2nd Mar 1918. Food must not be Wasted

FOOD MUST NOT BE WASTED.
NEW ORDER IN FORCE.

Under the Waste of Foodstuffs Order, 1918, which came into force on Monday, it is an offence for a person to waste any foodstuffs or permit it to be wasted.

The definition of waste is given as follows :—

(a) Whenever the foodstuff, being fit for use in human food, is wilfully or negligently damaged or is thrown away ; or

(b) Whenever any person having the control or custody of the foodstuffs omits to take any precaution which ought reasonably to be taken for its preservation ; or

(c) Whenever a person procures for any purpose a greater quantity of foodstuff than is reasonably required for such purpose, and any part of such foodstuff becomes unfit for human food ; or

(d) Whenever any person having the disposal of the foodstuff unreasonably retains the same undisposed of until the same becomes unfit for human food.

An exception is made in the case of trade waste not arising from want of due care, where the trader has been ready to sell foodstuff at reasonable prices, and could not reasonably have made it available for human food otherwise than by way of sale.

Any person authorised in writing by the Food Controller may enter premises where he has reason to believe that foodstuff is being wasted and may take samples.

RUGBY URBAN DISTRICT.
RUGBY & CRICK RURAL DISTRICT.
FOOD DISTRIBUTION SCHEME.

The Food Distribution Scheme now being set on foot in the above Districts will come into force on MONDAY, 25th MARCH NEXT.

The Foodstuffs to be first rationed will be Butter, Margarine, Tea. and Meat.

Ration Cards will be issued, one for Butter, Margarine, and Tea, and one for Meat.

Forms of application are now being delivered through the Post Office to every house in the district, and it is hoped that the delivery of these will be completed this week. The following is a table of dates which everyone must keep carefully in mind, as it is essential to the smooth working of the Scheme that the dates shall be strictly adhered to:—

WEDNESDAY, 6th MARCH.— Last day for receiving Shopkeepers’ Applications for Registration as Retailers.

SATURDAY, 9th MARCH.— Last day for receiving applications from the Public for Food Cards.

Do.     Do.            Last day for receiving applications from Caterers and Institutions for Authorities to obtain supplies.

THURSDAY, 14th MARCH.— Last day for Public to lodge their Food Cards with their chosen Retailers.

FRIDAY, 15th MARCH.— Last day for Caterers and Institutions to lodge their Authorities with Retailers.

SATURDAY, 16th MARCH.— Last day for receiving Retailers’ Returns of Individual Cards and Caterers and Institutions Authorities lodged with them.

MONDAY, 25th MARCH.— RATIONING SCHEME COMES INTO FORCE.

An Enquiry Office for the Rationing Section has been opened at Benn Buildings, Rugby,

where all information may be obtained.

F. M. BURTON, FREDK. FELLOWS. ) Executive Officers.
Food Office, Rugby, 28th February, 1918.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

In the “ London Gazette ” of February 18th the following appeared :—
Awarded bar to Military Cross, Capt Thomas Ainsworth Townsend, M.C, R.A.M.C ; M.C gazetted 25th November, 1916.

Capt Townsend (son of Mr T S Townsend, of Clifton Manor) has been serving in France since 1915. He is regimental surgeon to the 20th London Regiment.

SOLDIER’S WEDDING.—On Saturday a very pretty wedding took place at St. Peter’s Church between Sergt C A Carter, R.F.A, nephew of Mr & Mrs G East, Daventry Road, Dunchurch, and Miss Allen, of Grosvenor Road, Rugby. The Rev — Perry officiated,and the bride was given away by her father. Her two sisters were bridesmaids, and her youngest brother was best man. The guests numbered between 30 and 40, and there were many handsome presents. Sergt Carter has been in the Army nine years, and has been in the fighting ever since the War began. He wears the bronze star. He goes to back to the front again to-day (Saturday), and leaves Dunchurch with the best wishes of the parishioners.

