26th Feb 1916. Restrictions on the Use of Paper

RESTRICTIONS ON THE USE OF PAPER.

A WORD TO OUR READERS.

In consequence of the restriction on the importation of paper and materials for making it which come into force on March 1st, it will be necessary for publishers to exercise the strictest economy in the use of the paper they are allowed to receive, and reduce all wastage to the lowest possible point. Newsagents will in all probability find that the extra copies they have been able to obtain to meet casual sales will have to be limited, if not stopped altogether.

Our readers who are in the habit of obtaining copies of the “Rugby Advertiser” here and there in a casual way, will greatly assist the agents and the publishers if they place an order for the paper with a particular agent, and always obtain it there, so that the number required each week may be definitely ascertained.

As the space available for news, etc, in the reduced size will be greatly curtailed, we regret that we shall not be able to insert gratuitously any Volunteer Orders for the week, appeals for gifts or subscriptions, acknowledgments of gifts, official notices, musical successes, shorthand successes, and so forth.

OLD MURRAYIANS IN THE EASTERN THEATRE.

Mr W T Coles Hodges has this week received the following letters from soldiers formerly connected with the Murray School, who are now in the Eastern theatre of the war. Pte A S Horswell, Signalling Section, 10th Middlesex Regiment, writes :—

“ The greater part of October and all November we spent in dug-outs on the side of Lala Baba. We used to go out morning, afternoon, and night doing ghastly fatigue work, such as making a road across Salt Lake, digging trenches (a specialised form of gardening), and unloading wood for lighters ; carrying railway sleepers across loose sand to load them on mule carts also forms a pleasant interlude between tea and supper, especially when the interlude is of six hours’ duration and the music is supplied by the Turkish orchestra a couple or three miles away. Of course, you know that the Peninsula is now evacuated.

“ We were at Suvla Bay . . . . At the end of November, the 26th, to be accurate, there was a violent storm that swamped the whole dug-outs and made the trenches like rivers. The storm abated at about 10 or 11 p.m. We could not sleep or lie down in our dug-outs as they were a foot deep in wet, clayey mud. Four of us got what blankets we could find in a more or less dry state, and went and found a tolerably dry spot near an ‘incinerator’ on the slopes of Lala Baba, adjoining C Beach. The next day we were due to leave the peninsula, but the sea was too rough, and our company was sent at night to guard some trenches facing Salt Lake. That night was absolutely IT. We had to do sentry-go in a blinding sleet storm and the usual accompaniment of a howling wind. The next morning the sleet stopped. I forget details, but I know our wet clothes froze on us, and whole crowds, including myself, went into the hospital on C Beach with exposure, rheumatism, frost-bite, etc.

I ultimately found myself at the Citadel Hospital, Cairo, and got into bed for the first time since leaving England. I got to Cairo on Friday, December 3rd. . . . We had an A1 Xmas at the hospital, roast beef, turkey, and plum pudding, with ail the usual accompaniments. The Citadel Hospital was formerly one of the Khedive’s palaces. It is a fine building, most picturesque, and the thing that struck me most was the colour scheme of the whole affair. The exterior was colour washed a bright orange, with a white dado affair at the top where the gutters our roofs would be. The window fittings and lattices were green, all three forming vivid contrasts. When you saw all this against a background of bright blue sky, with white splashes of cloud here and there, the effect was very striking. I could not help wishing for a camera, but at the same time I realised that it would lose the greater part of its beauty when reduced to mere black and white. It was a beautiful, building, full of opportunities for the water colour artist. The place abounded with balconies, pagodas, and odd, queer staircases in corners of quadrangles and courts, but colour was most essential in any pictorial reproduction. Without colour, ‘ musquise ’ (no good), as the natives here would say.”

The writer states that on New Year’s Day he visited the Pyramids and the Sphinx, and says:

“ The trams take you within 300 and 400 yards of it. Then there is an uphill climb, which can be done on ‘ Shanks’s pony,’ donkey, or camel. A native attached himself to me in the capacity of guide, philosopher, and friend, and discoursed in ‘ pidgin ’ English on the beauties of the Sphinx and Egypt generally, in the hope of ‘ backsheesh ‘ to come. The place, if you can call it a place, was crowded with soldiers and civilians, all bent on sightseeing. Taking things on the whole, the place resembled Hampstead Heath in fair time without the roundabouts.” The writer expressed himself as disappointed with the Sphinx and Pyramids, and adds: “ One felt that one wanted to be alone. There was too much of the military element to allow of much ‘ mysticism.’ My last impression was that of two 20th Century motor cars standing at the base of the Great Pyramid, which was built 4,000 years B.C.”

Pte Horswell was afterwards drafted to the base near Alexandria, of which he says: “ It is a very, fine town. Of course the European element is very much in evidence. French is the language spoken most—other than the native Arabic. All official notices, names of streets, etc, are duplicated in French and Arabic. There is a large Italian and Greek population, as well. There is the usual type of English shop, kept, generally by French people, and also the native bazaar. Strangely enough, there are no restaurants or cafes in the ordinary English acceptance of the term. A cafe here is usually only a drinking place, nothing to eat being obtainable.”

T Hillwell, another Old Murrayian, who is with the allied Forces at Salonica, in a letter says : “ The dawn of the 1st of November saw us step out of the train on to Serbian soil, and exceedingly thankful we were, for a night’s travelling on an open truck is not conducive to warmth. First of all, we had long marches to do, and we were struck by the excellence of the roads. They were really remarkable. November was a comparatively quiet month, so far as fighting was concerned, but the last week we were busy fighting another enemy-frost-bite. To realise what this means, one must be really on the spot. Then came the celebrated retreat, which has filled columns in the English newspapers. It was an exciting affair altogether, and it is a marvel to me how we got safely out of it. But out of it we did get, and with great credit, too. I feel really proud to have belonged to an Irish Division. Without a doubt these Irishmen can fight. So we are back again and enjoying a well-earned rest.

OLD MURRAYIAN WITH THE HOWITZER BATTERY.

