3rd Feb 1917. Rugby Hairdressers and The War

RUGBY HAIRDRESSERS AND THE WAR.—Since the outbreak of war 22 Rugby hairdressers and their assistants have joined the Forces, and nine saloons in the town have been closed.

SOLDIERS’ PARCELS DESTROYED.—A number of soldiers’ parcels and letters for the Front were destroyed by a fire which broke out in one of the coaches of a mail train on Thursday afternoon last week. The fire was discovered at Welton Station, and the Long Buckby Fire Brigade, under Captain Clifton, were soon on the spot, and speedily coped with the flames. The coach and its contents were, however, practically burnt out.

WOUNDED SOLDIERS ENTERTAINED.—On Saturday afternoon the wounded soldiers of the Rugby Town Red Cross Hospitals were entertained by the members of the Bible and Sunday School at the Baptist Church. An excellent tea was provided, after which a musical programme was gone through by the members of the schools, and cigarettes were distributed among the soldiers.

CONCERT BY BLIND MUSICIANS AT THE SPEECH ROOM.

A delightful concert was given by blind musicians in the Temple Speech Room on Thursday night in aid of St Dunstan’s Hostel for our blinded soldiers and sailors. Space does not permit an extended critique. Every number, both vocal and instrumental, possessed undeniable merit, and if the wishes of the large audience had been gratified—they were in the second part of the programme—encores would have been general throughout. Miss Sarah Maden sang, beautifully in tune, an old favourite, “ The Enchantress,” which seemed to please even better than “ Hindoo song,” which came later in the evening. Miss Ada Jackson (soprano) gave as her first number Cowan’s popular song, “ The swallows,” and as her second “ Solveig’s song ” (Grieg). Both proved acceptable. Clay’s “ I’ll sing thee songs of Araby ” received full justice, and in some respects a new interpretation, from Mr Angus Brown ; whilst the vigour and ability with which Mr Andrew Fraser rendered the Cornish “ Floral dance ”—by no means easy to sing—won for him a hearty encore. During the concert the four vocalists contributed several part songs, in which their voices blended nicely. Instrumental pieces were rendered by Mr John Arr—quite a well-trained and accomplished violinist, and Mr W Wolstenholme, Mus.Bath, whose pianoforte playing was exquisite and whose improvisation of themes suggested by the audience were as marvellous as they were amusing. During the interval Mr Avalon Collard, under whose direction the concert was given, delivered a short address, illustrated by lantern slides on the work at St Dunstan’s Hostel, London.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Lieut-Col C B M Harris, D.S.O, of the Manor House, Marton, was amongst those mentioned in Field-Marshal Sir Douglas Haig’s New Year despatches.

FORMER “ ADVERTISER ” REPORTER HONOURED.

Capt Rawson Hughes, of the A.S.C, who has been mentioned in Sir Douglas Haig’s recent despatch for meritorious service, was formerly district reporter for the Rugby Advertiser at Kineton. Capt Hughes enlisted immediately on the outbreak of War, and he is now acting as deputy-quartermaster at one of the Divisional Headquarter Staffs in France.

MILITARY MEDAL FOR NEW BILTON SOLDIER.

Corpl Alfred John Potter, King’s Royal Rifles, son of Mr A J Potter, 4 Victoria Avenue, New Bilton, has been awarded the Military Medal for distinguished conduct in the field. Corpl Potter, who was employed at Messrs Willans & Robinson, enlisted at the outbreak of War, and has been in France about 18 months.

THE MILITARY MEDAL.

Sergt Charles Elliott Atkins, third son of Mr and Mrs J W Atkins, of the Carlton Hotel, South Lowestoft, has been awarded the Military Medal. Prior to the War, Sergt Atkins was with the British Thomson-Houston Company at Rugby, and at the outbreak he joined the Signal Section of the Royal Engineers.

LIEUT B C RELTON AGAIN WOUNDED.

The friends of Dr and Mrs Relton will regret to learn that their son, Lieut R C Relton, of the Royal Warwicks, has again been seriously wounded. His regiment has been taking part in the heavy fighting now going on in the East, and a short time ago Lieut Relton was shot by a sniper, the bullet passing through the upper part of his thigh. He recovered from this, and was apparently soon in action again. Official information has now come to hand that on January 25th he received a gun-shot wound in the head, and was reported two days later to be dangerously ill.