There are now

72 RUGBY & DISTRICT PRISONERS OF WAR IN GERMANY.

Six Standard Food Parcels, of an average gross weight of 10lbs, each parcel are sent to every man in the course of every four weeks, in addition to 26 lbs. of Bread.

The cost to provide for the 72 local men is now

£216 : 0 : 0 EVERY CALENDAR MONTH.

Are you helping to provide for our own Men ?

The poor boys count on the parcels, not merely as a means of keeping body and soul together, but as the break in the monotony of their prison life, which saves them from unutterable despair.

Proofs of this are abundant in the assurances of exchanged prisoners that the parcels stood between them and starvation, and they speak not only for themselves but for their comrades who are still in captivity.

DONATIONS or promises of regular or Monthly subscriptions, which will be gladly acknowledged, should be sent to

Mr. J. REGINALD BARKER,

Hon. Organising Secretary,

RUGBY PRISONERS OF WAR HELP COMMITTEE,

9, REGENT STREET, RUGBY (Registered War Charity).

URBAN DISTRICT COUNCIL OF RUGBY.
To the Editor of the Advertiser.
ROLL OF HONOUR.

DEAR SIR,—At the last meeting of the Urban District Council a was expressed that a Roll of Honour to the memory of those men of Rugby who have, during the present terrible war, made the great sacrifice in their countries cause, should be compiled. The Council are very anxious and desirous of carrying out this object, but to enable them to do so it is necessary to prepare a list of all the men so far as can be ascertained. May I appeal through your columns to the relatives of all our Rugby men who have given up their lives in the noble cause, to send their full names, together with their rank and the Navel or Military unit to which they belonged, to me, so that the Council may be in possession without delay of as accurate a list of Rugbians as is possible.—Yours faithfully,

ARTHUR MORSON, Clerk of the Council.

DEATHS.

CHEDGEY.—On February 23rd, ROBERT EDWIN CHEDGEY, officer’s steward, H.M. Destroyer “ Norman,” lost overboard and drowned at sea ; third son of Mr. & Mrs. Chedgey, Bitteswell, Lutterworth ; aged 23 years.

IN MEMORIAM.

HEWITT.—In loving memory of ELLIS JOHN (JACK), youngest son of Mr. & Mrs. Hewitt, 42 Dunchurch Road, Rugby, who was killed in action on February 27, 1917.—Not forgotten by his loving Mother, Dad, and Brother.

PRATT.—In loving memory of our dear son, Pte. F. PRATT, of the 6th Oxford and Bucks L.I., (New Bilton), who died of wounds on March 1, 1917, in France.—Still sadly missed by his loving Father and Mother, Sisters and Brothers.

 

 

 

 

Advertisements

7th Apr 1917. Death of Lieut G Redmayne

DEATH OF LIEUT G REDMAYNE.

Sincere regret was felt in the Rugby district last week-end when news was received of the death from pneumonia at Windermere of Lieut G Redmayne, who for about two years had been serving in France as a gunner with the Rugby Howitzer Battery. He won the Military Medal, and had been granted a Commission, and it was whilst on leave in England as a result of this promotion that he contracted the serious illness which resulted in his death.

For several years Mr Redmayne lived at Dunchurch, where he was a pupil to Mr C G Bolam, late agent to the Duke of Buccleuch, and during that time he assisted Rugby F.C as a three-quarter back, doing valuable service with the 1st XV. Afterwards he took up Association Football. He was very popular in the district, and sincere regret is felt at the untimely end of so gallant and promising a soldier.

Mr Redmayne was the mainstay of the Dunchurch Cricket Club and a good runner, and while at Dunchurch always took part in the cross-country run on Good Friday. Apart from his athletic prowess, he was generous and kind-hearted, and will be much missed by Dunchurch people. He was a keen supporter of the Working Men’s Club, the members of which have sent a letter of condolence to Mr and Mr Redmayne, and also a handsome wreath. A memorial service was held in the Parish Church on Wednesday evening. Special hymns and Psalms were sung, and an appropriate address was delivered by the Rev B B Carter. Mr E R Gilling, the organist, played “ Prelude in C Minor ” (Chopin), “ O rest in the Lord ” (Mendelssohn), and “ Dead March ” from “ Saul ” (Handel). A large number of parishioners attended.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Recent casualties announced include :- Wounded : W J Edwards (Stockingford), Royal Fusiliers ; A Taylor (Rugby), Royal Welsh Fusiliers ; A Lee (rugby), King’s Royal Rifle Corps.

