2nd Feb 1918. The Food Shortage

THE FOOD SHORTAGE.

The queue evil reached a climax at Rugby on Friday last when large crowds besieged practically the whole of the provision and butchers’ shops in the centre of the town. An unusually large quantity of margarine, five tons, was received in the town the previous day, and a large portion of this was commandeered by the Executive Officer and distributed amongst about a dozen other shops. Notwithstanding this, however, people were unable to obtain a share, while others by dodging from queue to queue, or sending different members of their families, secured considerably more than their reasonable requirements.

In the afternoon large crowds, estimated at several thousands of persons, including number of locomotive men, assembled in and near the Market Place. These latter were interviewed by Mr T A Wise, chairman of the Food Control Committee, and they also visited the warehouses of several tradesmen to satisfy themselves that there were no large hoards of supplies. The tradespeople did everything possible to satisfy the people, and when the much sought for fats could no longer be obtained a large stock of jam was released. The Police also exercised considerable tact in dealing with the crowd, which several occasions showed signs of exasperation. On the other hand those who were engaged in the difficult task of distributing were impressed with the inconsiderate and unreasonable attitude adopted by many of the people who besieged the shops.

On Saturday, however, the scenes were quite normal again, and in fact there were fewer queues than has been the case for some time.

This state of affairs continued til yesterday (Friday) morning, when large queues had assembled by seven o’clock, and at one establishment the police were sorely pressed to keep a huge crowd from forcing an entrance into the shop.

CULTIVATION OF RAILWAY LAND.—The L N-W announce that they are prepared to allocate plots of vacant land both inside and outside their fences to anyone, whether railway servants or not, who desire to add to the food production at a nominal rent of 1s each lot.

FATAL FALL FROM AEROPLANE.

An inquest was held at the Court House on Friday last week by Mr E F Hadow (coroner), concerning the death of Second-Lieut Harold Griffith Nelson (25), which took place, as reported in our last issue, as the result of an aeroplane accident.

Capt William Hubert Taylor deposed that the deceased officer’s home was in New York. He was a member of the American Air Service, and attached to the R.F.C. He was a learner, but very competent, and had flown altogether 67 hours.

Sergt Eric Jack Robjohns and Corpl William Hunter gave evidence to the effect that the engine and rigging of the machine were in good condition before the flight.

Capt Leslie Randall Wren deposed that he saw decease start off. After he had been up about half-an-hour he pulled the machine into a vertical stall, an evolution by which the machine would be practically “ standing ” on the tail. This evolution was of no practical use. He added that the position would automatically cause the machine to nose dive violently, and it would be out of control for a time. One would want a good deal of depth for such a dive, but 2,000ft. would be quite high enough. While the machine was turning over into the nose dive witness saw the deceased fly out of the machine.—The Coroner: It came round so quickly that it practically “ chucked ” him out ?—A: That is what it comes to ; or, on the other hand, his head might have struck the front of the machine, and during unconsciousness he might have fallen out. The tendency would be for him to fall out if he was not strapped in. Witness added that he immediately went to the machine and examined the belt, but it was not strapped up. It was the pilot’s businesses see that he strapped himself in, and he could not say whether deceased had taken that precaution. There was a possibility, but not a probability, that he might have jerked the belt open by the motion of his arms. Witness had never hoard of such a thing being done.

Second-Lieut G W Curtis gave evidence as to the damage to the machine, which came to earth a-half to three-quarters of a mile away.

Surgeon-Major Collins explained the frightful injuries received by the deceased, who, he said, might have been alive, but would probably have been unconscious by the time he touched the earth. Despite the tremendous impact deceased’s wrist watch, with an open dial, was unbroken, and continued to go without losing a second.

The Coroner referred to the surprisingly few accidents which occurred, in view of the number of flights made daily, and said this appeared to be a clear case of the usual precautions not having been taken.

