Willard, Kenneth Hugh. Died 12th Oct 1917

Kenneth Hugh Willard was born 23rd July 1898 to Thomas Webb Willard and Tryphena (Renshaw) at Rugby, and was baptised at St Andrews Church, Rugby 7th August 1898. Kenneth was their second child, his elder brother, James Donald, was born at Leamington in 1897, followed by Cynthia Violet Mary born Birmingham, Colin Gerald born Wolston and Rupert Alan born Rugby and another brother, Frederick, was born in 1900 but died the same year aged 4 months.

On the 1901 census Kenneth and his brother James are with their mother at 26 Bilton Road Rugby, their father is not with them, their mother is given as Wife of Thomas Webb Willard. On the 1911 census the family are all together and are still living at 26 Bilton Road Rugby, and their father’s occupation is Architect and Surveyor to the District Council. With the family are also a Governess, Mary Elizabeth Schineider and a Servant, Florence May Smith. Kenneth attended Lawrence Sheriff School and entered Rugby School in 1912 and left there in 1914 and went into his father’s office and in September 1916 he went to R. M. C. Sandhurst. He became a 2nd Lieutenant and in May 1917 he was assigned to the York and Lancaster Regiment and went to Reading, Castle Bromwich and Shrewsbury for his training for the Royal Flying Corps as a Pilot. Kenneth went to France on 6th October 1917 and was attached to the 45th Squadron R. F. C. 8th October 1917. On 12th September he was on patrol with others and they encountered German planes. He was then reported missing 12th October 1917.

An official list, published in Germany and republished in FLIGHT 1918, of British machines in which the Germans claim fell into their hands during October 1917, lists 37 single – seater  Sopwith machines, giving details of the pilots, one of which is Lieut. K.H. Willard wounded.

His parents were informed that he was missing but he had died later that day.
He is buried in Harlebeke New British Cemetery: Grave Reference XI. A. 18.

Rugby Advertiser 20th October 1917
SECOND-LIEUT K.H. WILLARD MISSING
Second Lieut Kenneth H. Willard, York and Lancaster Regiment, attached to the Royal Flying Corps, second son of Mr. T. W. Willard 26 Bilton Road, has been officially informed reported missing as from October 12th. In a letter to Mr. Willard a fellow officer writes “He went out with six other machines on the 12th inst. to do a patrol, the leader being one of our best pilots. About 15 to 20 enemy machines were encountered, and a general mix-up ensued, in which your son was seen handling his machine and fighting in a most efficient manner. Although our machines were greatly outnumbered, they put up a great fight, but on returning to the aerodrome it was discovered that your son was missing. No one saw him go down, and it is just possible that he may have been hit in the engine, and had to descend in the enemy lines.” Lieut. Willard was educated at Rugby School and Sandhurst, and visited his parents a fortnight ago on his final leave before proceeding to the front.

Rugby Advertiser 17th November 1917
DEATHS
WILLARD – In proud and loving memory of KENNETH HUGH WILLARD, 2nd Lieut., York and Lancaster Regiment attached to R. F. C. Killed in action on the Western Front on October 12th 1917; second son of T. W. And Tryphena Willard Rugby aged 19.

The Midland Daily Telegraph Saturday October 20th 1917
RUGBY OFFICER MISSING
Mr T. W. Willard, Surveyor to Rugby District Council, Has been officially notified that his second son, Second Lieut. Kenneth H. Willard is missing. He visited his parents so recently a fortnight ago on his final leave before proceeding to the front. It appears he was fighting with six others when they encountered about 20 enemy machines Second Lieut. K. H. Willard was educated at Rugby School and Sandhurst.

Rugby Advertiser 15th October 1920
IN MEMORIAM
WILLARD – In proud and loving memory of Kenneth Hugh Willard, 2nd Lieut. York and Lancaster Regt. (attached Royal Flying Corp) killed in action on October 12th 1917. Buried in the Cemetery of Honour at Rumbeke Belgium.

Lieut Kenneth Hugh Willard’s name is recorded at Rugby School in the Memorial Chapel on the East Wall South Transept, on the Rugby Memorial Gates, in Volume VII of Memorials of Rugbeians who fell in the Great War with his photograph, also recorded in the Old Laurentians (former schoolboys of Lawrence Sheriff School) who died during the First World War.

Memorials of Rugbeians who fell in the Great War VII

Second Lieut. K. H. Willard entered School in 1912 and left 1914.   For about 18 months after School he was in his father’s offices and then went to R. M. C. Sandhurst September 1916.   On passing out of Sandhurst in May 1917, he was gazetted to the York and Lancaster Regiment, and then went to Reading, and afterwards Castle Bromwich and Shrewsbury for his training for the Royal Flying Corps.

He went to France on October 6th 1917 and was attached to 45th Squadron R. F. C. He was flying with a patrol Squadron of seven machines to Houthulst Forest when they met a Squadron of German machines, fifteen to twenty strong. Two of our machines, of which he was one, failed to return and it was afterwards learned he had died in the hospital at RUMBEKE on the same day, October 12th 1917, age 19.

His captain wrote “Although your son was with us a short time, he gave every proof of being an exceptionally capable and well trained Pilot, who would have given a splendid account of himself, Although our machines were greatly outnumbered, they put up a great fight, and your son was seen to be handling his machine and fighting in a most efficient manner. We all feel his loss very much.”

Lieut. Kenneth H. Willard was entitled to receive the Victory Medal and The British War Medal. His parents would have been sent The Memorial Death plaque after the war which commemorated all of the war dead.