Mr William George Thompson, son of Mr Edward Thompson, East Haddon, had just been gazetted as First Lieutenant in the 2nd 20th London Regiment.

Harry Judd, only surviving son of Mr H Judd, Winfield Street, has passed his examinations as Fourth-class artificer in the Royal Navy, and goes to Portsmouth in a few days. Until recently he had been working in the drawing offices at the B.T.H Works.

Last month’s casualties to “ old boys ” of St. Matthew’s School include Pte E J Hewitt, Warwickshire Regiment, and Pte A K Reeve, Berkshire Regiment, whose deaths have been notified in previous issues of the Advertiser. Pte A P Prowse, Northamptonshire Regiment, a member of the School staff, has recently been severely wounded, having lost his left arm and received a number of shrapnel wounds, in addition to shell shock. He has been removed to England, and hopes are entertained of his recovery. Pte Prowse attested in the early days of the Derby scheme, was called up last June, and went to the front in September.

MARRIAGES

BUSH-BOURNE.-On March 29th, at St. Stephen’s Church, Westbourne Park, by the Vicar, the Rev. Shepley Smith, PAUL FRANCIS WHELER BUSH, Lieut., R.F.C., eldest son of Robert Evans Wheler Bush, of Oakfield, Rugby, and Mrs. Bush, of 21 Abbey Court, Abbey Road, to KATHLEEN, youngest daughter of the late Wykeham Bourne and Mrs. Bourne, of 53 Oxford Gardens, W.

DEATHS.

KINGHAM.—On March 1st (killed in action), Pte. CHARLES H. KINGHAM, M.G.S., 54th Battalion, Canadians (brother of Mrs. James Cave, 3 Charlotte Street, Rugby) ; aged 32.—In loving memory.

LANGHAM.—On March 23rd, Pte. HAROLD ALFRED, Churchover, (died of wounds, in France); aged 18 years and 9 months.

SALISBURY.-In loving memory of WILFRID JOHN SALISBURY, youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. Salisbury, 65 Manor Road, who was killed on active service (mine sweeping), March 25th, 1917.
“ Our hearts are broken,
But wait a little while,
And we shall pass the golden gates
And clasp thy loving hand.”
—From Father and Mother, Sisters and Brothers.

IN MEMORIAM.

PRESTIDGE.-In loving memory of our dear son and brother, JOSEPH PRESTIDGE, Barby, aged 21 years. Killed in action in France, April 11, 1915.
“ He sleeps, not in his native land,
But under foreign skies;
Far from those who loved him best,
But in a hero’s grave he lies.”

31st Mar 1917. Local War Notes

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Mr F W Young, Hillmorton Road, Rugby, who joined the Army Veterinary Corps six months ago, had been given a commission, and has been posted to a second-lieutenancy in a Regimental (Devon) Labour Unit.

L-Corpl E G Hastings, of the Mechanical Transport Section, who died of pneumonia in France on March 4th, was a brother of Mr H C Hastings, Chief Rheostat Engineer at the B.T.H, and was himself employed in the A.C Engineers Dept. A native of London and educated at Finsbury Technical College, L-Corpl Hastings was employed for about three years in the Test Dept, and for a similar period in the A.C Engineers. He joined the army in August, 1915.

This week’s casualties include the following :- Acting Lance-Sergt L V Locke (Rugby), and E J Hewitt (Rugby), Royal Warwickshire Regt.

Mr and Mrs Salibury, of Manor Road, Rugby, received news of their son Wilfrid’s death at sea last week-end. Wilfrid Salisbury was a wireless operator, and he was engaged on a trawler sweeping up a mine field when the vessel struck a mine. All the crew were lost. He was one of the most promising youths of the Baptist Church, and he was much liked by all who knew him.

