25th Nov 1916. Military Funeral

MILITARY FUNERAL.

On Wednesday afternoon, in Rugby Cemetery, the burial took place, with military honours, of Corpl John Henry Gilbert Reynolds, 2nd Grenadier Guards, son of Mr T Reynolds, builder, Dunchurch Road, who died in Chichester Hospital on November 20th of wound’s received in action at the age of 25 years. This is the third of Mr Reynolds’s sons who have fallen in the war, and his only surviving son—Pte Ernest Reynolds, of the Royal Warwicks—is now in Birmingham Hospital, and obtained leave to attend the funeral. Previous to joining the army, Corpl Jack Reynolds was in the Metropolitan Police Force, and eight of his former friends from the Islington sub-division, under an Inspector, attended the funeral. A firing party from Warwick was also present, together with a bugler, who sounded the “ Last Post ” at the graveside. The Rev A W Bunnett, Westminster, conducted the service. In addition to the family mourners there were present : Rev J H Lees, Messrs C G Steele, T A Wise, S Cox, J Ferry, and L-Corpl J Norman, a Crimean veteran. The floral tributes, which were very beautiful, were sent by “ His sorrowing father, brother, and sisters ” ; “ In ever loving memory of my darling Jack, from Mabs ” ; “ A Tribute of respect from the officers and men of the Islington Sub-Division Metropolitan Police ” ; Mrs Stubbs and Gladys ; Mr and Mrs P Cooke ; Mr and Mrs Busby and Sergt and Mrs Sherwood ; Cousins Harry and Emily ; “ In affectionate memory of a brave soldier from his friends at Fairlawn ”; Mr and Mrs Pottrill and Marjorie ; Aunt Mrs Charlton and Aunt Mrs Burnham ; Sister and Nurses, K AI Ward, Graylingwell Hospital, Chichester ; “ In memory of a brave comrade, from the patients of K A1 Ward, Graylingwell” ; Uncle Harry, Aunt Rachel, and Aunt Lucy ; and Mrs W P Brooks, 78 Dunchurch Road, Rugby.

[For biography see last post]

RUGBY URBAN DISTRICT COUNCIL.

SYMPATHY WITH A BEREAVED TOWNSMAN.

The Clerk mentioned that he had received an intimation that Mr T Reynolds, of Dunchurch Road, had lost his third son in the recent fighting, who was to be brought from Chichester hospital to Rugby for burial. He remarked that it seemed an especially sad case, because Mr Reynolds had only four sons, three of whom were now dead, and the fourth was lying wounded in hospital in Birmingham.—Mr Wise, in proposing a vote of sympathy on behalf of the Council and the town with Mr Reynolds, said he did not know of any family in Rugby that had suffered so heavily in the war.—Mr Robbins seconded, and said just before war broke out Mr Reynolds lost his wife, and he knew of no harder case.—The Chairman said in the early days of the war Mr Reynolds was frequently speaking to him about his sons, who were very fine fellows, and he was sure the town would like them to pass that vote of sympathy.—The Council signified their assent to the proposition by standing up.—In his remarks, Mr Wise suggested that, if possible, the Council should provide the grave free, and, meeting later as a Burial Board, they decided to do this. The advisability of adopting a similar course in other cases of Rugby men dying through the war and brought home for interment was referred to the Cemetery Committee, together with a suggestion that a portion of the burial ground should be set apart for such interments.

FIREMEN AND THE WAR.

Some time ago (the Clerk said) the Council sent a petition to the Government supporting an application by the National Fire Brigades Union that members of Volunteer Fire Brigades should be exempt from Military service. This had failed, and the national Fire Brigades Union had written to inform the Council of the fact.-Mr Newman informed the Council that thirteen members of the Rugby Fire Brigade, had actually joined the colours, and two men were going, leaving 14 of the original members still in the Brigade, and five old members, who had come forward to help in the present crisis.

ROAD SERVICE IN FRANCE.

The Surveyor had received a letter respecting the endeavour to raise 10,000 men for road service in France, and asking the Council’s hearty co-operation in an effort to provide a Warwickshire Company of 250 men, also pointing out that all able-bodied men up to 50 years of age, used to pick and shovel, would be eligible.—Mr Yates pointed out that several of the Council’s employees who had worked on the roads were now serving, and they might do useful work on the roads in France.—The Chairman : We have several in the Rugby Fortress Company, the steam roller driver included.—Referred to Highways Committee.

The Electric Lighting Committee reported that they had given directions that the free supply of current to houses occupied by the Belgian Refugees Committee be discontinued. Reports had been received alleging wrongful use of current supplied to a consumer, and they recommended that proceedings be taken against the man.—The report was agreed to.

RUGBY VOLUNTEER CORPS.

As announced on another page, an entertainment is to be held at the Co-operative Hall on Thursday and Friday next in aid of the Corps funds, and we are informed that the demand for tickets has made it necessary to increase the number of reserved seats. An impression, however, appears to be prevalent that the Corps does not require funds, but that the Government will find all the necessary equipment. No regulations on this point have bet been promulgated by the Government, but it is clear that they will not provide Complete equipment nor funds for general running expenses, which will have to be met by voluntary effort. It is to help this fund that members and friends have organised the forthcoming concert.

Lord French, speaking at the Guildhall Banquet, said : “ We must always act and appear as if we believe and know invasion to be possible, and then we shall never be taken by surprise.”