The jury returned a verdict of “ Accidental death ” ; but added that there was no evidence to prove whether the belt was fastened or not when deceased began the flight.

After the inquest an officer gave a demonstration with the belt, as a result of which the Coroner and Jury expressed the opinion that it probably was fastened up before the flight.

WOMEN LAND ARMY.

EFFICIENCY CERTIFICATES FOR LOCAL WORKERS.

The presentation of efficiency certificates won by Warwickshire women at the Midland test last autumn was made the occasion of a public demonstration at Birmingham on Tuesday, in which between 20 and 30 workers from the Rugby district took part, along with several hundred women from all parts of the county. The majority were wearing the severely practical uniform in which they are accustomed to work, and the cheerfulness of the girls and their healthy and robust appearance were at once a tribute to the wholesome effect which the work, despite trying conditions, has upon spirits and physique. The certificates were presented by the Lord Mayor (Ald Brookes), who said there were now 180 girls employed on farms in Birmingham and Warwickshire, and, in addition, there were 1,400 women in the villages who had registered themselves as willing to give part of their time to farm work.

Out the 84 Warwickshire girls who entered the tests 70 received certificates. Among them were the following local workers who passed three tests:—Miss Mary Crofts (Long Lawford), Miss Nellie Harrison (Clifton), and Miss Constance Walton (Clifton). Passed two tests: Miss Doris Stent (Pailton), Miss Richards (Clifton), Mrs Lee (Bourton), and Miss Bertha Steath (Clifton). Passed one test: Miss Annie Oven and Miss Kate Foster (Catthorpe), Miss Harriett Dickens (Brownsover), Mrs Edward Eales (Bourton). Others of the Land Army mentioned as doing good work in this district were : Miss Pape (Bretford), Mrs Harry Smith and Miss Robinson (Lawford Heath), Miss Tew (Pailton), Miss Taylor and Miss Smith (Princethorpe), Miss Edwards (Newbold), Miss Allerton (Stretton-under-Fosse), Miss Hunt, Miss Gibbs, and Miss Packer (working near Lutterworth).

There are also many whole-time and part-time workers in the Rugby area who have earned as many as six stripes on their arms for length of service, all going to work on the land. Each stripe represents 1,440 hours’ work.

MORE LOCAL PRISONERS OF WAR.

Four additional prisoners of war have been added to the list of the Rugby Committee. Reported missing since Nov 30, Sergt J R Sacree, 10th Batt. Rifle Brigade, is now known to be wounded with gunshot through the shoulder, and a prisoner of war interned at Soltau. Sergt Sacree, who joined up immediately on the outbreak of war, was an assistant for six years to Mr C T Tew, of Regent Street. He had been previously wounded four times, won the Military Medal and recommended again in September last year.— Rfn W E Boyles, 10th Kings Royal Rifle Corps, whose home is at Bishops Itchington, is a prisoner of war interned at Dulmen. An employee of Messrs Greaves, Bull & Lakin, Ltd. of Harbury, he enlisted in 1914. His firm have generously offered to defray the cost of his food parcels as well as for two other employees of theirs who are prisoners of war in Germany.—Pte A C Neal. Royal Warwickshire Regt, whose home is at Napton, is a prisoner of war at Limburg-a-Lahn.—Pte A E Mumford, Machine Gun Corps, attached Cavalry, is a prisoner of war at Minden. For three years he acted as barman for Mr W Jones, of “ The Barrel,” Market Place. He enlisted in August, 1914, in the Lancers, subsequently being transferred to the 17th Lancers—Mr J R Barker, hon secretary of Rugby Committer, has made the necessary arrangements for the despatch of the standard food parcels and bread to each of the above men.

The financial support given to the Committee has been splendid, sufficient to enable them to bear the whole cost of each man’s food parcels, etc. Every month means a grave increase in the number of prisoners of war and a corresponding increase in the expenditure. Constant help is very necessary to prevent any call upon the funds of the Red Cross. The number of prisoners of war now on the list is 83, and to provide for these men £230 6s 6d has to be found every four weeks.

