18th Nov 1916. The Great Battle Pictures.

THE GREAT BATTLE PICTURES.—The official pictures of the battle of the Somme, which have been attracting vast audiences all over the country, will be shown at the Empire twice nightly, and at matinees every day next week. Already seats are being extensively booked, and those who wish to secure good seats should do so at once.

LOCAL WAR NOTES,

Jim Eaton-Shore, Queen’s Westminster Rifles, has been reported wounded and missing since September 10. He is the youngest son of the late Mr James Eaton-Shore, for many years Works manager at Messrs Willans and Robinson’s, of Rugby, and later on, in the same capacity, at Messrs Siemen’s of Stafford. The three other sons are also serving in the forces—Jack in the New Zealand Engineers, Robert in the Canadians, and Tom in the Oxford and Buck Light Infantry.

A neatly printed certificate has been received by Mr C Pegg, 1 Addison Bead, New Bilton, to the effect that the Major-General commanding the Division in which his son—Corpl H Pegg, of the Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry—is serving has received a report of the young soldier’s gallant conduct on October 7th. The card was presented to Corpl Pegg by the commanding officer, who congratulate him, and congratulated him, and expressed the hope that next time it would be something better.

B.T.H. EMPLOYEE HONOURED.

Sergt William Black, of the 60th Light Infantry Brigade, Headquarters Staff, has been awarded the Military Medal. Before the war Sergt Black was employed as a clerk in the Stores Department at the B.T.H.

MILITARY MEDAL FOR SERGT F TUCKER.

A recent issue of the Gazette announced that Sergt F Tucker, of the Royal Rifle Brigade, had been awarded the Military Medal for bravery in the field, Sergt Tucker was wounded in August in about thirty places, and after treatment at Lincoln Hospital, he was sent to a convalescent home at Blackpool, where he still remains. Before the war, Sergt Tucker was employed as a compositor by Messrs Frost & Sons, and his mother lives in Charlotte Street.

LOCAL CASUALTIES.

Mrs H Lee, of Clarence Road, New Bilton, has received a postcard from her husband, a private in the R.W.R, stating that he has been wounded, and is now in Glen Hospital, France. This is the second time that Pte Lee, who went out with the original Expeditionary Force, has been wounded.

PTE FRED CRIPPS DIES OF WOUNDS.

Pte Fred Cripps, R.E., died in hospital recently from wounds received early in October in France. Pte Cripps was 28 years of age, and married. Before the war, he was employed as a carpenter by Messrs Foster & Dicksee at Rugby. His home was at Winslow.

DISTRICT APPEALS TRIBUNAL.

At Wednesday’s sitting at St Mary’s Hall, Coventry, there were present : Messrs M K Pridmore (chairman), W Johnson, jun, K Rotherham. and P G Lovert ; Military representative, Mr M E T Wratislaw ; Agricultural representative, Mr F W Channing.

A substitute having been found for Wm Fredk Brooks, a general farm worker employed by Mr Butlin, of Flecknoe, an appeal made on his behalf was withdrawn.

On behalf of Thos Arthur Stephenson, woollen and cotton rag merchant, Newbold Road, Rugby, Mr Harold Eaden said his client was now employed at the Daimler Works, Coventry. Certificates were not now issued, as it was found they had been abused, but if the clerk to the Tribunal applied, the firm would give him one.—Adjourned till the next Court.

Mr Wratislaw stated that a discharged soldier of excellent character had been found for Thos Wm Durham, carter, 13 Campbell Street, New Bilton, but the man was not due to report till that day.—A fortnight’s adjournment was asked for and granted.