Gunner A J Renshaw, of the Rugby Howitzer Battery, in a letter to his old schoolmaster, says :— “I arrived safely back to the land of mud and water, commonly known as ‘ Sunny France.’ During my absence there was plenty of fun going on, and ‘Fritz’ and his ‘brudders’ gave our infantry a surprise visit the other night, but as they strongly objected to their presence in our lines they ‘struck oil’ somewhat and were soon out again on the hop. Since then we have returned their visit with much more success. Of late considerable activity has been shown, and by now they are aware of the fact that we are out for business, for we have given them ‘ cold feet ‘ this last month or so, and soon you may here with confidence of our continued success. Of that there is very little doubt. We shall fight until we have avenged the dastardly atrocities they have committed in France and Belgian.”

A ST. MATTHEW’S OLD BOY IN SALONICA.

Extracts from letter of Pte F E Morley, R.A.M.C, an “ old boy ” of St Matthew’s School to Mr R H Myers, headmaster :—

“ We were the first of the British Expedition to land at Salonica, and you can well understand that, coming from Gallipoli, many of us wondered what we were doing to land in Greece at all. Still, it did not take long to make us aware of our mission, which was, of course, to link up with the gallant Serbian Army.

“ We spent a few days at Salonica before entraining for Gyevgeli, from which place we marched across country, landing about ten miles ahead of Dviran. Here we began to link up with the French troops, which were holding fast the road to Strumnitza. Fairly good progress was made, and by the end of November we were 22 miles ahead of Dviran. The country so for had been fairly decent, for at any rate it allowed the full use of transport, but as we began to get into the hills, mule transport only was possible. To describe to you the nature of the country where we were operating is far beyond my powers. From an artistic point of view it was ideal, but for the troops—well, just impossible.

“ Matters were very quiet for some few days and the weather conditions fairly favourable. Now and again Bulgar deserters came over to us and gave information of an impending attack which subsequently proved correct.

“ The last day of November saw the hills covered with a deep snow, a keen frost and biting wind accompanying it. Never before have I faced such a blinding storm, and one had a thousand pities for the boys in the trenches who had precious little protection. I happened to be at an advanced dressing station just behind the ‘ line,’ but fortunately we were able to make use of some houses in a deserted village, so that we had the comfort of a log fire.

“ We had many cases of exposure to deal with, and more than one poor fellow dropped to sleep in the snow, but, alas ! it meant the Sleep of death.

“ One night we were sent up to the ‘ line ’ for some sick men. The frost had continued making the ground very treacherous, so that it took us a matter of three hours to cover a distance of barely four miles. At frequent points on the way we had to crawl on hands and knees, while more than once we were ‘ footing it’ knee-deep in snow. Such were the conditions under which the jolly Irish boys held the line, and when you remember that only a few weeks back we had experienced the intense heat of Gallipoli, and then were suddenly transferred to this cold region, I think that the gallant conduct of our men during the subsequent,retirement into Greece is worthy of all praise.

“ We are now camped ‘ somewhere around Salonica,’ awaiting the anticipated attack. I cannot say much about the position, but I can assure you that ‘all’s well’ on this Front, and our boys would rather relish an attack in this quarter.

“ We have had a couple of air raids at Salonica, but very little damage was done. During the second our gun-firing was splendid, and I had the pleasure of seeing one Taube brought to earth.

“ I would like to come across some of our ‘old boys,’ but have not done so yet. Good luck to them, and may the day soon come when we shall be able to greet each other, proud in the knowledge that we have done our ‘little bit’ for old England and for the honour of the school.”

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Mr C Pegg, of 1 Addison Road, New Bilton, has heard from his son, Pte George Pegg, of the Leicestershire Regiment. He has been wounded in the leg, but is going on well.

The Chief Constable of Warwickshire has approved a scheme put forward by the Sutton Coldfield Volunteer Training Corps for “ police ” service in the event of a Zeppelin raid. Men have been allocated to districts in the borough, and their duty will be to see that all lights are extinguished, to regulate street traffic, and to prevent panic.

Corporal W Bale, an “ old boy ” of St Matthew’s School, serving in the 2nd Royal Welsh Fusiliers, has been promoted to the rank of Sergeant, for conspicuous gallantry on the field. Sergt Bale, who was recently mentioned in despatches, has been in the Army nine years, and was transferred from India to France on the Outbreak of the War.

WOUNDED TERRITORIALS.

1/7th Batt. Royal Warwickshire regiment : Pte. H. Snell, 2526, and Pte. A. Summers, 1351.

RECRUITING AT RUGBY.

During the past few weeks the number of recruits attested at the Drill Hall, Park Road, has averaged about 100 per week, of whom 70% have been single men. Those single men who wish to attest before the Military Service Act comes into force have only till midnight on Tuesday to do so, after then they will be conscripts and absorbed into the Army according to their classes.

In order to avoid a rush, which is anticipated at the last moment, men wishing to attest should visit the Drill Hall at once, and as early in the day as possible.

The Group system will remain open for married men after March 1st.

Attested men who wish to be medically examined before their groups are called up should make application to the Recruiting Officer at the Drill Hall. The medical examinations will take place at Warwick, and recruits will have to pay their own railway fare.

RUGBY COMMITTEE’S PARCELS FOR PRISONERS OF WAR ARRIVE WITHOUT DELAY.

It has been frequently brought to the notice of the Rugby Prisoners of War Help Committee that parcels sent by individuals to prisoners of war in Germany invariably arrive after long delay and almost useless, whereas the parcels sent through the Rugby Committee get through quickly and in perfect condition. This is mainly owing to good packing, and the fact that the committee is a registered and recognised society.

The Rugby Prisoners of War Help Committee are anxious to avoid this waste, and desire to make it known that they will gladly pack and forward food and clothing to any prison camp in Germany without charge.

Thus, if there are any persons in Rugby or the surrounding villages who have been in the habit of forwarding their own parcels, they are invited to send same in future to the Rugby Committee, who will indicate on the parcels the name of the giver.

Parcels should be sent to Mrs Blagden, at the Rectory, or to the Hon Secretary, Mr J Reginald Barker, 9 Regent Street, Rugby.

The Committee will also be glad to receive the names of any men from Rugby and district who are prisoners of war.

ASHLAWN HOSPITAL CLOSED.

In consequence of Ashlawn being required by the owner for residential purposes, it was closed as a V.A.D. Hospital on Tuesday last, and the patents were removed to other places.