MARRIAGES.

LEWIS-PACKWOOD.-On March 20th, at Market Drayton, GEOFFREY, 2nd Lieut., R.F.C., second son of Mr. and Mrs. Lewis, Merthyr Tydvil, to CICELEY EDITH, fifth daughter of Mr. and Mrs. C.J. Packwood, Rugby.

DEATHS.

CHEDGEY.-On March 2nd, PERCY JAMES CHEDGEY, Sergt., Queen Victoria’s Rifles (9th London Regiment), second son of Mr. and Mrs. W. Chedgey, of Bitteswell, Lutterworth. Killed in action in France. Aged 24.

Hewitt, Ellis John. Died 27th Feb 1917

Ellis John Hewitt was born in New Bilton, Rugby in September 1890 and baptised on 13 July 1890 at Bilton parish church.

In 1911 census he was a single general labourer living at 42 Dunchurch Road, Rugby. His father was Thomas, a blacksmith from Long Lawford and his mother Jane (nee Taylor), was born in Hillmorton. His brother Charles Edward was a railway clerk.

Ellis joined 14th Bt Royal Warwicks on 13 May 1915, Private 2772. He landed in Boulogne on 21 November 1915   and transferred to 13 Brigade 5 div on 28th December 1915.

In March 1916 5th Division took over a section of front line between St Laurent Blangy and the southern edge of Vimy Ridge, near Arras. They moved south in July to reinforce The Somme and were in action at, High Wood, The Battle of Guillemont, The Battle of Flers-Courcelette, The Battle of Morval and The Battle of Le Transloy. In October they moved to Festubert.

It was there that Ellis John Hewitt died on 27th February. He was buried at Browns Road Military Cemetery Festubert plot 111 .A.1.

His mother paid for the words “Love from Mother and Dad” to be engraved on the headstone.

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

 

2nd Oct 1915. Rugby Soldier’s life saved by a Cigarette Case

RUGBY SOLDIER’S LIFE SAVED BY A CIGARETTE CASE.

In the recent British advance, L-Corpl A Lewis (son of P.C Lewis, Rugby), had a narrow escape from death, his life being saved by a cigarette case. The plucky young fellow, who is at present in a hospital at Tunbridge, has written to his parents stating that he is wounded in the muscle of the left arm, and but for a cigarette-case, which deflected the bullet, he would have been shot through the heart. He states that his battalion lost rather heavily, and adds that it was terrible to hear the rapid firing of the artillery, which lasted for half-an-hour, and nothing could be heard but the hissing and banging of shells. This is the second time he has been wounded. Another son of P.C Lewis, Pte F Lewis, has been at the front since the commencement of the war, and has been wounded twice, and gassed slightly. He has now been transferred to the Cycle Corps.

WOUNDED BY SHRAPNEL.

News has been received that Pte George Victor Hewitt, of the Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, whose home is at 58 Abbey Street, Rugby, has been wounded. He is in a base hospital, and in a letter recently sent to his parents states that he has been wounded in the head by a piece of shrapnel, but not seriously. He was out with a working party in front of the lines, when (as he puts it) they “ had a good reception,” five out of the party of ten being hit.

A brother of the wounded soldier, Ernest Hewitt, has also joined H.M Army, enlisting at Newcastle ; and being a good shot, he was not long before he was sent to the front. He formerly worked at the B.T.H, and has sent home a number of interesting letters.

PTE TOWERS, OF HARBOROUGH FIELDS, KILLED

On Monday evening Mr Thomas Towers, farmer, of Harborough Fields Farm, Churchover, received a telegram from the Record Office, Warwick, stating that his elder son, Pte Martin Victor Towers, had been dangerously wounded in the brain by a bullet, and that he was lying unconscious in the 3rd Canadian Hospital, Carmiers Etaples. Early the next morning a wire, announcing his death, was received. Pte Towers, who was 19 years of age, enlisted on August 28th, 1914, and had been at the front about four months. Before enlisting he assisted his father on the farm.

