Hewitt, Ellis John. Died 27th Feb 1917

Ellis John Hewitt was born in New Bilton, Rugby in September 1890 and baptised on 13 July 1890 at Bilton parish church.

In 1911 census he was a single general labourer living at 42 Dunchurch Road, Rugby. His father was Thomas, a blacksmith from Long Lawford and his mother Jane (nee Taylor), was born in Hillmorton. His brother Charles Edward was a railway clerk.

Ellis joined 14th Bt Royal Warwicks on 13 May 1915, Private 2772. He landed in Boulogne on 21 November 1915   and transferred to 13 Brigade 5 div on 28th December 1915.

In March 1916 5th Division took over a section of front line between St Laurent Blangy and the southern edge of Vimy Ridge, near Arras. They moved south in July to reinforce The Somme and were in action at, High Wood, The Battle of Guillemont, The Battle of Flers-Courcelette, The Battle of Morval and The Battle of Le Transloy. In October they moved to Festubert.

It was there that Ellis John Hewitt died on 27th February. He was buried at Browns Road Military Cemetery Festubert plot 111 .A.1.

His mother paid for the words “Love from Mother and Dad” to be engraved on the headstone.

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

 

3rd Feb 1917. Rugby Hairdressers and The War

RUGBY HAIRDRESSERS AND THE WAR.—Since the outbreak of war 22 Rugby hairdressers and their assistants have joined the Forces, and nine saloons in the town have been closed.

SOLDIERS’ PARCELS DESTROYED.—A number of soldiers’ parcels and letters for the Front were destroyed by a fire which broke out in one of the coaches of a mail train on Thursday afternoon last week. The fire was discovered at Welton Station, and the Long Buckby Fire Brigade, under Captain Clifton, were soon on the spot, and speedily coped with the flames. The coach and its contents were, however, practically burnt out.

WOUNDED SOLDIERS ENTERTAINED.—On Saturday afternoon the wounded soldiers of the Rugby Town Red Cross Hospitals were entertained by the members of the Bible and Sunday School at the Baptist Church. An excellent tea was provided, after which a musical programme was gone through by the members of the schools, and cigarettes were distributed among the soldiers.

CONCERT BY BLIND MUSICIANS AT THE SPEECH ROOM.

A delightful concert was given by blind musicians in the Temple Speech Room on Thursday night in aid of St Dunstan’s Hostel for our blinded soldiers and sailors. Space does not permit an extended critique. Every number, both vocal and instrumental, possessed undeniable merit, and if the wishes of the large audience had been gratified—they were in the second part of the programme—encores would have been general throughout. Miss Sarah Maden sang, beautifully in tune, an old favourite, “ The Enchantress,” which seemed to please even better than “ Hindoo song,” which came later in the evening. Miss Ada Jackson (soprano) gave as her first number Cowan’s popular song, “ The swallows,” and as her second “ Solveig’s song ” (Grieg). Both proved acceptable. Clay’s “ I’ll sing thee songs of Araby ” received full justice, and in some respects a new interpretation, from Mr Angus Brown ; whilst the vigour and ability with which Mr Andrew Fraser rendered the Cornish “ Floral dance ”—by no means easy to sing—won for him a hearty encore. During the concert the four vocalists contributed several part songs, in which their voices blended nicely. Instrumental pieces were rendered by Mr John Arr—quite a well-trained and accomplished violinist, and Mr W Wolstenholme, Mus.Bath, whose pianoforte playing was exquisite and whose improvisation of themes suggested by the audience were as marvellous as they were amusing. During the interval Mr Avalon Collard, under whose direction the concert was given, delivered a short address, illustrated by lantern slides on the work at St Dunstan’s Hostel, London.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Lieut-Col C B M Harris, D.S.O, of the Manor House, Marton, was amongst those mentioned in Field-Marshal Sir Douglas Haig’s New Year despatches.

FORMER “ ADVERTISER ” REPORTER HONOURED.

Capt Rawson Hughes, of the A.S.C, who has been mentioned in Sir Douglas Haig’s recent despatch for meritorious service, was formerly district reporter for the Rugby Advertiser at Kineton. Capt Hughes enlisted immediately on the outbreak of War, and he is now acting as deputy-quartermaster at one of the Divisional Headquarter Staffs in France.

MILITARY MEDAL FOR NEW BILTON SOLDIER.

Corpl Alfred John Potter, King’s Royal Rifles, son of Mr A J Potter, 4 Victoria Avenue, New Bilton, has been awarded the Military Medal for distinguished conduct in the field. Corpl Potter, who was employed at Messrs Willans & Robinson, enlisted at the outbreak of War, and has been in France about 18 months.

THE MILITARY MEDAL.

Sergt Charles Elliott Atkins, third son of Mr and Mrs J W Atkins, of the Carlton Hotel, South Lowestoft, has been awarded the Military Medal. Prior to the War, Sergt Atkins was with the British Thomson-Houston Company at Rugby, and at the outbreak he joined the Signal Section of the Royal Engineers.

LIEUT B C RELTON AGAIN WOUNDED.

The friends of Dr and Mrs Relton will regret to learn that their son, Lieut R C Relton, of the Royal Warwicks, has again been seriously wounded. His regiment has been taking part in the heavy fighting now going on in the East, and a short time ago Lieut Relton was shot by a sniper, the bullet passing through the upper part of his thigh. He recovered from this, and was apparently soon in action again. Official information has now come to hand that on January 25th he received a gun-shot wound in the head, and was reported two days later to be dangerously ill.

RUGBY PRISONERS OF WAR HELP COMMITTEE

The monthly meeting of the Executive Committee of the Rugby Prisoners of War Help Fund was held on Saturday last, the Chairman (Mr William Flint, C.C) presiding.

The Hon Secretary (Mr J R Barker) reported that the subscriptions during January amounted to £66 6s 1d, and payments on account of food parcels amounted to £87 13s. Cheques were signed in pre-payment of the food parcels during February for the local men interned in German prison camps and forwarded to the Regimental Care Committees of each man’s unit, who will, in accordance with the new scheme, purchase the goods at wholesale prices, and pack and despatch same to the men in the name of the Rugby Prisoners of War Help Committee.

The parcels sent this week contained : 1lb Libby’s beef, 1lb salmon, 1lb biscuits, 1lb Quaker oats, 1lb dripping, largo tin potted meat, 1 bottle sauce, 1lb vegetables, 1 tin veal and ham.