Pte A King, of the Royal Scots, whose home is at Napton, has been repatriated, but no further news has yet come to hand.

D.C.M. WON BY RUGBY SOLDIERS.
BRAVE DEEDS.
The following further awards of the Distinguished Conduct Medal are officially recorded :—

10764 Pte J H Enticott, Oxford & Bucks L.I.(Rugby).
In spite of heavy machine gun fire, he volunteered to go out and look for wounded, and succeeded in bringing back successfully an officer and N.C.O. He showed complete disregard for danger.

32651 B.S.M H W Evans, R.F.A (Rugby).
When his wagon lines were heavily shelled he promptly organised the clearing of the lines, and removed the wounded to an aid post. All this took place under very heavy shell fire, which killed or wounded six men and 37 horses. By his complete coolness and splendid disregard of personal danger he averted all panic and saved many casualties.

840150 Bty Sergt-Major G Hopewell, R.F.A (Rugby).
When his battery ammunition dump was set on fire by enemy shelling he at once went to the position with his Battery Commander and another officer ; and although under heavy shell fire and in great danger from the exploding ammunition, he collected earth and saved a large quantity of material. Both . officers were wounded whilst performing this gallant act.

A RUGBY MASTER DIES AT SEA.—Second-Lieut Leonard George Colbeck, M.C (R.F.A), reported died at sea on the 3rd January, just after completing his 33rd year, was formerly an assistant master at Rugby School. A fine all-round cricketer at Marlborough when captain of the team in 1903, his batting had not a little do with his side averting defeat from Rugby at Lord’s. Two years later he secured a place in the Cambridge University team. One three occasions he figured in the Inter-Varsity hockey match.

MORE AIR RAIDS.—During an air raid on Monday night over London and the South-Eastern Counties 47 men. women and children were killed and 169 injured—30 of them in the basement of one establishment on which a bomb fell. There was a second raid on Tuesday injured.

THE DUNCHURCH AVENUE.
COUNTY COUNCIL ACCEPTS THE DUKE OF BUCCLEUCH’S OFFER.
OLD TREES TO BE REPLACED BY YOUNG ONE.

The Warwickshire County Council, at their meeting on Wednesday, discussed the question of the future of Dunchurch Avenue, on consideration of a special report by the Dunchurch Avenue Committee, and decided, after a long discussion, in favour of the first of two alternative schemes suggested by the Duke of Buccleuch. Ald J S Dugdale, K.C, presided.

The proposals made by the Duke of Buccleuch at an interview with the committee at London on January 4th were set forth in the report of the Avenue Committee. His Grace pointed out that his agent’s letter of June 15th last year had not been read or fully reported to the County Council meeting of October 24th last ; that if that had been done it would have made it clear that he himself would have been glad to preserve the Avenue intact ; but that the preservation of the elm trees was impossible because of the rotten and dangerous state of many of them ; and he made an alternative offer which is summarised in his agent’s letter of January 8th, given below. The committee added : We expressed regret to his Grace that any misapprehension should have arisen from the letter of June 15th not having been fully reported or read, and explained that it had been fully read to the County Roads and Bridges Committee, and that the report was in the ordinary course of the Council’s procedure.

THE DUKE’S OFFERS.