On two grounds—that of business and as a conscientious objector—Ernest Holliday, acting bank manager, 54[?] Newbold Road, Rugby, appealed for the renewal of his temporary exemption.-The Chairman asked Mr Wratislaw if appellant, as a conscientious objector, was not doing as good work now as he would be doing elsewhere ?—Mr Wratislaw : They are being treated differently now. They draw the pay of a soldier and the rest goes to charity.—Capt Thomas said on mobilisation he was called up, and three others who were in the bank had joined the army. Appellant was now assisted by one girl and one boy, and they were doing a great deal of work.—In reply to the Chairman, appellant said he was prepared to hand over £l a week from his salary to charity, but he would not like it to be thought he was buying himself out.—The Chairman : We are putting you in the same position as if you were in the army. You are not making a profit out of it.—Appellant : I don’t wish to do so.—The Chairman said he thought the sum should go to a local charity, and an order was made for £1 a week to be paid to the funds of the hospital, temporary exemption being granted so long as the conditions were observed.

Mr Worthington supported an application by John Basil Liggins, coal merchant and carter, 57 James Street, Rugby, claimed by his mother to be indispensable to the business. Mr Wratislaw suggested that the man might be used as a substitute, but the Chairman expressed the opinion that the carting of coal during the winter was very important, and exemption till February 28th was granted.

Conditional exemption was asked for by William George Essex, described as a dairy farmer and market gardener of West Street, Long Lawford.—The Clerk asked Mr Wratislaw if they had served the notice now necessary in such a case, and he replied in the negative.—Given till February 1st, and Mr Wratislaw was asked to then remember that notice must be served.

HILLMORTON.

A very successful and enjoyable concert was given on Friday last week by 55 Squadron R.F.C Pierrot Troop on behalf of the funds for sending Christmas parcels to the Hillmorton soldiers and sailors. As something out of the ordinary run was anticipated, the room was packed very soon after the doors were opened. The first part of the programme was taken entirely by the Pierrot Troop in costume, who rendered songs and jokes which kept the audience in roars of laughter. The second part consisted of songs, sword swinging display, dances and recitations, and loud and prolonged applause which followed each item was a proof of its excellence and of the appreciation of the audience ; particularly may this be said of the sword swinging display by Sergt-Major Rowland.

BOURTON-ON-DUNSMORE.

A start was made in November, 1915, to collect eggs for the wounded soldiers, and the villagers of Bourton and Draycote will be gratified to know that since that date to November, 1916, they have contributed a grand total of 1,792.

CHRISTMAS PARCELS FOR OUR SOLDIERS.—A house-to-house collection has been made in Bourton and Draycote, with the result that £7 18s 10d has been generously given for this good cause. Misses Hales and Davies undertook the collecting.

ANSTY.

SEC. LIEUT CADWALLER ADAMS KILLED.

The Adams family of Ansty Hall, near Nuneaton, have sustained a further bereavement by the death in action of Second lieutenant Geoffrey Henry Cadwaller Adams, Suffolk Regiment. Born in 1896, he was the second son of Mr Alfred Adams, barrister-at-law, and grandson of the Rev Henry Cadwaller Adams.

SOUTHAM.

A battle-plane had to descend at Southam on Wednesday afternoon, owing to engine trouble, and was guarded during its stay by members of the Volunteer Training Corps, to whom the officer afterwards expressed his thanks. The battle-plane aroused considerable interest, and was visited by hundreds of people from Southam and the neighbouring villages.

 

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26th Feb 1916. Restrictions on the Use of Paper

RESTRICTIONS ON THE USE OF PAPER.

A WORD TO OUR READERS.

In consequence of the restriction on the importation of paper and materials for making it which come into force on March 1st, it will be necessary for publishers to exercise the strictest economy in the use of the paper they are allowed to receive, and reduce all wastage to the lowest possible point. Newsagents will in all probability find that the extra copies they have been able to obtain to meet casual sales will have to be limited, if not stopped altogether.

Our readers who are in the habit of obtaining copies of the “Rugby Advertiser” here and there in a casual way, will greatly assist the agents and the publishers if they place an order for the paper with a particular agent, and always obtain it there, so that the number required each week may be definitely ascertained.

As the space available for news, etc, in the reduced size will be greatly curtailed, we regret that we shall not be able to insert gratuitously any Volunteer Orders for the week, appeals for gifts or subscriptions, acknowledgments of gifts, official notices, musical successes, shorthand successes, and so forth.