Other premises have not yet been obtained, and Mrs E D Miller, the commandant, is looking out for a suitable house.

RUGBY PETTY SESSIONS.

TUESDAY.—Before Dr Clement Dukes (in the chair), Arthur James, T Hunter, A E Donkin, and W Dewar, Esqrs.

EXEMPTION FROM RATES.—“ Te Hira,” now used as a Red Cross Hospital, and 67 Albert Street, Rugby, occupied by Belgian refugees, were exempted from the poor rates.—A similar application was made in respect of 39 Albert Street, Rugby, also occupied by Belgians, but this was adjourned for the assistant overseer to ascertain the earnings of the occupants of the house.

DOG OWNERS’ EXEMPTIONS.—Applications had been received from 212 farmers in the division for exemptions from licenses in respect of 273 dogs, and from 49 shepherds respecting 53 dogs.—Objection was made by the police in two instances.—Superintendent Clarke mentioned a bailiff who had applied for exemption as a farmer, but at present he had no dog, although he had kept one.—It was understood the man would be having a dog soon, and the Magistrates’ Clerk ruled that in the circumstances there was no reason why the exemption should not be granted.

THE MILITARY SERVICE ACT AND AGRICULTURE.

This Act practically applies to all fit single men and widowers (without children) between the ages of 18 and 41.

The Act does not apply to men voluntarily attested under Lord Derby’s scheme.

Every man to whom the Act applies and who is not exempted will be deemed to have enlisted, as from March 2nd, 1916.

WHO MAY BE EXEMPTED.

FARMERS & MARKET GARDENERS.

Farmer (including Market Gardener and Fruit Farmer)—provided that—

(a) farming is his sole occupation and his personal labour or superintendence is indispensable for the proper cultivation of his holding ; or

(b) if he is partly occupied in another occupation, his personal labour or superintendence is indispensable for the proper cultivation of his holding and such cultivation is expedient in the national interest.

Agricultural Machinery, Steam Ploughs and Threshing Machines :-
Attendant ; Driver ; Mechanic.
Farm—Bailiff, Foreman, Grieve, Steward.
“ Beastman, Byreman, Cattleman, Stockman, Yardman.
“ Carter, Horseman, Ploughman, Teamster, Wagoner.
“ Hind (if Foreman or Ploughman).
“ Servant (if Foreman or Ploughman), Scotland.
” Shepherd.
Thatcher.
Stallion Man (a man who looks after and travels a stallion).
Stud Groom (Scotland).
Hop, Fruit, and Market Gardens : Foreman.

CERTIFICATES OF EXEMPTION.

Application must be made to the Local Tribunal for a certificate of exemption in the case of every unmarried man of military age in one of the “ certified occupations ” who has not attested and who desires to be exempted from enlistment under the Act. The fact that he may have already been “starred” makes no difference in this respect.

Such applications must be made to the Local Tribunal BEFORE MARCH 2nd NEXT.

A certificate of exemption must be granted by the Local Tribunal to any man who shows that his principal and usual occupation is one of those in the list of “ Certified Occupations ” unless an objection has been received from the military representative.

Any appeal from the decision of the Local Tribunal must be made within three days after the decision of the Local Tribunal on a forms supplied by the Clerk.

HEAVY FALL OF SNOW.—During Wednesday night there was a heavy fall of snow in the Midlands, which continued almost without intermission throughout Thursday. The landscape presented a very wintry appearance in consequence, snow lying on the ground to a depth of several inches—nearly a foot in some places. Townspeople were busy on Thursday clearing the footpaths, in accordance with the request of the Urban District Council, and in the afternoon members of Rugby School from Mr Wilson’s house were occupied in this way in front of the School buildings in Lawrence Sheriff Street. Boys at the preparatory schools were also in their element, clearing snow away, and members of the fair sex did not hesitate to show their ability to use shovels, brushes, and any other implement that came handy.

Advertisements

19th Feb 1916. Should Motor Buses be Encouraged in War Time?

RUGBY URBAN DISTRICT COUNCIL.

SHOULD MOTOR BUSES BE ENCOURAGED IN WAR TIME ?

THE MOTOR BUSES.

Mr EVERS, in moving that the paragraph in the report dealing with motor buses be referred back to the Committee, said he would like to raise the whole question of these buses plying in Rugby. He did not consider that they should encourage them, either by allowing them to stand in the town or by allowing them to open up fresh routes, for this reason : That although they were a convenience to many people, at the same time they were not a necessity. At such times as this they ought not to encourage fresh enterprises of this sort, which were not a necessity, partly on account of the damage to the roads, but, more than that, because they ought to economise, and to encourage everybody else to economise, in the consumption of petrol, one of the commodities which had to be imported, and which they had to pay for. They could not do this by their exports, and so they had to do it either by sending gold abroad or selling their securities. He was sorry that the Highways Committee had given them permission to open up fresh enterprises to and from the station.

The CHAIRMAN : They have only given them permission subject to confirmation by the Council.

Mr WISE seconded, and said his views were the same as those of Mr Evers.

Mr RINGROSE opposed this motion, on the grounds that the new enterprise would benefit the town in a great many ways. If any member of that Council had duties to perform in the country instead of walking a few yards to work, he would take a different view of the matter.

Mr EVERS : That is rather a rude thing to say. I must ask you to withdraw it.

The CHAIRMAN asked Mr Ringrose not to be personal.

Mr RINGROSE added that he had to go out into the country, and he found the buses very handy. He hoped they would continue to run, not only for himself, but for the benefit of the people living in the villages around who had to come to work at Rugby in all weathers. It was better for the workmen to be able to come in a nice comfortable bus.

Mr WISE : We are talking of the new route.

The Clerk : The mover raised the general question, and the Chairman and Mr Walker agreed.

Mr RINGROSE said he was in favour of giving every facility for the omnibuses to run. The Company would have to pay for petrol, and if, eventually, it was found necessary to put a road tax on, they would have to pay it the same as anyone else did. He considered that to try to stop these things running in the town was very shortsighted.

Mr NEWMAN said the Highway Committee had carefully considered the question, and he thought the general opinion was that they could stop them.-The Clerk said he would like the matter referred back so that he could consider this question more deeply. At the present time he thought they had no power whatever. If the Company liked to apply for a license, the Council had to grant it.