Although the fact is not so generally known, the whole of the Special Constable Force for air raid service in the town is provided by the Corps. These men turn out at all hours of the night when Zeppelins visit our shores. Such services cannot be over-rated, and this alone should be sufficient to earn the support of every worthy citizen in this appeal for funds.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Pte Miles Berry, R.A.M.C, son of Mr and Mrs Berry, of Brownsover (late of Stockton), has been awarded the D.C.M.

Mr H Lupton Reddish has received intimation that his son, Pte H W L Reddish, of the H.A.C (Infantry), was wounded in the right arm and knee on Tuesday week by shrapnel while attacking. He has undergone an operation, and is going on satisfactorily. He is now in hospital in France.

Among those who were decorated on Saturday last by H.H the King for distinguished service in the field was Lieut H S Harrison, son of Mr H P Harrison, of Guilsborough (formerly of Hillmorton), who received the Military Cross for conspicuous bravery in leading his men and constructing a “ block ” in a sunken road under very heavy and persistent enemy fire.

Mr O M Samson, an assistant-master at Rugby School, and Well known as a cricketer—Somerset County and Rugby Club—has joined the Officers* Cadet Battalion at Topsham, near Exeter, to learn gunnery. His place in the Army Class has been filled by a member of the School.

Mc[?] Harry Pratt, of School Street, who has been in France since May with a section of the Royal Flying Corps, is now promoted to 1st Air Mechanic, dating from October 1st.

Rugby Prisoners of War Christmas Parcels.—The Rugby Prisoners of War Help Committee have this week despatched their Christmas parcels to the local men in prison camps in Germany. The contents included : 1lb tea, one tin cafe au lait, one tin condensed milk, 1lb sugar, one fruit pudding, one Christmas pudding, one tin of ox-cheek and vegetables, one tin salmon, one tin of sausages, one packet of chocolate, one tin of peppermints, one tin mustard, one card darning wool and needle, 100 cigarettes, and 1lb tobacco. There were 65 parcels.

THE KING AND HIS ARMIES.—To follow on the famous Somme picture at the Empire this week we understand Mr Morris has booked the second War Office official film of the series. It is entitled “ The King Visits his Armies in the Great Advance,” and will be presented about the middle of December.

IN MEMORIAM.

PEARCE.-In loving memory of WALTER, the dearly loved son of H. & C. Pearce, of Dunchurch, who was killed on H.M.S. Bulwark, November 26, 1914.
“ There is a link death cannot sever,
Sweet remembrance lasts for ever.”
—From his FATHER and MOTHER.

ROWE.—In loving memory of Pte. Geo. H. Rowe, who died from exposure at Gallipoli on Nov. 28, 1915.
“ Thy will be done was hard to say,
When one we loved was called away.”
—From his ever-loving WIFE, CHILDREN & FATHER.

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Reynolds, John Henry Gilbert. Died 20th Nov 1916

John Henry Gilbert Reynolds was born in Long Lawford, near Rugby in late 1891. His father was Tom Reynolds and his mother Emma Julia (nee Burnham). They had married in Church Lawford parish church in 30th August 1897. John Henry Gilbert (known as Jack) was the second of four sons. At the time, Tom was a bricklayer living at 3 Burnham Cottage, Long Lawford.

Emma died two years later in 1899, at the age of 33. Tom remarried in 1900 to Maria Bagnall. Together they had three more children, two girls and then another boy.

In 1901 the family were living in Campbell Street, New Bilton. By 1911 they had moved to 18 Dunchurch Road. Tom was a Builder/Bricklayer working on his own account. Jack was not with the family. He was in the Metropolitan Police Force. By the time the war started he was expecting promotion.

It is not known when Jack enlisted, probably early 1915 (he was awarded the 1915 star medal) He was mentioned as “a London policeman, being a corporal in the Grenadier Guards” in an article in the Rugby Advertiser in June 1915. His brother Frank had been reported missing at this time.

According to his Medal Roll card, he arrived in France on 6th November 1915. When he died, just aver a year later he was a Lance Corporal in the 5th Reserve Battalion, Grenadier Guards. This battalion spent the war on home soil, at Chelsea. Perhaps Jack was transferred to the 1st or 2nd Battalion, both of which took part in the final actions of the Battle of the Somme – The Battles of Flers-Courcelette and Morval in September 1916.

On 7th October it was reported that he had been seriously wounded and was in Chichester Hospital. He died there on 20th November and was buried in Clifton Road Cemetery, Rugby.

He is listed in the order of service for service at Westminster Abbey on 17th May 1919 “In Memory of the Officers and Constables of the Metropolitan Police, who in the Great War have laid down their lives for their King and their Country”
He is listed there as P.C. 893 Reynolds J. H. G. of N Division

His brother Frank died in 1915 and Herbert had died only a few weeks before on 5th September 1916. Two cousins also died in the war.

Picture from Rugby Advertiser 10th Mar 1922.

Picture from Rugby Advertiser 10th Mar 1922.

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

18th Nov 1916. The Great Battle Pictures.

THE GREAT BATTLE PICTURES.—The official pictures of the battle of the Somme, which have been attracting vast audiences all over the country, will be shown at the Empire twice nightly, and at matinees every day next week. Already seats are being extensively booked, and those who wish to secure good seats should do so at once.