OLD MURRAYIANS IN THE EASTERN THEATRE.

Mr W T Coles Hodges has this week received the following letters from soldiers formerly connected with the Murray School, who are now in the Eastern theatre of the war. Pte A S Horswell, Signalling Section, 10th Middlesex Regiment, writes :—

“ The greater part of October and all November we spent in dug-outs on the side of Lala Baba. We used to go out morning, afternoon, and night doing ghastly fatigue work, such as making a road across Salt Lake, digging trenches (a specialised form of gardening), and unloading wood for lighters ; carrying railway sleepers across loose sand to load them on mule carts also forms a pleasant interlude between tea and supper, especially when the interlude is of six hours’ duration and the music is supplied by the Turkish orchestra a couple or three miles away. Of course, you know that the Peninsula is now evacuated.

“ We were at Suvla Bay . . . . At the end of November, the 26th, to be accurate, there was a violent storm that swamped the whole dug-outs and made the trenches like rivers. The storm abated at about 10 or 11 p.m. We could not sleep or lie down in our dug-outs as they were a foot deep in wet, clayey mud. Four of us got what blankets we could find in a more or less dry state, and went and found a tolerably dry spot near an ‘incinerator’ on the slopes of Lala Baba, adjoining C Beach. The next day we were due to leave the peninsula, but the sea was too rough, and our company was sent at night to guard some trenches facing Salt Lake. That night was absolutely IT. We had to do sentry-go in a blinding sleet storm and the usual accompaniment of a howling wind. The next morning the sleet stopped. I forget details, but I know our wet clothes froze on us, and whole crowds, including myself, went into the hospital on C Beach with exposure, rheumatism, frost-bite, etc.

I ultimately found myself at the Citadel Hospital, Cairo, and got into bed for the first time since leaving England. I got to Cairo on Friday, December 3rd. . . . We had an A1 Xmas at the hospital, roast beef, turkey, and plum pudding, with ail the usual accompaniments. The Citadel Hospital was formerly one of the Khedive’s palaces. It is a fine building, most picturesque, and the thing that struck me most was the colour scheme of the whole affair. The exterior was colour washed a bright orange, with a white dado affair at the top where the gutters our roofs would be. The window fittings and lattices were green, all three forming vivid contrasts. When you saw all this against a background of bright blue sky, with white splashes of cloud here and there, the effect was very striking. I could not help wishing for a camera, but at the same time I realised that it would lose the greater part of its beauty when reduced to mere black and white. It was a beautiful, building, full of opportunities for the water colour artist. The place abounded with balconies, pagodas, and odd, queer staircases in corners of quadrangles and courts, but colour was most essential in any pictorial reproduction. Without colour, ‘ musquise ’ (no good), as the natives here would say.”

The writer states that on New Year’s Day he visited the Pyramids and the Sphinx, and says:

“ The trams take you within 300 and 400 yards of it. Then there is an uphill climb, which can be done on ‘ Shanks’s pony,’ donkey, or camel. A native attached himself to me in the capacity of guide, philosopher, and friend, and discoursed in ‘ pidgin ’ English on the beauties of the Sphinx and Egypt generally, in the hope of ‘ backsheesh ‘ to come. The place, if you can call it a place, was crowded with soldiers and civilians, all bent on sightseeing. Taking things on the whole, the place resembled Hampstead Heath in fair time without the roundabouts.” The writer expressed himself as disappointed with the Sphinx and Pyramids, and adds: “ One felt that one wanted to be alone. There was too much of the military element to allow of much ‘ mysticism.’ My last impression was that of two 20th Century motor cars standing at the base of the Great Pyramid, which was built 4,000 years B.C.”

Pte Horswell was afterwards drafted to the base near Alexandria, of which he says: “ It is a very, fine town. Of course the European element is very much in evidence. French is the language spoken most—other than the native Arabic. All official notices, names of streets, etc, are duplicated in French and Arabic. There is a large Italian and Greek population, as well. There is the usual type of English shop, kept, generally by French people, and also the native bazaar. Strangely enough, there are no restaurants or cafes in the ordinary English acceptance of the term. A cafe here is usually only a drinking place, nothing to eat being obtainable.”