RUGBY PRISONERS OF WAR HELP COMMITTEE

The monthly meeting of the Executive Committee of the Rugby Prisoners of War Help Fund was held on Saturday last, the Chairman (Mr William Flint, C.C) presiding.

The Hon Secretary (Mr J R Barker) reported that the subscriptions during January amounted to £66 6s 1d, and payments on account of food parcels amounted to £87 13s. Cheques were signed in pre-payment of the food parcels during February for the local men interned in German prison camps and forwarded to the Regimental Care Committees of each man’s unit, who will, in accordance with the new scheme, purchase the goods at wholesale prices, and pack and despatch same to the men in the name of the Rugby Prisoners of War Help Committee.

The parcels sent this week contained : 1lb Libby’s beef, 1lb salmon, 1lb biscuits, 1lb Quaker oats, 1lb dripping, largo tin potted meat, 1 bottle sauce, 1lb vegetables, 1 tin veal and ham.

Mr Barker has received from Pte F A Ward (Pailton), of the Oxford and Bucks L.I, the January number of the “ Rennbahn Church Times,” which is a record of camp spiritual work. It is excellently produced entirely by the prisoners in Rennbahn prison camp. There is one particularly interesting paragraph to the effect that one can easily locate the position of the church in Rennbahn camp. It stands just opposite the row of huts wholly given up for the censoring and distributing of parcels of comforts sent from their good friends at home. In the centre of the front page is an announcement as follows :- “ The ‘boys’ of Rennbahn sincerely thank their relatives and friends for all parcels of comforts sent to them during the past year.”

COVENTRY MUNITIONS TRIBUNAL.

Mr Carmichael presided on Friday last week, and the assessors present were Mrs Griffiths (women), Mr J Roberts (men), and Mr F W Smith (employers).

Miss S Hopkins, Hillmorton ; Miss O E Yapp, Rugby ; Mrs V Hopkins, Hillmorton ; and Mrs E Sutton, Rugby, were summoned for losing time.—Miss Hopkins wrote a letter complaining of   the cold in the shop.—The firm’s representative said they had 150 girls on shells, and they brought the cases because of the serious amount of time lost in this department. The firm had trained them in the work. The workers were divided into three shifts of 7½ hours each.—Fined 10s.—Miss Yapp wrote stating that she suffered from a strained arm, and had her eyes burnt by hot steel flying about.—The firm’s representative said the accident had not been reported.—The case was adjourned.—Mrs V Hopkins wrote to the Court explaining the cause of her absence.—She was fined 10s.—Mrs Sutton also did not appear, and it was said in her case she had been away a whole week.—Fined 10s.

A sitting of Coventry Munitions Tribunal took place at the Police Court on Monday, Mr E G M Carmichael presiding.

Mrs B Burt, Rugby, was summoned for losing time, and did not appear. She had been repeatedly warned about her time-keeping, the firm’s representative told the Court.—Fined 15s.

Miss O E Yapp, Rugby, was summoned on adjournment for breach of rules.—The case was adjourned to enquire into a statement she made in a letter at the first hearing about her eyes being burnt.—The firm’s representative said they had no record, and she could have had goggles for her eyes.—The Court imposed a fine of 12s 6d.

 

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16th Jan 1917. Rugby Officer gains the Military Cross

RUGBY OFFICER GAINS THE MILITARY CROSS.

Capt H H Neeves, of the Northumberland Fusiliers, elder son of Mr and Mrs S Neeves, “ Langdal,” Murray Road, Rugby, has been awarded the Military Cross for bravery in the fighting on the Somme during July last. Capt Neeves was at the same time promoted to his present rank. In the early days of the War the gallant young officer, who had been on the staff at Rugby Post Office, went out to the Dardanelles as a corporal in the Warwickshire Yeomanry, and took part in the landing at Suvla Bay. He was afterwards invalided home, suffering from the effects of dysentery ; and then, securing a commission, he was attached as a second lieutenant to the Northumberland Fusiliers, and went out to France in June. The gratification at his quick promotion and the honour he has won will be shared by his many friends and acquaintances in Rugby and district.