The report of the committee continued : Mr Cyprian Knollys, the Duke’s agent, wrote on January 8th : ” I now write to confirm what passed at an interview between the deputation from your Council and the Duke of Buccleuch on the 4th ult. The Duke has always shared the desire expressed by the deputation that the Avenue (which is now about 180 years old) should be preserved. He has had it under observation for some years, and particularly since the gales of December, 1915, and March, 1916, when 74 of the elm trees were blown down. The opportunity which these windfalls afforded for obtaining accurate information as to the state and condition of the trees has convinced the Duke that they have become dangerous, and that even if left the trees, as an avenue, would in the course of a few years practically cease to exist. His Grace is also of opinion that any lopping or pollarding would never be successful, and would only hasten the process of decay. He feels, therefore, that he cannot take the responsibly of leaving the trees standing. In view, however of the importance of maintaining the Avenue for the public benefit in the future the Duke made the following alternative proposals :—

“ (1) That be should himself dispose of the trees standing on the unenclosed land, and after deducting expenses and charges, handover half the proceeds of the sale to the County Council (or other approved body) to be used for re-planting and keeping up the Avenue : or (2) that he should sell to the County Council (or other approved body) the trees standing on the unenclosed land at 6d per cubic foot, which may be considered half their value, on the condition that an avenue it kept up. In either case his Grace will give all his rights over this unenclosed land on which the trees stand.

“ Scheme No. 1 should provide ample money to replant the Avenue as circumstances will permit.

“ Under Scheme 2 the Avenue would belong to the public, but in connection with it there are one or two observations which the Duke thinks the Council may like him to mention for their consideration :

“ If say half the trees are cut, a sufficient sum should be obtained to pay the cost of the purchase, and young trees could then be planted in the vacant spaces. This would, to a great extent, preserve the present appearance of the Avenue. On the other hand, the shade from the remaining trees might injuriously affect the growth of the young plants, and there would be considerable risk of the young trees being injured by the fall of any of the old trees or their limbs. It should also be borne in mind that when trees are grown close, as in an avenue, every tree that is blown down increases the danger of the remainder being also blown. If it was thought desirable to reduce this risk it might be done by cutting down one-half of the Avenue and re-planting it, and then gradually to re-plant the other half.

THE DUKE’S OPINION,

“ From a practical point of view, the Duke considers Scheme 1 to be the best, as though there would be a temporary loss of the Avenue, all danger to the public would be avoided, and there would certainly be a superior avenue in the future, as experience has shown that making up an old avenue is seldom, if ever, successful. And if, as was suggested the Avenue is to be considered as part of the proposed permanent memorial to the 29th Division, it would if newly planted throughout, be in its prime 100 years after the date of his Majesty’s inspection. In making these observations, however, the Duke desires it to be understood that he leaves it entirely to the Council to decide which (if either) of these proposals they would like to adopt ; and I am to add that if the experience and advice of his Forester would be of any assistance to the Council in their consideration of the subject his Grace will be happy if they will avail themselves of it. It was suggested that you would be able to let me hear from you by March 1st.”

“ VERY GENEROUS OFFER.”

The committee proceeded :—

[LONG DISCUSSION BY W.C.C.]

The question was then put to the vote, and the amendment was carried by 32 votes to 10—Scheme No. 1 being, therefore the one accepted.

It was pointed out that a public subscription would be necessary to provide the 29th Division Memorial.

A vote of thanks was passed to the Dunchurch Avenue Committee, and the committee will (it was stated) remain in being.

DEATHS.

HERBERT.—In loving memory of Pte. JAMES HERBERT, 6th Northants Regt., eldest son of Mr. & Mrs. Henry Herbert, Yelvertoft ; killed in action January 19th, 1918, aged 38 years.

IN MEMORIAM.

SMITH.—In loving memory of GEORGE EDWARD SMITH, who was killed in France on January 29, 1917.
“ We have lost him, we who loved him,
And, like others, must be brave ;
For we know that he is sleeping
In a British soldier’s grave.”
—From his loving Wife and Children.

WALDUCK.—In loving memory of our dear lad, ERN, who died of wounds on January 28, 1916.—From his loving Mother and Dad, Sisters and Brothers.