Mr NEWMAN said he would rather have seen a local company plying for hire instead of an outside one. As regarded petrol, it was a serious point to get over, but he thought there were a number of steam motors about.

Mr EVERS : These aren’t steam ones.

Mr NEWMAN said at the Committee meeting he tried to get a stipulation passed that the Company should give something towards the roads, but it was ruled out.

Mr YATES supported the reference back, mainly on the grounds enunciated by Mr Evers, that buses might be desirable in normal times, but not to-day. He would like to meet the convenience of people going to and from work, but he would go further than Mr Evers, and ask the Highway Committee to see if they had not got power to prohibit private motor cars using the roads to take people out for pleasure. This would save a good deal of petrol. Then, too, if they had power to prevent motor-cars dashing along at high speed at nights it would be a good thing. It would save petrol, too, if they were kept in the garage all the time. Although they might not have power to prevent the buses running, they had the power to prevent them having all the privileges they might have, were they a desirable thing.

Mt WALKER said he saw all the buses going along, and he had come to the conclusion that they were a great service to the working-class population. He would not give his vote against anything to hinder them.

Mr BARNSDALE also spoke in favour of the buses, and said they brought people into the town who otherwise would not come.

Mr ROBBINS, while disagreeing with Mr Evers on some things, agreed with him with regard to the consumption of petrol, and said it was an astonishing thing to him how any such firm could start nowadays. It must cost them double money to do it. He pointed out, however, that the chief people who used the bus were those who could not afford motor-cars, or could not get about very well. He thought the buses would be a great boon to the men working at Coventry. He had been approached by working men, who told him that there were 40 and sometimes 100 men going to Coventry every day ; these men had to get up at 3.30 to catch a train just after 4 o’clock, but now, by starting at 5 o’clock, they could get to work by 6 o’clock. He would therefore support the granting of facilities to the Company.

Mr LINNELL said the Committee., would be very pleased to reconsider the matter, especially as he would then be able to look the law up. He pointed out that the Committee looked upon the request as a reasonable one, and accordingly they granted it. The request complied: with the regulations. By simply taking out a license, the buses could run in the town as mush as they liked, and they could not stop them. In his opinion, if they took out a license, they were privileged to stand at any of the registered stands, the same as anyone else.

Mr STEVENSON said he was in favour of referring the matter back.

After complaining of these heavy motor vehicles, and similar ones belonging to the Government, using the roads without paying any compensation, Mr LOVEROCK expressed the hope that after the war there would be a tax put upon them…..

MILITARY SERVICE ACT, 1916.

THE following is an extract from a Minute of the London Yearly Meeting of the Society of Friends held specially from Jan. 28 to 30 last:—

“ We feel that Friends will have a duty in watching the action of the Tribunals, in assisting young men with regard to the statement of their conscientious objections before these Tribunals, including if necessary the Appeal Tribunals, and in giving what support and advice may be needed. We decide also to make known our readiness to assist conscientious objectors other than Friends so far as is in our power.”

Any interested are invited to enter into communication with HERBERT W. EDMUNDSON, “ Oakbank,” Bilton, near Rugby.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

H L Satchell, son of Mr J G Satchell, Dunchurch Road, who was promoted to lieutenant last October, has been Brigade Physical Training and Bayonet Fighting Officer of the 8th Reserve (Infantry Brigade for the last four months.

H J A Parkinson, youngest son of Sir and Mrs Parkinson, of Clifton Road, Rugby, who joined the 10th Leicester Regiment in June last, has been granted a commission as Second-Lieutenant in the 3/4th Leicesters. He holds a first-class certificate as a hand-grenade specialist, and he is now with his regiment in England. The elder son is now in the Motor Red Cross Ambulance in France.

The funeral of Pte Frederick Baxter, 10th R.W.R, of New Street, New Bilton, whose death from wounds received in action we recorded last week, took place at Rugby Cemetery on Friday afternoon last. A contingent from the Super-numerary Company, R.W.R, acted as bearers, and the wreaths included one from Old Comrades in the 10th Warwicks, and another from Friends in the Royal Warwickshire Regiment.

The whole of the sons of Mr James Martin, Liberal agent for East Wolverhampton, and for some years Liberal agent at Rugby, are either serving with the colours or have attested. Three of them are in infantry regiments, one is a mechanic in the Royal Flying Corps, the fifth is in training, and the other two are under Lord Derby’s scheme.

HOME FROM THE TRENCHES.

Drummer W Newman, of the Rugby Infantry Co, younger son of Mr C Newman, of Benn Street, Rugby, has been home on leave this week, after spending eleven months at the front. Until he reached Rugby he had not slept in a bed for seven months, but he is wonderfully well and in high spirits. His visit to Rugby comes to an end to-day (Saturday), when, as he puts it, he is going back “ to see it out.”

ALL UNEXEMPTED SINGLE MEN TO BE CALLED UP.

All single men of military age who have not been granted exemption from service are almost immediately to be called to the colours. The date upon which the first of the men to be affected by the order will be asked to present themselves is March 18.

The men concerned are those between the ages of 31 and 40 who have attested and are in Groups 14 to 23, and those of the same ago who under the Military Service Act will on March 5 be deemed to have enlisted.

There have been rumours that the War Office intended to place all the unmarried men under training as speedily as possible, but the decision to call up 10 groups and classes under one Proclamation was not generally anticipated, as up to the present the groups have been summoned four at a time.

INCONSIDERATE TELEPHONE SUBSCRIBERS.

On the occasion of the recent air raid the transmission of official telephonic messages of urgent importance was seriously interfered with at several, places by what the Postmaster-General calls the inconsiderate and unnecessary use of the telephone by private subscribers to call up the police and other public officials. The Postmaster-General earnestly appeals to the public to use the telephone as little as possible on such occasions, and on no account to call up the police or other public officials on unimportant or merely personal matters. If this warning is not regarded it may become necessary to curtail the facilities afforded to private persons on occasions of public emergency.

12th Feb 1916. Another Interesting Letter from the Front

ANOTHER INTERESTING LETTER FROM THE FRONT.

