3rd Nov 1917. Value of the Acorn Crop

VALUE OF THE ACORN CROP.

The President of the Board of Agriculture and Fisheries again urges upon stock-keepers the great importance of making full use of the present abundant crop of acorns. Acorns are specially adapted for pig-feeding, and can be used most effectively and economically when pigs are allowed to gather them where they fall. While it will still be necessary to prevent the indiscriminate straying of pigs, the Home Office concurs with the Board in thinking that, if in consequence of this notice the number of pigs found straying on highways by the police should increase, proceedings against their owners should not be instituted except when direct negligence on the part of the owners is shown.

THE SALE OF POTATOES.

The Potato Order, which prohibits any person, except the grower, to sell potatoes without a license, came into force on Thursday. It is also necessary for retailers to exhibit price lists in their places of business.

RUGBY PRISONERS OF WAR FUND COMMITTEE.

The monthly meeting of this committee was held on Monday, Mr W Flint, c.c. presiding. There were also present : Mrs Blagden, Mrs Anderson, Mrs Wilson,. Mr G W Walton, Mr A W Shirley, Mr Pepper, and the Hon Secretary (Mr J Reginald Barker). The latter reported that since the last meeting there had been five additions to the list of prisoners of war, and he regretted say that there were the prospects of further increases in the near future. The acknowledgements from the men had much improved, and letters he had received and reports from Regimental Care Committees showed that practically all the parcels now reached the men. Apart from the newly captured men, all the others were now in regular communication. The only one who had been giving any anxiety of late was Driver F Furniss (A.S.C), of Rugby, of whom nothing had been heard for several months. During the week-end, however, Mr Barker said he had heard from Furniss, who in his letter said that he had received all his parcels from Nos. 1 to 55 inclusive, which were quite satisfactory, and adding that he was in good health. A number of efforts were promised during the winter months, which would assist the funds of the committee. He regretted that it had been found necessary to increase the cost of the standard food parcels from 6s to 8s owing to the rise in the price of commodities and materials and the necessity for making the parcels a little larger. This meant that, instead of £2 3s 6d per month per man, the cost would be £2 15s 6d, or a total charge of £216 9s per month inclusive for the 78 men. Fortunately for the fund 27 of these men were now fully adopted, and with small sums guaranteed on behalf of other men, there remained a balance of about £130 per month still to be found, provided, of course, it was the committee’s wish that they bear the increased cost. The subscriptions continued to come in splendidly, and during the past two months they had received more than sufficient to cover the cost of the parcels, thus being able to add slightly to the bank balance.

Mr Barker said he thought the committee and the subscribers to the fund would feel proud of the fact that they had been able to “ carry on ” without asking for financial assistance from the British Red Cross Society, who, who as they knew, had guaranteed the parcels. The committee would appreciate this more fully when he reminded them that the Chairman of that Society recently stated that they had to find £1,500 per day to make good the lack of funds and support given to other Prisoners of War Committees throughout the country. Mr Barker said he could not too strongly emphasise the fact that every subscription to the Rugby Prisoners of War Fund was virtually a subscription to the British Red Cross Society.

Mr Flint said that, in view of this report, he felt that it would be everybody’s wish that the committee completed the cost of the food parcels and bread, and therefore moved this resolution.—In seconding, Mr G W Walton said that, notwithstanding the many other demands upon the public, the Prisoners of War Fund received the support of everyone. There were many persons contributing every week in a quiet way, and he felt sure they would be able to secure sufficient funds to enable the increased expenditure to be made.—The resolution was unanimously carried.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Mr & Mrs Brett have received official intimation that their son, Pte A J Brett, R.A.M.C, was wounded in October 7th, and is in hospital in France.

Mr W Cowley, of 34 Poplar Grove, has been notified by the War Office that his son, Pte G V Cowley, of the Dorset Regiment, was wounded by shrapnel in the thigh in an advance near Ypres on October 4th. He is an old St Matthew’s boy, He was previously wounded in September 1915.

Pte C E Freeman, Royal Warwicks, was wounded on October 17th, sustaining a severe gun-shot wound in the chest. His home is at 17 Charlotte Street.

