia on Easter Sunday, 1916.

LIEUT T W WALDING.
Mrs Walding, of The Limes, Rugby, has received information that her son, Lieut T W Walding, of the Machine Gun Corps, has been posted as missing since May 27th. A brother officer has written stating that Lieut Walding was with the guns in the forward area, and was completely surrounded, and the assumption was that he was made prisoner.

MILITARY FUNERAL AT RUGBY.
The death occurred, at the 1st Southern General Hospital, Birmingham (Dudley Road Section), on June 5th, of Pte W Lee, 1st Royal Warwicks, who was wounded on April 15th. Pte Lee, who was 41 years of age, was the son of the late Mr John Lee, of Rugby. He had served 3½ years in the War. The interment took place at Rugby Cemetery on Monday, when a firing party from Budbroke Barracks attended. The mourners included deceased’s two brother, Sergt R Lee and Sergt-Major Harry Lee, both of the Warwicks ; his sisters, Mrs Cements, Mrs Lisamer, Mrs Colledge, and Mrs Abbott ; his brothers-in-law, Sergt Arthur Clements, R.E (who had just arrived in England from Sierra Leone), and Mr Clements and Mr Lisamer (both of whom had served in the Boer War), Mrs R Lee (sister-in-law), Mr Jack Burns (cousin), &c.

AWARDS FOR GALLANTRY & DISTINGUISHED SERVICE.

Major P W Nickalls, Yeomanry, the well-known polo player, has been awarded the D.S.O.

The following have received the Meritorious Service Medal in connection with military operations in Salonika:—Sergt-Major D G Kinden, A.S.C (Rugby), and Staff Sergt-Major G H Sutton, A.S.C (Churchover, near Rugby).

The Military Medal has been awarded for gallantry and devotion to duty on April 30th to Driver F Calloway, R.F.A, son of Mr W Calloway, Sandown Road, Rugby.

The following men are included in the latest list of awards of the Distinguished Conduct Medal :—840139 Sergt H Battson, R.F.A, Rugby, and 22681 Sergt F H Marriott. M.G.C, Rugby.

AMPUTATION DURING RAID.—Miss Marian A Butler, a radiographer of the Scottish Women’s Hospitals, who has just returned from France, telling of experiences at the Hospital at Villers-Cotterets, said that during a German air raid Miss Frances Ivens, the chief medical officer, performed several operations, including amputations, by the light of two candles and with the instruments jumping about through the vibration caused by the explosions. Miss Ivens is a daughter of the late Mr W Ivens. of Harborough Parva.

RUGBY PETTY SESSIONS.

ABSENTEES.—Arthur Hill, painter, no fixed abode, was brought up in custody charged with being an absentee from the Army.—He pleaded not guilty.—Sergt Percival stated that he arrested prisoner in West Street, and asked him if he had any exemption from military service or any other documents ? He replied, “It is all right; I have been down to the Drill Hall.” Witness told him that he should take him to the Drill Hall, and on the way he said, “I have sent all my papers to the Minister of Munitions, Hay Lane, Coventry. I had exemption from military service while I was at work at Willans.” Witness telephoned to Coventry, and found that prisoner was an absentee. He also found that he was discharged from Willans & Robinson’s on July 2nd, 1917. Then he would be given 14 days to get other work.—Col Johnstone produced a copy of notice sent to Hill on June 28th, 1917, calling him up on July 12th. The notice was returned marked “ Unknown.” Witness also sent an absentee report.—Defendant claimed that no papers could be sent within eight weeks after his discharge from munitions. He said in June he registered at the Labour Exchange, and they advised him to get a note from the Drill Hall. At the latter place they said they could not help him ; he must paddle his own canoe. So he had paddled his own canoe since. If he was a wilful absentee he should not have remained in the town where he was known at the same address. He had written to the Ministry of Munitions at Coventry, giving his temporary address and all his papers.—Sergt Percival, in reply to the Bench, said no trace could be found of these papers at Coventry.—Col Johnstone said no notification had been received of any change of address.—The case was adjourned for a short time to enable the sergeant to make enquiries at the Labour Exchange.—On their return Sergt Percival said he had ascertained that prisoner last went to the Labour Exchange on June 27th, but his name was crossed off, as it was not renewed within seven days.—Fined £2, and handed over as a deserter.— Samuel Winfield, no fixed abode, was similarly charged.—Defendant pleaded guilty.—Sergt Hawkes deposed that he saw defendant in Gas Street, and asked him why he was not in the Army ? Defendant said he had dodged it. He had not been registered or medically examined.—Defendant had nothing to say.—Fined £2, and handed over to an escort.—Sergt Hawkes was complimented and awarded 10s.