The Rev CT Bernard McNulty, Vicar of Holy Trinity, Leamington, contributes to his Parish Magazine for this month another interesting letter written from the Headquarters, Divisional Artillery, British Expeditionary Force, where he is attached as a chaplain.

“ I write again,” he says, “ from this little village in France, a village in which every little farmhouse, and every tumble-down barn, is crowded with British soldiers—troops to whom the inhabitants as a rule show much kindness and consideration, and yet think what such a state of affairs means to the people here ! The best rooms in their houses are given us, the very straw is turned out of their barns in order to make room for our men ; consider how very small is the payment which the French people receive from their Government for all this, when compared to the prices paid in England for the billeting of troops. In England the house-holder receives 3s a night for every officer who sleeps in his house, and in many cases there are several officers in the one house, and for every private soldier payment of 6d a night is made ; but here in this country the rate of payment is one franc (8d) a night per officer, and 1/2 d a night for each soldier ! When troops are stationed in any district in England, it means an enormously increased prosperity in that particular locality, or town, but here the inhabitants gain very little pecuniary benefit by our presence, for with the exception of eggs and vegetables bought from the small farms, any extras which the soldiers purchase are bought at our army canteens, a number of which are provided in every division. Yet the people, with but few exceptions, are as a rule kind and obliging, at any rate, such has been my experience, and why ? Because they fully realise that we are here to protect and safeguard their homes from a foe who is close to their very doors, and they know full well that the safety and welfare of their country is at stake, and on every French person’s lips to-day there is but one motto. It is this: ‘ Honneur et Patrie.’

“ A few days ago I passed through several French villages, and in each village, here and there, I noticed houses brightly decorated with evergreens and holly, whilst over the door in large letters the motto was printed. I asked the reason for this, and I was told that the recruits of the 1916 class were being called out, and soon I saw companies of lads marching away from their villages, as years ago their fathers marched, for there are practically no men to-day in France who do not know what it is to fight in the wars. How it thrilled my heart to see these lads ! Strong, healthy-looking youths, tramping along with their rifles on their shoulders, with heads held high, and a smile on their lips, leaving their homes, yet bravely hiding the aching hearts proud that at last the looked-for day had come for them, when they could don the uniform of their army. ‘ Honneur et Patrie.’ Such were the words over each home from which a son had gone forth, and the parents’ hands had put up those evergreens, had written the glorious motto. They, too, had hidden the aching heart. Is it not a matter of rejoicing, say they, for has not our boy gone forth to the war ? And in the silence of the night, as they whisper his name in their prayers, it will be as if they heard the voice of God answering ‘ Honneur et Patrie ‘ !

“ Ah, yes, this is the dominating thought throughout the length and breadth of France, the one thought influencing the actions of all its people. It is honour and country which makes one man eager to go forth to the battery or the trench. It is the self-same motto which makes his brother work earnestly and cheerfully in factory or workshops. In the workshops the same golden motive is inspiring labour. They know that they toil for something higher and nobler than wages. The other day I was speaking to a French interpreter, a member of one of France’s noblest families, like many another French nobleman serving to-day as a private in the army of France. He told me that his brother had large munition works near Paris, and that the workmen had petitioned that they might be allowed to work on Sundays. They stated, as their reason, that they felt they could not rest that day, whilst their brothers were fighting in the trenches ! Dare I say that the sanctity of the Sabbath is violated by labour undertaken from such a motive ?

“ Soon there is to be in Great Britain a very modified form of compulsory service. Whatever may have been our opinions on that subject in the past, to-day such a course is right because it is necessary. It is necessary for honour and country. Let that sublime thought silence the voice of opposition, and let those who are called upon to send forth their sons, remember the decorated homes of France !

“ ‘ Honneur et Patrie.’ May that, indeed, be the proud motto for all in our country during this year of 1916. I can wish no grander thing. May it be the sole motive underlying the sayings and actions of every politician who sits within the walls at Westminster. May that same motive lighten the labours of thorn who toil in our workshops, making both employers and men earnest and faithful. May it make the women of our country eager and proud to send forth their manhood, and may that same thought make our soldiers brave in the face of danger. May it also bring consolation to those who mourn ! ”

LETTERS FROM OLD MURRAYIAN8.

Mr W T Coles Hodges, headmaster of the Murray School, has received several letters from Old Boys with the Colours.

Ptes C E Williams and E A Welch, C Section, Machine Gun Company, 143rd Infantry Brigade, write:—

“ We chaps of the Machine Gun are now no longer attached to our old Battalion, for we have been formed into a Machine Gun Company; find so we are away from the rest of they old “ E ” Company. However, we are still able to see them occasionally, and we are pleased to say that they all seem to keep in fairly good health. Would you kindly thank the Rugby Territorial Comforts Committee from the Rugby boys of the Machine Gun Company for all the gifts they so kindly sent us, which were handed on to us by Q.M.Sergt Tomlinson. They were much appreciated by all. At present, there are only two Old Murrayians in our section. The trenches are a little better now than they have been for a month or two. We still have our share of mud, but it is drying up a treat.

“ Fritz is as amiable as ever, only just lately he has begun to talk too much with his artillery. He always get paid back with interest, though, by our artillery, which includes the Rugby Howitzer Battery. We are out of the trenches now, but go in again shortly. While out, we have to man a gun for anti-aircraft purposes, and we are anxiously waiting for a Taube to come over, so that we can warm our gun up a little.”

W Holmes, a sailor boy on one of H.M. warships, has also written to Mr Hodges, stating that he is having a good time and is now at sea.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

In response to the appeal of the Rugby Womens’ Volunteer Reserve for fresh fruit and vegetables for the sailors—who have to depend upon gifts from friends for such luxuries—a gift ? held at the Murray School on Friday in last week, when neatly 7cwt. of produce, consisting of artichokes, parsnips, oranges, apples, beet, cabbage, onions, carrots, turnips, etc, were received. The gifts were afterwards packed up under the supervision of Captain , Moss and Quartermaster Dickinson, of the W.V.R.

NEW BILTON SOLDIER WOUNDED.

Mr C Pegg, of 1 Addison Road, New Bilton, received an official intimation that his son, Pte George Pegg, of the Leicestershire Regiment, was wounded on January 6th. Particulars of nature of the wounds have not yet come to hand.

 

PTE FREDK BAXTER DIES OF WOUNDS.