In the list of casualties published last week-end appears the name of Lieut W E Littleboy, of the Warwickshire Regiment. He was educated at Rugby School, and was a prominent member of the Football XV of three years ago.

A letter has been received from Second-Lieut Basil Parker, Machine Gun Company, who was recently reported missing, stating that he is a prisoner of war in Germany. He is a son of Mr E Parker, of the Avenue Road, New Bilton, and was formerly a teacher at St Matthew’s School.

Mr and Mrs Whitbread have now received definite news from the War Office that the only son, Second-Lieut Basil Whitbread, was killed in action on the night of the 22nd July, 1916. His body was found outside the lines and was buried at High Wood.

The Rev R F Morson, M.A, elder son of Mr & Mrs Arthur Morson, who has for the past 4½ years been assistant priest at St Silas the Martyr, Kentish Town, London, has offered his services as a chaplain to H.M Forces, which have been accepted. He has been ordered to Salonica.

At the Rural District Tribunal on Thursday conscientious objection was pleaded by a Bilton youth, 18, single, who asked to be allowed either to undertake work with (1) the Friends’ War Relief Committee ; (2) Friends’ Ambulance Unit, general service section ; (3) full-time work on the land ; or (4) that the case should be referred to the Pelham Committee. He had previously been temporary exempted in order that he might complete his education. He was given conditional exemption on joining the Friends’ Ambulance Unit, general service section.

CORPL C H TOMPKINS.

News has been received at the B.T.H that Corpl C H Tompkins, of the Oxon and Bucks Light Infantry, who prior to the War was employed by the Company, died on October 23rd from wounds received in action.

BRANDON.

ROLL OF HONOUR.—Mr & Mrs Reuben Banbrook, of Brandon, have received the news that their son, Pte Banbrook, of the Royal Warwicks, is in hospital in Mesopotamia suffering from sand fly fever. Out of their five sons who enlisted two others are still suffering from wounds. Pte S Banbrook was for several years in the stables at Brandon Hall.—Pte G. Newman, Royal Warwicks, has been wounded in the right foot. He formerly worked at market gardening for Mr Gupwell.—Mr & Mrs Thomas Halford have been notified of the death of their second son, Pte S G Halford. He has been missing for more than 12 months. Much sympathy is felt for the parents, who some short time back lost another son. Deceased was formerly in the employ of Mr J Rankin, of Brandon Grounds Farm, where his father was employed for many years.

BINLEY.

Mr & Mrs J L STEVENS have received news of the death of their elder son, Pte J A Stevens, of the Machine Gun Company. Before entering the Army he was employed at Binley Colliery, and his father was in the employ of the Earl of Craven as a keeper, and resided at Piles Coppice.

BILTON.

REPORTED MISSING.—Miss E Watts has received official notification that her nephew, Private C Eccles, Royal Warwicks, has been reported missing as from October 4th. He was in the great push on the Yser in which Lance-Corpl Houghton, also of Bilton, lost his life.

ROYAL RED CROSS AWARD.

The King has been pleased to award the Royal Red Cross to Miss Kathleen Bolam, superintendent, Ashlawn and Bilton Hall Red Cross Hospital, for valuable services rendered. We believe this is the first V.A.D member in Warwickshire to receive this honour which Miss Bolam has thoroughly earned and deserves.

DEATHS.

BYERS.—In loving memory of Corpl ANGUS BYERS, 1st K.O.S.B, who was killed in action on September 20, 1917, “ somewhere in France.”—Deeply mourned. From all at 82 Rowland Street.

GRENDON.—Killed in action on the Vimy Ridge on April’s 9th, Pte. WM. GRENDON, 2nd Canadian mounted Rifles, aged 31 ; dearly loved only son of J. & A. M. Grendon, late of Grandborough.