LOCAL WAR NOTES,

Jim Eaton-Shore, Queen’s Westminster Rifles, has been reported wounded and missing since September 10. He is the youngest son of the late Mr James Eaton-Shore, for many years Works manager at Messrs Willans and Robinson’s, of Rugby, and later on, in the same capacity, at Messrs Siemen’s of Stafford. The three other sons are also serving in the forces—Jack in the New Zealand Engineers, Robert in the Canadians, and Tom in the Oxford and Buck Light Infantry.

A neatly printed certificate has been received by Mr C Pegg, 1 Addison Bead, New Bilton, to the effect that the Major-General commanding the Division in which his son—Corpl H Pegg, of the Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry—is serving has received a report of the young soldier’s gallant conduct on October 7th. The card was presented to Corpl Pegg by the commanding officer, who congratulate him, and congratulated him, and expressed the hope that next time it would be something better.

B.T.H. EMPLOYEE HONOURED.

Sergt William Black, of the 60th Light Infantry Brigade, Headquarters Staff, has been awarded the Military Medal. Before the war Sergt Black was employed as a clerk in the Stores Department at the B.T.H.

MILITARY MEDAL FOR SERGT F TUCKER.

A recent issue of the Gazette announced that Sergt F Tucker, of the Royal Rifle Brigade, had been awarded the Military Medal for bravery in the field, Sergt Tucker was wounded in August in about thirty places, and after treatment at Lincoln Hospital, he was sent to a convalescent home at Blackpool, where he still remains. Before the war, Sergt Tucker was employed as a compositor by Messrs Frost & Sons, and his mother lives in Charlotte Street.

LOCAL CASUALTIES.

Mrs H Lee, of Clarence Road, New Bilton, has received a postcard from her husband, a private in the R.W.R, stating that he has been wounded, and is now in Glen Hospital, France. This is the second time that Pte Lee, who went out with the original Expeditionary Force, has been wounded.

PTE FRED CRIPPS DIES OF WOUNDS.

Pte Fred Cripps, R.E., died in hospital recently from wounds received early in October in France. Pte Cripps was 28 years of age, and married. Before the war, he was employed as a carpenter by Messrs Foster & Dicksee at Rugby. His home was at Winslow.

DISTRICT APPEALS TRIBUNAL.

At Wednesday’s sitting at St Mary’s Hall, Coventry, there were present : Messrs M K Pridmore (chairman), W Johnson, jun, K Rotherham. and P G Lovert ; Military representative, Mr M E T Wratislaw ; Agricultural representative, Mr F W Channing.

A substitute having been found for Wm Fredk Brooks, a general farm worker employed by Mr Butlin, of Flecknoe, an appeal made on his behalf was withdrawn.

On behalf of Thos Arthur Stephenson, woollen and cotton rag merchant, Newbold Road, Rugby, Mr Harold Eaden said his client was now employed at the Daimler Works, Coventry. Certificates were not now issued, as it was found they had been abused, but if the clerk to the Tribunal applied, the firm would give him one.—Adjourned till the next Court.

Mr Wratislaw stated that a discharged soldier of excellent character had been found for Thos Wm Durham, carter, 13 Campbell Street, New Bilton, but the man was not due to report till that day.—A fortnight’s adjournment was asked for and granted.

On two grounds—that of business and as a conscientious objector—Ernest Holliday, acting bank manager, 54[?] Newbold Road, Rugby, appealed for the renewal of his temporary exemption.-The Chairman asked Mr Wratislaw if appellant, as a conscientious objector, was not doing as good work now as he would be doing elsewhere ?—Mr Wratislaw : They are being treated differently now. They draw the pay of a soldier and the rest goes to charity.—Capt Thomas said on mobilisation he was called up, and three others who were in the bank had joined the army. Appellant was now assisted by one girl and one boy, and they were doing a great deal of work.—In reply to the Chairman, appellant said he was prepared to hand over £l a week from his salary to charity, but he would not like it to be thought he was buying himself out.—The Chairman : We are putting you in the same position as if you were in the army. You are not making a profit out of it.—Appellant : I don’t wish to do so.—The Chairman said he thought the sum should go to a local charity, and an order was made for £1 a week to be paid to the funds of the hospital, temporary exemption being granted so long as the conditions were observed.

Mr Worthington supported an application by John Basil Liggins, coal merchant and carter, 57 James Street, Rugby, claimed by his mother to be indispensable to the business. Mr Wratislaw suggested that the man might be used as a substitute, but the Chairman expressed the opinion that the carting of coal during the winter was very important, and exemption till February 28th was granted.

Conditional exemption was asked for by William George Essex, described as a dairy farmer and market gardener of West Street, Long Lawford.—The Clerk asked Mr Wratislaw if they had served the notice now necessary in such a case, and he replied in the negative.—Given till February 1st, and Mr Wratislaw was asked to then remember that notice must be served.

HILLMORTON.

A very successful and enjoyable concert was given on Friday last week by 55 Squadron R.F.C Pierrot Troop on behalf of the funds for sending Christmas parcels to the Hillmorton soldiers and sailors. As something out of the ordinary run was anticipated, the room was packed very soon after the doors were opened. The first part of the programme was taken entirely by the Pierrot Troop in costume, who rendered songs and jokes which kept the audience in roars of laughter. The second part consisted of songs, sword swinging display, dances and recitations, and loud and prolonged applause which followed each item was a proof of its excellence and of the appreciation of the audience ; particularly may this be said of the sword swinging display by Sergt-Major Rowland.

