27th Jan 1917. Very Drunk at the Station

VERY DRUNK AT THE STATION.—On Thursday last, before T Hunter, Esq, Bernard Nutt, second air mechanic (R.F.C), Regent Street, London, was summoned for being drunk on the L & N-W Railway Station, at Rugby, on January 24th.—He pleaded guilty, and William S Laughton, ticket examiner, stated that the man was so intoxicated that a doctor was sent for, who, on account of his condition, ordered his removal to the Police Station for safety. Defendant travelled from London with an Australian soldier, who had a big bottle of whiskey.—Defendant informed the Magistrate that he was a teetotaller, and had only just come out of hospital. He had a little drop of whiskey, and that upset him.—Discharged on paying doctor’s fee, 5s.

PRESENTATION.—On Saturday last an interesting presentation took place at the establishment of Mr J J McKinnell, Sheep Street, when Mr Horace Sanderson was the recipient of a very nice wristlet watch and a pair of silver vases. Mr J J Thompson, in making the presentation on behalf of his fellow-employees, spoke of the very efficient manner in which Mr Sanderson had discharged his duties during the 18 years that he had served as assistant and traveller, and felt sure that he would continue to serve as faithfully now he had responded to the call of his King and country. Mr Sanderson has also received a very useful letter wallet in recognition of his services as registrar at the Rugby Brotherhood, in which capacity he has done a good and faithful work.

THE PARCELS sent on behalf of the Rugby Prisoners War Help Committee this week to local men in German prison camps contained : 1 large tin rations, 1 tin tripe, 10-oz tin sardines, ½-lb margarine, 1lb milk, 1lb rolled oats, 1lb cake, 1 tin fruit, ½-lb chocolate, ¼-lb tea, 30 cigarettes, ½-lb sugar, mustard.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Capt R W Barnett, acting Brigade Major of a Naval Brigade, son of Mr Walter Barnett, of Bilton, has been awarded the Military Cross.

Mr W W Peberdy, Lansdowne House, Rugby, has received intimation from the Admiralty that his son. Flight Sub-Lieut W H Peberdy, R.N, failed to return from a scouting flight in the East on the 14th inst. At present he is reported missing.

LOCAL SOLDIER DECORATED BY KING PETER.

Flight-Sergt A Forsyth, of the Royal Flying Corps, son of Mrs Forsyth, of 8 Murray Road, Rugby, has been decorated by the King of Serbia with the Silver Star in recognition of his distinguished services during the campaign in that country. Sergt Forsyth has since been promoted sergeant-major. He was for a number of years employed at the B.T.H Works, but at the time he enlisted he was assistant works manager at the Aluminium Works, Birmingham.

NEW BILTON MAN WINS THE MILITARY MEDAL.

Sergt George King, R.E, youngest son of Mr and Mr Tom King, 89 Lawford Road, New Bilton, and a native of the parish, has been awarded the Military Medal for devotion to duty with the Forces in France. When he joined the Army, Sergt King belonged to the Coventry City Police, but he is well known at New Bilton, and formerly played both for the Cricket and Football Clubs. His father has worked at the Portland Cement Works for 53 years, having served under five successive managers, and he has lived in his present home since the time of his wedding 43 years ago.

MR J E COX’S SON SLIGHTLY WOUNDED.

Information has been received this week by Mr J E Cox, of Lodge Farm, Long Lawford, that his son. Trooper G H Cox, of the Warwickshire Yeomanry, has been slightly wounded in the right thigh, and is in a General Hospital in Egypt. Another of Mr Cox’s sons (E E Cox) joined the 3rd Gloucesters last week. Mr Cox has now three sons serving in the Army.

STRETTON-ON-DUNSMORE.

Much sympathy is felt for Mr and Mrs J Nicholas, of Lime Kiln Farm, who have received news that their eldest son, Lance-Corpl John Nicholas, of the Warwickshire Yeomanry, has again been wounded in the chest in action in Egypt ; also that their third son, Stewart, is officially reported wounded and missing since September 29th—the same day that his youngest brother, Percy, was wounded.—Trooper Alf Falconbridge, of the Warwickshire Yeomanry, who enlisted with Lance-Corpl Nicholas, has sustained a fractured arm.

BRANDON.

Mr and Mrs Reuben Banbrook have received the news that their son, Pte Bert Banbrook, has been badly wounded in the back and shoulder. He had not long returned to the front, having been previously wounded in the leg. He is one of five brothers upholding the honour of their country. He is now in hospital in France.—Pte J Ward, son of Mr and Mrs Thomas Ward, has also been home for the first time after his wounds. Unfortunately the poor fellow has completely lost the sight of an eye. Much sympathy is felt for Mr and Mrs Ward, who have already had one son killed.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR.
THE GREAT WAR LOAN.

To the Editor of the Advertiser.