When his mother died in 1964, and was buried in Clifton Road Cemetery Rugby, the inscription on her headstone reads “In proud and loving memory of KENNETH HUGH WILLARD 2ND Lt York & Lanc Regt R F C killed in action Oct 12th 1917 aged 19years. Buried at Rumbeke, Belgium. In loving memory of TRYPHENA WILLARD died March 20 1964 aged 89 years.   In loving memory of FREDERICK DOUGLAS MARK WILLARD died August 27 1900 aged 4 months. “Ere sin could blight or sorrow fade.” In loving memory of THOMAS WEBB WILLARD died December 28 1940 aged 78 years.

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

 

 

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18th Aug 1917. Fatal Accident to an Aviator

FATAL ACCIDENT TO AN AVIATOR.

A shocking aeroplane accident, resulting in the instant death of a pilot, Lieut William Alexander Taylor, of the Royal Flying Corps, occurred near Rugby early on Friday evening last week. Lieut Taylor, who was only 21 years of age, and the son of Mr William Taylor, of Mary Hill Park, Glasgow, was flying at a height of about 3,000 feet, when one of the plane collapsed, and the machine fell to the earth. The engine was deeply embedded in the pound, and the unfortunate aviator was badly mangled. His skull and practically every bone in his body were broken, and Dr Wardrop, who was quickly on the spot, was only able to state that death had been instantaneous.

The inquest was held by Mr C H Davis, Northampton, on Saturday evening. Mr J G Harper was foreman of the jury.

Second-Lieut Frank William Balls, R.F.C, identified the body, and said deceased was 22 years old. He had been in the Flying Corps at least 18 months.

Captain Kenneth Graeme Leask, R.F.C, said the accident happened about 5.53 p.m on Friday last week. Witness was in the air at the time testing a new machine, and saw the accident. Deceased’s machine was the only other one a in the air. It went up vertically at great speed. Witness than saw the left-hand wing collapse. The machine spun upwards one turn, and then fell to the earth with a spinning nose dive. There were no flames about the machine. When deceased went up vertically witness thought he was trying to loop the loop, and probably he pulled the control back too suddenly, pausing a great strain on the planes and the left-hand plane to collapse. The machine was in order, and had been used the same day by Lieut Park, while witness had used it the night before, when he looped and spun it, and everything was all right. The speed must have been very great for the machine to speed upwards as it did. Witness was about half-a-mile away when deceased went up. Deceased had done observing in France, and also acted as a pilot. In witness’s opinion deceased was very capable pilot for the time he had flown, and on one occasion witness saw him show great presence of mind in saving two machines from clashing together. Deceased had only been in witness’s flight about ten days. Immediately witness saw the occurrence he came down.

A verdict of “ Accidental death ” was returned.

A REMARKABLE COINCIDENCE.

This is only the second fatal mishap that has occurred at the aerodrome since its institution, and when we take into account the number of aeroplanes that go up daily year in and year out, this immunity from more numerous accidents is quite re-assuring.

But there was a remarkable co-incidence about the two accidents. The records kept by Surgeon-Major Collins, the Medical Officer of the Flying Corps, show that both happened on the same day of the month, August 10th, within a few minutes of the same time of the evening, and at a spot which might be said to be identical. The other fatality was twelve months ago, when two officers came into collision.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Corpl W Hyam, Lincolnshire Regiment, son of Mr H Hyam, Drury Lane, was wounded in the last big push. He is going on well. He ia an “ Old boy ” of St Matthew’s School.

Mr P F Fullard, R.F.C., son of Mr A H Fullard, of West Haddon, who recently received his captaincy, has just been awarded the Military Cross for services at the front.

Mrs May, 8 Ringrose Court, North Street, has received information from the War Office that her youngest son, Joe, who is in the Rugby Howitzer Battery, was wounded in action on July 18th, and is now making satisfactory progress. Before the War he was an apprentice at Willans & Robinson’s.

Captain Alan Greenshields-Leadbetter, R.H.A, who was killed last week, was an Old Rugby boy. He served in Gallipoli with the 29th Division until January 8, 1916 — the night of the evacuation of Helles.

Quarter-Master-Sergt Painter, of the Rugby Howitzer Battery, has been injured in action by his horse falling upon him.. His foot was fractured.

Mrs John French, of 3 Bridge Street, Rugby, has received news that her husband, Pte J French, R.W.R., has won the Military Medal in France. He has been wounded three times, and has returned to the trenches for the fourth time. He also won the Queen’s Medal in the South African War. He is the son of Mr and Mrs James French, Long Itchngton.

REV. F. B. HARBORD KILLED IN FRANCE.