LOCAL CASUALTIES.

Sergt A E Dodd, Leicestershire Regiment, one of the earliest recruits from the B.T.H Works, is in hospital at Ipswich suffering from wounds. Sergt Dodd has been wounded three times—at Monchy, Guillemont, and Combles, The last time he received four different wounds at once, and has undergone 14 operations. Before the War he was employed in the B.T.H Wiring Department.

DR RELTON’S SON WOUNDED.

Dr and Mrs Relton, of Rugby, have received intimation that their son, Second-Lieut B C Relton, of the Warwickshire Regiment, has been wounded. Before the War he showed promise as a footballer, he having played half-back both for Rugby School and the Town Club. As a cricketer, too, he gained his colours in the School XI., and later on assisted the Rugby Club, being a very useful fast bowler.

BRETFORD.

DEATH OF PTE TIMMS.—Mr Wm Timms, of Bretford, has received the sad news that his brother has succumbed to wounds in Rouen Hospital. He was injured rather dangerously in France, but it was thought at one time he would recover. He belonged to the Middlesex Regiment. Before joining the Colours he was employed on the railway dining cars. Mr Timms has another brother in the 2nd Leinsters, who has been on foreign service for a long time. Much sympathy is felt for the relatives.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Lieut Wilfred H Parker, son of the Hon E W Parker, Westfeild House, Rugby, has been awarded the Military Cross for distinguished service in the field.

From “ London Gazette ” of Monday, January 1st :—Gordon Highlanders, Sec Lt F Hunter resigns his commission on account of ill-health contracted on active service.

Capt R N O’Connor, of the Scottish Rifles, son of Mrs O’Connor, Overslade Manor, Rugby, has been mentioned in despatches by Sir Douglas Haig. This is the third time Capt O’Connor, who has already gained the Military Cross, has been mentioned in despatches, and he has recently been gazetted Brevet-Major.

The parcels sent this week on behalf of the Rugby Prisoners of War Help Committee to the local men in prison camps in Germany contained: ½-lb sugar, ½-lb milk, 1 tin herrings, ½-lb dripping in tin, ½ lb biscuits, 1 tin oxo cubes, 2ozs tobacco, pepper, salt, mustard, ½-lb cooked ham in tin, ¼-lb tin of cocoa, 1 tin sausages.

COUNTY COUNCIL CLERK’S SON HONOURED.

In Tuesday’s honours list is the name of Second-Lieut (temp Lieut) Edward Hubert Field, R.F.A, who has been awarded the Military Cross. He is the son of Mr Edward Field, clerk of the Peace for Warwickshire and clerk to the County Council.

MENTIONED IN DESPATCHES.

In special lists connected with his recent descriptive despatches on the operations on the Somme, General Sir Douglas Haig mentions :

Temporary Lieutenant-Colonel H J Nutt, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, who commands a Coventry Territorial Battalion, and has been associated with the Territorial Force for many years.

Temporary Major A Welch, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, who has already been decorated for his services as a Volunteer officer. He is serving with a Territorial Battalion, and was promoted to the rank of Major in October, 1914.

NEW RED CROSS HOSPITAL OPENED AT RUGBY.

The new Red Cross Hospital at the Rugby Union Infirmary was opened on Monday, when thirty wounded soldiers arrived from the First Southern Hospital, Birmingham. There was no formal opening, but on Friday the hospital and staff were inspected by General Quayle Jones, the Countess of Denbigh, and Mr E K Little, County Director of the Warwickshire British Red Cross. General satisfaction was expressed at the admirable equipment, etc. Mrs Brooke Michell, Vice-President of the Rugby V.A.D, was also present at the inspection.

The building, which was built for an infirmary, is a very commodious one, and admirably adapted for its present uses. It has accommodation for sixty men. There are three large wards, each capable of containing 18 beds, and two smaller ones. There is a surgical room, but not an operating theatre, and minor operations are performed in the wards. There is also a spacious day and recreation room. The staff is provided by Warwick 40 and Warwick 66 V.A.D, and the principals are :—Mrs H P Burdekin, commandant ; Miss M Townsend, assistant commandant ; Mrs C O Wharton, quartermaster ; Miss Townsend, assistant quartermaster. Mrs Thomas, who has worked at Te Hira for the past twelve months, is the matron, and the trained sister is Sister Gordon. Dr Crooks and Dr Wardrop comprise the medical staff.