SIR,—The Chancellor of the Exchequer has addressed an appeal to War Savings Committees throughout the country to assist in promoting the new War Loan. He suggests first that they should stimulate the purchase of War Savings Certificates during the next few weeks by all means in their power. But he also asks us, further, to extend our activities so as to include persons of moderate incomes to whom the plan of co-operative investment by means of War Savings Associations does not specially appeal, and particularly those who might be able to invest at once any sum between £5 and £50. Such people are often not familiar with the machinery of investment, and it is felt that in order to secure their help it is necessary not only to advertise the appeal to lend, but also to make available some means of obtaining information or advise, and especially assistance in filling up the necessary forms. For this purpose the Rugby Central War Savings Committee have, with the consent of the Rugby Urban District Council, established an Information Bureau in the Benn Buildings every day from 12.15-1.15, and from 7-9 o’clock ; also on Saturday afternoons. The Bureau will be opened on Monday next, Jan. 29th.

The committee are also arranging a public meeting, to be held in the Temple Speech Room at 8 o’clock on Saturday, February 3rd, at which Major J L Baird, M.P, has promised to speak. The Schools and Boy Scouts are being asked to assist in the work of advertising. Other measures are in preparation by which we hope to make this national appeal so widely known and understood that no money which can possibly be lent to the Government will remain in Rugby uninvested on February 16th. To this end we ask with confidence for the help of all classes of our fellow-townsmen.

The time is short, and the need is very urgent. Let Rugby take a worthy part in meeting it-and at once.—Yours very truly,

J J McKINNELL (Chairman).

A A DAVID (Hon. Secretary),

Rugby War Savings Central Committee.

IN MEMORIAM.

WALDUCK.—In loving memory of our dear lad, ERN., who died of wounds in France, January 28, 1916.—Sadly missed by his loving MOTHER, FATHER, SISTERS and BROTHERS.

WALDUCK.—In loving memory of my dear brother, ERN., who died of wounds in France, January 28, 1916.—Deeply mourned by MET.

 

9th Sep 1916. Lady Dorothie Feilding Gains The Military Medal

LADY DOROTHIE FEILDING GAINS THE MILITARY MEDAL.

DECORATED BY THE KING.

Lady Dorothie Feilding, the Earl of Denbigh’s youngest daughter, is first on the list of the British women military medallists. The honour is awarded for her gallant service with Dr Hector Munro’s Field Ambulance. For months she tended the sick and wounded in the cellar of a house close to the Belgian trenches. The situation became so dangerous the Lady Dorothie and her companions were at last persuaded to move, and ten minutes after they had removed their belongings a German shell crashed on the house and destroyed it. King Albert bestowed on Lady Dorothie Belgium’s highest military decoration, the Order of Leopold. She was also mentioned in a French brigade order for “ giving to all almost daily the finest example of contempt of danger and devotion to duty.” The official account of the present award states that Lady Dorothie “ attended the wounded for over a year with marked devotion to duty and contempt of danger.”

Lady Dorothie Feilding, accompanied by her father, Col. The Earl of Denbigh, was decorated by the King with the Military Medal at Windsor Castle on Wednesday last, and had the honour of lunching afterwards with their Majesties.

The Military Medal is one recently instituted by the King solely for acts of bravery in the field under fire and has as its sole inscription on the back of the medal “ For bravery in the field.”

Lady Dorothie is the first British woman to receive the decoration. She returned to her work with the Munro Ambulance Corps in Belgium yesterday (Friday).

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Capt P W Nickalls, Northants Yeomanry, has been gazetted temporary major.

Sergt Harry Beers, 1st King’s (Liverpool) Regt. reported missing on August 8th, has written to state that he is a prisoner of war at Dulmen, Germany. Sergt Beers is an old St Oswald’s boy (New Bilton).

Mrs T Douglas, 87 Cambridge Street, has received news that her eldest son, Pte Frank Belcher, is lying at St Pat’s Hospital, Malta, with malaria fever, contracted in Salonika. He joined the colours on September 2nd, 1914, and after going through several engagements in France was drafted out to Salonika in October, 1915. He is now on the high road to recovery.

A FIGHTING FAMILY.—Few families have a better war record than that of Mr and Mrs Dunkley, of l5 Chester Street, Rugby. There are five sons in the Army, including two who have been reported missing for some time past. William Albert, the eldest, is in the King’s Royal Rifles, and he has a son serving with him at Salonica. Walter Ernest has served his time with the Royal Warwicks, and has just re-joined the Army from Lutterworth, having been drafted into a different regiment. Harry, who joined the Royal Warwicks, has been missing since July 30th ; and Percy John, of the Lancashire Fusiliers, has been missing since July 25th. The fifth son, Arthur Rowland, is serving with the Labour Battalion. A sixth member of the same family (Alfred Thos Dunkley) has been discharged from the Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry on medical grounds, and is now employed in a controlled factory. Mrs Dunkley has two brothers serving in France, and two of her nephews are in the Army.