General regret was occasioned in Dunchurch and Thurlaston and the district around at the news, which arrived on Sunday morning, of the death from wounds while serving as chaplain with the R.F.A of the Rev F R Harbord, vicar of Dunchurch. Mr Harbord was 49 years of age, and was the youngest son of the late W Engledow Harbord, of the Manor House, Stutton. He was preparing for Cambridge when he had a breakdown in health, and was ordered to South Africa, where he took Holy Orders. For many years he was stationed in the Orange Free State, and for two years was an acting chaplain with the Forces in the Boer War. On returning to England he was curate of Yorktown and Camberley, Surrey, 1909-10, and then rector of Pershore till his subsequent appointment to Dunchurch. On the outbreak of the present War he volunteered for service, but was not called up until August, 1916, and had completed exactly a year of service abroad on the day of his death, August 8th. He had just arranged for a further extension of leave from his parish, and in one of his last letters home wrote :- “ I cannot leave the Army when the hardest fighting is to take place.” Mr Harbord succeeded the Rev C T Bernard McNulty, Leamington, as vicar of Dunchurch five years ago, and he was exceedingly popular in the parish. He was a true friend to the poor, taking a keen interest in all matters appertaining to the welfare of his parishioners. He was one of the governors of the Boughton Trust, chairman and correspondent to the Managers of the Schools, chairman of the Almshouse Trustees, a trustee of the Poor’s Plot Charity, and a member of the Committee of the Dunchurch Working Men’s Club. He is the 19th man from Dunchurch to fall in they present War. Until recently the vicarial work at Dunchurch was undertaken by the Rev B B Carter, who relinquished duty about a fortnight ago, and has been succeeded temporarily by the Rev A F G Wardell.

In a letter to Mrs Harbord, an officer of the R.A.M.C. Writes :—“ I have just come back from a little military cemetery, where we laid to rest this afternoon, at three o’clock, the body of your husband—and to all of us—our Padre. We got the sad news this evening. I went down to the dressing station after breakfast this morning to see the arrangements carried out, and we took him back a few miles to our wagon lines. At the dressing station there was a Church of England chaplain, who saw him when they brought him in, and the end was peaceful and quiet. The doctor there assured me that he was beyond human aid. He had a billet on the main road, and, as was his custom, he used to give a cheery word to the men as they passed. It was while talking to a sergeant and one or two men that the fatal shell came. I do not think he could have suffered much pain—the shock would be so great. There were five officers and five men at the funeral, and Major Dickinson, the senior chaplain, conducted the Burial Service. How much we miss him I cannot say. We had known him now since August of last year, and had lived with him, and out here a constant friendship of a year means a great deal. We, the officers of the staff, are having a cross made to mark the spot where he is laid, and as long as we are in his area you can rest assured that the grave will be looked after. He was a personal friend to everyone, and in that degree the loss to us is a personal one. How vividly some of his great thoughts stand out-thoughts that had helped many of us to bear these hard things in the past and to look forward with some hope to the future. He used to say to us in his service and in the mess that whosoever made the supreme sacrifice out here made it as it was made two thousand years ago. It is a fine thought.”

Another officer writes :—“ I cannot possibly tell you how terribly grieved we are at the death of our Padre. He was a friend of every single man in the Divisional Artillery, and especially in this Brigade, with whom he had lived since he came out last August, and there were very few whom he did not know personally. I should think the greatest consolation you could possibly have must be the knowledge that he died as he himself would have wished—talking to some of the men outside his billet on the road where the infantry pass on their way down from the trenches, and the gunners bring their guns and ammunition wagons.”

The Commanding Officer has written :—“ I regret to have the sad task of informing you of the death of your husband in action. The best consolation I can offer you is that he suffered no pain, and that he has been tireless in his efforts throughout this trying time in cheering and looking after the men of this brigade. My staff and the whole Brigade feel his loss very deeply, and we offer you our very heartfelt sympathy in your great loss. It may comfort you to know that he performed his duties often under severe fire with cheerfulness and personal bravery. The Brigade, one and all, are deeply grieved.”

[Memorial Service also reported in this issue]

WOUNDED ENTERTAINMENT.—On Wednesday last Mr Smith and friends entertained the wounded at “ Te Hira ” with a musical programme. A sergeant acted as chairman. During the concert cigarettes were passed round, and the soldiers were very appreciative.

RUGBY SCHOOL NOTTING HILL MISSION.—Following the visit of the girl members of this Mission which is supported by past and present members of Rugby School, about 60 boys, all employed in munition work in the east end of London, have had a week’s holiday at Rugby. They arrived on Saturday, and were accommodated at the School Gymnasium. On Tuesday they played a team of wounded soldiers at cricket, and they were entertained by the R.F.C. Officers at Lilbourne on another day this week.

VARIETY OF FOOD IN WAR TIME.

In the pursuit of national economy, the daily round of mealtime is apt to become a little monotonous in these days. Any suggestions which provide change, without adding to the cost, and also show the way to use up in the form of tasty dishes such commonplace items as left-over rice pudding and stale bread , will be more than welcome to our readers.

The well-known firm of Messrs Alfred Bird & Sons, Ltd. Have sent us a copy of their very useful and well-produced cookery booklet, entitled “ Pastry and Sweets.” This contains about 120 well-tried household recipes of great interest to every housewife. They have placed a limited number of these books at our disposal. Any reader, therefore, of the Rugby Advertiser who would like to have a copy sent to them post free can obtain same by writing on a post-card to Alfred Bird & Sons, Ltd, Birmingham, and mentioning the name of this paper. As the number available is strictly limited, early application is necessary.

DEATHS.

PARNELL.—On July 23rd, 1917, Corpl. JAMES PARNELL, of Withybrook, 1st Batt. R.W.R., killed in action in France ; aged 22 years.
“ So ready to answer the call to the brave,
Although you now rest in a far-distant grave ;
More or better could any man give
Than die for his country that others might live.”

IN MEMORIAM.

LEACH.—In loving memory of our dear son, PERCY JOHN LEACH, who died at Sulva Bay, August 4th, 1915.
Two years have passed—our hearts still sore.
Day by day we miss him more ;
His welcome smile, his dear sweet face,
Never on earth can we replace.
We often sit and think of him,
And think of how he died ;
To think he could not say “ Good bye ”
Before closed his eyes.
Still sadly missed by his loving Mother and Father, Sisters and Brothers.