RUGBY URBAN DISTRICT COUNCIL
WASTE OF WATER.

Notice is hereby given that no consumer is permitted to use WATER BY HOSE PIPE, without the permission of the Council, except when the supply is by meter.

Consumers are urgently requested to co-operate with the Council, in reducing waste of water as much as possible.

Consumer are requested to report all cases of waste at the Surveyor’s Office.

Persons taking and using water in contravention of the Water Regulations of this Council are liable to a penalty not exceeding five pounds for every such offence.

JNO. H. SHARP,
Water Engineer & Surveyor.
Benn Buildings, Hight Street, Rugby.
May 29th, 1918.

DEATHS.

INGRAM.—In ever loving memory of my dearest and youngest son, Pte. LEONARD INGRAM, 15th Royal Warwickshire Regiment, who died from wounds in France on May 29th ; son of the late Joseph and Mary Ingram, 61 Victoria Avenue, New Bilton ; aged 20 years
“ His sufferings here are ended,
His work on earth is done ;
He fought the fight with patience,
And now the victory’s won.
I loved him, oh, no tongue can tell
How much we loved him and how well.
God loved him, too, and thought it best
To take him home with Him to rest.”
“ Though lost from sight, to memory ever dear.”

IN MEMORIAM.

BAUM.—In ever-loving memory of Sergt. G. BAUM, 8th Leicesters, of Claybrook-Magna ; killed in action on June 11, 1917 ; aged 22 years.—Not forgotten by his, friends at Churchover.

WOOD.—In loving memory of Pte. ARTHUR WILLIAM WOOD, son of the late J. Wood, of 153 Grosvenor Road, Rugby ; killed in action on June 10, 1917, in France.—From Madge and Ernest.

WOOD.—In loving memory of Pte. ARTHUR WOOD, M.G.C, who was killed in action in France on June 10 1917.—From George and Ellen.

12th Jun 1915. A Fierce Struggle

A FIERCE STRUGGLE.

Pte A Goode, attached to the machine gun section of the 1st Battalion Loyal North Lancashire Regiment, “ somewhere in France,” in a letter his father, 173 Cambridge Street, Rugby, says :-

“ I suppose by this time you will have read about the great fight we had on May 9th. I shall never forget it. We have named it “ The bloody Sunday.” We went into the trenches at ten o’clock on the Saturday night, and lay there during a bitterly cold night. At five o’clock on Sunday morning the big guns commenced their music, which was terrible, and it lasted an hour. Then came the order to advance to do or die. We had to go over five lines of breastworks, 200 yards of open ground between each. All the time the enemy were raining upon us shrapnel shells, “ coal-boxes,” and lead from machine guns ; but we never faltered, and as chum after chum went down we set our teeth and gripped out guns tighter. When we had passed the last breastwork we took a breather for two minutes ; then for the German trenches 350 yards in front—is was hell itself, I can tell you. We charged them with the bayonet, but it was beyond the power of man to get through their barbed wire fences. Blood, however, flowed like water ! But our time will come when we will avenge our brave chums who gave their lives on that field for home and country. The fight lasted through 24 hours, until the Monday. It was a terrible sights after we had finished to see dead and wounded. Never mind ; we are all ready and willing again when wanted ; but we are getting less in numbers—I mean we who came here first. Will the young men of England pluck up and come out and give us a hand ? It is about time some of them threw away the tennis bats and golf clubs and learn to use a rifle, and come out and help us. We have a very stubborn enemy, and he will take some shifting ; but by the help of men, guns, and ammunition, we shall do it—for we are still British and have the hearts of men. Pluck up, slackers, and give us a hand.”

IMPUDENT GERMAN SNIPERS.

Drummer W Newman, of the 7th Battery Royal Warwickshire Regiment, brother to Mr C J Newman, architect, of Rugby, in a letter from the front says:—“ The weather out here is grand, but it is enough to roast us as we do our sentry duty, which is nothing but standing and watching through a periscope at the enemy’s lines. They have been rather cheeky this time. For instance, during Saturday night one of their patrols must have been very near to ours, for in the morning, when we looked over the parapet, we saw fastened on a willow tree, about 200 yards away, a board with the words painted on it: ‘Przemysl Zunicherobert.’ The last word we take to mean ‘re-taken.’ However, if they come out doing those tricks too many times they will find a ‘pleasant surprise’ waiting for them in the way of a bomb or a shot from one of our patrols.”