LOCAL CASUALTIES.

Walter Wilkins, 2nd Battalion Oxon and Bucks Light Infantry, who worked in the Illumination Department at the B.T.H, and was a member of the B.T.H hockey team, has been killed in action. He was only married a few months before the War broke out.

We learn that Transport Sergt F R Spencer, Royal Warwicks, was wounded on August 27th by a bullet which passed through his right leg. By a strange coincidence he was first attended when brought in by his own medical attendant, who is now at the front. Sergt Spencer is now in hospital at Lincoln, going on well. He had been out in France about 18 months.

ACCIDENT TO PTE J H HOLMES.

Pte J H Holmes, a member of the Rugby Advertiser staff, who joined the R.A.M.C in October last, has met with an accident in France, as a result of which he has broken his left leg in two places below the knee. In a letter to a friend he says : “ After spending a few days in three different hospitals in France, I arrived in Southampton from Boulogne on Friday. The thing which struck me most was the excellent arrangements for transporting the wounded. The hospitals, too, contain the most up-to-date instruments. The hospital I am in is a fine place, food and attention being perfect.”

TWO MORE ST MATTHEW’S OLD BOYS KILLED.

News has just come to hand that Lance-Corpl A Lewis, of the 5th Oxford and Bucks L.I. has been killed in action. He was the second son of P.C Lewis, of Rugby, and an old scholar of St Matthew’s School, where he was popular and much liked. Lance-Corpl Lewis joined the Army early in the war, and was several times wounded, on one occasion his life being saved by a cigarette case in his breast pocket, which deflected the bullet.

Pte W Goffin, of the 5th Oxford and Bucks L.I, another St Matthew’s old boy, whose home is at 35 Pennington Street, who was posted as missing after the battle, of Loos last year, is now reported as killed. Pte W Goffin’s brother, Pte H J Goffin, 7th Royal Warwickshire Regiment, has just been wounded for the second time. No less than sixteen near relatives in the Goffin family are now on active service.

STRETTON-ON-DUNSMORE.

NEWS has been received from the War Office that Lance-Corpl John Nicholas, of the Warwickshire Yeomanry, son of Mr and Mrs J Nicholas, Lime Kiln Farm, Stretton-on-Dunsmore. was wounded in action in Egypt on August 5th. His many friends will he pleased to hear his wound is not serious, the bullet having passed through the muscle of his left leg, and he is now progressing favourably in hospital at Romani. He joined at the commencement of the War, and has been in Egypt twelve months. His two youngest brothers, of the Royal Fusiliers, are also serving in France, thus making a total of three sons out of four serving with his Majesty’s Forces.

A DYING SOLDIER’S REGRET.—Our readers will doubtless remember that a few months ago a soldier billeted in the town was fined for being drunk and disorderly and disturbing an open air service of the Salvation Army. News has. now reached Rugby that this man has died from wounds. While he was being carried off the field he asked any member of the stretcher party if they visited Rugby to call at the Salvation Army Citadel and express his regret for the occurrence. The corporal of the stretcher party has since been wounded and sent to England, and on Sunday afternoon he called at the Citadel and gave the dying soldier’s message to the officer in charge.

DEATHS.

MASON.—On Sept. 1st, died of wounds, Sergt. Arthur T. Mason, Oxford & Bucks Light Infantry.
“ Greater love than this no man hath, that a man lay down his life for his friends.”
—From his devoted and sorrowing wife.

WILKINS.—Killed in action on August 24th, Walter Wilkins, 2nd Oxford & Bucks L.I.

RUGBY PRISONERS OF WAR FUND.

SUCCESSFUL FLAG DAY.

The effort on Saturday on behalf of the fund to provide comforts for prisoners of war from Rugby and district was in all respects a great and gratifying success. Following to many Flag days for deserving objects, it may have been assumed that the public were getting rather tired of these appeals ; but the plight of prisoners captured by the Germans and incarcerated in detention camps is such that the well-organised scheme to provide them with regular supplies of comforts, such as that undertaken by the local committee, must commend itself to everybody. Certain it is that the endeavour to raise a substantial sum of money to send weekly parcels to prisoners from this locality met with very enthusiastic support. All previous records were easily broken, and the sale of flags, supplemented by donations, has resulted in approximately £500 being raised. The sale of flags in the town and village produced £211 14s 11d. It will be remembered that for the Alexandra Rose Day about £140 was raised, and this was the highest amount brought in before Saturday by “ flag day ” collections in Rugby.