The hospital staff is receiving instructions in fire drill, in order that they may be prepared for any eventuality. Visitors desirous of visiting the Hospital will be welcomed on Wednesday afternoons.

CHANGED TIMES.

Some of the many social changes which have been foreshadowed during the last few weeks came into operation with the New Year. The most noticeable changes were those affecting railway travel. Monday was the first day of the new order resulting in fewer and slower trains and a general increase of 50 per cent, in fares. The baking of standard bread also became general in accordance with the new Order. A separate Food Production Department has been set up at the Board of Agriculture to organise schemes for increasing the home-grown food supplies. It is understood rather under 10,000 German prisoners are available for work on the land. There is still too much evasion of the drink control regulations in some quarters, and the need of more stringent penalties for offences is under discussion. An Order was issued on Tuesday making it illegal to sell spirits unless reduced to 30 per cent. under proof, and a further reduction to 50 per cent. under proof is permissible.

DISTRICT APPEALS TRIBUNAL.

Held on Friday (Dec 29) at St Mary’s Hall, Coventry. Present : Messrs M K Pridmore (chairman), H W Wale, S J Dicksee, and K Rotherham. Military representative : Mr M E T Wratislaw. Agricultural representative : Mr F W Channing.

WELCOME TO RUGBY REPRESENTATIVE.

Before taking the Rugby cases the Chairman welcomed Mr Dicksee on behalf of the Tribunal. He said they felt from the first they were very much handicapped with the Rugby cases because they had no Rugby representative. It was not the fault of the Tribunal, because they strove very hard to get a Rugby representative, but could not find anybody to act ; but when the numbers were extended they asked for one, and were very pleased to have Mr Dicksee with them.—Mr Harold Eaden also offered a welcome to Mr Dicksee, and said he was sure his assistance would be of value to the Tribunal.

ALLEGED “ NOTORIOUS POACHER ” AS A SUBSTITUTE.

The substitute offered by the Military to John Smith Cockerill, Pailton, for his son, Thos John Cockerill (20, single), was described by Mr Harold Eaden, representing the farmer in question, as “ a notorious poacher in the district.” He added that on the first two days the man was ill, and when he presented himself on the third day and was called upon to do the ordinary work, for which he was there—that of a cowman and stockman—he could not milk a cow and understood nothing about stock. Mr Cockerill tolerated him for two days, but at the end of the fourth day gave him his week’s money. The Military seemed to have offered a substitute without satisfying themselves that he could do the work- They must send a man who could do the work, and not a man whose principal qualification was poaching.

Mr Wratislaw contradicted the statement that the substitution officer did not satisfy himself as to the man he was sending. Mr Livingston (who had tried the substitute) said he was a most capable man and a very willing worker. Mr John Harrison, of Pailton, described him, as “ a capable farm labourer and willing worker,” adding : “ I have employed him several times, and have always been satisfied with him ” ; whilst Mr Davy, who had also had the man in his employ, said if he had a man of Military age for whom he required a substitute he was exactly the man he would wish for. The man said he did some thatching and milked, and worked out the full week ; and, in the opinion of the local Tribunal, until young Cockerill was taken away his father was not going to have a substitute.

Mr Eadon replied that Mr Cockerill was quite willing to let his son go if a reasonable substitute could be found.-The Chairman : This man does seem to be reasonable.—Mr Cockerill said it took the man half-an-hour to milk a cow, and he sat down on the wrong of the animal to milk her (laughter). He said he had never milked a cow in his life.

Mr Wale said he did not see any reason why an advocate should come into that Court and suggest that a substitute, whatever his previous character had been, was a poacher. He objected to that.—Mr Eaden said the man might be a very good labourer, but he was useless to Mr Cockerill, particularly in the winter.

The Chairman said in a case like this the man ought not to have been dismissed ; the employer should have first communicated with the Military.

Mr Eaden : If the man was no good the Military could not make him any good.—The Chairman : You know the whole point is : These men have got their sons, and do not want to part with them. They will take no substitute if they can help it.