Hart-Davies, Ivan Beauclerk. Died 27th Jul 1917

Lieutenant Ivan Beauclerk Hart—Davies R.F.C.

21 April 1878 — 27 July 1917

Ivan Hart—Davies (known as Harty) son of the Reverend John Hart-Davies and Mrs Hart-Davies of Southam Rectory, Warwickshire, was a charismatic adventurer who touched many peoples lives.

Educated at Maidenhead and Kings School, Canterbury, he became a schoolmaster at New Beacon, Sevenoaks, and was excellent in many sporting activities. In 1905, he decided to open an insurance office in Rugby. Because of the railway and the presence of many gentry due to the hunting and polo being of paramount importance to the area, Rugby was prosperous.

He met Jennie Ward, a lady who shared his passion for motorcycles, and was also a stockbroker and owning a domestic staff agency. He decided she was the person to manage his new enterprise and she became a very important person in his life.

In 1907 Harty formed his own boy scouts troop, organising the first boy scouts camps, B.S. Fire brigade and displays at polo matches in front of royalty from various countries. This troop was organised for boys who had no educational prospects. He was criticised for not including the sons of gentlemen.

June 12 & 13 1911 he broke the end to end record, from John O’Groats to Lands End, on a Triumph motorcycle in 29 hours 12 minutes. A.C.U. Banned further attempts too dangerous. The record still stands.

June 23 & 24 1913 with a passenger, he broke the light car end to end record, 886 miles in 34 hours 39 minutes, on a 10 HP Singer cyclecar.

1914 – Whilst on holiday in Europe with three friends broke the bob-sleigh record, winning the Murren Cup, although none of them had seen a bob-sleigh previously.

1911 – Until his death, he worked with the military, testing various guns in a range near Clifton. He had obtained his aircraft licence, tested aircraft, long distance flying and endurance trained pilots and established 1″ R.F.C. Aerodrome at Clifton. Also the ability of motorcycles to climb mountains and speed, nearly being killed on more than one occasion.

With Jennie’s help, organised the Battle of Rugby for military observers. The Coventry Motorcycle & Car Club had to penetrate the defences of the boy scouts and reach the Clock Tower, using fields and canals as well as the normal roads, and many vehicles and occupants were captured. Some military observers decided that motorcycles were useless in a war because they made too much noise. National and International newspapers reported this event.

The eve before he was due to fly to France for active service, he flew his Bristol aircraft F2B No 7103 with his batman for a last look at England. Coming in to land the plane crashed killing Harty, his batman survived.

He is buried in the family grave at Southam, which is still visited by many from the U.K. and abroad.

Copyright: 1981 J.D. -Cooke

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

 

 

 

 

Shirley, Archibald Vincent. Died 8th Jun 1917

Archibald Vincent (Archie to his family) was born at Penarth on 17 May 1887. His father was Walter Rayner Shirley, a solicitor, his mother Eliza Agnes Walker Hood. He was their eldest child, he had sisters Phyllis and Beryl, and brother Rayner.

In 1891 the family, with his sister Phyllis, were lodging in Great Malvern. By 1901 Archie aged 13 was a pupil at Stancliffe Hall Preparatory School in Darley, Derbyshire, after which he attended Rugby School. He read for his degree at Exeter College Oxford, and enlisted in the Welsh Horse Yeomanry, a Territorial unit, at the outbreak of war, first as a despatch rider, then serving in the ranks. He gained his commission in spring 1915, served in Gallipoli, then was sent to Egypt until October 1916 when he transferred to the Royal Flying Corps as a Second Lieutenant.

picture from de Ruvignys Roll of Honour

His biography in de Ruvigny’s Roll of Honour gives this information together with a photograph, and adds he died at Roulers in Flanders, and that “he was killed in aerial battle where he encountered an overwhelming number of enemy machines, and, colliding with one, came crashing to the ground.”

As well as his name appearing on the Rugby Memorial Gates, he is commemorated on the Arras Flying Services Memorial located in the Faubourg-d’Amiens Cemetery in Arras, in Rugby School Memorial Chapel, and on the War Memorial of Llandough and Leckwith, near Cardiff where his father was living.

Llandough & Leckwith Institue War Memorial (with thanks to John Stansfield)

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

 

Andrews, Melvin Bruce. died 8 Apr 1917

Melvin Bruce Andrews was born on 4 July 1894, at Six Lakes, Michigan, U.S.A. The second son of Thomas and Sarah Maria Andrews. There were three sons. All born in Michigan, U.S.A. William Legh Andrews, born Greenville (17 Sept 1981 – 20 Sept 1913), John Wroxall Thomas Andrews, born Lancing (19 June 1896 – 5 May 1965).

Thomas was a farm foreman and lived at Only Fields, near Barby at least from 1902 until his death in 15 December 1906. The remaining family were living in Bath Street in 1911. John W T Andrews served an apprenticeship at the B.T.-H. and a draughtsman for the electrical equipment manufacturer.

Known as ‘Bruce’, M B Andrews was 22 years old when he died. He was a member of the St. Andrews church and their supplementary choir. He had been apprenticed to J J McKinnell in the grocery trade. Subsequently he worked in the cashier’s office of British Thomson-Houston at Rugby.  