BOURTON-ON-DUNSMORE.

A start was made in November, 1915, to collect eggs for the wounded soldiers, and the villagers of Bourton and Draycote will be gratified to know that since that date to November, 1916, they have contributed a grand total of 1,792.

CHRISTMAS PARCELS FOR OUR SOLDIERS.—A house-to-house collection has been made in Bourton and Draycote, with the result that £7 18s 10d has been generously given for this good cause. Misses Hales and Davies undertook the collecting.

ANSTY.

SEC. LIEUT CADWALLER ADAMS KILLED.

The Adams family of Ansty Hall, near Nuneaton, have sustained a further bereavement by the death in action of Second lieutenant Geoffrey Henry Cadwaller Adams, Suffolk Regiment. Born in 1896, he was the second son of Mr Alfred Adams, barrister-at-law, and grandson of the Rev Henry Cadwaller Adams.

SOUTHAM.

A battle-plane had to descend at Southam on Wednesday afternoon, owing to engine trouble, and was guarded during its stay by members of the Volunteer Training Corps, to whom the officer afterwards expressed his thanks. The battle-plane aroused considerable interest, and was visited by hundreds of people from Southam and the neighbouring villages.

 

Bending, Stanley Emberson. Died 18th Nov 1916

Stanley Emberson Bending was born in Chelmsford, Essex. His father, Frank Bending, was born in Somerset. His mother Annie Bansor came from Chelmsford and they must have met in Hastings, where, in 1881, Frank was working as a tailor and Annie was an assistant in a draper’s shop. They married in Chelmsford the following year and Stanley was born there in 1889, the youngest of five children. In 1891 they were living at 5 Critchell Terrace, Rainsford Road in Chelmsford. Frank was a tailor’s cutter. A few years later the family moved to Tunbridge Wells in Kent and two more children had joined the family.

Frank Bending died in 1908 at the age of 54 and in 1911 Annie was still living in Tunbridge Wells, with her daughter and four younger sons. Stanley was aged 21 and a salesman in the boot trade. The oldest son was married and lived nearby; the other, Percy Greenway Bending was also married and living at 16 Plowman Street, Rugby. He was a police constable.

This must have been what brought Stanley Bending to Rugby. When the war started he was a workman at Willans and Robinson and he enlisted at the start of September 1914. He joined the 2nd Battalion, King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry No. 23406 and at the time of his death his rank was lance corporal. He arrived in France on 3rd August 1915.

In 1916 the K.O.Y.L.I. took part in the Battle of the Somme and in November, the final stage, the Battle of Ancre.

KOYLI Way Diary.Pagefrom 18th Nov 1916

KOYLI Way Diary. Page from 18th Nov 1916

Transcription

Beaumont-Hamel

18-11-16

At 5.15 am on the 18th inst the battalion was drawn up on an advanced line which had been marked out by the R. E’s. running due North and South and we dug in.

The order was A. B. C. D. from right to left, our right was in touch with the 11th Borders and our left ran towards LARGER TRENCH occupied by the Manchester Regt.

The companies were drawn up in company column. All four battalions of the brigade were in the line, our front originally allotted was 300 yds but it was afterwards reduced to 225 yds. The conditions were bad, it started snowing just before the attack and therefore observation was very difficult, but at zero which was at 6.10am our barrage was intense and apparently very effective, consequently the enemy sent up numbers of very lights this with the white ground lit up all the surroundings. The line advanced with MUNICH TRENCH as their first objective, the left half of the battalion was able to push forward and reach their first objective. but the right half was held up by intense machine gun and rifle fire so they took up a position in a line of shell holes in front of the German wire. Meanwhile our left went on and gained their final objective after heavy fighting and mopping up as they advanced. At this period Capt H. Whitworth O. C. the left company who was wounded and forced to retire / confirmed the report that his company had gained their first objective and were about to advance on to their second. After this we got no definite news of the two left companies, but believing that they must have advanced with their right flan unprotected, all reinforcements that could be found, including a platoon which was extricated after being involved with the 11th Border Regt; were sent to support them and to take up bombs. At about 5-30 pm 2 Lieut H. R. Forde who was O. C. the right company came back to report the situation. Still there was no news of the two left companies so with no line to hold and with their left flank unprotected, and on the right the 11th Borders had retired, the Commanding Officer decided to withdraw to the original line. At about 6-30pm the battalion took up the old line; at that time it consist of the Colonel, Adjutant, Intelligence Officer, 2 Lieut H. R. Forde and about 170 O. R’s

At zero the following were the officers in action. [10 missing, 2 shell shock, 2 wounded]

19-11-16

In the evening at about 10-0 pm the 16th Lancashire Fuss: relieved the battalion in the line, when it retired to billets in MAILLEY-MAILLET

20-11-16

The battalion rested.

This is probably the action in which Stanley Emberson Bending was killed.
He is buried in the Ten Tree Alley Cemetery, Puisieux.

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

11th Nov 1916. Inspection of Warwickshire Volunteers by Lord French

INSPECTION OF WARWICKSHIRE VOLUNTEERS BY LORD FRENCH.