Pte Fredk Baxter, youngest son of Mrs Baxter, New Street, New Bilton, who, as we recently reported, was seriously wounded in the knee in France on January 7th, died as the result of his injuries in Colchester Hospital on Saturday. Pte Baxter, who belonged to the Royal Warwickshire Regiment, was out with a scouting party when a bullet passed through his knee, killing the officer in charge who was behind him. Pte Baxter was brought to England about three weeks ago, and it was ascertained that his injury was so serious that it was found necessary to amputate the limb. At first he made good progress, and it was hoped that he would ultimately recover, but towards the end of last week he became worse, and his mother was summoned on Saturday, but he died before she reached the hospital. He was 26 years of age, and joined the army after the outbreak of war. The body was brought to Rugby, and the funeral took place in the Cemetery yesterday (Friday) afternoon.

[Private Baxter is remembered on the Croop Hill War Memorial]

SCHOOLBOYS WITH ARMLETS.

We understand that every master of military age at Rugby School has attested or been rejected, and a number of the senior boys of the school may be seen wearing armlets, showing they, too, have done their duty in this connection.

RECRUITING AT RUGBY.

There have been very few enlistments under the Group System during the past week, but the majority of those who have presented themselves were single men. We would remind single men who have not yet attested that the Group System so far as they are concerned comes to an end this month, after which time they will be automatically absorbed into the Army.

POST OFFICE NOTICE.

REDUCTION OF DELIVERIES IN RUGBY.

On and from Monday, the 21st inst, there will only be two deliveries on weekdays in Rugby, at 7 a.m and 12.30 p.m. Sunday deliveries will remain for the present.

In the rural districts the deliveries are being limited to one daily, and these changes are being carried out as circumstances permit.

PROTECTIVE MEASURES AGAINST ZEPPELINS.

CONFERENCE IN BIRMINGHAM.

A DEMAND FOR EARLY WARNING.

The conference of representatives of Midland authorities, convened by the Lord Mayor of Birmingham (Alderman Neville Chamberlain), to consider the question of the better protection of the Midlands in the event of further aircraft raids, was-held on Wednesday afternoon at the Council House Birmingham. The Lord Mayor presided, and there was a large and representative attendance of nearly 100 public gentlemen from all parts of the counties of Warwick, Worcester, and Stafford.

A resolution was passed calling on the military authorities to organise a system for giving an early warning of the approach of hostile aircraft and information as to subsequent movements inland. A committee was appointed to lay before the authorities the methods which the meeting considered would best the situation.

The meeting then proceeded to discuss the various methods to be adopted in giving warning to the public, and while so engaged a telegram was received by the Lord Mayor from the Under-Secretary of State for the Home Department, stating that “ the matter of organisation for conveying to police, factories, etc, information of movements of hostile aircraft being actively pressed forward by Field-Marshal Commanding-in-Chief Home Forces in co-operation with Post Office.”

TEST MOBILISATION OF BOY SCOUTS.

On Wednesday, February 2nd, a surprise mobilisation, was held of the town, troops of the Boy Scouts, the idea being to ascertain how soon the boys could turn out in the event of their being required in case of an air raid, to assist the public organisations such as the St John’s Ambulance Brigade, Red Cross Nurses, Fire Brigades, etc.

Although the Scouts were quite unaware when the mobilisation would take place, 50 responded to the call, and assembled on the B.T.H. Athlete Field. A number of the boys, of course, were prevented by overtime, and by evening classes, from taking part. After the mobilisation had taken place, the boys were practised in outpost and sentry duty under the following scheme :— Important military stores were supposed to be located in the field, the Scouts being deputed to defend same from hostile attack while some kind friends had previously undertaken to set as “ enemies ” and. endeavour to obtain access to these stores. Some of these spies were duly caught by the Scouts…

DEARTH OF PETROL

The supply of petrol available for the use of owners of private motor cars will in future be considerably restricted.

Nearly a month ago restrictions upon the supplies of petrol were foreshadowed by the British Petroleum. Company in a circular which they sent out. Now, by some companies at any rate a limit has been placed upon the number of gallons to be supplied to various districts. Hitherto the public have paid little attention to the warnings they have received that, in the national interests, private users should exercise the utmost economy. The restrictions upon the supply which have now been put into force do not affect the owners of vehicles used for commercial purposes.

THE MILK SUPPLY.

COTTAGERS & GOAT-KEEPING.

A very interesting circular has been issued by the Board of Agriculture and Fisheries, pointing out how in certain districts goat-keeping might be extended with advantage. It is well known (says the “ Lancet”) that many cottagers and others living outside the area of retail delivery find it difficult to obtain milk for their families. The large dairy farms are, as a rule, under contract to supply milk to distributing agencies in towns, or else they, turn their milk into cheese and butter. As the Board rightly says, all the objections which apply to the keeping of a cow by a cottager would be met in the case of a goat. The first; expenditure for its purchase is within his means, the housing accommodation is reduced to a minimum, the food costs little, and there is no great expense to be borne for the maintenance of the animal.

Even in the event of a cow’s milk supply being available, goats may profitably be kept to supply milk for domestic use. It is, as a rule, a most wholesome milk, and its flavour, if the food of the animal is regulated, is not any real drawback to its employment. Moreover, goat’s milk is easily digested by children, and especially infants, and, as is well known, it is fair lets likely than cow’s milk to contain tubercle bacilli of animal origin. The average goat will give at its flush three pints of milk a day, and, on the whole, calculations based on extreme cost of keep, outlay, and so forth, show that while a good supply of milk could be maintained, a very fair profit could be made. The suggestion is a valuable one, and the information contained in this circular as to how to start goat-keeping, as to the choice of breeds, as to breeding itself, housing, feeding, tethering, milking, and the care of the milk, and so forth, should be spread up and down the land.

The composition of cow’s milk and goat’s milk is much the same, although goat’s milk is superior as regards fat, which is an advantage. Human milk differs chiefly from goat’s and cow’s milk in that it contains a much smaller proportion of mineral salts and casein.

 

TO RELATIVES OF WOUNDED SOLDIERS.

AN OFFER FROM CHICHESTER.