 

 

27th Jan 1917. Very Drunk at the Station

VERY DRUNK AT THE STATION.—On Thursday last, before T Hunter, Esq, Bernard Nutt, second air mechanic (R.F.C), Regent Street, London, was summoned for being drunk on the L & N-W Railway Station, at Rugby, on January 24th.—He pleaded guilty, and William S Laughton, ticket examiner, stated that the man was so intoxicated that a doctor was sent for, who, on account of his condition, ordered his removal to the Police Station for safety. Defendant travelled from London with an Australian soldier, who had a big bottle of whiskey.—Defendant informed the Magistrate that he was a teetotaller, and had only just come out of hospital. He had a little drop of whiskey, and that upset him.—Discharged on paying doctor’s fee, 5s.

PRESENTATION.—On Saturday last an interesting presentation took place at the establishment of Mr J J McKinnell, Sheep Street, when Mr Horace Sanderson was the recipient of a very nice wristlet watch and a pair of silver vases. Mr J J Thompson, in making the presentation on behalf of his fellow-employees, spoke of the very efficient manner in which Mr Sanderson had discharged his duties during the 18 years that he had served as assistant and traveller, and felt sure that he would continue to serve as faithfully now he had responded to the call of his King and country. Mr Sanderson has also received a very useful letter wallet in recognition of his services as registrar at the Rugby Brotherhood, in which capacity he has done a good and faithful work.

THE PARCELS sent on behalf of the Rugby Prisoners War Help Committee this week to local men in German prison camps contained : 1 large tin rations, 1 tin tripe, 10-oz tin sardines, ½-lb margarine, 1lb milk, 1lb rolled oats, 1lb cake, 1 tin fruit, ½-lb chocolate, ¼-lb tea, 30 cigarettes, ½-lb sugar, mustard.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Capt R W Barnett, acting Brigade Major of a Naval Brigade, son of Mr Walter Barnett, of Bilton, has been awarded the Military Cross.

Mr W W Peberdy, Lansdowne House, Rugby, has received intimation from the Admiralty that his son. Flight Sub-Lieut W H Peberdy, R.N, failed to return from a scouting flight in the East on the 14th inst. At present he is reported missing.

LOCAL SOLDIER DECORATED BY KING PETER.

Flight-Sergt A Forsyth, of the Royal Flying Corps, son of Mrs Forsyth, of 8 Murray Road, Rugby, has been decorated by the King of Serbia with the Silver Star in recognition of his distinguished services during the campaign in that country. Sergt Forsyth has since been promoted sergeant-major. He was for a number of years employed at the B.T.H Works, but at the time he enlisted he was assistant works manager at the Aluminium Works, Birmingham.

NEW BILTON MAN WINS THE MILITARY MEDAL.

Sergt George King, R.E, youngest son of Mr and Mr Tom King, 89 Lawford Road, New Bilton, and a native of the parish, has been awarded the Military Medal for devotion to duty with the Forces in France. When he joined the Army, Sergt King belonged to the Coventry City Police, but he is well known at New Bilton, and formerly played both for the Cricket and Football Clubs. His father has worked at the Portland Cement Works for 53 years, having served under five successive managers, and he has lived in his present home since the time of his wedding 43 years ago.

MR J E COX’S SON SLIGHTLY WOUNDED.

Information has been received this week by Mr J E Cox, of Lodge Farm, Long Lawford, that his son. Trooper G H Cox, of the Warwickshire Yeomanry, has been slightly wounded in the right thigh, and is in a General Hospital in Egypt. Another of Mr Cox’s sons (E E Cox) joined the 3rd Gloucesters last week. Mr Cox has now three sons serving in the Army.

STRETTON-ON-DUNSMORE.

Much sympathy is felt for Mr and Mrs J Nicholas, of Lime Kiln Farm, who have received news that their eldest son, Lance-Corpl John Nicholas, of the Warwickshire Yeomanry, has again been wounded in the chest in action in Egypt ; also that their third son, Stewart, is officially reported wounded and missing since September 29th—the same day that his youngest brother, Percy, was wounded.—Trooper Alf Falconbridge, of the Warwickshire Yeomanry, who enlisted with Lance-Corpl Nicholas, has sustained a fractured arm.