CASUALTIES IN THE SEVENTH WARWICKSHIRE BATTALION.

The following casualties in the Warwickshire Territorial Battalion are reported under dates May 19th and 22nd :-

KILLED.—Brooks, 1168, Sergt E.

WOUNDED.—Evans, 2785, Pte R O ; Hobbs, 2632, Pte W R ; Shearsby, 2741, Pte A ; Tuggey, 2578, Pte W ; Ball, 1621, Pte R ; Blundell, 2452, Pte R ; Coltman, 1814, Lce-Corpl W C ; Cook, 2269, Pte J ; Dolman, 2649, Pte ; Dunn, 2511, Pte W ; Fowler, 2064, Pte W H ; Hughes, 1755, Pte J ; Mence, 1802, Pte F ; Ramsden, 2377, Pte J A ; Sadler, 1287, Lce-Corpl J ; Sale, 1674, Pte J ; Savage, 909, Pte W ; South, 1986, Sergt G ; Taylor, 1071, Corpl H A ; Ward, 2762, Pte E ; Wormell, 2536, Pte J

 

LOCAL CASUALTIES OF THE WAR.

“ E ” COMPANY’S CASUALTIES.

A member of “ E ” Company (now merged with “ C ” Company of the 7th Warwickshire Territorial Battalion), writing under date June 6th, says :-

“ The weather here is glorious ; we are all brown as berries and in the very best of health. On Tuesday last I paid the Company a visit. They were off to the trenches that night ; but, to judge by the interest displayed in an inter-company cricket match, you would never believe that within an hour or two they would be doing their whack in the trenches. The news, I’m sorry to say, is by far the worst since our arrival in France, and concerns members of the old ‘E’ Company. On Thursday, May 27th, Lance-Corpl R Clowes and H Rogers were wounded. The former, I regret to say, died on June 2nd. On Friday night, May 28th, there was a most exciting episode, in which the Rugby lads came through with flying colours, but with further loss. The following are, as far as I could gather, the details :—A party, including Corpl W Bromwich, Ptes L Hill, L Eaton, and P Hall, were out on the listening post, when a party of Germans came out and tried to surprise them. The enemy opened fire, killing L (Bleb) Hill, a Newbold lad, and wounding L Eaton. The latter stuck to his post, and continued firing until help arrived, consisting of a party under Sergt G Ward. I expect the enemy gave it up for a bad job, and upon examination by our chaps we found they had left one dead. Our men brought him in, and he proved to be an iron cross man. His rifle has been despatched to England, and will some day repose in the Rugby Drill Hall as a war trophy. The Company has been congratulated by the Colonel, as undoubtedly by their watchfulness and presence of mind they saved an awkward situation. Corpl Bromwich has since been promoted lance-sergeant. Some of this news may be stale by now, yet I think the Rugby people should learn what their lads are doing. At the request of several I have been asked to point out that what they consider to be an insult to them is the booming of the troops who were billeted in Rugby as “ The Rugby Soldiers, &c.” The sentiments expressed to me are that only the Battery and ‘E’ Company, &c, really come under that nomenclature. We appear to be off the picture. We were the original ‘ Rugby soldiers ’ long before this war broke out, and still claim that honour ; and, what’s more, refuse to allow any other troops—no matter what splendid work they have done, sacrifices they have made, and losses suffered—to step into our rightful position in the hearts and sympathies of the people of Rugby. The Rev B McNulty conducted a service a week last Wednesday. He was quite pleased to drop across Rugby men.”

LOCAL WAR CASUALTIES

CAPT RENNIE WATERHOUSE KILLED.

Capt Rennie Waterhouse, of the 7th Lancashire Fusiliers, who is reported as having been killed in the Dardanelles on May 10th, was formerly a member of the B.T.H Company’s staff as an engineer in the contract and turbine sales department. He was the third son of Mrs T C Waterhouse, of Lomberdale Hall, Bakewell, and of Thorncliffe, Kersal Edge, Manchester, and all his brothers are serving with H.M Forces. Capt Waterhouse, who during his residence in Rugby lived at Epworth, Clifton Road, owned a textile mill at Rheims, which has been destroyed by the Germans.

BILTON.