The appeal was dismissed, and Mr Eaden said his client would try and find a substitute independently of the Military Authorities.

Mr Eadon asked for his client to be allowed 28 days, but Mr Wratislaw objected, and it was not granted.

“ CREATING SLAVERY.”

Chas Oakes, Kirby Lane Farm, Monks Kirby, appealed for Edwin Lowe, cowman and farm labourer, Monks Kirby.—Mr Wratislaw stated that conditional exemption was granted to Lowe whilst in the employ of Mr S Hodgetts, but the man left that employ, and the Monks Kirby Tribunal upheld the view that Mr Oakes could not possibly appeal for him.—Mr Wale : certainly he could. He claims as the employer. It does not mean that a man is to be bound for ever to that particular employer. You are creating slavery.—The Chairman said the Tribunal had to decide that the was in order ; and then, according to the new Army Regulations, adjourn the case sine die.—This course was adopted.—The Chairman (to Mr Wratislaw) : You had better pass on the poacher.—Mr Eaden : We do not want him again.

The appeals for John Bryson, stockman and shepherd, Manor Farm, The Grange, Wolston, and Geo Wilson, wagoner. Gate Farm, Bourton, were also adjourned sine die.

APPLICATION FOR LEAVE REFUSED.

Mr Worthington represented Ernest Jinks, grocer, clothier, and beer retailer, 104 Cambridge Street, Rugby, who asked for leave to appeal for an extension of the temporary exemption, to January 1st.-The appeal had been made on the ground of domestic hardship ; and Mr Worthington said the man had four young children.—The Chairman said they knew the position very well. They could not make a practice of granting leave to appeal, or they would have everybody coming back and asking for leave. There must be further facts.-The application was refused.—Appellant : Give me time to clear my stuff off ?—The Chairman : No ; there is no more.

SUBSTITUTION EFFECTED.

With respect to the appeal for Francis John Bucknill farmer and wagoner, Marton, Mr Wratislaw said they had effected a substitute, and Mr Bucknill, sen, expressed himself as satisfied, it transpired that a man from Broadwell, who had been passed in a low category was the substitute, and Mr Bucknill said his son was going into the Army on the following Monday.—The Chairman : I think you ought to be congratulated on the course you have taken.

WHEELWRIGHTS WANTED IN THE ARMY.

The case of John George Bennett, wheelwright, &c, 7 Gladstone Street, New Bilton, in the employ of Mr F Sharpe, of Rugby, had been adjourned for enquiries to be made to see if the man could still be enlisted in his trade, and Mr Wratislaw said their information was that the Royal Engineers were appealing for wheelwrights.-The employer’s appeal was, therefore, dismissed.

STILL HANDLING SUGAR.

The Home and Colonial Stores, Ltd, appealed for their Rugby manager, Alfred Wm Elsley, 70 King Edward Road, paused for garrison duty abroad.—Mr Wratislaw said the man was not in a certified occupation, because he was not a manager in the strict sense of the word. Whatever he required for the shop was supplied from the head office.—Mr Sharman, who represented the firm, said that point had been decided in their favour by the Central Tribunal.—Mr Wratislaw : You do not handle big sides of bacon, do you ?—Mr Sharman : We have 2½ cwts of sugar to handle.—The Chairman :   You are very lucky.—Given till May 1st.

ANXIOUS TO DO WAR WORK.

An appeal as a skilled man who wished to be placed on war work was made by Wm Thos Scrawley (28, married), general fitter, 15 James Street, Rugby.—The appeal was at first dismissed, the Chairman remarking that the man would be very useful in the Army ; but appellant then produced documentary evidence that he was badged ; and the Chairman remarked that the Military could not touch him ; and Mr Wale advised applicant, in his own interests, to get into a controlled establishment.

BUILDER’S APPEAL FOR AN ELECTRICIAN.

Messrs Linnell & Son, builders, Rugby, appealed (through Mr Worthington) for Horace Walter Gilbert, electrician, 56 New Street, New Bilton.—It was pointed out that this was the only man left in the electrical, department, and his going would mean closing the department, which had taken seven years to build up, and this would be a most serious financial loss to the firm.-Mr Wratislaw said Mr Linnell, jun. had gone into the Army ; and in the circumstances Col Johnstone suggested that Gilbert might remain till March 31st.—This course was approved.