He had joined the Royal Flying Corps, as 3rd Air Mechanic, from the B.T.-H. only five weeks before death. He was based at Ascot flying park. Andrews died of bronchial pneumonia, following measles, at Aldershot Isolation Hospital on the 8 April 1917.

Bruce Andrews was buried with full military honours in the Rugby town cemetery, Clifton road on 20 April. R.F.C. personnel from Lilbourne airfield were present and a firing party from Warwick attended. The last post was sounded.

Grave of M Bruce Andrews, Clifton Road Cemetery

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

27th Jan 1917. Very Drunk at the Station

VERY DRUNK AT THE STATION.—On Thursday last, before T Hunter, Esq, Bernard Nutt, second air mechanic (R.F.C), Regent Street, London, was summoned for being drunk on the L & N-W Railway Station, at Rugby, on January 24th.—He pleaded guilty, and William S Laughton, ticket examiner, stated that the man was so intoxicated that a doctor was sent for, who, on account of his condition, ordered his removal to the Police Station for safety. Defendant travelled from London with an Australian soldier, who had a big bottle of whiskey.—Defendant informed the Magistrate that he was a teetotaller, and had only just come out of hospital. He had a little drop of whiskey, and that upset him.—Discharged on paying doctor’s fee, 5s.

PRESENTATION.—On Saturday last an interesting presentation took place at the establishment of Mr J J McKinnell, Sheep Street, when Mr Horace Sanderson was the recipient of a very nice wristlet watch and a pair of silver vases. Mr J J Thompson, in making the presentation on behalf of his fellow-employees, spoke of the very efficient manner in which Mr Sanderson had discharged his duties during the 18 years that he had served as assistant and traveller, and felt sure that he would continue to serve as faithfully now he had responded to the call of his King and country. Mr Sanderson has also received a very useful letter wallet in recognition of his services as registrar at the Rugby Brotherhood, in which capacity he has done a good and faithful work.

THE PARCELS sent on behalf of the Rugby Prisoners War Help Committee this week to local men in German prison camps contained : 1 large tin rations, 1 tin tripe, 10-oz tin sardines, ½-lb margarine, 1lb milk, 1lb rolled oats, 1lb cake, 1 tin fruit, ½-lb chocolate, ¼-lb tea, 30 cigarettes, ½-lb sugar, mustard.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Capt R W Barnett, acting Brigade Major of a Naval Brigade, son of Mr Walter Barnett, of Bilton, has been awarded the Military Cross.

Mr W W Peberdy, Lansdowne House, Rugby, has received intimation from the Admiralty that his son. Flight Sub-Lieut W H Peberdy, R.N, failed to return from a scouting flight in the East on the 14th inst. At present he is reported missing.

LOCAL SOLDIER DECORATED BY KING PETER.

Flight-Sergt A Forsyth, of the Royal Flying Corps, son of Mrs Forsyth, of 8 Murray Road, Rugby, has been decorated by the King of Serbia with the Silver Star in recognition of his distinguished services during the campaign in that country. Sergt Forsyth has since been promoted sergeant-major. He was for a number of years employed at the B.T.H Works, but at the time he enlisted he was assistant works manager at the Aluminium Works, Birmingham.

NEW BILTON MAN WINS THE MILITARY MEDAL.

Sergt George King, R.E, youngest son of Mr and Mr Tom King, 89 Lawford Road, New Bilton, and a native of the parish, has been awarded the Military Medal for devotion to duty with the Forces in France. When he joined the Army, Sergt King belonged to the Coventry City Police, but he is well known at New Bilton, and formerly played both for the Cricket and Football Clubs. His father has worked at the Portland Cement Works for 53 years, having served under five successive managers, and he has lived in his present home since the time of his wedding 43 years ago.

MR J E COX’S SON SLIGHTLY WOUNDED.

Information has been received this week by Mr J E Cox, of Lodge Farm, Long Lawford, that his son. Trooper G H Cox, of the Warwickshire Yeomanry, has been slightly wounded in the right thigh, and is in a General Hospital in Egypt. Another of Mr Cox’s sons (E E Cox) joined the 3rd Gloucesters last week. Mr Cox has now three sons serving in the Army.

STRETTON-ON-DUNSMORE.

Much sympathy is felt for Mr and Mrs J Nicholas, of Lime Kiln Farm, who have received news that their eldest son, Lance-Corpl John Nicholas, of the Warwickshire Yeomanry, has again been wounded in the chest in action in Egypt ; also that their third son, Stewart, is officially reported wounded and missing since September 29th—the same day that his youngest brother, Percy, was wounded.—Trooper Alf Falconbridge, of the Warwickshire Yeomanry, who enlisted with Lance-Corpl Nicholas, has sustained a fractured arm.

BRANDON.

Mr and Mrs Reuben Banbrook have received the news that their son, Pte Bert Banbrook, has been badly wounded in the back and shoulder. He had not long returned to the front, having been previously wounded in the leg. He is one of five brothers upholding the honour of their country. He is now in hospital in France.—Pte J Ward, son of Mr and Mrs Thomas Ward, has also been home for the first time after his wounds. Unfortunately the poor fellow has completely lost the sight of an eye. Much sympathy is felt for Mr and Mrs Ward, who have already had one son killed.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR.
THE GREAT WAR LOAN.

To the Editor of the Advertiser.