At 8.45 on Sunday last the members of the Rugby Volunteer Corps fell in at the Drill Hall under Mr C H Fuller, the Commanding Officer of No 2 Company (comprising Rugby, Nuneaton, and Atherstone) of the 2nd Battalion of the Warwickshire Volunteer Regiment, to take their part in the inspection of the Warwickshire Regiment by the Field-Marshal, Lord French, at Calthorpe Park, Birmingham.

In due course the Battalion reached their allotted position, forming, together with the 1st, 3rd, 4th, and 5th Battalions, and a Company of Engineers, a Regiment some 3,000 in strength, under command of Col D F Lewis, C.B, Lieut-Col F F Johnstone (Commander of the 2nd Battalion) acting as Parade Commander.

Shortly after the Lord-Lieutenant of the County—the Earl of Craven—had arrived, Lord French, who had been met at the Station and accompanied by the Lord Mayor of Birmingham, entered the Park with his Staff, and was received with a General Salute. Without loss of time Lord French proceeded to inspect thoroughly each Battalion and Company of the Regiment, and afterwards in a clear strong voice addressed the Volunteers in terms which left no shadow of doubt in the minds of his hearers that they had won the appreciation of that gallant soldier and of the Authorities, and that they would be called upon to fill a role in the national defence which would release the more active soldier for services abroad. The discomforts of the pouring rain and the depressing weather were forgotten when words of praise for the soldierly bearing of the whole Regiment fell from the Field-Marshal’s lips ; words backed by his very emphatic statement, “ I mean what I say.”

Immediately after the inspection, and before addressing the Regiment, Lord French sent a special message to the 2nd Battalion, saying how pleased he was with them, and that from the way they stood they might have been soldiers all their lives. To the Rugby men this message was particularly gratifying, for they formed almost one complete Company of the Battalion to whom that message was sent.

The Rugby Corps arrived back in Rugby about 6.31 p.m, every man feeling that he had taken part in an historic event, marking one of the milestones on the road which Volunteers have set out to traverse- the road which shall lead them to be of service to their country whenever she may require it.

Notwithstanding the extremely bad weather, the conduct and general bearing of the men throughout the day was splendid.

The success of the inspection, and the keenness shown by the Rugby men, ought to have the effect of bringing new recruits, and enable the Rugby Corps to form itself into a complete Company.

THE POSSIBILITY OF AN INVASION.

On the same day Lord French inspected Volunteer at Bletchley, Oxford, and Wolverhampton.

In his address following the inspection at Birmingham, Lord French said the more men be saw of the Volunteer regiments the more he realised their enormous value to the country. Unless he had seen it himself, he never would have believed of the existence in this country to-day of such an extraordinary residue of latent military strength.

At Wolverhampton he said that whenever they heard of naval engagements near our coasts, and there was one in the Channel only the other day-it was always possible that behind the enemy ships of war transports might be bringing troops to land in this country at some unoccupied point. The whole history of war taught us that what happened was something that we did not expect. Therefore he wanted them to remember that invasion was possible. He did not say it was probable or imminent, or menacing ; but it was possible. Hence the great importance of the Volunteer movement.

“ OUR OWN DAY.”

£150 RAISED FOR RED CROSS.

All previous Flag Day records in Rugby were eclipsed on Saturday, when £150 8s 8d was collected on behalf of the new auxiliary hospital for wounded soldiers, which is to consist of eighty beds, and is to be located at the Institution Infirmary. About 130 ladies, including 30 Red Cross Nurses, sold flags in the streets, and upwards of 20,000 of these small tokens were disposed of. The arrangements, as usual, were entrusted to Mr J R Barker, and although he had only ten days in which to carry through the effort, his organisation was so complete that everything passed off smoothly, and a good deal of the credit for the success of the effort was due to his experience in these matters. He received valuable assistance from Miss D E Wood, who acted as Hon Secretary, and from members of the Boys’ Brigade, who delivered supplies of flags, etc, to the various sellers, all of whom received their flags on Friday evening. Mr R P Mason, London City and Midland Bank, was the Hon Treasurer, and he was assisted in the counting of the money, which took place at the supply depot, the Benn Buildings (kindly lent by the Urban District Council), by Messrs J Ferry, W G Mitchell, J R Barker, and Miss Dickinson. Throughout the morning Mr Barker visited the various districts, and so complete were the arrangements that it was almost impossible for anyone to escape buying a flag. The efforts organised by Mr Barker during the past sixteen months have produced over £2,000, and we believe few towns of the size of Rugby can show such a result.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Captain Thomas Ainsworth Townsend, R.A.M.C, of Clifton, has been awarded the Military Cross.

There are 200 conscientious objectors in Warwick prison.

Pte A Godwin (South Staffordshires), who, when in Rugby, was engaged at Mr A Dicken’s, hairdresser, Clifton Road, is now a prisoner of war at Dülmen, Germany. He was a member of the Conservative Club.

THE RUGBY FARMERS’ MOTOR AMBULANCE.

An officer belonging to Rugby, now at the front, was recently returning from the firing line when he met a motor ambulance, and on it he saw with pleasurable surprise the inscription, “ Presented by the Rugby and District Farmers’ Association.” The officer is probably the only Rugby man in that locality.

LOCAL CASUALTIES.

MR G F HOWKINS LOSES ANOTHER SON.