ANOTHER CASE FOR SUBSTITUTION.

The Military appealed against the exemption that had been granted to George Mascord White (22, single), shoeing and general smith, Dunchurch, in the employ of his father.—Mr Wratislaw said they offered as a substitute a man named Loydall, of Long Lawford.—The Chairman informed Mr White, sen, that he could not keep a young man of 22, passed for general service, and told him he had better “ collar on ” to the substitute, and consider himself lucky.—Mr White said he was afraid the substitute named would not suit him, and asked for a month or two to try him, as he had very valuable horses to shoe.—The Chairman said they could not keep a young man of 22 back to shoe valuable horses, and the Military appeal was upheld.

QUITE OPPORTUNE.

“ All the pipes in the parish are burst,” said Mr Eaden, adding that it was an opportune moment for the appeal of Wm Walter Heap, (37, married), builder, plumber, and undertaker, Dunchurch.-The Tribunal offered till March 1st.-Mr Eaden said he should want to ask for further time. Mr Wale : You must pray for the frost to continue.-March 1st.

“ WOULD SOONER PUT KHAKI ON ”

Edwin Edwards, carter, &c, appealed for his son, Wm Edwards (24, married, and passed for general service), 56 Railway Terrace, Rugby, engaged in the delivery of parcels and helping in the business.-Mr Eaden said a substitute was offered, but when he looked at the job he admitted he was not strong enough for it.—Mr Wratislaw said the substitute refused the job because the wages offered were only 25s a week.-Mr Edwards : He said he would sooner put khaki on.—Mr Wale : I should say so. He would be better off.-The Chairman said it could not be suggested that the work was of high national importance.-Appeal dismissed.

A POSITION OF A FOREMAN BAKER.

An appeal by the Military was made with respect to George Brown (37, single), foreman baker, 32 James Street, Rugby, on the ground that, although the man was in a certified occupation, he spent only six hours a day in bread baking, and the other part in confectionery.—The employer said he used five sacks of flour a week for broad, and he was also under a contract to supply cake to the Military.—March 1st.

A CURIOUS CASE.

There were unusual circumstances connected with the case of John Frederick Woodford, slaughterman and butcher, 82 Craven Road, Rugby.—Mr Wratislaw said the Master Butchers met the Advisory Committee extremely fairly, and until they could substitute Woodford they thought he ought to stay ; but the moment they got a substitute the master butcher employing the man offered to release him for general service. They found a substitute, but when the case came before the Rugby Tribunal, who had given a certificate of exemption, they promptly refused to go into the matter, and said they would not interfere with their previous decision.—Mr Nelson (clerk to the Tribunal) said he had a letter from Mr Smith, the man’s employer, stating that he was quite prepared to assent to the question raised by the Military.—Appeal allowed.

INNKEEPER TO JOIN UP.

An application by Ernest Shepherd (38, married), Clifton Inn, Rugby, for a munitions order to enable him to keep his business together was opposed by Mr Wratislaw, who contended that the father, aged 75, who previously held the license, was quite capable of supervision.—Mr Worthington represented appellant, who was given till January 28th.

HORSE TRAINING FOR 23/- A WEEK.

John E Wilkins, horse trainer, Bretford, appealed for Arthur Edwin Taylor (28, married), assistant horse trainer and farm hand, stating that it was necessary in his business to have a young man used to the work, as a good many of the horses sent to be trained were spoilt, and of bad character.—Mr Wratislaw : It is rather a dangerous job.—A : Yes.—Mr Wratislaw : And for that risk and skill you only pay 23s a week, without a cottage ?—Mr Wilkins replied that he paid more than most of the farmers in the neighbourhood, and the man had a garden in which to grow potatoes and other vegetables. He would give him more wages if he stayed. Mr Wale : I do not think 23s a week constitutes indispensability.-Mr Wratislaw : Do you consider for a man to whom you pay that wage it is in the national interest he should be retained ?-Mr Wilkins : I am paying a good deal more than my father used to pay.—Mr Wratislaw : We say it is not in the national interest the man should be retained.—Applicant : Is is not in the national interest that horses should be trained ? Could not you find me a substitute ?—The Chairman : Not at 23s a week. They are not to be had.—Applicant : What wages do you think I ought to pay ?—The Chairman : That is for yourself to decide.-Appeal dismissed.

