17th Feb 1917. Do not Worry too much about Submarines

Mr and Mrs C Chater, of 7 Plowman Street, Rugby, have received official notification that their son, Pte W T Chater, Royal Warwicks, has died from wounds received in action in Mesopotamia on January 23rd. He was 20 years of age, and at the time of joining up in September, 1915, was employed by Mr W Elliott, mineral water manufacturer. As a footballer, he used to play for St Matthew’s.

Mrs Satchell, 94 Park Road, Rugby, has received notice from the War Office that her son, Pte W F W Satchell, 1/6th Warwicks (Terr), was wounded on February 4th in France, and is now in the 1st Australian General Hospital, Rouen.

As showing the fine spirit of our boys at the front, a member of the R.A.C writes : “ One night we (a party of stretcher-bearers) were awaiting a convoy of wounded. It was raining terribly hard, and one of the boys suddenly started singing, ‘ Adieu, adieu, kind friends adieu,’ when a wag chimed in : ‘Call it a dew, do you ? I reckon it’s raining bally hard !’”

Much regret has been occasioned in Coventry by the news of the death in France, from bronchitis and asthma, of Lance-Corpl W J McGhie, of the Machine Gun Corps(Heavy Section). Born in Rugby and educated in Edinburgh, Mr McGhie went to Coventry 21 years ago on the editorial staff of the “ Midland Daily Telegraph,” and at the time of his enlistment in June last he was joint editor of that journal. An enthusiast in matters musical, his death is a real loss to the musical life of Coventry. He took a keen interest in Association footfall, and assisted to organise the Coventry City F.C when the club first launched out into high-class football. He went to France about three months after enlistment in the Army, and took part in the fighting during the succeeding months, being slightly wounded at Thiepval. He leaves a widow and two children. His mother was a daughter of the late Mr W I Tait, the founder of the Advertiser, and is noteworthy that the death of his cousin, Mr Roland Tait of Rugby, was recorded in the same week.

RAZORS WANTED FOR THE TROOPS.

A Post Office notice states that razors are urgently needed for troops, and will be thankfully received at the Post Office. The condition of the razor is not important so long as there is a blade which can be re-ground—the Cutlers’ Company, Sheffield, having undertaken to put them in proper order.

AIDED BY THE TRANSFUSION OF BLOOD.

Mrs J Dunn, 2 Round Street, Rugby, has received information that her husband, Pte J Dunn, of the Machine Gun Corps, has been admitted to a casualty hospital in France, suffering from severe wounds. In a letter to Mrs Dunne, a sister of the hospital says : “ Pte Dunn was seriously wounded in the leg, and suffered from shock and loss of blood.” She added, “ The surgeon specialist said it would be necessary to amputate the leg, but he was in such bad condition that he did not think he could live through the operation, so he tried to stimulate him instead, and to get him into better condition. He asked if someone would give their blood for him, and as usual with these brave men, several offered, and Pte T Carter, of the Royal Sussex, was chosen and his blood was transferred into your husband. After this he was able to stand the operation, and his leg was amputated.” The writer added that owing to the great amount of infection which had gone through the body Pte Dunn was still in a serious condition, but they hoped he would soon be returned back to health again.

SIR DOUGLAS HAIG’S PREDICTION.

In the French newspapers on Tuesday there appeared confident statements by Sir Douglas Haig on the prospects of the Allied offensive. There is no doubt, he says, that the German front in the West—which is, and Will remain, the principal front of operations—will be broken by the Franco-British Armies. This year will be decisive in the sense that it will see the war decided on the battlefield, an event after which Germany will appear defeated militarily. It may be that the year of decision will also be the year of peace, but if Germany cannot be entirely beaten this year we shall not hesitate to carry on the war.

“ DO NOT WORRY TOO MUCH ABOUT SUBMARINES.”

Speaking at Greenwich on Saturday, Captain Hamilton Benn, M.P, read the following message from Vice-Admiral Sir Reginald Bacon :-

“ Do not worry too much about submarines. The Navy will give all the worry they want. The splendid pluck of our merchant seamen will upset the German calculations at the end of the War.”

19th Feb 1916. Should Motor Buses be Encouraged in War Time?