Sincere sympathy will be felt with Mr G F Howkins, of Crick, in the fact that his youngest son, Mr Sidney Howkins, has been killed in France. The young soldier, who was about 25 years of age, was formerly employed in the Northamptonshire Union Bank, and when war broke out he joined the Northamptonshire Yeomanry, Going with them to the front in the following November, he was killed on October 30. This is the second son Mr Howkins has lost owing to the war.

WOUNDED.—Pte H Lee, R.W.R, Clarence Road, New Bilton, gun shot in left leg ; Pte A Parkinson, Worcesters, Ringrose Court, gun shot wound and severe fracture of right leg.

PTE W STRATFORD, OF HARBOROUGH MAGNA.

Mrs Davenport, of Harborough Magna, has received official news that her brother, Pte W Stratford, of the R.W.R, died of wounds on October 29th. Pte Stratford, who was a native of Badby, and about 32 years of age, enlisted at the commencement of the war, and had been in France eighteen months.

SUDDEN DEATH OF AN OLD SOLDIER.

An inquest was held by the Deputy Coroner, Dr Day, at the Rugby Police Court on Monday, touching the death of Q.M.S William Henry Jones, Observer Co, which took place suddenly at his lodgings, 4 Frederick Street, on Friday morning. The deceased, who was 45 years of age, was, before he enlisted in September, 1914, a schoolmaster at Birkenhead. He was married shortly afterwards. For some years he had suffered very badly from rheumatism, but had not had rheumatic fever, although on one occasion he kept his bed for two months. He was not allowed to proceed to the front on account of his heart being weak. Since he had been at Rugby he had suffered a good deal from indigestion. His wife stated that at eight o’clock on Friday morning he went to the bathroom and locked the door. She afterwards heard him groaning, and called the landlady, Mrs Louch. A man was also summoned, a panel of the door was smashed, and they found deceased lying on the ground with his head towards the door.

Dr Patrick, who made a post-mortem examination, said the heart was very much enlarged, and one of the valves was diseased. In his opinion death was due to syncope.—Lieut Fergusson, of the Observer Co, said deceased was an old soldier, and went through the South Afrian War. His work was only of a sedentary nature.—A verdict was returned in accordance with the medical testimony, and the jury expressed sympathy with the widow.

The funeral took place on Tuesday afternoon, when, despite a heavy downpour of rain, there was a large number of spectators. The coffin was preceded by a firing party from Budbrooke Barracks, and the deceased’s comrades, of the Observer Company, under Lieut Fergusson, followed after the mourners. The first part of the service was conducted by the Rev C M, Blagden, Rector, and was held in the Parish Church. The coffin, which was covered with the Union Jack, and deceased’s belt and hat, was borne to the grave by his fellow N.C.O’s. After the service three volleys were fired, and the “ Last Post ” was sounded. Beautiful floral tributes were sent by his wife, his mother, and sister; Major B D Corbet and Lieut Fergusson ; from the headquarter staff, No 6 Observer Company, with a card attached, “ Mourning deeply a true and faithful comrade ” ; Mr and Mrs C F Louch ; Howard W Clayton, 11th King’s Regiment ; Harold and Tom ; Sergt-Major Rowland, R.F.C ; a few civilian friends ; Mrs D Barnwell ; J H Lane, Miss Bull, and Mrs F Solomon; and Mrs A Thomas.

RUGBY SOLDIER HONOURED.-Pte J Enticott, Oxford and Bucks L.I, has been awarded the military Medal for bravery shown on September 15th by attending wounded single handed under heavy shell fire. He is the youngest son of Mr A Enticott, of Union Street, and was formerly employed at the B.T.H. Works.

ABSENTEE.—At the Rugby Police Court on Friday morning, before T Hunter, Esq, George Henry Smith, of Rugby, was charged with being an absentee from the R.W.R, and was remanded to await an escort

THE PARCELS sent by the Rugby Prisoners of War Committee to local men who are prisoners of war in Germany this week contained : tea, condensed milk, baked beans, 1lb sugar, grape nuts, fish paste, herrings in tomato sauce, margarine, cocoa, and 2lbs biscuits.

THE BATTLE OF THE SOMME. — A SPECIAL ATTRACTION AT THE EMPIRE.—For six days commencing November 20th, a film giving pictures of the Battle of the Somme — Official War Pictures of the British Army in France, taken by permission of the War Office, 5,000 feet in five reels to be shown at The Empire, Rugby.

EPIDEMIC OF BIGAMY IN WARWICKSHIRE. — At the Warwickshire Assizes on Monday, Mr Justice Bailhache commented on the fact that four out of the seven prisoners for trial were charged with bigamy. He said there seemed to be an epidemic of bigamy in Warwickshire.

IN MEMORIAM

CLARKE.—In ever loving memory of Walter, younger son of the late E. T. Clarke, and of Mrs. Clarke, 19 Temple Street, Rugby, who was killed in action. November 15th, 1915.
“ Greater love hath no man than this, that he lay down his life for his friends.”
—Never forgotten by his Mother, Brother, and Sisters

We Remember Them

Today we remember all the men from Rugby who fought and died in conflicts around the world

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The Soldier

If I should die, think only this of me:
That there’s some corner of a foreign field
That is forever England. There shall be
In that rich earth a richer dust concealed;
A dust whom England bore, shaped, made aware,
Gave, once, her flowers to love, her ways to roam,
A body of England’s, breathing English air,
Washed by the rivers, blest by the suns of home.