T Hillwell, another Old Murrayian, who is with the allied Forces at Salonica, in a letter says : “ The dawn of the 1st of November saw us step out of the train on to Serbian soil, and exceedingly thankful we were, for a night’s travelling on an open truck is not conducive to warmth. First of all, we had long marches to do, and we were struck by the excellence of the roads. They were really remarkable. November was a comparatively quiet month, so far as fighting was concerned, but the last week we were busy fighting another enemy-frost-bite. To realise what this means, one must be really on the spot. Then came the celebrated retreat, which has filled columns in the English newspapers. It was an exciting affair altogether, and it is a marvel to me how we got safely out of it. But out of it we did get, and with great credit, too. I feel really proud to have belonged to an Irish Division. Without a doubt these Irishmen can fight. So we are back again and enjoying a well-earned rest.

OLD MURRAYIAN WITH THE HOWITZER BATTERY.

Gunner A J Renshaw, of the Rugby Howitzer Battery, in a letter to his old schoolmaster, says :— “I arrived safely back to the land of mud and water, commonly known as ‘ Sunny France.’ During my absence there was plenty of fun going on, and ‘Fritz’ and his ‘brudders’ gave our infantry a surprise visit the other night, but as they strongly objected to their presence in our lines they ‘struck oil’ somewhat and were soon out again on the hop. Since then we have returned their visit with much more success. Of late considerable activity has been shown, and by now they are aware of the fact that we are out for business, for we have given them ‘ cold feet ‘ this last month or so, and soon you may here with confidence of our continued success. Of that there is very little doubt. We shall fight until we have avenged the dastardly atrocities they have committed in France and Belgian.”

A ST. MATTHEW’S OLD BOY IN SALONICA.

Extracts from letter of Pte F E Morley, R.A.M.C, an “ old boy ” of St Matthew’s School to Mr R H Myers, headmaster :—

“ We were the first of the British Expedition to land at Salonica, and you can well understand that, coming from Gallipoli, many of us wondered what we were doing to land in Greece at all. Still, it did not take long to make us aware of our mission, which was, of course, to link up with the gallant Serbian Army.

“ We spent a few days at Salonica before entraining for Gyevgeli, from which place we marched across country, landing about ten miles ahead of Dviran. Here we began to link up with the French troops, which were holding fast the road to Strumnitza. Fairly good progress was made, and by the end of November we were 22 miles ahead of Dviran. The country so for had been fairly decent, for at any rate it allowed the full use of transport, but as we began to get into the hills, mule transport only was possible. To describe to you the nature of the country where we were operating is far beyond my powers. From an artistic point of view it was ideal, but for the troops—well, just impossible.

“ Matters were very quiet for some few days and the weather conditions fairly favourable. Now and again Bulgar deserters came over to us and gave information of an impending attack which subsequently proved correct.

“ The last day of November saw the hills covered with a deep snow, a keen frost and biting wind accompanying it. Never before have I faced such a blinding storm, and one had a thousand pities for the boys in the trenches who had precious little protection. I happened to be at an advanced dressing station just behind the ‘ line,’ but fortunately we were able to make use of some houses in a deserted village, so that we had the comfort of a log fire.

“ We had many cases of exposure to deal with, and more than one poor fellow dropped to sleep in the snow, but, alas ! it meant the Sleep of death.

“ One night we were sent up to the ‘ line ’ for some sick men. The frost had continued making the ground very treacherous, so that it took us a matter of three hours to cover a distance of barely four miles. At frequent points on the way we had to crawl on hands and knees, while more than once we were ‘ footing it’ knee-deep in snow. Such were the conditions under which the jolly Irish boys held the line, and when you remember that only a few weeks back we had experienced the intense heat of Gallipoli, and then were suddenly transferred to this cold region, I think that the gallant conduct of our men during the subsequent,retirement into Greece is worthy of all praise.