Mr Barker has received from Pte F A Ward (Pailton), of the Oxford and Bucks L.I, the January number of the “ Rennbahn Church Times,” which is a record of camp spiritual work. It is excellently produced entirely by the prisoners in Rennbahn prison camp. There is one particularly interesting paragraph to the effect that one can easily locate the position of the church in Rennbahn camp. It stands just opposite the row of huts wholly given up for the censoring and distributing of parcels of comforts sent from their good friends at home. In the centre of the front page is an announcement as follows :- “ The ‘boys’ of Rennbahn sincerely thank their relatives and friends for all parcels of comforts sent to them during the past year.”

COVENTRY MUNITIONS TRIBUNAL.

Mr Carmichael presided on Friday last week, and the assessors present were Mrs Griffiths (women), Mr J Roberts (men), and Mr F W Smith (employers).

Miss S Hopkins, Hillmorton ; Miss O E Yapp, Rugby ; Mrs V Hopkins, Hillmorton ; and Mrs E Sutton, Rugby, were summoned for losing time.—Miss Hopkins wrote a letter complaining of   the cold in the shop.—The firm’s representative said they had 150 girls on shells, and they brought the cases because of the serious amount of time lost in this department. The firm had trained them in the work. The workers were divided into three shifts of 7½ hours each.—Fined 10s.—Miss Yapp wrote stating that she suffered from a strained arm, and had her eyes burnt by hot steel flying about.—The firm’s representative said the accident had not been reported.—The case was adjourned.—Mrs V Hopkins wrote to the Court explaining the cause of her absence.—She was fined 10s.—Mrs Sutton also did not appear, and it was said in her case she had been away a whole week.—Fined 10s.

A sitting of Coventry Munitions Tribunal took place at the Police Court on Monday, Mr E G M Carmichael presiding.

Mrs B Burt, Rugby, was summoned for losing time, and did not appear. She had been repeatedly warned about her time-keeping, the firm’s representative told the Court.—Fined 15s.

Miss O E Yapp, Rugby, was summoned on adjournment for breach of rules.—The case was adjourned to enquire into a statement she made in a letter at the first hearing about her eyes being burnt.—The firm’s representative said they had no record, and she could have had goggles for her eyes.—The Court imposed a fine of 12s 6d.

 

27th Jan 1917. Very Drunk at the Station

VERY DRUNK AT THE STATION.—On Thursday last, before T Hunter, Esq, Bernard Nutt, second air mechanic (R.F.C), Regent Street, London, was summoned for being drunk on the L & N-W Railway Station, at Rugby, on January 24th.—He pleaded guilty, and William S Laughton, ticket examiner, stated that the man was so intoxicated that a doctor was sent for, who, on account of his condition, ordered his removal to the Police Station for safety. Defendant travelled from London with an Australian soldier, who had a big bottle of whiskey.—Defendant informed the Magistrate that he was a teetotaller, and had only just come out of hospital. He had a little drop of whiskey, and that upset him.—Discharged on paying doctor’s fee, 5s.

PRESENTATION.—On Saturday last an interesting presentation took place at the establishment of Mr J J McKinnell, Sheep Street, when Mr Horace Sanderson was the recipient of a very nice wristlet watch and a pair of silver vases. Mr J J Thompson, in making the presentation on behalf of his fellow-employees, spoke of the very efficient manner in which Mr Sanderson had discharged his duties during the 18 years that he had served as assistant and traveller, and felt sure that he would continue to serve as faithfully now he had responded to the call of his King and country. Mr Sanderson has also received a very useful letter wallet in recognition of his services as registrar at the Rugby Brotherhood, in which capacity he has done a good and faithful work.

THE PARCELS sent on behalf of the Rugby Prisoners War Help Committee this week to local men in German prison camps contained : 1 large tin rations, 1 tin tripe, 10-oz tin sardines, ½-lb margarine, 1lb milk, 1lb rolled oats, 1lb cake, 1 tin fruit, ½-lb chocolate, ¼-lb tea, 30 cigarettes, ½-lb sugar, mustard.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Capt R W Barnett, acting Brigade Major of a Naval Brigade, son of Mr Walter Barnett, of Bilton, has been awarded the Military Cross.

Mr W W Peberdy, Lansdowne House, Rugby, has received intimation from the Admiralty that his son. Flight Sub-Lieut W H Peberdy, R.N, failed to return from a scouting flight in the East on the 14th inst. At present he is reported missing.

LOCAL SOLDIER DECORATED BY KING PETER.

Flight-Sergt A Forsyth, of the Royal Flying Corps, son of Mrs Forsyth, of 8 Murray Road, Rugby, has been decorated by the King of Serbia with the Silver Star in recognition of his distinguished services during the campaign in that country. Sergt Forsyth has since been promoted sergeant-major. He was for a number of years employed at the B.T.H Works, but at the time he enlisted he was assistant works manager at the Aluminium Works, Birmingham.

NEW BILTON MAN WINS THE MILITARY MEDAL.

Sergt George King, R.E, youngest son of Mr and Mr Tom King, 89 Lawford Road, New Bilton, and a native of the parish, has been awarded the Military Medal for devotion to duty with the Forces in France. When he joined the Army, Sergt King belonged to the Coventry City Police, but he is well known at New Bilton, and formerly played both for the Cricket and Football Clubs. His father has worked at the Portland Cement Works for 53 years, having served under five successive managers, and he has lived in his present home since the time of his wedding 43 years ago.

MR J E COX’S SON SLIGHTLY WOUNDED.

Information has been received this week by Mr J E Cox, of Lodge Farm, Long Lawford, that his son. Trooper G H Cox, of the Warwickshire Yeomanry, has been slightly wounded in the right thigh, and is in a General Hospital in Egypt. Another of Mr Cox’s sons (E E Cox) joined the 3rd Gloucesters last week. Mr Cox has now three sons serving in the Army.

STRETTON-ON-DUNSMORE.

Much sympathy is felt for Mr and Mrs J Nicholas, of Lime Kiln Farm, who have received news that their eldest son, Lance-Corpl John Nicholas, of the Warwickshire Yeomanry, has again been wounded in the chest in action in Egypt ; also that their third son, Stewart, is officially reported wounded and missing since September 29th—the same day that his youngest brother, Percy, was wounded.—Trooper Alf Falconbridge, of the Warwickshire Yeomanry, who enlisted with Lance-Corpl Nicholas, has sustained a fractured arm.

BRANDON.