And think, this heart, all evil shed away,
A pulse in the eternal mind, no less
Gives somewhere back the thoughts by England given;
Her sights and sounds; dreams happy as her day;
And laughter, learnt of friends; and gentleness,
In hearts at peace, under an English heaven.

Rupert Brooke

4th Nov 1916. St Matthews Old Boy’s Story of High Wood

ST MATTHEW’S OLD BOY’S STORY OF HIGH WOOD.

Rifleman R Coles, of the London Regiment (Post Office Rifles), in a letter to Mr R H Myers, headmaster of his old school, writes of his personal experiences of the fighting at High Wood :—

“ It was the first time the ‘ Tanks ‘ were used. I was never more surprised in my life than when I saw them coming down shell holes and over trenches, and rattling out their rations for the Huns. It was great and made one feel proud of England to think we had got something which the enemy had not. On this eventful morning we were all ‘ standing to,’ waiting for 6.00[?] to come, and on the minute the order was given, ‘0ver you go, lads,’ and we were soon over. We got through the wood all right, but at the edge the enemy gave up a very heavy curtain fire. It was awful, but we lost comparatively few, and on we went into the open. It was a grand sight to see all our boys advancing, just like one straight line, as far as you could see. Unfortunately, about 150 yards from the wood, I was shot right through the right foot and right wrist. For a few minutes I lay down, and then I got up to get my rifle and in doing so received another wound in my right thigh, so I had to get to a shell hole. After about four hours some of the boys carried me to one of the German trenches we had taken. I was all right there for a time till we had heavy shelling, and I got buried up to the ears—a sensation I never want again. When they dug me out I was a wreck, but some of my companions were dead when they got them out. It seemed impossible to get stretcher bearers, so I decided to try and crawl back, succeeded after over seven hours crawling. When I got to the dressing station it was 25 hours after being wounded ; but what a relief it was to get there and have my wounds attended to ! Then followed a weary journey on stretchers and motors and jolting on French hospital trains. I was glad to find myself at last at Bristol, and it does seem a treat to be back in dear Old England. Everyone in this hospital is so kind that it is just like being at home.”

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Lieut O H Buckingham, of the Leicestershire Regt. who was, before the war, on the staff of the B T.H. has been mentioned in despatches by Sir Percy Lake. Lieut Buckingham served in France before leaving for Egypt and the Persian Gulf, and he served under Gen. Sir Percy Lake’s Tigris Force in the Kut Relief Expedition. On January 7th at the battle of Sheikh Sa’ad he was severely wounded and sent to India, whence he was invalided home in September.

RUGBY POLICE OFFICER OBTAINS A COMMISSION.

P.C Victor Rollason, who at the outbreak of the war was a member of the local force, and was called up as belonging to the reserve of the East Lancashire Regt. has just been granted a commission in the 17th Manchester Regt.

PRISONERS OF WAR.

The names of fourteen men of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment who, after being notified as missing, are now reported as being prisoners of war, are included in the latest casualty lists. The following Rugby men are included : W F College, H McDonald, A Walker, F Nicholls (King’s Own Lancs) ; previously reported killed.

LOCAL CASUALTIES.

SERGT M O’BRIEN KILLED.

News has been received at the B.T.H Works that Sergt M O’Brien, of the Oxford and Bucks L.I, was killed in action about the 15th October, Sergt M O’Brien, who enlisted at the commencement of the war, was formerly employed in the Foundry Department.

 

BRETFORD.

SERGT C DASHWOOD.—The friends of Charlie Dashwood will be pleased to hear that he has now been promoted to Sergeant. He enlisted in the R.F.A at the outbreak of war, but has since volunteered for one of the Trench Mortar Batteries, in which he has obtained rapid promotion. His father volunteered when the South African War was on, and lost his life there.

VOLUNTEERS TO BE INSPECTED BY LORD FRENCH.

Field-Marshal Lord French is inspecting the five Warwickshire Battalions of Volunteers in Calthorp Park, Birmingham, on Sunday next. This is undoubtedly a historic event in the present Volunteer movement, and is in continuation of the numerous inspections which Lord French has been making for several weeks past. We understand the Rugby Corps, which forms the larger part of B Company of the 2nd Battalion is turning out in strength.

DISTRICT APPEALS TRIBUNAL.

Military appeals chiefly occupied the attention of this Tribunal at the sitting at St Mary’s Hall, Coventry, on Wednesday evening, when there were present : Messrs M K Pridmore (chairman), W Johnson, jun, P G Loveitt, and K Rotherham ; Military representative, Mr M E T Wratislaw.

The Coventry Military representative mentioned the case of a farm servant named Buckingham, of Combe Fields, it having been suggested that he should be used as a substitute.—Mr Wratislaw thought the man might go into the employ of Mr Corbishly, of Brandon, and an order was made that the man might be so used, it being left with the Military to decide whether the place was suitable or not.

On behalf of Thos Arthur Stephenson, woollen and cotton rag merchant, Newbold Road, Rugby, whose case had been postponed for him to find work of national importance, Mr Harold Baden said the man was to present himself on the following day at the Daimler Works, Coventry—Adjourned for 14 days.

An appeal was made on behalf of Alfred William Elsley (35, married), 70 King Edward Road, Rugby, a manager of grocery stores in Sheep Street.—Mr Wratislaw said the man was in charge of a branch shop, and simply ordered his goods through the head office.—Given to December 31st, to carry him over Christmas time, with the intimation that he would have to be ready then.