SIR,—The Chancellor of the Exchequer has addressed an appeal to War Savings Committees throughout the country to assist in promoting the new War Loan. He suggests first that they should stimulate the purchase of War Savings Certificates during the next few weeks by all means in their power. But he also asks us, further, to extend our activities so as to include persons of moderate incomes to whom the plan of co-operative investment by means of War Savings Associations does not specially appeal, and particularly those who might be able to invest at once any sum between £5 and £50. Such people are often not familiar with the machinery of investment, and it is felt that in order to secure their help it is necessary not only to advertise the appeal to lend, but also to make available some means of obtaining information or advise, and especially assistance in filling up the necessary forms. For this purpose the Rugby Central War Savings Committee have, with the consent of the Rugby Urban District Council, established an Information Bureau in the Benn Buildings every day from 12.15-1.15, and from 7-9 o’clock ; also on Saturday afternoons. The Bureau will be opened on Monday next, Jan. 29th.

The committee are also arranging a public meeting, to be held in the Temple Speech Room at 8 o’clock on Saturday, February 3rd, at which Major J L Baird, M.P, has promised to speak. The Schools and Boy Scouts are being asked to assist in the work of advertising. Other measures are in preparation by which we hope to make this national appeal so widely known and understood that no money which can possibly be lent to the Government will remain in Rugby uninvested on February 16th. To this end we ask with confidence for the help of all classes of our fellow-townsmen.

The time is short, and the need is very urgent. Let Rugby take a worthy part in meeting it-and at once.—Yours very truly,

J J McKINNELL (Chairman).

A A DAVID (Hon. Secretary),

Rugby War Savings Central Committee.

IN MEMORIAM.

WALDUCK.—In loving memory of our dear lad, ERN., who died of wounds in France, January 28, 1916.—Sadly missed by his loving MOTHER, FATHER, SISTERS and BROTHERS.

WALDUCK.—In loving memory of my dear brother, ERN., who died of wounds in France, January 28, 1916.—Deeply mourned by MET.

 

13th Jan 1917. B.T.H. Airman Killed

LOCAL CASUALTIES.
B.T.H AIRMAN KILLED.

News has been received at the B.T.H this week that Second Lieut J E Townsend, R.F.C, was killed while flying near Bristol on January 2nd. Lieut Townsend, who was, until the outbreak of war, employed in the tinsmith department at the B.T.H Works, enlisted in 1914 in the Worcester Regiment, and was subsequently granted a commission and transferred to the Royal Flying Corps. It was stated at the inquest, at which a verdict of accidental death was returned, that Lieut Townsend was under instruction, and had had sufficient experience to fly alone. He was navigating a machine, and Second Lieut Francis Bissicks, a trained pilot, accompanied him. There was nothing in the weather or engine conditions to explain the accident. The machine seemed to lose speed and nose-dive to the ground. Lieut Townsend was killed instantly, and his companion received injuries to which he succumbed at the Bristol Royal Infirmary.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Sir Henry Horne, K.C.B, whose home is at East Haddon, Northants, has been promoted Lieutenant-General as a Now Year Honour. The Czar of Russia has also conferred on General Horne the Order of St Vladimir.

“ No more men must be called from the land for military service under present circumstances.”-Mr Prothero’s instructions to Tribunals.

Miss M Cook, of Holmby, Clifton Road, Rugby, has paid over £21 16s 9d from the whist drive held in the Co-operative Hall recently in aid of the Star and Garter Fund.

An oak lining has been placed round one of the pillars of St Peter’s Church by Mrs Duncuff, in memory of her husband, L-Corpl A P Duncuff, who was killed in action in France on August 3rd, 1916.

Captain (temporary Major) Eustace C Brierley, formerly of Rugby, has been awarded the D.S.O.

Temporary Major Leonard Tate, of Swinford Lodge, was mentioned by Sir Douglas Haig in his despatches, and his name appeared in the list published on Jan 3rd.

Second Lieut S E Rogers, of the Somerset L.I, formerly for some years in Rugby, was mentioned in Sir Douglas Haig’s recent despatch for gallant service in the Somme fighting.

Temporary Major Henry Noel Hoare, A.S.C, was one of the recipients of the D.S.O in the New Year Honours list. When living in Rugby some years ago, he was well known as a very capable exponent of Rugby football (on the three-quarter line), hockey, and cricket, playing fairly regularly with the town clubs.

Capt F S Neville, Northampton Regiment, is among the officers mentioned for special bravery in the field in the Commander-in-Chiefs recent despatches. Capt Neville, who was badly wounded early in the Somme Battle, is an Old Laurentian, and was a member of the staff of St Matthew’s Boys’ School when the War broke out.

In his monthly letter in the Parish Magazine the Rector says :— Mr Dugdale has just written home to me to say that he has been appointed Chaplain to the 5th Army Infantry School for Officers and N.C.O.’s, and that he now has a chance of doing “ a permanent piece of work—that chance which one always longs for in a battalion and never gets.” He is anxious to start a regular Institute, with a reading room and a chapel in it.

Amongst the Army Chaplains specially mentioned in Sir Douglas Haig’s despatch relating to operations on the Western front, appears the name of the Rev C T B McNulty, who is well known in Rugby and district. The reverend gentleman has been Vicar of Holy Trinity, Leamington, since 1912. Ordained in 1898, he served as Curate in Edgbaston Parish Church for two years. He left to become Curate of Holy Trinity. Coventry, and in 1905 was preferred the living of Dunchurch, and remained there for seven years.

PROHIBITION OF WOOL SALES.