“ We are now camped ‘ somewhere around Salonica,’ awaiting the anticipated attack. I cannot say much about the position, but I can assure you that ‘all’s well’ on this Front, and our boys would rather relish an attack in this quarter.

“ We have had a couple of air raids at Salonica, but very little damage was done. During the second our gun-firing was splendid, and I had the pleasure of seeing one Taube brought to earth.

“ I would like to come across some of our ‘old boys,’ but have not done so yet. Good luck to them, and may the day soon come when we shall be able to greet each other, proud in the knowledge that we have done our ‘little bit’ for old England and for the honour of the school.”

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Mr C Pegg, of 1 Addison Road, New Bilton, has heard from his son, Pte George Pegg, of the Leicestershire Regiment. He has been wounded in the leg, but is going on well.

The Chief Constable of Warwickshire has approved a scheme put forward by the Sutton Coldfield Volunteer Training Corps for “ police ” service in the event of a Zeppelin raid. Men have been allocated to districts in the borough, and their duty will be to see that all lights are extinguished, to regulate street traffic, and to prevent panic.

Corporal W Bale, an “ old boy ” of St Matthew’s School, serving in the 2nd Royal Welsh Fusiliers, has been promoted to the rank of Sergeant, for conspicuous gallantry on the field. Sergt Bale, who was recently mentioned in despatches, has been in the Army nine years, and was transferred from India to France on the Outbreak of the War.

WOUNDED TERRITORIALS.

1/7th Batt. Royal Warwickshire regiment : Pte. H. Snell, 2526, and Pte. A. Summers, 1351.

RECRUITING AT RUGBY.

During the past few weeks the number of recruits attested at the Drill Hall, Park Road, has averaged about 100 per week, of whom 70% have been single men. Those single men who wish to attest before the Military Service Act comes into force have only till midnight on Tuesday to do so, after then they will be conscripts and absorbed into the Army according to their classes.

In order to avoid a rush, which is anticipated at the last moment, men wishing to attest should visit the Drill Hall at once, and as early in the day as possible.

The Group system will remain open for married men after March 1st.

Attested men who wish to be medically examined before their groups are called up should make application to the Recruiting Officer at the Drill Hall. The medical examinations will take place at Warwick, and recruits will have to pay their own railway fare.

RUGBY COMMITTEE’S PARCELS FOR PRISONERS OF WAR ARRIVE WITHOUT DELAY.

It has been frequently brought to the notice of the Rugby Prisoners of War Help Committee that parcels sent by individuals to prisoners of war in Germany invariably arrive after long delay and almost useless, whereas the parcels sent through the Rugby Committee get through quickly and in perfect condition. This is mainly owing to good packing, and the fact that the committee is a registered and recognised society.

The Rugby Prisoners of War Help Committee are anxious to avoid this waste, and desire to make it known that they will gladly pack and forward food and clothing to any prison camp in Germany without charge.

Thus, if there are any persons in Rugby or the surrounding villages who have been in the habit of forwarding their own parcels, they are invited to send same in future to the Rugby Committee, who will indicate on the parcels the name of the giver.

Parcels should be sent to Mrs Blagden, at the Rectory, or to the Hon Secretary, Mr J Reginald Barker, 9 Regent Street, Rugby.

The Committee will also be glad to receive the names of any men from Rugby and district who are prisoners of war.

ASHLAWN HOSPITAL CLOSED.

In consequence of Ashlawn being required by the owner for residential purposes, it was closed as a V.A.D. Hospital on Tuesday last, and the patents were removed to other places.

Other premises have not yet been obtained, and Mrs E D Miller, the commandant, is looking out for a suitable house.

RUGBY PETTY SESSIONS.

TUESDAY.—Before Dr Clement Dukes (in the chair), Arthur James, T Hunter, A E Donkin, and W Dewar, Esqrs.

EXEMPTION FROM RATES.—“ Te Hira,” now used as a Red Cross Hospital, and 67 Albert Street, Rugby, occupied by Belgian refugees, were exempted from the poor rates.—A similar application was made in respect of 39 Albert Street, Rugby, also occupied by Belgians, but this was adjourned for the assistant overseer to ascertain the earnings of the occupants of the house.