Mr and Mrs Reuben Banbrook have received the news that their son, Pte Bert Banbrook, has been badly wounded in the back and shoulder. He had not long returned to the front, having been previously wounded in the leg. He is one of five brothers upholding the honour of their country. He is now in hospital in France.—Pte J Ward, son of Mr and Mrs Thomas Ward, has also been home for the first time after his wounds. Unfortunately the poor fellow has completely lost the sight of an eye. Much sympathy is felt for Mr and Mrs Ward, who have already had one son killed.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR.
THE GREAT WAR LOAN.

To the Editor of the Advertiser.

SIR,—The Chancellor of the Exchequer has addressed an appeal to War Savings Committees throughout the country to assist in promoting the new War Loan. He suggests first that they should stimulate the purchase of War Savings Certificates during the next few weeks by all means in their power. But he also asks us, further, to extend our activities so as to include persons of moderate incomes to whom the plan of co-operative investment by means of War Savings Associations does not specially appeal, and particularly those who might be able to invest at once any sum between £5 and £50. Such people are often not familiar with the machinery of investment, and it is felt that in order to secure their help it is necessary not only to advertise the appeal to lend, but also to make available some means of obtaining information or advise, and especially assistance in filling up the necessary forms. For this purpose the Rugby Central War Savings Committee have, with the consent of the Rugby Urban District Council, established an Information Bureau in the Benn Buildings every day from 12.15-1.15, and from 7-9 o’clock ; also on Saturday afternoons. The Bureau will be opened on Monday next, Jan. 29th.

The committee are also arranging a public meeting, to be held in the Temple Speech Room at 8 o’clock on Saturday, February 3rd, at which Major J L Baird, M.P, has promised to speak. The Schools and Boy Scouts are being asked to assist in the work of advertising. Other measures are in preparation by which we hope to make this national appeal so widely known and understood that no money which can possibly be lent to the Government will remain in Rugby uninvested on February 16th. To this end we ask with confidence for the help of all classes of our fellow-townsmen.

The time is short, and the need is very urgent. Let Rugby take a worthy part in meeting it-and at once.—Yours very truly,

J J McKINNELL (Chairman).

A A DAVID (Hon. Secretary),

Rugby War Savings Central Committee.

IN MEMORIAM.

WALDUCK.—In loving memory of our dear lad, ERN., who died of wounds in France, January 28, 1916.—Sadly missed by his loving MOTHER, FATHER, SISTERS and BROTHERS.

WALDUCK.—In loving memory of my dear brother, ERN., who died of wounds in France, January 28, 1916.—Deeply mourned by MET.

 

Lee, Herbert Charles. Died 3rd Sep 1916

Herbert Charles Lee’s birth was registered in Rugby between Jul and Sept 1891 Vol 6d page 550.

His parents were Thomas or Tom Lee born Yelvertoft about 1853 and Elizabeth nee Pinder born about 1855 Belmesthorpe,  Rutland they married in 1877 in Rugby and by 1881 they were living in New Street near the vicarage in New Bilton. Thomas was a railway Fireman and they had 1 child Albert age 1, other relatives including boarders were also living with them. Interestingly Caroline age 2 and born 1879 is not mentioned in this census she is living 19 Lawford Road Rugby with grandparents Thomas and Ann Pinder.

Some 10 years later in 1891 Census the family were living at 114 Oxford Street Rugby and had 6 children Caroline born 1879 New Bilton,   Albert born 1881 New Bilton,   Ethel aged 6 born Rugby, Harold age 4 born Rugby, Ernest age 2 born Rugby and Arthur T age 1 month born Rugby.

Herbert Charles Lee was baptised at St. Andrews Church Rugby on Wednesday 5th May 1897, his brother Leonard and his sister Amy were also baptised on the same day, it tells us that the family were living at Abbey Street Rugby and his father Thomas Lee was a driver this we assume to be a train driver on the railway, his mother was Elizabeth Lee. Amy Harriet Wright was also baptised on the same day. The Reverend W. E. Philpotts assistant curate carried out the service.

Interestingly when his sister Ivy May Lee was baptised on 11th September 1896 at St.Andrews Church Rugby it said that Ivy’s parents were Tom and Elizabeth Lee and in the column of trade or profession of father the words single women is crossed out and the word “widow” is written.

There is no record for Thomas or Tom Lees death in Rugby or in Warwickshire just prior to 1896, and with Thomas Lee being common name in England we have no way of confirming date of death.

Some 4 years later Herbert age 9 appears on the 1901 UK Census living 126 Abbey Street Rugby together with his widowed mother Elizabeth Lee age 46 a charwomen and 5 siblings:-   Harold Lee age 14 an errand boy, Ethel Lee age 16 laundry maid, Amy Lee age 7, Leonard Lee age 5 and Ivy Lee age 4 + 2 boarders Morris Silvaman age 20 born Romania and a tailor journeyman, and Charles Ludlow age 21 born Warwick who is an engine cleaner.

1911 census Herbert Charles Lee age 19 and Iron Moulder out of work living 94 Winfield Street Rugby with mother Elizabeth Lee age 56 a widow, brother Arthur Thomas Lee age 20 locomotive engine cleaner, sister Amy Lee age 17 laundress, brother Leonard Lee age 15 locomotive engine cleaner, and sister Ivy May Lee age 14 a mica cutter in Electrical Engineers, all these family were living with married sister Caroline Jones nee Lee age 32 and her husband Charles Jones age 35 and their 5 children living in 6 rooms.

Herbert Lee joined the 2nd Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment his regimental number was 1095 his attestation papers are missing. He arrived in France on 4th May 1915.

Private Herbert Lee died 3 September 1916 age 25 and is remembered with Honour on the Thiepval Memorial Pier 9 column 9a, 9b & 10b, and by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission he was the son of Elizabeth Lee of 24 Sandown Road Rugby.

H. Lee is on Rugby Memorial and his name sits between, C. R. Lee and W. Lee.

Herbert Lee pension/effects details Record No. 377975 registry No. 293738 he had Credits of £21.   8s. 2d. + £8. 10s. 0d, his mother Elizabeth received a total 14 payments which included payments to his siblings during 1917 totalling £29. 18s. 2d.

His mother Elizabeth death is registered 1930 Q3 Rugby age 76.

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

 

 

29th Jul 1916. Some After Effects of the Great Offensive

SOME AFTER EFFECTS OF THE GREAT OFFENSIVE.