RUGBY BUILDER’S APPRENTICE REPORTED KILLED.

There is reason to fear that Pte Tom Shone, who was apprenticed to the carpentry at Messrs Foster & Dicksee’s, and enlisted in Kitchener’s Army in September last year, was killed in the general advance at Loos. The death has not been officially reported, but Bob Salmon, of the same regiment, in a letter to his father, Mr George Salmon, of 45 Lower Hillmorton Road, also a carpenter at Messrs Foster & Dicksee’s, mentions the occurrence, the belief being that he was killed by shell fire in the German lines. Bob Salmon states that they were in the charge, and took four of the enemy’s lines. Reference is made in the letter to casualties amongst other Rugby chums—Bert Snutch and Tom Reeve-but the writer says that Abbott, Butler, and himself came through all right, and that Keyte was not in the charge, but left behind. The last he saw of Tom Shone was two minutes before the attack, when he had just been made the captain’s orderly. “ We were afterwards told by one of the officers that the work we did in attaining the objective was excellent.” He adds: “ I was jolly thankful to get out of the trenches that night.”

ANOTHER EMPLOYEE OF MESSRS. FROST & SONS KILLED.

News has been received that Rifleman E Negus, of the 12th Battalion Rifle Brigade, who at the time he enlisted in September last year was a machine-minder in the employ of Messrs Frost & Sons, has been killed in action. He went out to France in July and, as will be seen by the following letter from the machine-gun officer to his father, he lost his life on September 21st, through the bursting of a shell near him :—

“ Dear Mr Negus,-I am sorry to inform you that your son was killed in action this afternoon. A shell burst quite near him and killed him instantaneously. He could not have known anything about it, and of that I am glad. Your son is a great loss to his friends and to myself, I could not wish for a more cheery lad or a more willing worker. His place in his gun team will be hard to fill. Please accept my deepest sympathy in your sorrow. He will be buried tomorrow morning at 10 a.m, quite near the firing-line.—Yours sincerely, R C S STEVENSON, machine-gun officer.

“ September 21st.”

When he joined the army deceased had only been in Messrs Frost & Sons’ employ about three months, but he was very much liked by his fellow-workmen, and had qualities that made him deservedly popular. His father’s home is in Tottenham, London.

FRANKTON.

PRIVATE HERBERT HOLLIS, eldest son of Mr Amos Hollis, of Frankton, late of Harbury, who enlisted on September 7th, 1914, in the 9th Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment, was killed in action oa August 10th last at the Dardanelles.

BRAUNSTON.

PTE CLIFFORD HAYNES, 1st Batt Northants Regiment, of this village, who was seriously wounded in the retreat from Moms, was again sent out to the front in March, being then convalescent. He was again seriously wounded with fire pieces of shrapnel in July. Having barely recovered from his wounds, he has been home for a few days’ furlough, before going out to the Dardanelles. What do the shirkers say to this ?

CORPL JACK FORTNAM, Warwickshire Yeomanry, who was seriously wounded in the left arm while engaged in the charge of yeomanry on Hill 70, Gallipoli new landing, is progressing slowly but favourably at Netley Hospital.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Mr Isham, of Churchover, has received a field card from his son. Rifleman W Isham, of the Rifle Brigade, stating that he has been wounded and is in hospital.

In a letter to his old Schoolmaster, Pte Wm Padley, R.A.M.C, an old Murrayian, states that he as now on duty at a large hospital at Ras-el-Tin, Alexandria, and for six weeks he was engaged on a hospital ship, fetching sick and wounded from the Dardanelles.

The friends of Corpl Frank Davis of 38A Bridget Street, Rugby, have received intimation that he was wounded with shrapnel in the charge, and is now in hospital in England. He Worked at the B.T.H before his enlistment in September last year, and went out with his regiment in May.

CASUALTIES TO WARWICKSHIRE MEN.

The following further casualties in the Warwickshire Yeomanry at the Dardanalles are reported :-

KILLED.-Pte W Hartley, Pte A Allbright, Pte W J Beech.