The first public sitting of the War Losses Commission for awarding compensation in respect of property taken over by the Government under the Defence of the Realm Regulations was held at Spencer House, St James, on Tuesday. The Commission, which was composed of Sir James Woodhouse (chairman), Mr E Shortt, K.C, and Sir Matthew Wallace, has already held over a hundred sittings in private.

The prohibition of the Wool Sales at Rugby last summer formed the subject of an application by Messrs Cropper, Steward, and Cattell, auctioneers, of Rugby, who asked for compensation for loss sustained by reason of the prohibition of their wool sale by the Government. It was stated that the wool was gathered from the farmers in the district, and the sale had been extensively advertised for June 21. On June 8, however, a general order was made prohibiting dealings in wool, and the War Office telegraphed prohibiting the sale.

The Chairman ruled that as the prohibition was in the nature of a general order affecting the whole of the United Kingdom, any loss which had been sustained by reason of such order was outside the warrant of the Commission. They were not authorised to grant compensation for losses sustained in common, and the claim was therefore barred.

Mr Cattell urged that it was rather a hard case.

The Chairman : We have a good many hard cases before us. We cannot act on sympathy.

The firm were allowed their expenses.

A similar application by Messrs Tait, Sons, and Pallant was dealt with in a like manner.

 

GOVERNMENT SCHEME EXPLAINED AT BILTON.

At a meeting of the Bilton Parish Council held in the Church House, Bilton, on Wednesday evening, representatives from several surrounding parishes attended for the purpose of debating the Board of Agriculture’s scheme for increasing the home production of food as plained by Miss Day, of the Board of Agriculture.

Mr A E Warr (vice-chairman of the Parish Council) presided, and other members of the Council present were : Messrs F M Burton, J Veasey, A T Watson, G H Frost, and E J Smith. In addition there were also present : Mr Graham Patterson and Lady Rowenao Patterson (hom secretaries of the Rugby Sub-Committee of the County Agricultural Committee), Miss Day, Major and Mrs Neilson, Mrs Latouche, Miss Hastings, Mrs J Parnell, Mrs C Nickalls, Mrs P Nickalls, Mr and Mrs W Barnett, Miss Line, Capt Miller Rev W O Assheton, Mr H P Burdekin, and Mr C N Hoare.

The Chairman read a letter of apology for absence from Mr M E T Wratislaw (Chairman of the Council), who was on military duty at the Coventry Tribunal, and he expressed the hope that the Council would give a favourable reception to the committee dealing with the Waste Land Scheme.

Mr Graham Patterson explained that the representatives of Hillmorton, Dunchurch, and Bilton had taken the opportunity of attending that Council meeting, at the kind suggestion of Mr Wratislaw, to ask their advice and assistance in the scheme to bring into cultivation waste lands and vacant allotments there and in the adjoining villages. Time was pressing for the spring planting, and they begged the support of, and suggestions from, the Council to make the vacant plots prolific and productive.

PROPOSALS OF THE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE.

Miss Day then briefly sketched the proposals of the Board of Agriculture for dealing with the pressing need for increased food production. She did not think she was sounding a note of pessimism when she said that the only thing which might lead to an inconclusive peace would be the lack of food to go on fighting. The difficulties of getting food for three or four months hence were very great indeed, and they would have to rely far more on the resources of their own country. Mr Lloyd George saw that the question was one of urgent necessity, and he put a very able man at the head of the Board of Agriculture. She did not suppose that anyone could suggest anyone better for this position than Mr Prothero, who had gone very carefully into the matter. The proposals at present were to make the War Agricultural Committees in every county a sort of Local Board of Agriculture. These committees would have the district War Agricultural Committees under them, and these in turn would, it was hoped, call in the assistance of the Parish Councils, because, if this work was to be done properly it must be done by the people on the spot, who knew the local conditions. It was not suggested that the Board of Agriculture in London should write to any farmer and tell him to grow such and such a crop. That was to be decided by the parish or Rural District committees. Wheat was urgently needed, but if it was undesirable to grow wheat and they could get better crops of other cereals, it was as well to grow the better crops. The question which faced them all was:

“ WHAT ARE YOU GOING TO DO? AND HOW ARE YOU GOING TO DO IT ?”

It was no use going wildly and madly into any scheme. The first thing to decide was how to bring in more land which was going out of cultivation ; secondly, to reclaim land which had gone out of cultivation during the last five years. This was all they would be able to do for the spring sowing. With regard to the autumn, they would have time to consider what pasture land it would be useful to plough up. If they were to do this work, she supposed the burning question of the moment was labour. Everyone was prepared to do the work if they could only get the labour. They all agreed, however, that the war had got to be won, and that Englishmen were required to win it. She had been asked by farmers in many cases whether they were going to lose the men they had now got. It was absolutely impossible for one to answer that question. It depended on how the war went on. If the Germans could retain Roumania till June, they would get the whole of the Roumanian wheat crop, which would certainly lengthen the war, and it was a question whether the Russians would be able to regain Roumania in that time. The whole matter rested on that. With regard to labour, the Government had at their disposal 10,000 German prisoners who had been employed in agriculture, and there were also large numbers of interned aliens, who were doing useful work. Where one or two men, or any number up to five men were required, she considered interned aliens were more useful the German prisoners, because they did not require a guard. Farmers simply had to apply to the Home Office for them and notify the police when they arrived. The aliens were not allowed to go more than five miles distant from where they lived, and if anything went wrong the farmer could notify the police, who would remove them. The farmer did not have to pay the fares for the men to come or go. They would be paid at the ordinary rates for unskilled labourers. There were also conscientious objectors, but she found that as a rule the farmers preferred aliens to these men.