An artillery officer who is in the great offensive writes to a friend in Rugby :- “ For days before the attack we were firing continuously, and on the actual day we got rid of a prodigious amount of ammunition. Fortunately[?], there was a bit of a lull after the attack, and we got some well-needed rest. So tired was one of my Sergeants that a rat gnawed at his face as he was lying in his dug-out. In a sleepy way he brushed it on one side, but it only returned, and finally he slept on, to find his face a mass of blood in the morning.

“ As for my Subalterns, they did nothing but eat and sleep for many days.

“ The Battery did very well, especially —who was complimented on the “ gallantry and initiative ” which he displayed.

“ It was rather sad to see our wounded come back, but they all seemed very cheery, and generally were hugging a German helmet, cap, pistol, or something as a souvenir. We escaped very fortunately in the casualty line, only having one N.C.O and two horses wounded, but on the day of the attack the Bosches fired gas shells at us, which made us all very sick and faint. On the whole, however, our worst enemy is the rain. There have been some extraordinary heavy showers, which have flooded our gun-pits and dug-outs at times. We are experts at mud shovelling, but it takes a lot of work and ingenuity to keep our homes from washing down. Getting out of bed in the morning is a work of fine art. We sleep in bunks in two rows, and the puzzle is, how to get into your boots without stepping on the floor, which, has or three inches of mud. It’s Wonderful how clever one gets at standing on one leg. The trenches are of course, very often waist deep in water, and it is often a choice between staying in and getting wet through, or jumping, out and risking a bullet. All the same we manage to keep merry and bright.”

WOLSTON.

AT CONTALMAISON.—Pte T Webb, writing to a friend says : “ Just to let you know I and the Wolston boys are still in the pink after a few days with the Germans. No doubt you have been having good news of the ‘boys’ this last few days. I shall never forget it. Talk about the Loos and Neave Chapelle battles, this was the worst I have ever been in. It was on July 8th when we had orders to get ready and stand-to. For five hours our artillery, with all sorts of shells, bombarded the village of Contalmaison, till there was hardly a wall or house left standing. The time came, and over we went with fixed bayonets and bombs. We had about 250 yards to go. We got there, and what a game we had chasing the Germans in and out of cellars and dug-outs. After holding on to the village a little time we had to retire owing to shells and machine gun fire from the Germans, but a little later on we made again for the village, and secured it this time. It was a sight to see the Germans lying about. We made 60 prisoners, and they seemed glad to be taken. One of them, who could speak rather good English, said they had just come from Verdun for a rest, and then the English started on them. One chap had the chance to get back to his lines, but refused to do so. They were rather tall, but only old men and boys, 16 or 50. We were up to our knees in mud and water, but they could not shift the Worcester sauce, which was a bit too strong for them. We hung on until we got relieved by another division the next night. We have pushed them back a few miles this time. It was a treat to look round their dug-outs. One I went down was about 40ft under the ground, fitted up with several compartments. It was more like an hotel, with spring beds, tables, and everything for use. On the walls were all sorts of photos and picture postcards from relatives and friends from Germany. The kitchen took our eye most ; it was fitted up with cooking stoves, boilers for making soup, and pots of all sorts. I think they were there, as they thought, for the duration of the War ; but we caught them napping, and use their hotel for ourselves now. We are having a quiet rest, and hope to be with them again very soon.”

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Mr Evan Percy Biddles, of Clifton, who has been in Paraguay, South America, for four years, his given up a good post there, and has returned home to serve his country.

Second-Lieut S A Miller-Hallett, South Wales Borderers, killed on July 11th, was in the Rugby School Cricket XI in 1908 and 1909. He was the second son of Mr A Miller-Hallett, of Chelsfield, whose XI provided very good club cricket in Kent some years ago.

Lieut A H Hales, Wiltshire Regiment, killed on July 5th, was a versatile athlete. Educated at Rugby and Corpus, Oxford, he gained his rowing Blue, and was at No. 3 in the Varsity crews of 1904 and 1905. As a Rugby footballer he was in his School XV in 1900, and afterwards played for the Harlequins and Monkstown. He was awarded the Military Cross for conspicuous gallantry in March, 1915.

Tuesday was the last day for unattested men who had not received calling up papers to report under the Military Service Act, but, probably owing to the thorough manner in which the calling-up process has been gone through locally, only one man reported at Rugby Drill Hall.

Mr Harry Hoare, so well known a few years ago in connection with the Rugby, Football, Cricket, and Hockey Clubs, now holds the rank of Major in the Army Service Corps, and Acts as Senior Supply Officer to the 38th Welsh Division.

SERGT J SOMERS, V.C, WOUNDED.

Sergt James Somers, of the Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, formerly billeted with Mrs Burns, Corbett Street, Rugby, who gained the Victoria Cross in the Dardenelles, was wounded for the third time in the great advance, and is at present in hospital at Newcastle.

LOCAL CASUALTIES.

The following Rugby men, belonging to the Rifle Brigade, have been reported wounded :—Rifleman J F Earl (5556), Rifleman J Hughes (235), Rifleman F P Liddington (751), Acting-Corpl A Packer (1283), Rifleman H Fulham (8), and Rifleman T C Smith (2426).

Corpl P Hammond, of E Co, R.W.R, son of Mr W D Hammond, 1 Kimberley Road, was wounded in the face on June 19th, but has now recovered and returned to the firing line.

Mr and Mrs W Aland, of 30 Arnold Street, received news on Sunday that their son, Pte Roy Aland, of the Warwicks, had been severely wounded by gun shot, the head, shoulders, back, and both arms and both legs being involved. The parents went over to France to see their son without delay. Pte Aland was employed as a foreman at Rugby when he enlisted, and has spent sixteen months in the trenches.

William Ewart Davenport, only son of Mr and Mrs A Davenport, of Harborough Magna, was killed in action on July 19th. Deceased was 18 years of age, and previous to the war was employed by the L & N.-W Railway as a cleaner. In a letter to the bereaved parents, his officer says : “ An officer and three telegraphists, including your son, were engaged on telephone work. The shelling was so severe that they took shelter in a dug-out. Immediately a shell dropped on this dug-out, killing all the occupants. The bodies were recovered and buried in a cemetery back of the lines.” The officer adds : — “ He was always cheerful, kind, obliging, and willing to do anything to help and further his work. Your son was a hard-working telephonist, who took a keen interest in his work, and was not afraid to go into the danger zone if it was necessary in the course of his duty.”