RUGBY URBAN DISTRICT COUNCIL.

SHOULD MOTOR BUSES BE ENCOURAGED IN WAR TIME ?

THE MOTOR BUSES.

Mr EVERS, in moving that the paragraph in the report dealing with motor buses be referred back to the Committee, said he would like to raise the whole question of these buses plying in Rugby. He did not consider that they should encourage them, either by allowing them to stand in the town or by allowing them to open up fresh routes, for this reason : That although they were a convenience to many people, at the same time they were not a necessity. At such times as this they ought not to encourage fresh enterprises of this sort, which were not a necessity, partly on account of the damage to the roads, but, more than that, because they ought to economise, and to encourage everybody else to economise, in the consumption of petrol, one of the commodities which had to be imported, and which they had to pay for. They could not do this by their exports, and so they had to do it either by sending gold abroad or selling their securities. He was sorry that the Highways Committee had given them permission to open up fresh enterprises to and from the station.

The CHAIRMAN : They have only given them permission subject to confirmation by the Council.

Mr WISE seconded, and said his views were the same as those of Mr Evers.

Mr RINGROSE opposed this motion, on the grounds that the new enterprise would benefit the town in a great many ways. If any member of that Council had duties to perform in the country instead of walking a few yards to work, he would take a different view of the matter.

Mr EVERS : That is rather a rude thing to say. I must ask you to withdraw it.

The CHAIRMAN asked Mr Ringrose not to be personal.

Mr RINGROSE added that he had to go out into the country, and he found the buses very handy. He hoped they would continue to run, not only for himself, but for the benefit of the people living in the villages around who had to come to work at Rugby in all weathers. It was better for the workmen to be able to come in a nice comfortable bus.

Mr WISE : We are talking of the new route.

The Clerk : The mover raised the general question, and the Chairman and Mr Walker agreed.

Mr RINGROSE said he was in favour of giving every facility for the omnibuses to run. The Company would have to pay for petrol, and if, eventually, it was found necessary to put a road tax on, they would have to pay it the same as anyone else did. He considered that to try to stop these things running in the town was very shortsighted.

Mr NEWMAN said the Highway Committee had carefully considered the question, and he thought the general opinion was that they could stop them.-The Clerk said he would like the matter referred back so that he could consider this question more deeply. At the present time he thought they had no power whatever. If the Company liked to apply for a license, the Council had to grant it.

Mr NEWMAN said he would rather have seen a local company plying for hire instead of an outside one. As regarded petrol, it was a serious point to get over, but he thought there were a number of steam motors about.

Mr EVERS : These aren’t steam ones.

Mr NEWMAN said at the Committee meeting he tried to get a stipulation passed that the Company should give something towards the roads, but it was ruled out.

Mr YATES supported the reference back, mainly on the grounds enunciated by Mr Evers, that buses might be desirable in normal times, but not to-day. He would like to meet the convenience of people going to and from work, but he would go further than Mr Evers, and ask the Highway Committee to see if they had not got power to prohibit private motor cars using the roads to take people out for pleasure. This would save a good deal of petrol. Then, too, if they had power to prevent motor-cars dashing along at high speed at nights it would be a good thing. It would save petrol, too, if they were kept in the garage all the time. Although they might not have power to prevent the buses running, they had the power to prevent them having all the privileges they might have, were they a desirable thing.

Mt WALKER said he saw all the buses going along, and he had come to the conclusion that they were a great service to the working-class population. He would not give his vote against anything to hinder them.

Mr BARNSDALE also spoke in favour of the buses, and said they brought people into the town who otherwise would not come.

Mr ROBBINS, while disagreeing with Mr Evers on some things, agreed with him with regard to the consumption of petrol, and said it was an astonishing thing to him how any such firm could start nowadays. It must cost them double money to do it. He pointed out, however, that the chief people who used the bus were those who could not afford motor-cars, or could not get about very well. He thought the buses would be a great boon to the men working at Coventry. He had been approached by working men, who told him that there were 40 and sometimes 100 men going to Coventry every day ; these men had to get up at 3.30 to catch a train just after 4 o’clock, but now, by starting at 5 o’clock, they could get to work by 6 o’clock. He would therefore support the granting of facilities to the Company.