DIED OF WOUNDS.-Corpl Whittall, Sergt E J Cox, and Pte D E Powell.

WOUNDED.—Lce-Corpl Barnard, Pte G Curran (not missing as previously reported), Pte F H Gould, Pte J Boven.

The Warwickshire Yeomanry is evidently a very popular branch of the service. The first line is doing splendid service in the Dardanelles, and has been strengthened by drafts from the second line, which is still in this country. The third, line is attracting very large numbers of recruits of a very fine type, and has also sent a hundred to fill up the ranks of the second line, caused by over a hundred being sent to take part in the Mediterranean Expeditionary Force. The county has, in fact, great reason to be proud of its Yeomanry regiment.

THE SEVENTH WARWICKS.

One of the “ Pals,” writing to us from the Front, says “ A Leamington Sergeant who has just returned from leave assures me that several Leamingtonians could not credit the fact that the 1/7th Warwicks had ever held front-line trenches. He was asked ‘ What Regulars did you have in front of you ?’ I should like to assure you that the 1/7th R.W.R have been holding front-line trenches on and off ever since the first fortnight after we came abroad. The value of Territorials as reliable troop for trench warfare was at one time doubted, but this doubt was quickly removed, and I think you will agree with me when I say that the Territorial Force has ‘made good.’”

7TH WARWICKSHIRE MEN WOUNDED.

The following members of the 7th Warwickshire Territorial Battalion are reported wounded :- Lce-Corpl T Booth, Lce-Corpl E Reading, and Pte F Cotton.

DEATHS.

CLEAVER.—Killed in action in the Dardanelles on August 10th, Pte. James Cleaver, 9th Royal Warwickshire Regiment, only son of the late James Cleaver, of Frankton, and dearly-beloved brother of Mrs. Doyle, 71 Victoria Street, New Bilton, Rugby, aged 28 years. Duty done.

RECRUITING AT RUGBY.

The following recruits have been attested at Rugby Drill Hall this week :—A Bates, 220th Fortress Co, R.E ; R H Cowley (driver), R.E ; R Williams and A Burton, K.R.R ; J A Spear, 14th Gloucester Bantams ; J H White, R.F.A ; H Edmans, Yorks and Lancs ; S L Howard, R.A.M.C ; and T Gamble, Coldstream Guards. All branches of the army, with the exception of the cavalry, are now open for recruits. There are good openings for drivers in the R.E, recruits 5ft and upwards in height, being accepted up to 45 years.

THE LOCAL PRISONERS OF WAR FUND.

The Local Prisoners of War Help Committee have this week despatched 28 parcels to British prisoners in Germany. Each parcel contained a large tin of beef, cheese, biscuits, cafe au lait, cocoa, soup tablets, and pickles. Each parcel which cost 3s. also contained either a pair of socks or a flannel shirt, these articles having been sent by generous donors to the Rectory.

During the coming winter the committee will be grateful for any gifts of suitable warm under-clothing in a decent state of repair for despatch with the weekly parcels.

That the work of the committee is appreciated by the brave fellows who receive parcels is proved by the many postcards and letters of thanks which are being continually received acknowledging the receipt of parcels.

CRICK RIFLEMAN’S EXPERIENCE IN THE FIRING LINE.

Rifleman Harry Fretter, of the Rifle Brigade, whose home is at Crick, and who was formerly employed there, in a letter to a Rugby friend, gives his first experiences of trench warfare as follows :—“ We are holding a part in the firing-line which is well advanced, so we have steered clear of bayonet charges ; but we have seen enough to give us a good idea of what real fighting is like, We have to be careful or else we get a few German snipers after us, who try very hard to hit as. They are very good shots, and, of course, if they play the game too bad, we just put our machine-gun on them, which is far superior to the German’ machine-gun. Then we get a little excitement watching our artillery blow the German trenches up. It is lovely to see the sand-bags and dirt go up in the air. As for Germans, we have not seen any yet. We can hear them at night, and that is our share at present, but when the time comes our boys will just show them what they are made of.”