Flags were flying half-mast at the L & N.-W Stations and at sub-stations to Rugby, early in the week, as the result of the news that two of the late employes—C W Standish, of the Northamptonshire Regiment, and C A Jeeves, of the King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry—had been killed in the general advance in France. Standish was a cleaner, whose home is at Peterborough. He had a leg amputated in France, and was brought to a hospital in England, where gangrene set in, and he died. Jeeves came from Bedford. This makes six men connected with the Rugby Engine Shed who have been killed, and, in addition, nineteen have been wounded.

Mrs Ward, of 170 Lawford Road, New Bilton, received on the 7th inst. an official communication that her son, Pte Thomas Walter Ward, who has been reported missing since August 6, 1915, is now regarded as dead. Pte Ward, who enlisted in the Oxford and Bucks Regiment in September, 1914, was home on sick leave in June of last year, and, re-joining his regiment, was shortly afterwards transferred to the Hampshire Regiment, and left England for the Dardanelles. Pte Ward was a prominent member of the New Bilton Rugby Football and Cricket Clubs, and was very popular with all who knew him. Previous to the War he worked at Willans & Robinson’s. Much sympathy is felt for Mr and Mrs Ward in their great loss. They have a younger son, Lance-Corpl Sidney Ward, serving in France.

Lieut J Greenwood, of the Northampton Regiment, the well-known Rugby and Newbold footballer, is in hospital at Birmingham suffering, from wounds. Lieut Greenwood, who before the War was a teacher at Eastlands School, took part in the fighting at Fricourt during the first stage of the advance, and was wounded by a sniper in a tree on July 12th. His collar-bone is badly fractured, and he is also suffering severely from shock ; but his many friends will be pleased to hear that he is now making good progress.

CORPL A M BLADES, OF BROWNSOVER.

On Thursday Mr. Tom Blades, of Brownsover, received the sad news that his son, Corpl Albert Moisey Blades, of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment, has died of wounds received during the recent fighting in France. Deceased, who was 21 years of age, enlisted early in the war.

B.T.H MEN KILLED.

Acting Sergt C F Miller, R.E, and Pte Pearson, Siege Co, R.E, two employes of the B.T.H, have been killed in the recent advance. Sergt Miller, who was an Irishman, was formerly in the Test, and Pte Pearson was employed in the Generator Dept.

A BRAVE SOLDIER.

Corpl Doyle, whose death was reported last week, lost his life under the following circumstances :—After the attack on the German trenches volunteers were called for to bring in the wounded. Corpl Doyle was one of the first to volunteer. He brought in one wounded soldier safely, and was bringing in another when he was shot dead. His Commanding Officer (Capt Lucas) says : “ His conduct was beyond all praise. A better or braver soldier never lived.”

RIFLEMAN JOHN LAMBOURNE, OF CLIFTON.

The death took place, as the result of founds received in the great offensive on July 9th, of Rifleman John Lambourne, Rifle Brigade, son of Mr Wm Lambourne, of Clifton. Rifleman Lambourne, who was only 17 years of age, joined the Army when he was 16, and had been in France since last December. He was formerly employed at the B.T.H Works.

DUNCHURCH

PTE J HUGHES, of the K.R.R, has arrived in Birmingham suffering from wounds. Of two companies of his regiment, in one of which he was fighting, there were only seven men left. He it the eldest son of Mr and Mrs J Hughes, Daventry Road, Dunchurch.—Pte R Elkington, Mill Street, who has been in many engagements, is home for a few days before going to Egypt.—Lieut J W Barnwell, R.W.R, Daventry Road, is suffering from wounds in France. Mr Barnwell has gone to see him.— Pte Carter, of the Territorials has also been injured, and is in London.

BRINKLOW.

ROLL OF HONOUR.—The parishioners of Brinklow extend their deepest sympathy to Mr and Mrs T Kenney and family in their grief at the loss of their son, Roland Kenney, who has been killed in action during our great offensive. Roland joined the Territorials just prior to the War, and like many others, volunteered for service abroad, where he has been for over twelve months. He was of a particularly lively nature, and was always a prominent figure in all the outdoor sports the village. He undoubtedly made a good soldier, and was accordingly promoted to the rank of sergeant.

LONG ITCHINGTON.

MONTAGU PEARSON KILLED.—On Monday morning the news was officially confirmed of the death of Lance-Corpl Montagu Pearson (South Staffs Regiment), eldest son of Mr and Mrs W J Pearson. He was killed while fighting in France on the 1st inst. Previous to the War he had been employed at the B.T-H Works at Rugby, and enlisted from there on August 17, 1914. He took part in the operations in Gallipoli, where he was wounded on August 9, 1915. Last January he paid a short visit home. He was 23 years old. Lance-Corpl Pearson was of fine athletic build and a keen lover of sport. For several years he had done good service for the local Football Club, of which he latterly held the position of captain. He will be greatly missed by many.

THE ROLL OF HONOUR.—On Sunday the Vicar (Rev W E Ellis) made feeling reference to the three deaths which have, within the past three weeks, occurred in the ranks of our local soldiers—Rowland Evetts, Montagu Pearson, and Sutton Russell. The loss of the latter he particularly instanced as one which touched himself very keenly. From the time when a very little lad he attended the Church Schools he found Joseph Sutton Russell a very regular attendant there, and also as a member of the Church Choir. From the time of his confirmation he had always been a devout and regular communicant. The sermon was followed by the singing of Dr Neale’s hymn, “ They whose course on earth is o’er.”

SOUTHAM.

KILLED IN ACTION.—News was received on Friday last week of the death in action of Pte Arthur Adams, of the Manchester “ Pals ” Regiment. Deceased, who was highly respected in Southam, was the eldest son of Mr and Mrs H Adams, of Oxford Street, was of a bright and cheery disposition. Before the War Pte Adams was a grocer in Manchester. He leaves a widow, for whom much sympathy is felt.

DEATHS.

DAVENPORT.—On July 19th (killed in action), William Ewart, R.F.A, only son of Mr and Mrs. A. Davenport, Post Office, Harborough Magna. Aged 18 years.
“ He sleeps not in his native land.
But neath some foreign skies ;
And far from those that loved him best.
In a hero’s grave he lies.”
—From his loving mother, father, and sisters Jess and Della.