MILLS.—In ever-loving memory of JOSEPH MAWBY, eldest son of Mr. & Mrs. T. Mills, Marton ; killed in action on October 23rd ; aged 23.
“ Had we been asked, how will we know
We should say, ‘ Oh, spare this blow,’
Yes, with streaming tears, would say,
‘ Lord, we love him—let him stay,’
He bravely answered duty’s call,
He gave his life for one and all ;
But the unknown gravest is the bitterness blow,
None but his loved ones will ever know.”
—From his sorrowing Father, Mother, Sisters, Brothers, and Percy.

 

Advertisements

20th Oct 1917. Street Lighting in Rugby

STREET LIGHTING IN RUGBY.

By permission of the Chief Constable, a number of lamps at the most important points in the centre part of town are now being lighting at night. The majority of these have to be extinguished at ten o’clock, but the remainder will be alight all night, subject to arrangements being made for them to be extinguished within a few minutes of the receipt of the Field Marshal’s warning. Needless to say, this concession is greatly appreciated by all who use the streets after dark.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Major F Glover is gazetted second in command of the 2nd Battalion, Warwickshire Volunteer Regiment.

Pte W Slater, of 36 Frederick Street, has been wounded in France, and is now in Kitchener’s Hospital, Brighton, where he is progressing favourably.

Lance-Corpl F E Boyes, Oxford and Bucks L.I, son of Mr J Boyes, 84 Railway Terence, has been reported wounded and missing on August 16th. He has been previously wounded twice, and had served in France over two years. This is the second son of Mr. Boyes, returned as missing this year.

Mrs Rathbone, 23 James Street, Rugby, has received official notification that her brother, Pte George Ruddle, was killed in action in France on September 3rd. He was an Old Murrayian.

Mr & Mrs Summers, of Long Lawford, have received news that their son, Pte A Summers, has been wounded in the back and is going on well.

Mr & Mrs Plumb have received news that their only son, Lance-Corpl J W Plumb, of the Machine Gun Corps, has been wounded. He is an Old St Matthew’s boy, and before he enlisted in September, 1914, worked for the Rugby Gas Company.

Corpl E P Moore, Machine Gun Section, who before joining the Army was employed in the Electrical Laboratory at the B.T.H, died from wounds received in action on October 6th.

SECOND-LIEUT K H WILLARD MISSING.

Second-Lieut Kenneth H Willard, Yorks and Lancs Regiment, attached to the Royal Flying Corps, second son of Mr T W Willard, 26 Bilton Road, has been officially reported missing as from October 12th. In a letter to Mr. Willard a fellow officer writes : “ He went out with six other machines on the 12th inst. to do a patrol, the leader being one of our best pilots. About 15 to 20 enemy machines were encountered, and a general mix-up ensued, in which your son was seen to be handling his machine and fighting in a most efficient manner. Although our machines were greatly out-numbered, they put up a great fight, but on returning to the aerodrome, It was discovered that your son was missing. No one saw him go down, and it is just possible that he may have been hit in the engine, and had to descend in the enemy lines.” Lieut Willard was educated at Rugby School and Sandhurst, and visited his parents a fortnight ago on his final leave before proceeding to the front.

CAPT. HON. HENRY FEILDING.

Captain Hon Henry Feilding, Coldstream Guards, the third and youngest son of the Earl and Countess of Denbigh, died of wounds on October 9th, aged 23. He had just been given command of his Company, and was leading them into action for the first time in the attack of October 9th. They had achieved their first objective when they came under heavy German artillery barrage. It was then that Capt Feilding was severely wounded by a shell. He was carried back to the casualty clearing station, where he had every possible care and attention, but the case was hopeless from the first. Recovering slight consciousness in the afternoon, he died peacefully and painlessly at 10.30 p.m. Father Crisp, R.C chaplain to the Forces, of Leicester, was with him at this period and gave him the last helps[?] of religion.

Captain Henry Feilding was educated at the Oratory School, Edgebaston, and Trinity College, Cambridge, where he held a commission before the war in King Edward’s Horse, with which he mobilised and went to France in April, 1915. He was later taken on the staff as A.D.C. to General Sir Henry Horne, with whom he went to Egypt in January, 1916. As he wished to with a fighting regiment, he resigned his appointment on the staff after six months, and transferred to the Coldstream Guards, with which he served at the front for 12 months.