APPEALING TO WOMEN.

Then there were the women, who could do a certain amount of work, although she did not suggest that they could do the heavy land work. They were now making a stronger appeal than they had ever made before to the girls of the educated class. They were appealing to women who would, naturally, be taking up scholarships at the Universities. Men had given up their scholarships to join the army, and it was only fair that the women should put their scholarships aside for a year or two to help their country. A certain number of soldiers would also be available for the work. Then, too, machinery would be much more used than was the case in the past, and Mr Prothero, immediately on going to the Board of Agriculture, ordered a thousand motor tractors for the use of the War Agricultural Committees. Men were also being trained to drive them. Warwickshire had ordered some, and these would be ready about the third week in January. She thought there would be sufficient to do the work Required in the country.

THE UTILISATION OF SMALL PLOTS.

Dealing with the cultivation of small waste plots, Miss Day said it was suggested that they should get more people to take up allotments, and where, as in some cases had happened, large and small gardens had been allowed to go out of cultivation, it was hoped that arrangements would be made for having these cultivated again. There were also building and other vacant plots which might be used. To do this work they would have to go to the owners, and they wished to do this as gently as they could, and to get as much as possible done by persuasion. If this failed, they could go in by force ; but so long as they did the work peacefully they would got far more done than by putting peoples backs up. She wished to impress on them, and she hoped they would try and teach others, that there was

GOING TO BE A SHORTAGE.

They would have very little difficulty in getting things done if people only realised that things were going to be short, that there would not be sufficient to go round, and that they would be lucky if they were only hungry. This was the problem facing the agricultural population at the moment. Where land or gardens were not being properly cultivated, powers would be given to an accredited body like the Parish Council or Rural District Council to go in and take them over. She thought the Parish Councils would probably be the medium, because that was where they got down absolutely to the parish. To carry this scheme through they would want a small committee in every village. Dealing with the

MOST PROFITABLE SYSTEM OF CULTIVATION.

Miss Day suggested that where vacant plots were concerned, they should obtain expert opinion as to the value of cultivating them or not, so that no time should be wasted. With regard to the digging, she suggested that they should get the clergy or postmen and policemen to help them in their spare time. Digging was too heavy for the average woman. In the towns they could get a good deal of help from the volunteers. If they could not get the digging done in any village, they should refer the matter to the War Agricultural Committee. Machinery might be available for the larger plots. After the digging was done the women, properly organised, should be able to do the planting. She was very anxious that they should grow produce with a certain amount of common sense. She wished them to produce the same variety of vegetables as far as possible, because the Board would be prepared to market their surplus stock. They could not do this, however, if all the produce was of a different variety, because it had to be cooked in bulk. In order to do this, they might get some people who had sufficient ground to grow a number of seedlings for distribution at so much per score.

PIG KEEPING.

Miss Day then advocated pig keeping, and said food could be produced more quickly in that way than by any other method. If it was not possible for one person to get enough food to keep a pig, they might have co-operative pigs. She believed if they once started a village piggery they would find it would grow very quickly. The school children should be enlisted to help in various ways, and Mr Prothero himself had approached the head of the Board of Education to try to get as much assistance from the schools as possible, and several counties had requested that the children should be allowed three half-days off per week, such absence to count as attendance if they were working in agriculture. The Board of Agriculture were going to stick at nothing in reason in order to get this food grown, and they were quite prepared to work, and to work hard, but it was quite impossible for the Board of Agriculture or any other Board to say that they should have anyone back who had gone into the army ; but where it was shown that there was a recognised shortage of skilled men they would try to get them back. The munition factories and mines were to be combed, and it was not proposed, as a general rule, to take any more men from agriculture. She quite understood the difficulty ; but it had to be faced, and it would not be satisfactory to the agricultural community of England to feel that an inconclusive peace had to be made, unless they felt that they had strained every nerve to get the food which was necessary for the country.

In reply to Mr Barnett, Miss Day said the Government were considering the advisability of providing artificial manures.—Mr Hoare asked if they would fix the price of seed potatoes, and in connection with this Mr Follows read a letter from Mr Gordon Everitt, of the County War Agricultural Committee, asking the Parish Council to ascertain what seed potatoes were required in the parish. The County Committee would be able to supply these, but they did not know the prices or varieties yet. Not more than 5cwt would be sold to any one man, and the price would be less than £14 per ton.

In reply to Mr Burdekin, Miss Day said where new land was ploughed up, expert advice as to the best crop to be grown could be obtained.

Mr Watson asked if the restrictions as to pig keeping were to be relaxed, and Miss Day said she believed they were to be suspended, provided the pigs were kept clean and to the satisfaction of the sanitary inspector.

In answer to Mr Fellows, it was stated that two men were sent out with the motor tractor.—Major Neilson : Is the ploughing done free, or do people have to pay ?— Miss Day : A charge of so much per acre is made.

Mr Warr assured Miss Day that the Council would do all they could to further the scheme.—It was decided to elect a committee of seven, three of whom should represent the Parish Council. Those elected from the village were Messrs J E Cox, H P Burdekin, W Barnett, and T Smith. The Parish Council representatives chosen were Messrs M E T Wratislaw, E J Smith, and A J Askew, with Mr J J Cripps in reserve in case either of these failed to serve.