LENTON.—In loving memory of William Henry (Will), dearly beloved son of the late Mr. and Mrs. T. Lenton, Wood Street, who died from wounds in France, July 19,1916, aged 36 years.
“ Lord, ere I join the deadly strife,
And battles terrors dare ;
Fain would I render heart and life
To Thine Almighty care.
And when grim death in smoke wreaths robed,
Comes thundering o’er the scene,
What fear can reach a soldier’s heart
Whose trust in Thee has been.”

MANNING.—On July 11, 1916, died of wounds in France, Thomas Manning, Northants Regiment, of Braunston, beloved husband of Georgina Manning, of Leamington Spa.

SEENEY.—Killed in action in France, July 2, 1916, Signaller W. Seeney, R.W.R.,of Bourton, aged 18.
“ We loved him—oh! no tongue can tell
How much we loved him and how well ;
His fresh young life could not be saved,
And now he sleeps in a soldiers grave.”
—Deeply mourned by his loving MOTHER, SISTERS and BROTHERS.

IN MEMORIAM.

TOMLINSON.—In loving Memory of William Tomlinson, K.R.R.’s, killed in action at Hooge, July 30,1915.
“ He bravely answered duty’s call,
His life he gave for one and all.
But the unknown grave is the bitterest blow :
None but aching hearts can know.”
-From his loving father, mother, sisters, and brothers.

PRESTON.—In loving Memory of Rifleman Jack Preston, 7th K.R.R., killed in action, July 30, 1915.
“ Somewhere in France there is a nameless grave,
Where sleeps our loved one amid the brave.
One of the rank and file, he heard the call,
And for the land he loved he gave his all.”
—Father, mother, and sisters.

REDFEARN.—In loving Memory of Rifleman Joseph Charles (Tim) Redfearn, 7th K.R.R., died of wounds, July 21, 1915.
“ Had he asked us, well we know
We should cry, ‘ O spare this blow.’
Yes, with streaming tears should pray,
‘ Lord, we love him ; let him stay.’”
—His wife and daughters, High Street, Thame.

SMITH.—In loving memory of Herbert, the dearly loved son of Frederick Smith. Killed in action in Flanders, July 30, 1915.—“ We loved you well ; God loved you best.”—FATHER, SISTER and BROTHERS.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR.

A BRITISH SOLDIER.

To the Editor of the Advertiser.

SIR,—I was talking to a wounded boy of the Hampshire Regiment on the platform of Rugby Station the other day. I asked him what his wounds were ? He replied : “ My right arm is shattered, three fingers off left hand,” and he also had a large gash across one cheek. He had been at Loos, Hulluck, and Ypres ; and, as he termed it, had had the biggest part of a shell. He added : “ I am no more use, sir; but I am glad I went.” A little thing like this, I think, helps to show the spirit of our men and the stuff they are made of.—I am, yours faithfully,

CORBET SMITH.
July 26, 1916.

EGGS FOR WOUNDED SOLDIERS.—At Rugby Railway Mission a collection of eggs was made on Sunday afternoon, and no fewer than 250 were received, including 64 from the men working in the Locomotive Department at Rugby Station, to whom a special appeal had been made. Mr J J Thompson gave the address at the service, which was well attended, and the eggs, having been received by Mr Frank Ward, were placed in a large nest, made of hay and decorated with the national colours by Mrs Beard. The eggs were afterwards distributed between the three local Red Cross Hospitals.

PRISONERS OF WAR FUND.

The usual monthly meeting of the Executive Committee of the Rugby Prisoners of War Fund was held on Wednesday.

The Hon Secretary (Mr J R Barker) reported that to date the subscriptions amounted to £545 13s 10d, and the expenditure on food parcels &c, was £432 11s 5d, leaving a balance in hand of £113 2s 5d, sufficient for six weeks’ parcels. During the week subscriptions amounted to £18 17s 4d, including the sum of £8 3s collected at the V.T.C Sports on Saturday last. This was the first week for some time that the receipts exceeded the expenditure.

All outstanding accounts were passed for payment, and as this would be the last meeting of the financial year, the Secretary was instructed to prepare the accounts for audit, so that a balance-sheet could be issued early next month.

This week’s parcels contained ¼-lb tea, jar of marmalade, one large tin salmon, one large tin fruit, one tin of cafe au lait, one tin potted meat, one tin condensed milk, tin cocoa, tablet of soap, ¼-lb sugar.

RAILWAY CONCESSION TO MUNITION WORKERS.—For the convenience of munition workers who have to go from Rugby to Coventry in the early morning the L & N-W Railway have arranged to run a train from Rugby at 5.5 a.m, and arrive at Coventry at 5.20 a.m. It will commence on Monday, July 31st, and be continued for a fortnight to see whether the number of passengers justifies permanent running of the train.

Davis, Roland. Died 27th Apr 1916

Roland Davis was born in early 1891 and baptised on 10th August 1892, together with his sister Elsie at New Bilton Church. His father was Robert, a labourer, and the family lived at 5 Alexander Terrace. Robert had married Mary Jane RANDS in 1886. They had seven children, but by 1911 three had died. By that date the family was living at 25 New Street and Robert was a Stationery Engine Driver. Roland was aged 20 and was a Labourer at Iron Foundry (he was working at BTH Generator Dept when he enlisted)

Roland joined the 5th Bn, Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry as a private (No 11895). He arrived in France on 1st October 1915 and died on 27th April 1916, He was buried at Blangy Military Cemetery.

St. Laurent-Blangy is a village adjoining the north-east side of Arras. Roland Davis must have died in the fighting after it was taken by British troops in March 1916 The village remained on the front line until the remainder fell into British hands on the first day of the Battles of Arras, the 9th April, 1917.

After the war his body was transferred to Cabaret-Rouge British Cemetery at Souchez. The remains were badly smashed up and he was identified by a French cross on the grave and portions of Khaki.

He is also listed on the BTH War Memorial.

A notice appeared in the In Memorial column of the Rugby Advertiser of 28th April 1917.

“Davis – In ever-loving memory of our dear son and brother, Private ROLAND DAVIS, of New Bilton, who was killed in action in France on April 27th, 1916. – Not forgotten by his loving FATHER, MOTHER, BROTHER and SISTERS.”

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

12th Feb 1916. Another Interesting Letter from the Front

ANOTHER INTERESTING LETTER FROM THE FRONT.

The Rev CT Bernard McNulty, Vicar of Holy Trinity, Leamington, contributes to his Parish Magazine for this month another interesting letter written from the Headquarters, Divisional Artillery, British Expeditionary Force, where he is attached as a chaplain.