His elder brother, Lieut-Commander Hon Hugh Feilding, R.N, was killed at the Battle of Jutland on May 31, 1916 ; whilst his eldest brother, Lieut-Col Viscount Feilding, D.S.O, has served in France since September 1914.

The C.O. Writes of Capt Feilding :—“ I cannot tell you what a loss he is both as a friend and a soldier. It was the first time that he commanded a company in action, and he was doing so well. He was full of enthusiasm for this first attack, and I only wish he could have seen the successful ending of such a great day for the regiment, but all officers of his Company fell wounded before reaching the final objective.”

A brother officer writes :—“ He was always so cheery and so full of fun, and was the life of our of mess, and in every way a most delightful companion. In his work he was always very thorough, and would take any amount of trouble over the men, with whom I always felt he was a great favourite. He will be terribly missed by everyone in the Battalion. I had such a cheery letter from him only a day or two ago, telling me he was just of to battle.”

A personal telegram of sympathy has been received from the King.

BRANDON & BRETFORD.

WOUNDED SOLDIERS.—News has reached Mr & Mrs Reuben Banbrook that their son has been wounded in the foot. He belongs the Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, and has been on foreign service for a considerable time. Mrs Banbrook has five soldier sons, of whom Pte James Banbrook has been gassed and Pte Bert Banbrook wounded twice.—Mr R Hart has received the news that his brother has been badly wounded. He was in the Regular Army before the War started, and been through most of the engagements. His ankle has been smashed and the other leg badly wounded.

CHRISTMAS PARCELS FOR PRISONERS OF WAR.

The Christmas parcels for prisoners in Germany will be despatched during the first week in November.

The special parcel will be substituted for one of the six standard packages sent during November, and will include a rich Christmas pudding, roast beef, potatoes, sausages, cheese, and 50 cigarettes. If the relatives or “ adopters ” pay for this (the price is 8s) their names will be put on the parcels, but only one parcel can be sent to each man.

A larger parcel can costing 15s, will contain extras in the shape of turkey, bacon, butter, spaghetti, chocolate, tongue, and dried ginger.

Relatives of Rugby and district men desirous of sending one of these parcels in their own names should remit the cost, not later than Saturday next, the 27th inst, to Mr J Reginald Barker, hon secretary, Rugby Prisoners of War Help Committee, 9 Regent St, Rugby.

No person can send any foodstuffs direct to a prisoner.

ANOTHER RED CROSS SALE.

At a meeting of the Rugby District Farmers’ Red Cross Committee on Tuesday, presided over by the Rev R S Mitchison, it was thought that the time had arrived for another effort on behalf of the Red Cross Society, as there is a very pressing need of increased support, the expenditure being largely in excess of the receipts. Opinions were expressed that all classes of the community should join.

It was decided to ask the Rector of Rugby, the Headmaster of Rugby School, the representatives of the Urban Council, the Chamber of Trade, the Butchers’ Association, the Trades and Labour Council, influential gentleman, and others to join the Rugby District Farmers in a united effort to hold a Red Cross sale.

A preliminary meeting will be held on Tuesday, October 23rd, at 7 p.m., at the Eagle Assembly Room, Market Place, Rugby.

WOLSTON.

THE HOUSING QUESTION at Wolston in fast becoming a serious matter. There are already numerous couples living with their parents, and are having to store their goods—in one instance in a hovel. A number of the present houses have been condemned, and this further accentuates the shortage. It is felt by many of the working-men of the village that the 25 houses the District Council propose to build after the War will be quite inadequate. Much unrest is at present caused, and only within the last few days a soldier’s wife has been threatened with proceedings if she does, not leave, the cottage being wanted for someone else.

DEATHS.

BOOTE.—In loving memory of Pte. S. BOOTE (SID), 4th Worcestershire Regiment, who died of wounds in France on October 11, 1917. “ He did his duty.” —From his loving brother and sister, JACK & JEANNIE, and his little nephew, AUBREY.

CROMBIE.—In loving memory of Regimental Q.M.-S. W. CROMBIE, 1st K.O.S.B., who died of wounds in France on October 4, 1917. From all at 35 Oliver Street.