Mr Robert Bottrill, of Rugby House. Chichester, wishes to be informed when Rugby soldiers are patients in the Graylingwell War Hospital. If relatives will communicate with him, he says he. will be very pleased to visit such soldiers and to take them motor rides ; also, if any friends of the wounded would like to visit them at Chichester, Mr Bottrill offers to provide them with a bed, etc. He adds : “ I believe we have had several Rugby boys here, and I have missed them.”

Mr. Bottrill is a native of Rugby, which explains his desire to show kindness to wounded soldiers from homes in the town who may be staying in the Graylingwell Hospital.

5th Feb 1916. Midlands visited by Zeppelins

MIDLANDS VISITED BY ZEPPELINS.

WANTON SLAUGHTER OF CIVILIANS.

59 KILLED AND 101 INJURED.

Many people in Warwickshire did not regard it as probable, or even possible, that Zeppelins would ever come so far inland as the centre of the country, but that feeling of security was shattered on Monday night when it became known that German aircraft were cruising over a wide district, which included the Midlands and the Eastern Counties, and The Official Report from the War Office was eagerly awaited and this was issued in the early hours of Tuesday morning. Supplementary reports being issued in the evening.

From these it was gathered that the raid was undertaken by six or seven Zeppelins, and covered a larger area than on any previous occasion ; but the raiders were hampered by the mist. After reaching the coast they steered various courses, and dropped over two hundred bombs in Norfolk, Suffolk, Derbyshire, Leicestershire, Lincolnshire, and Staffordshire. Considerable material damage was caused in one part of Staffordshire, but in no case was there any military damage.

The latest particulars of the casualties are :—

Killed : Men, 33; women, 20; children, 6; total, 59.

Injured : Men, 51; women, 48; children, 2; total, 101.

Total killed and injured, 160.

One church and a Congregational chapel were badly damaged, and a parish room wrecked. Fourteen houses were demolished, and a great number damaged less seriously by doors, window-frames, etc, being blown out. Some damage, not very serious, was caused to railway property in two places ; only two factories, neither being of military importance, and a brewery were badly damaged, and two or three other factories were damaged slightly.

In many localities pre-arranged regulations for extinguishing all lights and taking other precautions were promptly carried out, and it would appear that those places suffered most where such means to baffle the invaders were not adopted.

Trains on railways were brought to a stand-still, and in many instances passengers had to remain seated right through the night while Zeppelins were passing and repassing over them, and bombs were being dropped in the vicinity.

Some very pathetic fatalities are recorded, Staffordshire seems to have suffered somewhat badly. Two visits were paid to some districts in that county, and there was considerable loss of life.

In one house a man and his wife, with their daughter and son-in-law and their two children, were killed instantly. The bombs fell on footpath of the narrow thoroughfare, smashing in the front of the house. The occupants, who were sitting round the fire, were terribly mangled.

A boy walking along the street received the full force of the explosion and was killed on the spot, while a man standing in front of his house some distance away also met with instant death. In another case a man was carrying on his business in a small shop, and the place collapsed and he was killed. One of the bombs, falling in a field, made a hole 6ft or 7ft deep and 10ft square.

Another bomb fell in front of a public house and demolished it, but the, landlord, his wife, and their two sons had a wonderful escape.

Passing on, the Zeppelins dropped five bombs on a small township some miles away. A man walking along was killed. In an adjoining borough some heavy bombs fell, and damage was done to small houses. A family of five, sitting together here, met with an instant and terrible death, a bomb dropping directly on the roof of the house and scattering the brickwork and furniture in all directions.

In another borough, one man was killed instantly, and another has since died. The Mayoress was struck by a fragment of a bomb, and seriously injured, and now lies in a critical condition. A bomb removed a portion of the roof of a congregational church, and another dropped in a public park.

Some of the victims were killed as they hurried through the streets. In one street a woman and her child lost their lives, while another woman had both legs blown off. Over an area of about one and a half miles several bombs were dropped in all direction.

On the other hand,a great many bombs were dropped on open spaces, where they did no damage except to excavate enormous holes ; but generally speaking the raiders paid particular attention to localities where lights were visible.

The Zeppelin fleet was observed passing the coastline between 4.30 and 7 o’clock on Monday night, and most of the damage in the Midlands was done between the latter hour and about 1 a.m.

THE LIGHTING REGULATIONS.

SATISFACTORY RESULTS.

One result of the Zeppelin raid over the Midlands on Monday night has been to convince those who considered restrictions with regard to lighting which have been enforced in Rugby unnecessary and vexatious, that the authorities were right after all. The fact has been established all too clearly that these airships can reach the Midlands, and that in all probability many towns within the area covered by the visitation of the Zeppelin fleet owe their immunity from damage to the happy circumstance that the regulations had been complied with, and being in total darkness they could not be located by the navigators.

While the raid lasted, it was a very anxious time for the heads of police in the various localities.

As far as Rugby is concerned, Superintendent Clarke is much gratified with the way in which the inhabitants have fallen into line with the requirements. At Northampton about 100 tradesmen and householders were summoned this week for non-compliance, but at Rugby it has not been found necessary in any case to do anything more than to point out here and there that a little more might be done, and in every instance the suggestions of the police have been cheerfully and promptly carried out.

Superintendent Clarke feels sure the inhabitants will continue to do their best to keep their lights subdued or screened for the next few weeks, especially on dark, still nights, and, where possible, go a little farther in securing total obscuration.

In order to minimise the danger to pedestrians during the dark evenings, the posts in the Church Walk and other narrow passages in the town have been painted white. A much needed improvement has also been effected near the Lawrence Sheriffe Almshouses, where the protruding arm of the iron railings and the awkward step have been removed and the path levelled.

DEFENCE OF THE REALM.

NEW REGULATIONS.

The “London Gazette ” contains a long list of new regulations under the Defence of the Realm Act. They deal with a variety of offences. One of the regulations provides that if any person without lawful authority or excuse, by the raising of blinds, removal of shades, or in any other way uncovers wholly or in part any light which has been obscured or shaded in compliance with any directions given in pursuance of such an order, he shall be guilty of a summary offence against these regulations.”

CARRIER PIGEONS.