MUCH regret has been caused in this village by the death of Gnr. Harold Freeman, of the Royal Field Artillery, son of Mr H Freeman ; and the greatest sympathy is felt for the bereaved relatives. Harold, a strong, well-built young fellow, was a painter and plumber by trade, and his unassuming manner and genial disposition made him a general favourite in the place. He was a member of the Cricket and Football Clubs, and also of the Working Men’s Club, for which he did a great deal of useful work when it became necessary to renovate the club premises last summer. He also belonged to the Foresters’ Court, and in all respects his conduct was exemplary. When the war broke out he at once realised that it was his duty to obey the call to arms, and enlisted in the Royal Field Artillery. He quickly made himself an expert artilleryman, and was several times offered promotion, but preferred to remain a private. His Battery was daily expecting orders to go to the front; everything was in readiness, and he was looking forward to the opportunity of seeing active service, when some time last week he was taken ill with pneumonia, complications developed, and he passed away on Monday at the age of 26. The body was brought to Bilton on Wednesday night and placed in the Memorial Chapel, near his home at The Magnet, to await burial yesterday (Friday) afternoon.

NEWBOLD-ON-AVON.

THE DEATH OF PTE. HILL.

Mr and Mrs Hill, parents of Pte Hill, of the Rugby Territorial Company, who, as reported last week, was killed in action, have received a letter from Sergt Ward, who says :—

“ I wish to express my deepest sympathy with you all in the loss of such an excellent soldier as your son, who was killed whilst doing his duty on Friday, May 28th, at about 1 a.m. We are all sorry at the loss of his services, for he was one of our best men. Whenever he was called upon to perform any duty, no matter what it was, he did it with a cheerful spirit. This time he was out on the listening post, which is in front of our lines between 50 and 60 yards, when a party of Germans attacked them. Every man performed his duty splendidly. His comrade by his side was also wounded, but kept on firing until a party reinforced them, and made it possible for us to get his body and retire to the trenches. His death was avenged by a German’s death, whose body was fetched in. There is not a man in the Company that will not miss him, for a good many times when on the march he has made the march go easy by singing a song. He was in my section, and there is no one out hero who will miss him more than I shall. I must express to you the deepest sympathy on behalf of the section to which he belonged, also the whole platoon. Louis was buried by the side of our other unfortunate comrades. He suffered no pain or agony, for death was instantaneous.”

To the letter is appended the following note by Capt Mason :—

“ Unfortunately no time to write a letter, but the above expresses the opinion of officers as well as men. On behalf of the officers I most deeply sympathise with you in your bereavement.”

Q.M.S A C Tomlinson also writes:-

“ It is with deepest regret and sincere sympathy that we have to tell you of the death of your son, Pte L Hill. He met his death gallantly, fighting in defence of the post entrusted to him. His memory is proudly established in the hearts of all his comrades. He was always cheery, always happy, and every man in the Company was his friend, and we all miss his bright presence. It may be a comfort for you to know that his death was instantaneous and without pain. He died fighting for his King, his country and his home, and no man can wish for a prouder death.”

Mr and MRS J HIPWELL received a notification from the War Office on Sunday last that Corpl William Hence, C Company, 2nd Border Regiment, was killed in action on May 16th. He was employed at Messrs Willans & Robinson’s, and joined the regiment soon after the war commenced. He was 25 years of age, and has made his home with Mr and Mrs J Hipwell (Newbold) from a boy. He had been previously wounded, and was away in hospital for seven weeks, but returned to the firing-line again a short time ago.

WOLSTON.

MR AND MRS A OWEN, of Wolsten, have now heard definitely that their son is amongst the missing and they have received official intimation that he has been missing since an action near Ypres on the 25th of April last. Since that date no information has come to hand as to his whereabouts.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Capt G T Seabroke, of the East Lancashire Regiment, son of Col Seabroke, Rugby, has been gazetted major.

Mr P G Chamberlain, M.A, of No. 3 Market Place, Rugby, has joined the H.A.C (Infantry Battalion).

The French Military Authorities have requested Dr Frances Ivens (formerly of Harborough Parva) to start a Field Hospital between the firing line and Royaumont. With the approbation of the Scottish Committee, Dr Ivens agreed to do so and to have it ready at 48 hours’ notice.

Brev-Col R A Richardson, of the Warwickshire Yeomanry, whose gallant conduct on the occasion of the torpedo attack on the Wayfarer was referred to in an Army Order, published last week, is a brother of Mrs Mulliner, of Clifton Court.

Mrs H R Lee, of 78 Campbell Street, New Bilton, has received official intimation that her husband, Pte Lee, of the 1st Royal Warwickshire Regiment, a former employee of the B.T.H, is in a hospital at Rouen suffering from a slight scalp wound.

It is gratifying to learn that the complaints which have been made in certain quarters of slackness among workmen employed in the manufacture of munitions do not apply to Rugby, and that the local representatives of the allied engineering trades are rendering every assistance. In accordance with Press regulations we abstain from giving further details.