Mr LINNELL said the Committee., would be very pleased to reconsider the matter, especially as he would then be able to look the law up. He pointed out that the Committee looked upon the request as a reasonable one, and accordingly they granted it. The request complied: with the regulations. By simply taking out a license, the buses could run in the town as mush as they liked, and they could not stop them. In his opinion, if they took out a license, they were privileged to stand at any of the registered stands, the same as anyone else.

Mr STEVENSON said he was in favour of referring the matter back.

After complaining of these heavy motor vehicles, and similar ones belonging to the Government, using the roads without paying any compensation, Mr LOVEROCK expressed the hope that after the war there would be a tax put upon them…..

MILITARY SERVICE ACT, 1916.

THE following is an extract from a Minute of the London Yearly Meeting of the Society of Friends held specially from Jan. 28 to 30 last:—

“ We feel that Friends will have a duty in watching the action of the Tribunals, in assisting young men with regard to the statement of their conscientious objections before these Tribunals, including if necessary the Appeal Tribunals, and in giving what support and advice may be needed. We decide also to make known our readiness to assist conscientious objectors other than Friends so far as is in our power.”

Any interested are invited to enter into communication with HERBERT W. EDMUNDSON, “ Oakbank,” Bilton, near Rugby.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

H L Satchell, son of Mr J G Satchell, Dunchurch Road, who was promoted to lieutenant last October, has been Brigade Physical Training and Bayonet Fighting Officer of the 8th Reserve (Infantry Brigade for the last four months.

H J A Parkinson, youngest son of Sir and Mrs Parkinson, of Clifton Road, Rugby, who joined the 10th Leicester Regiment in June last, has been granted a commission as Second-Lieutenant in the 3/4th Leicesters. He holds a first-class certificate as a hand-grenade specialist, and he is now with his regiment in England. The elder son is now in the Motor Red Cross Ambulance in France.

The funeral of Pte Frederick Baxter, 10th R.W.R, of New Street, New Bilton, whose death from wounds received in action we recorded last week, took place at Rugby Cemetery on Friday afternoon last. A contingent from the Super-numerary Company, R.W.R, acted as bearers, and the wreaths included one from Old Comrades in the 10th Warwicks, and another from Friends in the Royal Warwickshire Regiment.

The whole of the sons of Mr James Martin, Liberal agent for East Wolverhampton, and for some years Liberal agent at Rugby, are either serving with the colours or have attested. Three of them are in infantry regiments, one is a mechanic in the Royal Flying Corps, the fifth is in training, and the other two are under Lord Derby’s scheme.

HOME FROM THE TRENCHES.

Drummer W Newman, of the Rugby Infantry Co, younger son of Mr C Newman, of Benn Street, Rugby, has been home on leave this week, after spending eleven months at the front. Until he reached Rugby he had not slept in a bed for seven months, but he is wonderfully well and in high spirits. His visit to Rugby comes to an end to-day (Saturday), when, as he puts it, he is going back “ to see it out.”

ALL UNEXEMPTED SINGLE MEN TO BE CALLED UP.

All single men of military age who have not been granted exemption from service are almost immediately to be called to the colours. The date upon which the first of the men to be affected by the order will be asked to present themselves is March 18.

The men concerned are those between the ages of 31 and 40 who have attested and are in Groups 14 to 23, and those of the same ago who under the Military Service Act will on March 5 be deemed to have enlisted.

There have been rumours that the War Office intended to place all the unmarried men under training as speedily as possible, but the decision to call up 10 groups and classes under one Proclamation was not generally anticipated, as up to the present the groups have been summoned four at a time.

INCONSIDERATE TELEPHONE SUBSCRIBERS.

On the occasion of the recent air raid the transmission of official telephonic messages of urgent importance was seriously interfered with at several, places by what the Postmaster-General calls the inconsiderate and unnecessary use of the telephone by private subscribers to call up the police and other public officials. The Postmaster-General earnestly appeals to the public to use the telephone as little as possible on such occasions, and on no account to call up the police or other public officials on unimportant or merely personal matters. If this warning is not regarded it may become necessary to curtail the facilities afforded to private persons on occasions of public emergency.