Another regulation provide that “if any person (a) without lawful authority or excuse kills, wounds, molests, or takes any carrier or homing pigeon not belonging to him ; or (b) having found any such carrier or homing pigeon dead or incapable of flight, neglects forthwith to hand it over or send it to some military port or some police constable in the neighbourhood, with information as to the place where the pigeon was found ; or (c) having obtained information as to any such carrier or homing pigeon being killed or found incapable for flight, neglects forthwith to communicate the information to a military post or to a police constable in the neighbourhood; he shall be guilty of a summary offence against these regulations.”

INTOXICANTS.

With regard to intoxicants, it is laid down that if any person gives, sells, procures, or supplies, or offers to give, sell, procure, or supply, any intoxicant (a) to or for a member of any of his Majesty’s forces with the intent of eliciting information for the purpose of communicating it to the enemy, or for any purpose calculated to assist the enemy ; or (b) to or for a member of any of his Majesty’s forces when not on duty with the intent to make him drunk or less capable of the efficient discharge of his duties ; or (c) to or for a member of any of his Majesty’s forces when on duty either with or without any such intent as aforesaid ; he shall be guilty of an offence against those regulations.”

HELPING THE ENEMY.

A substituted regulation sets forth that “if any person assists any prisoner of war or interned person to escape, or knowingly harbours or assists any such person who has escaped, or without lawful authority transmits, either by post or otherwise, or conveys to any prisoner of war or interned person any money or valuable security or any article likely to facilitate the escape of any prisoner of war or interned person, or in any way to interfere with the discipline or administration of any place of detention for prisoners of war or interned persons, he shall be guilty of an offence against these regulations.

RECRUITING AT RUGBY.

The figures for Rugby have shown a distinct falling off during the past week, and only about twenty men have attested. All of these have enlisted under the Group System, and there have been no volunteers for immediate service.

The departmental, non-combatant units are now closed, and only fighting men are needed.

The recruiting appeal tribunals for the Urban and Rural districts have held several sitting during the last few weeks, and we understand that a large number of men have been either exempted or put back until later groups.

WORK FOR DISABLED SAILORS & SOLDIERS.

Employers desirous of obtaining assistance in nearly every occupation, could obtain such help by means of disabled sailors or soldiers on application to the Recruiting Officer, Drill Hall, Park Road, Rugby, who would see that these are forwarded to the proper quarter ; or by applying direct to the Soldier’ and Sailor’ Help Society.

LIEUT. T. A. TOWNSEND, R.A.M.C., PROMOTED.

Lieutenant Thomas Ainsworth Townsend, R.A.M.C, has been gazetted Captain—promotion to date from December 25th.

Captain Townsend, who is in France, is regimental surgeon to the 24th London Regiment, which has done so splendidly in and around Loos and the Hohenzollern Redoubt. He has had a very busy time of late, and on the occasion of the visit of the sailors from the Grand Fleet to his trench, the Germans exploded five mines close to them.

We are glad to learn that he is well, and in a recent letter to his father, Captain Townsend says :—

“ We have had rather a strenuous time of late and you can imagine how welcome news is, and the Rugby Advertiser is always a joy. We are now resting in very pleasant surroundings till probably ——, when we go up to a fresh line of trenches. Last week we had a mine attack, and have had a very thrilling time on the whole. This piece of line was always rather a nasty bit and I think we got out of it pretty luckily. Strangely enough, on the day they blew up the mines, quite close to us, we had a visit from the Navy! I was fortunate enough to be in the front line at the moment, and our Colonel had taken up —(who was in command of the Naval chaps) that day. Tremendous explosions followed—hell let loose—but our men had manned the parapets in no time, and the sailors were soon letting fly with anything they could lay hands on. I only had about thirty casualties, I am thankful to say.

“ We had a pretty lucky escape in our Aid Post, which was a dug-out and unusually close to the front line—in the support trenches. An hour or so after I had got back, blest if the back part of it wasn’t blown in by a shell, and we were lucky to get off with a few bruises. My orderly (who was in rubber trench boots at the time) had one of them cut right across and got his toe damaged, and I was well bruised over the right leg and left foot—as I was standing at the time — writing up my cases !

“ I must have had a near shave, as we were all temporarily laid out for a second or two.

— behaved awfully well, as it was our second dug-out that day, in fact, -—’s third, and he took it in very good part.

“ Tea is a wonderful stand-by, and after a bit of a rest I enjoyed a very good dinner, but was simply covered with mud from head to foot. We had a pretty disturbed night, and units, from all and sundry, came in from the Brigadier downwards, through the night.

“ The next day cooled off considerably, and we have now moved into reserve, and all is well with us.”

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

HILLMORT0N SOLDIER KILLED.

Official news was received in Hillmorton on Friday last week that Pte Walter Brown, of the 11th Hants Pioneers, whose home is in School Street, Hillmorton, had been killed in action on January 23rd. Pte Brown, who leaves a widow and two children, was at one time employed in the Locomotive Department on the L & N.-W Railway, but he afterwards became a bricklayer’s labourer.

The following letter has been received by Mrs Brown from the officer in charge of his company:

DEAR MRS BROWN.—It is with regret that I have to inform you of the death of your husband, Pte W Brown, No 12272. He was wounded by rifle fire last night, and died about 8.45 a.m to-day. He was buried this evening, and the service was conducted by the Rev Webb Peploe (Major), Chaplain to the Forces. His loss will be deeply felt by all in the company and by myself, as he was always a good soldier, keen and smart, and a great example to all those with whom he came in contact, and he received his wounds whilst bravely doing his duty. In extending to you my sincere sympathy, I feel that it may be of some help to you in your loss, to know his end came quietly and he died in the execution of his duty.—Yours faithfully, CAPT. ANDREWS.

[Walter Brown is remembered on the Hillmorton War Memorial]

1 /7th WARWICKS IN THE FIGHTING

In a recent letter to his brother and sister a private of the 1st/5th Warwickshire Regiment states that they went into the trenches again on January 28th. The company they relieved had a very trying time, the Germans sending over about 2,000 shells of all sizes. Fortunately only two men were killed. The enemy also sent a bombing party to the trench, but they were soon driven out. The Germans left a chalk line so that they should be able to find their way back to their own trenches. The 7th Warwicks had to stand at attention all night as the Germans made a gas attack on the left of the Warwicks’ position, but no infantry attack followed.