Percy John Allen (30, married), boot maker, 131 Cambridge Street, who had been given to October 31, again appealed, mainly on the grounds of domestic hardship.—Mr Wratislaw did not think there was any hardship worse than in many other cases.—Appeal dismissed, the Military to allow 28 days.

Pleading that the man would be responsible to the landlord for the rent of the farm next March, and had a large amount of capital invested in stock, Mr Harold Eaden asked for conditional exemption for Fred Green (26, married), Castle Farm, Woolscott.—As he would not be called up till January 1st, the Tribunal unanimously agreed to dismiss the appeal.

Temporary exemptions granted to two members of Messrs Foster & Dicksee’s staff were appealed against by the Military. They concerned Herbert Watson, 20 Arnold Street, and James Henry Pennington, 54 Lawford Road, both of whom were married men and had been passed for service abroad. Mr Watson, who is acting secretary to the Company, put in a written appeal from the firm, stating that the business would be greatly dislocated by his loss as a cost clerk.—Mr Harold Baden represented Mr Pennington, who, he said had been with the firm 22 years, had two children, and heavy financial liabilities. He had also an appointment to present himself this week at H.M Factory at Queen’s Ferry, with respect to taking a post there.—The Chairman pointed out that Mr Watson was an attested man, and the Tribunal thought, therefore, that they must leave him. The Military appeal in this case was dismissed.—In the other case it was allowed.

In regard to Fredk Foster (26), coal carter, Barby, in the employ of the Rugby Coal and Coke Co, the amount of wages paid (25s weekly) evidently weighed with the Tribunal in their decision to uphold the Military appeal against a temporary exemption till November 15th.—Mr Wratislaw said another employee had left and gone to the Co-operative Society, where he received 30s weekly, and 2s war bonus.—Mr Brereton, who represented the Company, produced a copy of a futile advertisement for another man.—The Chairman : We are unanimous that a man earning 25s a week cannot be indispensable, and we allow the appeal. We give you 28 days.

Exception was also taken by the Military to the temporary exemption granted to Percy Leeson (25, single), 48 Chapel Street, Rugby, engaged chiefly in the delivery of parcels for Messrs Sutton & Co.—Mr Wratislaw said they sent as a substitute a reliable man on October 6th, and he was told they did not require him.—Mrs Lesson, mother of appellant, said she fully explained to the man who came the nature of the business, and he said he would not think of taking such a responsible post.—Mr Wratislaw : He came back to the recruiting officer and said you told him you didn’t require anyone.—The Military appeal was allowed, but 28 days was given, and Mr Wratislaw promised that the same substitute should be sent again, or they would try and find another.

Exemption to January 1st had been granted to Thos Wm Durham, carter and horsekeeper (30, married), 13 Campbell Street, New Bilton, on the ground that his occupation was principally that of carting flour from Rugby Station to bakers, and also the carting of hay, oats, etc, to the remount departments.-The Military had appealed, and Mr Wratislaw said almost next door was a carter named Lowe who had been sent into the army, and it was not fair that one should be taken and anotherbleft.—Mr Worthington said lest month Mr Durham carted 293 tons of flour, and the carting for the remounts was 24 tons a month.—On Mr Wratislaw offering to find a substitute, the case was adjourned for 14 days.

Thos Mm Alfred Arnold, firewood and hardware dealer, 54 Avenue Road, New Bilton, appealed, through Mr Harold Eaden, for the temporary exemption granted by the Local Tribunal to be confirmed, but that it might be varied so as not to be made final.—In this case a munition order, subject to the approval of the substitution officer at Rugby, was granted.

S Mackaness, Cestersover, appealed on behalf of his son, Chas Henry Mackaness (19, single), described as a shepherd, on a farm of 940 acres, of which 130 were arable. In reply to Mr Wratislaw, appellant said he had four sons, neither of whom was in the army.—The Chairman : You will get to the 1st of January. We shall dismiss the appeal.

ABSENTEE.—At the Rugby Police Court on Monday, before J. E. Cox, Esq, Ellis John Hewitt, of Dunchurch Road, Rugby, pleaded guilty to being an absentee from the R.W.R, and was remanded to await an escort.

THE GLOVE WAISTCOAT SOCIETY.

DEAR SIR,-This Society is a company of ladies who make wind-proof waistcoat linings for our soldiers and sailors out of old gloves. Some friends in it have asked me to find out if Rugby will help them with old gloves of any kind of skin or fur ; woollen gloves are not used. Any such gloves, so long as there is a square inch of sound skin in them, will be gratefully received at 10 Moultrie Rood, or at Mr S Overs, 19 High Street, and will be sent to the Society and promptly used.—Yours faithfully, W H PAYNE-SMITH.

DEATHS.

DYKE.—Killed in action in France, on October 12th, 1916, CORPL. OTHELLO DYKE, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, the dearly beloved brother of Mona Barrett, of Bilton Grange, aged 34.

HOWES.—The beloved wife of Pte. J. C. Howes, died suddenly, October 20th, 1916, aged 26 years.

IN MEMORIAM.

PARKER.—In loving memory of EDWARD JOSEPH, the beloved son of Mr. and Mrs. T. Parker, of Dunchurch, died of wounds received in action on November 3rd, 1914.
— Not forgotten by Father, Mother, Brothers, and Sisters.-“ At Rest.”