“ I write again,” he says, “ from this little village in France, a village in which every little farmhouse, and every tumble-down barn, is crowded with British soldiers—troops to whom the inhabitants as a rule show much kindness and consideration, and yet think what such a state of affairs means to the people here ! The best rooms in their houses are given us, the very straw is turned out of their barns in order to make room for our men ; consider how very small is the payment which the French people receive from their Government for all this, when compared to the prices paid in England for the billeting of troops. In England the house-holder receives 3s a night for every officer who sleeps in his house, and in many cases there are several officers in the one house, and for every private soldier payment of 6d a night is made ; but here in this country the rate of payment is one franc (8d) a night per officer, and 1/2 d a night for each soldier ! When troops are stationed in any district in England, it means an enormously increased prosperity in that particular locality, or town, but here the inhabitants gain very little pecuniary benefit by our presence, for with the exception of eggs and vegetables bought from the small farms, any extras which the soldiers purchase are bought at our army canteens, a number of which are provided in every division. Yet the people, with but few exceptions, are as a rule kind and obliging, at any rate, such has been my experience, and why ? Because they fully realise that we are here to protect and safeguard their homes from a foe who is close to their very doors, and they know full well that the safety and welfare of their country is at stake, and on every French person’s lips to-day there is but one motto. It is this: ‘ Honneur et Patrie.’

“ A few days ago I passed through several French villages, and in each village, here and there, I noticed houses brightly decorated with evergreens and holly, whilst over the door in large letters the motto was printed. I asked the reason for this, and I was told that the recruits of the 1916 class were being called out, and soon I saw companies of lads marching away from their villages, as years ago their fathers marched, for there are practically no men to-day in France who do not know what it is to fight in the wars. How it thrilled my heart to see these lads ! Strong, healthy-looking youths, tramping along with their rifles on their shoulders, with heads held high, and a smile on their lips, leaving their homes, yet bravely hiding the aching hearts proud that at last the looked-for day had come for them, when they could don the uniform of their army. ‘ Honneur et Patrie.’ Such were the words over each home from which a son had gone forth, and the parents’ hands had put up those evergreens, had written the glorious motto. They, too, had hidden the aching heart. Is it not a matter of rejoicing, say they, for has not our boy gone forth to the war ? And in the silence of the night, as they whisper his name in their prayers, it will be as if they heard the voice of God answering ‘ Honneur et Patrie ‘ !

“ Ah, yes, this is the dominating thought throughout the length and breadth of France, the one thought influencing the actions of all its people. It is honour and country which makes one man eager to go forth to the battery or the trench. It is the self-same motto which makes his brother work earnestly and cheerfully in factory or workshops. In the workshops the same golden motive is inspiring labour. They know that they toil for something higher and nobler than wages. The other day I was speaking to a French interpreter, a member of one of France’s noblest families, like many another French nobleman serving to-day as a private in the army of France. He told me that his brother had large munition works near Paris, and that the workmen had petitioned that they might be allowed to work on Sundays. They stated, as their reason, that they felt they could not rest that day, whilst their brothers were fighting in the trenches ! Dare I say that the sanctity of the Sabbath is violated by labour undertaken from such a motive ?

“ Soon there is to be in Great Britain a very modified form of compulsory service. Whatever may have been our opinions on that subject in the past, to-day such a course is right because it is necessary. It is necessary for honour and country. Let that sublime thought silence the voice of opposition, and let those who are called upon to send forth their sons, remember the decorated homes of France !

“ ‘ Honneur et Patrie.’ May that, indeed, be the proud motto for all in our country during this year of 1916. I can wish no grander thing. May it be the sole motive underlying the sayings and actions of every politician who sits within the walls at Westminster. May that same motive lighten the labours of thorn who toil in our workshops, making both employers and men earnest and faithful. May it make the women of our country eager and proud to send forth their manhood, and may that same thought make our soldiers brave in the face of danger. May it also bring consolation to those who mourn ! ”

LETTERS FROM OLD MURRAYIAN8.

Mr W T Coles Hodges, headmaster of the Murray School, has received several letters from Old Boys with the Colours.

Ptes C E Williams and E A Welch, C Section, Machine Gun Company, 143rd Infantry Brigade, write:—

“ We chaps of the Machine Gun are now no longer attached to our old Battalion, for we have been formed into a Machine Gun Company; find so we are away from the rest of they old “ E ” Company. However, we are still able to see them occasionally, and we are pleased to say that they all seem to keep in fairly good health. Would you kindly thank the Rugby Territorial Comforts Committee from the Rugby boys of the Machine Gun Company for all the gifts they so kindly sent us, which were handed on to us by Q.M.Sergt Tomlinson. They were much appreciated by all. At present, there are only two Old Murrayians in our section. The trenches are a little better now than they have been for a month or two. We still have our share of mud, but it is drying up a treat.

“ Fritz is as amiable as ever, only just lately he has begun to talk too much with his artillery. He always get paid back with interest, though, by our artillery, which includes the Rugby Howitzer Battery. We are out of the trenches now, but go in again shortly. While out, we have to man a gun for anti-aircraft purposes, and we are anxiously waiting for a Taube to come over, so that we can warm our gun up a little.”

W Holmes, a sailor boy on one of H.M. warships, has also written to Mr Hodges, stating that he is having a good time and is now at sea.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

In response to the appeal of the Rugby Womens’ Volunteer Reserve for fresh fruit and vegetables for the sailors—who have to depend upon gifts from friends for such luxuries—a gift ? held at the Murray School on Friday in last week, when neatly 7cwt. of produce, consisting of artichokes, parsnips, oranges, apples, beet, cabbage, onions, carrots, turnips, etc, were received. The gifts were afterwards packed up under the supervision of Captain , Moss and Quartermaster Dickinson, of the W.V.R.

NEW BILTON SOLDIER WOUNDED.

Mr C Pegg, of 1 Addison Road, New Bilton, received an official intimation that his son, Pte George Pegg, of the Leicestershire Regiment, was wounded on January 6th. Particulars of nature of the wounds have not yet come to hand.

 

PTE FREDK BAXTER DIES OF WOUNDS.