TWO RUGBY CLERICS JOIN THE FORCES.

We understand that the Rev S M Morgan, curate-in-charge of the Church House, and the Rev R W Dugdale, curate-in-charge of Holy Trinity Church, have been appointed by the Chaplain-General as chaplains to H.M. Forces in the 63rd and 64th Brigades, now stationed at Tring, and that they will be leaving Rugby shortly. We are sure that they will carry with them the hearty good wishes of all Rugbeians.

RECRUITING AT RUGBY.

Eighteen recruits have been accepted at Rugby Drill Hall during the past week, as follows :- S W Wareing, J E Burnham, and T Batchelor, R.W.R ; T Jennings, 13th Gloucesters : G B Cox, Leicesters ; F Southam, Rifle Brigade ; F Gardner, Oxon and Bucks L.I ; H Bishop, A.S.C (H.T) ; W R Seaton, Welsh Guards ; J Clarke and W H Moseley, Army Vet. Corps ; H Bate, F C Woodhouse, S C Hobbs, W R Davis, E W Ellson, and S H Oswell, Rugby Fortress Company. R.E ; F Morrey, Household Cavalry.

HAIRDRESSERS’ CHARGES.

A meeting was held on Monday last by the Rugby hairdressers to discuss the advisability of increasing their saloon charges. It will be remembered that about twelve months ago the Rugby Hairdressers’ Association fixed a minimum price of 1½d for shaving and 3d for haircutting, which abolished 1d shaving in Rugby. The better-appointed shops have decided that, owing to the rapid increase of expenses—both business and domestic—and the flourishing state of the labour market they will increase their charges to the following prices:—Shaving, 2d; hair-cutting, 4d; ditto (boys under 14), 3d; singeing, 4d; shampooing, 4d. The new prices are to come in force on Thursday, June 10th.

It was mentioned that a great number of their customers had joined his Majesty’s Forces, and were now in training or at the front, and those who were serving his Majesty in the local works were working so many hours that they are unable to attend the saloon, and therefore cause a considerable fall in the saloon takings. It was decided by those who have adopted the new prices to attend the Warwickshire Reservists at the old prices, and the same privilege will be extended to those customers who have donned the khaki when they come home on furlough.

NOTICE TO WARWICKSHIRE LICENSED VICTUALLERS.

The Chief Constable of Warwickshire (Captain J T Brinkley) has issued the following notice to licensed victuallers under the Intoxicating Liquor Laws :- “Complaints being received from Red Cross Hospitals in the county that wounded soldiers are being supplied with drink in the public-houses, and, in some instances, return in an intoxicated condition, license holders are requested not to serve them with intoxicants. The Brigadier-General commanding this district informs me that unless this request is observed as far as it is possible to do so, it will be necessary to put the premises complained of out of bounds for all troops, with the further liability of being closed altogether under the Defence of the Realm regulations if further complaints are received.

 

 

 

 

5th Jun 1915. Casualties from the villages

BARBY.

RIFLEMAN BERRIDGE KILLED IN ACTION.

The Rector has received the following letter :-“ Reverend Sir,-To-day the enclosed card arrived from you for No 419 Rifleman G Berridge, of my Company, who, I deeply regret to inform you, was killed in action on the 13th inst, while serving in the Company in the trenches. I shall be grateful if you will inform his relatives and convey to them the deepest sympathy of the N.C.O’s and riflemen of C Company. We can only hope that the knowledge of his death in the service of his country will afford them some little consolation in their sorrow.-Yours very truly, T Sherwood, C.G.M.S, C Company, R.B.

On Sunday afternoon a memorial service was held in conjunction with the afternoon service in the Parish Church. Special psalms and hymns were sung, the lesson in the Burial Service was read, and the sentences and prayers in the service were used. In front of the pulpit was hung the picture, “ The Great Sacrifice,” representing the   soldier dying for his country, trusting in Christ.-The Rector took as his text Rev iv, 1, “ After this I looked, and behold a door was opened in heaven,” The Rector said something like this : There were times in the lives of all people and countries when in their sorrows and losses and anxieties they scarcely knew where to go for help. Worldly things seemed to crumble away and fail, and the world’s hollowness was seen by the world’s incapacity to help in time of need. At such times the Church teaches us to lift up our eyes and look not to this earth for help, but to heaven. Then, as we pray in the Saviour’s Name and look upwards, the door of heaven seems to open to us, and we see the vision which St John saw, the glory there, the great throne, and the vision of Him who sat on the throne. There we get comfort, there we get help. This terrible war has claimed one more noble young man from among us-George Berridge. He had seen a very great deal of fighting, having been at the front and in the trenches a long time. Everybody liked him. No one could say a word against him ; one felt it was the best who were going first. He has gone, but as he goes he leaves behind him this message to all who knew him, and others as well : “ Go and do as I have done, I have trusted in my God, I have given my all for my country. You go and do the same.” His mother, overwhelmed with sorrow at her loss, must feel proud she had reared such a son, and we who have known him feel proud. The Rector asked everyone to pray to the Heavenly Father to comfort her. George Berridge would be much missed by his many friends. In the future, if God gave us the victory and preserved our Church, when a painted window or tablet was placed in the Church and the names of those who had fought and died for their country were inscribed, the second name would be Rifleman George Berridge.