Anticipating a large sale of flags, the committee secured no fewer than 35,000 for disposal in Rugby and the surrounding villages. The flags were specially made for this effort. On one side were the letters in white on blue ground, “ Rugby Prisoners of War Fund,” and on the reverse side was a picture representing three British soldiers behind a barbed wire barricade, and guarded by Germans, with the word’s, “ Help our men,” printed at the foot.

The Benn Buildings, kindly lent by the Urban District Council, formed the centre of operations, and about 300 people helped in the collection. Some of the flag sellers were astir quite early in the morning, and towards mid-day there seemed a likelihood of the supply of flags giving out, and accordingly small Union Jacks were procured and stamped with the green seal familiar to local shopkeepers ; but by carefully regulating the sales throughout the town it was not found necessary to utilise a great number of these.

Another popular feature was the sale of sprays of lavender, of which between 7,000 and 8,000 were distributed. This idea originated with Mrs Bernard Hopps, of Thurlaston, and so great was the demand that extra supplies were needed. These were provided from the gardens of Mrs Hopps, Mr W Fiint, Mrs Blagden, Mrs Dickinson, Mm Eckersley, and others.

During the day Mr W Flint, the chairman of the committee, drove round the town and through the district in his car with Mr J R Barker, the energetic secretary, and visited the various depots which had been established.

On Sunday evening a special concert in aid of the Prisoners of War Fund was given at the Empire, the promoter being Mr B Morris, the proprietor. Admission was by silver collection, taken by Mrs Cosford and Miss Kimber. Miss Phyllis Morris and the artistes at the Empire gave their services, and a special film was shown. The proceeds of this concert amounted to just under £10.

The whole of the arrangements were carried out by the Hon Secretary, Mr J Reginald Barker, who received considerable assistance in the clerical work from Miss C M Judd.

Mr Barker made full use of the local newspapers in his publicity arrangements, and took advantage of every opportunity to make the cause of the prisoners of war understood and realised by everyone, in Rugby and the surrounding villages ; and this, no doubt, helped largely to bring about such a satisfactory result.

LIGHTING OFFENCES.

Alfred G Cox, shop manager, Poplar Grove, Rugby ; Ada Teague, 13 Park Road, Rugby ; George A Towers, newsagent, 120 Cambridge Street, Rugby ; Thos Norcross, draughtsman, Lodge Road, Rugby ; and John Henry Lines, Queen’s Head Inn, West Street, Rugby, were summoned for not obscuring lights as required by the Lighting Order.

Mrs Lines appeared for her husband, who was unwell, and said there was only a small light burning for a few minutes while she opened the window to let in some fresh air.—P.S Percival said at 11.15 he saw a bright light shining from the Queen’s Head. The blinds were not drawn, but there was a shade on the wrong side of the light. When he knocked at the door the light went out, but no one answered.—Mrs Lines said the reason she did not answer the door was that she thought it was a drunken soldier, against whom she had previously locked the door.—Fined £1.

A G Cox was summoned in respect of a light at the Co-operative Society’s Furniture Stores. He admitted the offence.—P.S Percival said he saw a bright light shining through the window of the furniture shop.—Defendant said he went in at midnight for the purpose of stock-taking, and switched on the light without thinking to first draw down the blind.—Fined £1.

Mr Towers said the light was showing accidentally.—P.C Lovell said he saw a bright light shining from the bedroom. Defendant’s attention was drawn to it, and he said he was sorry it had occurred. He did all he could to comply with the regulations. Mr Towers said the window was thrown up and the blind was blown outwards by the wind.—Fined £1.

T Norcross also admitted the offence.—P.C Elkington said at 10.35 p.m he saw a bright incandescent light shining from the bedroom window on to the houses opposite. The blind was not drawn.—Defendant said he had only been in the house a week, and the blinds had not been fixed. That was the first time he had used the gas, and that was only for a minute, because he had no candle in the room.—Fined £1.

Mr W Davis, solicitor, Rugby, appeared for Mrs Teague, and pleaded guilty.—P.C Elkington stated that he saw a bright light shining from the back of Mrs Teague’s house. There were two naked lights down-stairs and one upstairs. No blinds were drawn.—Mr Davis stated that Mrs Teague, who took in boarders, had taken down the blinds that night to wash them, and had retired to bed. One of the boarders subsequently turned on the light, not knowing that the blinds had been taken down.—Fined £1.

POINTS FOR FARMERS.—The War Agricultural Committee have received official information of interest to farmers in the district on the following points :— Sulphate of ammonia can be bought during August and September for 15s per cwt nett cash on condition that it is removed from the seller’s works before September 30th. After that the price will be raised to 15s 6d per cwt. Labour Exchanges are still authorised to deal with applications for soldiers to assist with the harvest.

THE PARISH CHURCH CLOCK.—For the present the church clock will not strike the hours and quarters. In view of air raids, all clocks have to be silent at night, and the churchwardens found it too expensive for the strike to be detached every evening and connected again next morning.