BRANDON.

Mr and Mrs Reuben Banbrook have received the news that their son, Pte Bert Banbrook, has been badly wounded in the back and shoulder. He had not long returned to the front, having been previously wounded in the leg. He is one of five brothers upholding the honour of their country. He is now in hospital in France.—Pte J Ward, son of Mr and Mrs Thomas Ward, has also been home for the first time after his wounds. Unfortunately the poor fellow has completely lost the sight of an eye. Much sympathy is felt for Mr and Mrs Ward, who have already had one son killed.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR.
THE GREAT WAR LOAN.

To the Editor of the Advertiser.

SIR,—The Chancellor of the Exchequer has addressed an appeal to War Savings Committees throughout the country to assist in promoting the new War Loan. He suggests first that they should stimulate the purchase of War Savings Certificates during the next few weeks by all means in their power. But he also asks us, further, to extend our activities so as to include persons of moderate incomes to whom the plan of co-operative investment by means of War Savings Associations does not specially appeal, and particularly those who might be able to invest at once any sum between £5 and £50. Such people are often not familiar with the machinery of investment, and it is felt that in order to secure their help it is necessary not only to advertise the appeal to lend, but also to make available some means of obtaining information or advise, and especially assistance in filling up the necessary forms. For this purpose the Rugby Central War Savings Committee have, with the consent of the Rugby Urban District Council, established an Information Bureau in the Benn Buildings every day from 12.15-1.15, and from 7-9 o’clock ; also on Saturday afternoons. The Bureau will be opened on Monday next, Jan. 29th.

The committee are also arranging a public meeting, to be held in the Temple Speech Room at 8 o’clock on Saturday, February 3rd, at which Major J L Baird, M.P, has promised to speak. The Schools and Boy Scouts are being asked to assist in the work of advertising. Other measures are in preparation by which we hope to make this national appeal so widely known and understood that no money which can possibly be lent to the Government will remain in Rugby uninvested on February 16th. To this end we ask with confidence for the help of all classes of our fellow-townsmen.

The time is short, and the need is very urgent. Let Rugby take a worthy part in meeting it-and at once.—Yours very truly,

J J McKINNELL (Chairman).

A A DAVID (Hon. Secretary),

Rugby War Savings Central Committee.

IN MEMORIAM.

WALDUCK.—In loving memory of our dear lad, ERN., who died of wounds in France, January 28, 1916.—Sadly missed by his loving MOTHER, FATHER, SISTERS and BROTHERS.

WALDUCK.—In loving memory of my dear brother, ERN., who died of wounds in France, January 28, 1916.—Deeply mourned by MET.

 

Walduck, Ernest. Died 28th Jan 1916

Ernest WALDUCK – d. 28 January 1916

Ernest Walduck’s birth was registered in Rugby in late 1893.   He was the son of Joseph Walduck, born about 1865, in Drayton Parslow, Buckinghamshire and his wife, Kate, née Hogg, Walduck, born about 1867, in Little Horwood, also in Buckinghamshire. Their marriage was registered in early 1891 in Northampton [Q1, 3b, 121]. They moved to Rugby before the birth of their eldest, Polly, whose birth was registered in early 1892.

In 1901 the family was living at 784 New Station – in one of the ‘railway cottages’. The family moved to Hillmorton in about 1908 and in 1911 were enumerated in Upper Street, and were probably at Hill Cottage, which was their address in 1916.