BIRDINGBURY SMALLHOLDER ALLOWED TIME.

A long letter was put in by Chas Barfoot (33, married), joint smallholder and carrier, Birdingbury, in support of his application.—He was given till March 31st, with the hint that he had better be ready to join up by then.

HELPING A NEIGHBOUR.

On the understanding that he helped a neighbouring farmer, who last week met with an accident, breaking his leg on the ice, Sidney Strong, farmer and wharf manager, Royal Oak Inn, Hillmorton Wharf, was given a temporary exemption till March 31st.

DEATHS.

DONALD.—On December 31, 1916, at Aldershot, of pneumonia, Bombardier CHAS. DONALD, the beloved husband of Alice Donald, 16 Wood Street ; aged 38.—“ Peace, perfect peace.”

3rd Apr 1915. Departure of Territorials

DEPARTURE OF TERRITORIALS.

The South Midland Division, which comprises the Birmingham and Warwickshire Territorials, left Essex, where they have been located some time, for foreign service last week-end.

Letters to hand state that the Battalion is already close up to the firing line.

THE HOWITZERS.

The Howitzer Brigade was moved from its quarters at Great Baddow for foreign service.

RECRUITING AT RUGBY.

The following have been recruited this week at the Rugby Drill Hall :-Royal Berks Regiment, C Noon ; Hants Regiment, J E Hunt ; Coldstream Guards, W Jaques ; Royal Engineers, A E Goldfinch ; A.S.C, T Winterburn and W Baines.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Mr H W Pratt, of Newton Manor, has enlisted in the Sportsmen’s Battalion, Royal Fusiliers, as a private.

Mr B R Relton, son of Dr B Relton, of Rugby, has just returned from the trenches in France on a short leave, and he has, we understand, received a commission as second-lieutenant.

“ The Astoroid,” the official journal of the B.T.H Club, issued this week, tells us that the total number of B.T.H employees who have joined the colours up to the present time is 1,085.

Pte W Gardner, of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment, a reservist, previous to being called up at the commencement of the war was employed by Mr W Lowe, New Bilton Post Office, has been wounded in the hand. The wound had now healed, and he is in a convalescent home at Milton Hill, Berks, but it is believed that he has lost the use of his hand.

Mrs Underwood, of Long Lawford, has received news from the front that her son, Private W Underwood, B Company, 1st Royal Warwick Regiment, has been killed in action. Pte Underwood was stationed in India for eight years, and returned to England two years ago. He was resting in his dug-out when a shell burst, and wounded him. While his comrades were assisting to remove him to a place of safety, he was struck by another shell, the wound this time proving fatal. In a letter to Mrs Underwood, the Captain of the Company, after detailing the facts and expressing the sympathy of deceased’s comrades, says he had known Pte Underwood for four years, and he would be particularly missed by the machine-gun section, as he was one of their best men. He was 30 years of age, and had been in the Army nearly 12 years.

RUGBY VOLUNTEERS TRAINING CORPS.

There will be no drill on Saturday, April 3rd. Platoon drills will be as usual next week.

The rifle range will be closed on Friday, Saturday, and Monday next ; but will be open, as usual, on and after Tuesday, April 6th.

RUGBY CHAMBER OF TRADE.

The usual monthly meeting of the members was held on Monday last, at the Court Room, Town Hall, Rugby, Mr J R Barker (chairman of the Chamber) presiding over a fair attendance of members.

The Secretary read a letter received from Major Nickalls, officer commanding 1st Company 5th Warwickshire R.F.A Battery(Howitzer), acknowledging the receipt of 48 pairs of pants for the use of the men of the Battery.

FALSE ALARM.

Not a little consternation was occasioned in the town on Tuesday evening by the ringing of the big bell of the School Chapel, which, it was announced, was to be sounded in conjunction with the B.T.H blower in the event of threatened Zeppelin raid. The occasion was, however, a service in the School Chapel; but this not being common knowledge, the authorities were inundated with enquiries as to the cause. Services were held on other evenings in the week, but in the circumstances the bell was not rung.