There was a very large congregation, and the great number of people showed the esteem in which he was held.

CHURCHOVER.

Mr and Mrs W Webb, of Churchover, on Thursday last week received intimation from the Chaplain of the South Midland Casualty Clearing Station to the effect that their younger son, Corpl J W Webb, of the 4th Battalion Rifle Brigade, had been wounded in the groin. The wound is not dangerous. The battalion to which Corpl Webb belongs has been engaged in heavy fighting of late, and his friends have received some very interesting letters from him. In one, dated May 9th, he says :-” I expect you have heard from Mrs Matthews (Churchover) that John was wounded this week. I must say he was very lucky. Tell him the last battle we had was a thousand times worse than the one he was in. They shelled us with shrapnel, and I had my rifle smashed, my pack cut open, and my overcoat was torn all to pieces. I escaped myself with only a scratch on the face.”

On May 16th he wrote:-“ We went up to reinforce a battalion of another regiment that was being shelled all to pieces. We went up in broad daylights across an open ploughed field, and I   have only to thank God that I am alive to tell you of it. We were enfiladed with rifle fire, shell fire, machine gun fire, and that dreadful shrapnel. Shells were bursting all around, over, and in front, and still we went on. It lasted about half-an-hour. You can’t imagine what war is like. . . . We have had 36 days in the trenches straight off. We can beat them (the Germans) on the open ground, but they are masters at trench work.”

In a third letter, dated May 21st, Corpl Webb says:-“ We were inspected by General French yesterday, and he praised our brigade wonderfully. This big battle that we have been in will rank as one of the biggest in history, and our losses were heavy. I got through myself with only a few scratches. We have had five weeks of hard work, never out of shell fire the whole time, and I shall never forget it.” Corpl Webb , and his brother joined the Army at the outbreak of war.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Pte Webb, 4th Rifle Brigade, of Churchover, who, as we announced last week, has been wounded, has been sent to England, and is now in hospital at Reading.

NEWBOLD TERRITORIAL KILLED IN ACTION.

Another member of “ E ” Company, 7th R.W.R, Pte Lewis Hill, second son of Mr E I Hill, of Newbold, has been killed. The sad news was contained in a letter sent from a friend, who stated that Pte Hill was killed by a sniper while on patrol duty on May 29th. The writer added that a comrade had since accounted for the sniper, and had his coat as a memento. Pte Hill, who was 19 years of age, had been a member of “ E ” Company for several years, and previous to the war was employed at the Newbold Cement Works.

BRANDON.

PRIVATE F WEBB.—Some short time back Mr and Mrs Webb, of the Railway Cottages, were notified from the headquarters at Warwick, that their son had been wounded in the left arm and was in hospital. Since that date his parents have heard from him on two occasions, and were delighted to find that the report was not correct. He had been in hospital suffering from his legs, but had not been injured. He is now quite convalescent, and has re-joined his regiment—the 1st Warwicks. As his two cousins—Lee-Corpl T Webb and Pte W Webb, of Wolston, had both been wounded in the arm, it is thought that is how the error occurred. They all belong to the 1st Royal Warwickshire.

BRINKLOW.

ROLL OF HONOUR.—We regret to announce that Private Thomas Clifton, of the Worcestershire Regiment, was killed in action on May 9th. Joining the army immediately after the outbreak of the war, he soon became popular among his new comrades, and showed his ability at the regimental sports. His love of sport, however, did not eclipse his devotion to the sterner side of his soldier life, and although but a few months in the ranks he was very successful with the rifle, and he volunteered to go to France to strengthen his regiment. Prior to the war he was a member of the local Football Club, and was greatly esteemed. The village people sympathise most deeply with his parents in their loss.

 

21st Nov 1914. Local War Notes

It is stated that the Leicestershire Yeomanry are now in the fighting line.