By 1911, Ernest’s father, Joseph Walduck, was 46, and a ‘Foreman, Platelayer, LNWR’; his wife, Kate, was 44.   By 1911 they had had eight children, but two had died. Their surviving six children were all still living at home: Pollie Walduck, was 19, a ‘Cigar Maker’; Ernest Walduck, 17, was a ‘Carriage Cleaner, LNWR’ – and like his father, and indeed his grandfather, worked on the Railway. Florence Jennie Walduck, 16, was a ‘Tungsten Lamp Arcer, Electrical Engineering Works’; Roland George Walduck, was 11; Isabella Walduck, 9; and Philip Walduck, 3 years old.

Two children, Ethel Eliza, b.1896 and Joseph, b.1898, had died in infancy. An Ethel Ada R Walduck, also registered in Rugby in 1901, was a member of another, seemingly unrelated, family.

As was the case for a number of local men, Ernest enlisted at Rugby as Private, No.10467 in the 5th Battalion of the Oxford and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry.

The surviving Service Records for the Ox. and Bucks. suggest that there was a rapid response to the recruitment drive and the service numbers can be used to make an estimate of the place and date of attestation for other soldiers. With the number 10467, it is likely that Ernest joined up in Rugby very early in the war and indeed, a later article suggests that his enlistment was in August 1914,[1] and certainly well before 12 September 1914 as he was listed under Hillmorton in an article, ‘Villages Answer the Call’.[2]

The 5th Bn. Ox. and Bucks. was formed at Oxford in August 1914 as part of Kitchener’s new army and was placed under the orders of the 42nd Brigade in the 14th (Light) Division. However, Ernest did not go to France until 20 May 1915, which suggests he was with the draft that landed in Boulogne on 21 May 1915.

Some background to his likely service can be found in the report on the actions of the 5th Ox & Bucks in the second Battle of Bellewaarde Farm, 25 September 1915. Then on 16 and 17 October there were heavy losses in the mine explosion and subsequent actions in that area [see the biography of Walter Davis, who died on 17 October 1915].

At some date Ernest had been promoted to Corporal. The Newspaper report stated that ‘… He had seen much fighting, and also acted as a stretcher bearer. … His parents had expected him home on leave any day.[3]

Before Christmas there had been rumour that the Battalion was to be posted to Egypt – but this was cancelled and ‘… During January we had three tours of the trenches not always in exactly the same part, and we generally had four days in the line, four days at B Huts, near Vlamertinghe, and four days at Elverdinghe, the period out of the line being devoted, as usual, to training and providing working parties. There was a certain amount of excitement at different times in the trenches, and a good deal of shelling and sniping went on, but as a rule things were pretty quiet, and we had few casualties.[4]

At some date in later January, when things were ‘pretty quiet’, he was wounded and evacuated to the Hospital area around Lijssenthoek to the west of Poperinge, where he died on 28 January 1916.

‘In a kind and sympathetic letter from the sister in charge of M.C.C. Station[5] to which Corpl. Walduck was conveyed, it stated that he was going on comfortably till a sudden and unexpected change set in, and he died shortly afterwards without being able to give a message for home.   He was laid to rest in the soldiers’ cemetery.’[6]

He was buried adjacent to the hospital area in the Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery, Plot: IV. C. 39.

He was awarded the British and Victory Medals and the 1915 Star, and is remembered on the Hillmorton War Memorial and on the Rugby Memorial Gates.

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

= = = =

 

This article was written for a Rugby Family History Group [RFHG] project, by John P H Frearson and is © John P H Frearson and the Rugby Family History Group, January 2016.

 

[1]       Rugby Advertiser, February 1916.

[2]       Rugby Advertiser, 12 September 1914.

[3]       Rugby Advertiser, February 1916.

[4]       http://www.lightbobs.com/5-oxf–bucks-li-1915-1916.html, Record of the 5th (Service) Battalion, 1st August 1915 to 30th June 1916.

[5]       Probably Medical Casualty Clearing Station – more commonly CCS; a large number of CCSs were established at Remy Farm, Lijssenthoek, on the railway to the west of Poperinge, in the rear area of the Ypres sector.

[6]       Rugby Advertiser, February 1916.