Pte Fredk Baxter, youngest son of Mrs Baxter, New Street, New Bilton, who, as we recently reported, was seriously wounded in the knee in France on January 7th, died as the result of his injuries in Colchester Hospital on Saturday. Pte Baxter, who belonged to the Royal Warwickshire Regiment, was out with a scouting party when a bullet passed through his knee, killing the officer in charge who was behind him. Pte Baxter was brought to England about three weeks ago, and it was ascertained that his injury was so serious that it was found necessary to amputate the limb. At first he made good progress, and it was hoped that he would ultimately recover, but towards the end of last week he became worse, and his mother was summoned on Saturday, but he died before she reached the hospital. He was 26 years of age, and joined the army after the outbreak of war. The body was brought to Rugby, and the funeral took place in the Cemetery yesterday (Friday) afternoon.

[Private Baxter is remembered on the Croop Hill War Memorial]

SCHOOLBOYS WITH ARMLETS.

We understand that every master of military age at Rugby School has attested or been rejected, and a number of the senior boys of the school may be seen wearing armlets, showing they, too, have done their duty in this connection.

RECRUITING AT RUGBY.

There have been very few enlistments under the Group System during the past week, but the majority of those who have presented themselves were single men. We would remind single men who have not yet attested that the Group System so far as they are concerned comes to an end this month, after which time they will be automatically absorbed into the Army.

POST OFFICE NOTICE.

REDUCTION OF DELIVERIES IN RUGBY.

On and from Monday, the 21st inst, there will only be two deliveries on weekdays in Rugby, at 7 a.m and 12.30 p.m. Sunday deliveries will remain for the present.

In the rural districts the deliveries are being limited to one daily, and these changes are being carried out as circumstances permit.

PROTECTIVE MEASURES AGAINST ZEPPELINS.

CONFERENCE IN BIRMINGHAM.

A DEMAND FOR EARLY WARNING.

The conference of representatives of Midland authorities, convened by the Lord Mayor of Birmingham (Alderman Neville Chamberlain), to consider the question of the better protection of the Midlands in the event of further aircraft raids, was-held on Wednesday afternoon at the Council House Birmingham. The Lord Mayor presided, and there was a large and representative attendance of nearly 100 public gentlemen from all parts of the counties of Warwick, Worcester, and Stafford.

A resolution was passed calling on the military authorities to organise a system for giving an early warning of the approach of hostile aircraft and information as to subsequent movements inland. A committee was appointed to lay before the authorities the methods which the meeting considered would best the situation.

The meeting then proceeded to discuss the various methods to be adopted in giving warning to the public, and while so engaged a telegram was received by the Lord Mayor from the Under-Secretary of State for the Home Department, stating that “ the matter of organisation for conveying to police, factories, etc, information of movements of hostile aircraft being actively pressed forward by Field-Marshal Commanding-in-Chief Home Forces in co-operation with Post Office.”

TEST MOBILISATION OF BOY SCOUTS.

On Wednesday, February 2nd, a surprise mobilisation, was held of the town, troops of the Boy Scouts, the idea being to ascertain how soon the boys could turn out in the event of their being required in case of an air raid, to assist the public organisations such as the St John’s Ambulance Brigade, Red Cross Nurses, Fire Brigades, etc.

Although the Scouts were quite unaware when the mobilisation would take place, 50 responded to the call, and assembled on the B.T.H. Athlete Field. A number of the boys, of course, were prevented by overtime, and by evening classes, from taking part. After the mobilisation had taken place, the boys were practised in outpost and sentry duty under the following scheme :— Important military stores were supposed to be located in the field, the Scouts being deputed to defend same from hostile attack while some kind friends had previously undertaken to set as “ enemies ” and. endeavour to obtain access to these stores. Some of these spies were duly caught by the Scouts…

DEARTH OF PETROL

The supply of petrol available for the use of owners of private motor cars will in future be considerably restricted.

Nearly a month ago restrictions upon the supplies of petrol were foreshadowed by the British Petroleum. Company in a circular which they sent out. Now, by some companies at any rate a limit has been placed upon the number of gallons to be supplied to various districts. Hitherto the public have paid little attention to the warnings they have received that, in the national interests, private users should exercise the utmost economy. The restrictions upon the supply which have now been put into force do not affect the owners of vehicles used for commercial purposes.

THE MILK SUPPLY.

COTTAGERS & GOAT-KEEPING.

A very interesting circular has been issued by the Board of Agriculture and Fisheries, pointing out how in certain districts goat-keeping might be extended with advantage. It is well known (says the “ Lancet”) that many cottagers and others living outside the area of retail delivery find it difficult to obtain milk for their families. The large dairy farms are, as a rule, under contract to supply milk to distributing agencies in towns, or else they, turn their milk into cheese and butter. As the Board rightly says, all the objections which apply to the keeping of a cow by a cottager would be met in the case of a goat. The first; expenditure for its purchase is within his means, the housing accommodation is reduced to a minimum, the food costs little, and there is no great expense to be borne for the maintenance of the animal.

Even in the event of a cow’s milk supply being available, goats may profitably be kept to supply milk for domestic use. It is, as a rule, a most wholesome milk, and its flavour, if the food of the animal is regulated, is not any real drawback to its employment. Moreover, goat’s milk is easily digested by children, and especially infants, and, as is well known, it is fair lets likely than cow’s milk to contain tubercle bacilli of animal origin. The average goat will give at its flush three pints of milk a day, and, on the whole, calculations based on extreme cost of keep, outlay, and so forth, show that while a good supply of milk could be maintained, a very fair profit could be made. The suggestion is a valuable one, and the information contained in this circular as to how to start goat-keeping, as to the choice of breeds, as to breeding itself, housing, feeding, tethering, milking, and the care of the milk, and so forth, should be spread up and down the land.

The composition of cow’s milk and goat’s milk is much the same, although goat’s milk is superior as regards fat, which is an advantage. Human milk differs chiefly from goat’s and cow’s milk in that it contains a much smaller proportion of mineral salts and casein.

 

TO RELATIVES OF WOUNDED SOLDIERS.

AN OFFER FROM CHICHESTER.

Mr Robert Bottrill, of Rugby House. Chichester, wishes to be informed when Rugby soldiers are patients in the Graylingwell War Hospital. If relatives will communicate with him, he says he. will be very pleased to visit such soldiers and to take them motor rides ; also, if any friends of the wounded would like to visit them at Chichester, Mr Bottrill offers to provide them with a bed, etc. He adds : “ I believe we have had several Rugby boys here, and I have missed them.”

Mr. Bottrill is a native of Rugby, which explains his desire to show kindness to wounded soldiers from homes in the town who may be staying in the Graylingwell Hospital.