C Spicer and A E Lorriman have joined the Rugby Howitzer Battery. The latter was formerly a member, but went away to America, and returned to England in order to re-enlist.

Mr R Herron, of Rugby, who for the past two years has been in training at a Baptist Theological College, has joined the Royal Army Medical Corps. He is a competent ambulance man, and has already been promoted to the rank of sergeant.

We understand that the whole of the Belgian refugees, with one exception, living at 17 Hillmorton Road, have obtained employment, three of them at the B.T.H Works at Rugby, and two others at Birmingham. A boy is also working at the shop of a tradesman in the town.

Members of the St John Ambulance Brigade are doing useful service in accompanying wounded Belgian soldiers from the Red Cross Hospital who are able to get out for walks in the vicinity of Rugby. On three days a week they are doing this, the walk generally occupying about an hour, and the men greatly appreciate the kindness shown.

The Rugby Co-operative Society’s employees have sent warm mufflers, helmets, and socks, together with supplies of cigarettes, to their comrades, 18 in number, who have joined Lord Kitchener’s Army. The gifts have been very much appreciated, and letters of thanks have been received, saying they were just the articles that were required.

On Sunday afternoon the Salvation Army Boys’ Band (under the leadership of Mr Whitmore) played patriotic airs and the various National Anthems for an hour at the Red Cross Hospital for the benefit of the wounded Belgian soldiers. The visit was greatly appreciated, and the soldiers sent to the band by way of thanks an illuminated card, the handiwork of one of their number-a graceful act of acknowledgement that the band fully reciprocated.

A QUICK PROMOTION.

George Edward Middleditch, a premium apprentice who was employed in Rugby Erecting Shop, serving his time to fitting, and enlisted in the Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry Regiment in August last, has done particularly well. He showed ability and quickly rose to the rank of sergeant. This week he has received his discharge papers from this regiment and offered a commission, which he has very naturally accepted. Middleditch has gone to his home in Devon for a brief rest, and awaiting instructions from the War Office as to the regiment to which he is gazetted. Before leaving Rugby for home he visited the erecting shop to say “ good-bye ” to the workmen, who took the opportunity to warmly congratulate him on his well-merited promotion.

WAR CASUALTIES.

Pte. Arthur Hill, a reservist in the Royal Horse Artillery, who previous to the war was employed by Messrs Willans & Robinson, has written to his former land lady, Mrs Judd, of 21 Dale Street, stating that he has been wounded.

Mrs Meadows, of Inwood’s Cottages, near Bilton Grange, this week received news of her son, Pte J T Meadows, 1st Northants Regiment, who is now lying wounded in Duchess of Westminster’s Hospital in Paris, but he hopes before long to be able to return home.

Pte G T Wills, of the North Staffordshire Regiment, who resides at 57 Jubilee Street, New.Bilton, and who, as reported last week, had been wounded, was an Old Elborow Boy, and a member of the Rugby Parish Church Choir during the rectorship of the late Mr Murray. He served for one year and ten months in the South African campaign, and has written to his wife informing her that he is in a hospital at Versailles, is being well looked after, and going on as well as can be expected.

We understand that Mrs H Flavell, of 14 Newbold Road, who a few week ago received official intimation that her husband, Pte H Flavell, a reservist in the Coldstream Guards, had been posted as missing, has since received a communication from him stating that he is well.

WOUNDED AND PRISONER OF WAR.

Pte A Hirons, of the 1st Coldstream Guards, of whom nothing had been heard for some time, has written to his landlady, Mrs Green, of Hillmorton, informing her that he has been wounded in the back and been taken a prisoner by the Germans. Pte Hirons, who is a native of Churchover, served three years in the Guards, and had been on the reserve twelve months. Before mobilization he was employed in the Loco Department at the L & N. W. Railway Station, Rugby.

HOW A RUGBY SOLDIER’S LIFE WAS SAVED – A COMRADES DEVOTION.

Pte A Glen, reservist of the King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry, and a native of Rugby, has arrived home, on sick leave, suffering from three wounds received in the trenches at La Basse, and tells the story of how his life was saved by the devotion of a comrade.