HAYES.—On October 10th, at 14th General Hospital, Wimereux, France, from wounds received in action, Coy.-Sergt.-Major G. H. Hayes, 265385 R.W.R, third son of Mrs. Hayes, 80 York Street, age 34 years. Also, on July 19, 1916, Pte. FRANK H. HAYES, 2215, who was killed in action “ somewhere in France.”—On earth divided, in death united.”—From his sorrowing Mother, Brothers and Sisters.

LANE.—On October 13th, BERTRAM CHARLES, the youngest son of Mrs. Lane, 76 Bath Street ; aged 24.

STAY.—ARTHUR GEORGE STAY, eldest son of F. Stay, 99 Grosvenor Road, Rugby, killed in action Sept. 21.

IN MEMORIAM.

BACHELOR.—In loving memory of my dear son, Pte ERNEST ANDREW BATCHELOR, Worcester Regiment, who was killed in action on October 24, 1916.
“ In a soldier’s lonely grave,
Beneath France’s blood-stained sod,
There lies my dearest son,
Resting in peace with God ;
Though rolling seas divide us,
And he sleeps on a pitiless shore,
Remembrance is a relic that shall live for evermore.”
—Never forgotten by his loving Mother, Father, Brothers and Sisters.

 

 

 

27th Jan 1917. Very Drunk at the Station

VERY DRUNK AT THE STATION.—On Thursday last, before T Hunter, Esq, Bernard Nutt, second air mechanic (R.F.C), Regent Street, London, was summoned for being drunk on the L & N-W Railway Station, at Rugby, on January 24th.—He pleaded guilty, and William S Laughton, ticket examiner, stated that the man was so intoxicated that a doctor was sent for, who, on account of his condition, ordered his removal to the Police Station for safety. Defendant travelled from London with an Australian soldier, who had a big bottle of whiskey.—Defendant informed the Magistrate that he was a teetotaller, and had only just come out of hospital. He had a little drop of whiskey, and that upset him.—Discharged on paying doctor’s fee, 5s.

PRESENTATION.—On Saturday last an interesting presentation took place at the establishment of Mr J J McKinnell, Sheep Street, when Mr Horace Sanderson was the recipient of a very nice wristlet watch and a pair of silver vases. Mr J J Thompson, in making the presentation on behalf of his fellow-employees, spoke of the very efficient manner in which Mr Sanderson had discharged his duties during the 18 years that he had served as assistant and traveller, and felt sure that he would continue to serve as faithfully now he had responded to the call of his King and country. Mr Sanderson has also received a very useful letter wallet in recognition of his services as registrar at the Rugby Brotherhood, in which capacity he has done a good and faithful work.

THE PARCELS sent on behalf of the Rugby Prisoners War Help Committee this week to local men in German prison camps contained : 1 large tin rations, 1 tin tripe, 10-oz tin sardines, ½-lb margarine, 1lb milk, 1lb rolled oats, 1lb cake, 1 tin fruit, ½-lb chocolate, ¼-lb tea, 30 cigarettes, ½-lb sugar, mustard.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Capt R W Barnett, acting Brigade Major of a Naval Brigade, son of Mr Walter Barnett, of Bilton, has been awarded the Military Cross.

Mr W W Peberdy, Lansdowne House, Rugby, has received intimation from the Admiralty that his son. Flight Sub-Lieut W H Peberdy, R.N, failed to return from a scouting flight in the East on the 14th inst. At present he is reported missing.

LOCAL SOLDIER DECORATED BY KING PETER.

Flight-Sergt A Forsyth, of the Royal Flying Corps, son of Mrs Forsyth, of 8 Murray Road, Rugby, has been decorated by the King of Serbia with the Silver Star in recognition of his distinguished services during the campaign in that country. Sergt Forsyth has since been promoted sergeant-major. He was for a number of years employed at the B.T.H Works, but at the time he enlisted he was assistant works manager at the Aluminium Works, Birmingham.

NEW BILTON MAN WINS THE MILITARY MEDAL.