Pte Glen, who is the caretaker of the Conservative Club in Abbey Street and is well known in town, stated in an interview with our representative that the first battle he was engaged in was at Le Cateau. About a month ago his brigade was ordered to relieve another section in the trenches at La Basse. Their position, however, was located by a spy, and the Germans immediately started business with their “Jack Johnsons.” A church steeple near the British lines was set on fire by the shells, and fell into the trenches, causing great havoc. Several hayricks were also fired, and by the light from these the Germans were able to easily locate the British, and then rake them with such a shower of shells that they were forced to retire, their places being taken by Indians. Pte Glen received a bullet wound in the head, and was also struck on the neck and shoulder by a fragment from a “ Jack Johnson,” and thus was unable to leave. A comrade remained behind to render assistance, and whilst he was bandaging Pte Glen’s head was fatally struck by a shell, which would otherwise have struck the wounded man. When Pte Glen came round in the morning the dead body of his faithful chum was laying across his back. According to Pte Glen, matters are going very well for the Allies in the Western Theatre. He added, optimistically, “ We are winning safe as eggs, slow, but sure, and at big price. There is no doubt about that. The Germans have machine guns made of papier mache ; and these, in addition to being very effective, are easily carried by one man, and thus give them a great advantage. The rifle fire of the German infantry as a body is poor ; but the companies of sharp shooters do great mischief. One significant fact struck Pte Glen very forcibly, and that was the great deterioration in the quality of the German troops now being brought into action. At the commencement of the campaign the German infantry consisted of fine set-up men ; but the troops now opposed to the British consist, for the most part, of boys from 18 to 20 years of age and old grey-headed men. Pte Glen, who was also wounded in South Africa, said[?] that he only saw one Rugby man at the front, Pte S Cockerill, of his regiment, who has also been wounded.

NEW BILTON RESERVIST WOUNDED.

Mr H Berwick, a reservist in the 1st King’s Own Regiment, has returned to England wounded, and has written to his former landlady, Mrs Smith, of 123 Lawford Road, New Bilton. In this he states that after the retirement from Mons the British took up positions on a hill, and were ordered to prepare for a night or early morning attack. They were preparing to do this when at about 400 yards away a very deadly fire commenced with a few rapid shots from what we call their ” safe deliveries ” (siege guns), which were right in among our Brigade. It was found out after we had been forced to retire that the enemy had a whole Army Corps and had been carefully watching our movements. They had, it is estimated, eight machine guns all turned on one battalion, and I am sorry to say that battalion was mine. That was our first experience, and where we lost 540 officers, N.C.O’s and men. I received a hit in the shoulder by shrapnel, the first shot they fired, which also dislocated my shoulder.” After alluding to the German use of dum-dum bullets and the abuse of the white flag,” the writer says, “ I must confess that their (German) gunners are fine shots. So would you if you were near them. If It was not for their Susie Greens (big guns), I think the English Boy Scouts could beat them, as I think their infantry is absolutely bad.” Describing a German charge at Armentierres, he states that they had been contiguously attacked by the Germans at night and early morning, and the R.E. put some wire entanglements about 200 yards in front of the British trenches, and they then waited for the Germans. We spotted them at about 600 yards, and let them come on until they got to 300 yards. Then they seemed to hesitate. All of a sudden there went up a sort of downhearted yell, and on they charged – if we can call it a charge. It was simply lovely, a great big grey mass with their heads down, and could not see where they were coming until they got on to our wires. Some of our lads thought they were on a fair ground, as their great round heads looked just like cocoanuts.” Among the places where the writer saw heavy fighting were Mons, Marne, Aisne, St Margarette, St Omar, Lille, and Armentierres.

HILLMORTON SOLDIER KILLED IN ACTION.

About a fortnight ago Mrs. G. Thorneycroft, of Hillmorton, wife of Pte. Thorneycroft, of the 1st Royal Warwicks, received the following note, written on the back of a letter she had enclosed in a package of cigarettes to her husband :-” I am very sorry to have let you know that your husband met his death on the battlefield. His letters have been opened and the cigarettes have been given to his friends. We all sympathise with you in your great loss.” The letter was undated, and was only initialled. Mrs Thorneycroft has since been in communication with the military authorities, and on Wednesday received official intimation that he was killed in action on October 23rd. Pte Thornycroft served nine years with the colours, during which time he served in India and also went through the South African War, one of his most treasured possessions being Queen Victoria’s chocolate box. He had been in the reserve for seven years, and previous to being called up was employed by Mr Whittaker, the builder. He was about 36 years of age and highly respected in the village, where much sympathy is expressed for his widow.

RECRUITING AT RUGBY.

During the past week 20 recruits have enlisted at Rugby Drill Hall, bringing the total figures up to 1962, exclusive of a considerable number who have gone from the town to other recruiting offices. Men are still urgently required for the various regiments of infantry of the line.-Recruiting, for the Howitzer Battery Reserve has been proceeding at Rugby and Coventry this week, and we understand that the number required has now been raised.