Sergt George King, R.E, youngest son of Mr and Mr Tom King, 89 Lawford Road, New Bilton, and a native of the parish, has been awarded the Military Medal for devotion to duty with the Forces in France. When he joined the Army, Sergt King belonged to the Coventry City Police, but he is well known at New Bilton, and formerly played both for the Cricket and Football Clubs. His father has worked at the Portland Cement Works for 53 years, having served under five successive managers, and he has lived in his present home since the time of his wedding 43 years ago.

MR J E COX’S SON SLIGHTLY WOUNDED.

Information has been received this week by Mr J E Cox, of Lodge Farm, Long Lawford, that his son. Trooper G H Cox, of the Warwickshire Yeomanry, has been slightly wounded in the right thigh, and is in a General Hospital in Egypt. Another of Mr Cox’s sons (E E Cox) joined the 3rd Gloucesters last week. Mr Cox has now three sons serving in the Army.

STRETTON-ON-DUNSMORE.

Much sympathy is felt for Mr and Mrs J Nicholas, of Lime Kiln Farm, who have received news that their eldest son, Lance-Corpl John Nicholas, of the Warwickshire Yeomanry, has again been wounded in the chest in action in Egypt ; also that their third son, Stewart, is officially reported wounded and missing since September 29th—the same day that his youngest brother, Percy, was wounded.—Trooper Alf Falconbridge, of the Warwickshire Yeomanry, who enlisted with Lance-Corpl Nicholas, has sustained a fractured arm.

BRANDON.

Mr and Mrs Reuben Banbrook have received the news that their son, Pte Bert Banbrook, has been badly wounded in the back and shoulder. He had not long returned to the front, having been previously wounded in the leg. He is one of five brothers upholding the honour of their country. He is now in hospital in France.—Pte J Ward, son of Mr and Mrs Thomas Ward, has also been home for the first time after his wounds. Unfortunately the poor fellow has completely lost the sight of an eye. Much sympathy is felt for Mr and Mrs Ward, who have already had one son killed.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR.
THE GREAT WAR LOAN.

To the Editor of the Advertiser.

SIR,—The Chancellor of the Exchequer has addressed an appeal to War Savings Committees throughout the country to assist in promoting the new War Loan. He suggests first that they should stimulate the purchase of War Savings Certificates during the next few weeks by all means in their power. But he also asks us, further, to extend our activities so as to include persons of moderate incomes to whom the plan of co-operative investment by means of War Savings Associations does not specially appeal, and particularly those who might be able to invest at once any sum between £5 and £50. Such people are often not familiar with the machinery of investment, and it is felt that in order to secure their help it is necessary not only to advertise the appeal to lend, but also to make available some means of obtaining information or advise, and especially assistance in filling up the necessary forms. For this purpose the Rugby Central War Savings Committee have, with the consent of the Rugby Urban District Council, established an Information Bureau in the Benn Buildings every day from 12.15-1.15, and from 7-9 o’clock ; also on Saturday afternoons. The Bureau will be opened on Monday next, Jan. 29th.

The committee are also arranging a public meeting, to be held in the Temple Speech Room at 8 o’clock on Saturday, February 3rd, at which Major J L Baird, M.P, has promised to speak. The Schools and Boy Scouts are being asked to assist in the work of advertising. Other measures are in preparation by which we hope to make this national appeal so widely known and understood that no money which can possibly be lent to the Government will remain in Rugby uninvested on February 16th. To this end we ask with confidence for the help of all classes of our fellow-townsmen.

The time is short, and the need is very urgent. Let Rugby take a worthy part in meeting it-and at once.—Yours very truly,

J J McKINNELL (Chairman).

A A DAVID (Hon. Secretary),

Rugby War Savings Central Committee.

IN MEMORIAM.

WALDUCK.—In loving memory of our dear lad, ERN., who died of wounds in France, January 28, 1916.—Sadly missed by his loving MOTHER, FATHER, SISTERS and BROTHERS.

WALDUCK.—In loving memory of my dear brother, ERN., who died of wounds in France, January 28, 1916.—Deeply mourned by MET.