DOG OWNERS’ EXEMPTIONS.—Applications had been received from 212 farmers in the division for exemptions from licenses in respect of 273 dogs, and from 49 shepherds respecting 53 dogs.—Objection was made by the police in two instances.—Superintendent Clarke mentioned a bailiff who had applied for exemption as a farmer, but at present he had no dog, although he had kept one.—It was understood the man would be having a dog soon, and the Magistrates’ Clerk ruled that in the circumstances there was no reason why the exemption should not be granted.

THE MILITARY SERVICE ACT AND AGRICULTURE.

This Act practically applies to all fit single men and widowers (without children) between the ages of 18 and 41.

The Act does not apply to men voluntarily attested under Lord Derby’s scheme.

Every man to whom the Act applies and who is not exempted will be deemed to have enlisted, as from March 2nd, 1916.

WHO MAY BE EXEMPTED.

FARMERS & MARKET GARDENERS.

Farmer (including Market Gardener and Fruit Farmer)—provided that—

(a) farming is his sole occupation and his personal labour or superintendence is indispensable for the proper cultivation of his holding ; or

(b) if he is partly occupied in another occupation, his personal labour or superintendence is indispensable for the proper cultivation of his holding and such cultivation is expedient in the national interest.

Agricultural Machinery, Steam Ploughs and Threshing Machines :-
Attendant ; Driver ; Mechanic.
Farm—Bailiff, Foreman, Grieve, Steward.
“ Beastman, Byreman, Cattleman, Stockman, Yardman.
“ Carter, Horseman, Ploughman, Teamster, Wagoner.
“ Hind (if Foreman or Ploughman).
“ Servant (if Foreman or Ploughman), Scotland.
” Shepherd.
Thatcher.
Stallion Man (a man who looks after and travels a stallion).
Stud Groom (Scotland).
Hop, Fruit, and Market Gardens : Foreman.

CERTIFICATES OF EXEMPTION.

Application must be made to the Local Tribunal for a certificate of exemption in the case of every unmarried man of military age in one of the “ certified occupations ” who has not attested and who desires to be exempted from enlistment under the Act. The fact that he may have already been “starred” makes no difference in this respect.

Such applications must be made to the Local Tribunal BEFORE MARCH 2nd NEXT.

A certificate of exemption must be granted by the Local Tribunal to any man who shows that his principal and usual occupation is one of those in the list of “ Certified Occupations ” unless an objection has been received from the military representative.

Any appeal from the decision of the Local Tribunal must be made within three days after the decision of the Local Tribunal on a forms supplied by the Clerk.

HEAVY FALL OF SNOW.—During Wednesday night there was a heavy fall of snow in the Midlands, which continued almost without intermission throughout Thursday. The landscape presented a very wintry appearance in consequence, snow lying on the ground to a depth of several inches—nearly a foot in some places. Townspeople were busy on Thursday clearing the footpaths, in accordance with the request of the Urban District Council, and in the afternoon members of Rugby School from Mr Wilson’s house were occupied in this way in front of the School buildings in Lawrence Sheriff Street. Boys at the preparatory schools were also in their element, clearing snow away, and members of the fair sex did not hesitate to show their ability to use shovels, brushes, and any other implement that came handy.

12th Feb 1916. Another Interesting Letter from the Front

ANOTHER INTERESTING LETTER FROM THE FRONT.

The Rev CT Bernard McNulty, Vicar of Holy Trinity, Leamington, contributes to his Parish Magazine for this month another interesting letter written from the Headquarters, Divisional Artillery, British Expeditionary Force, where he is attached as a chaplain.

“ I write again,” he says, “ from this little village in France, a village in which every little farmhouse, and every tumble-down barn, is crowded with British soldiers—troops to whom the inhabitants as a rule show much kindness and consideration, and yet think what such a state of affairs means to the people here ! The best rooms in their houses are given us, the very straw is turned out of their barns in order to make room for our men ; consider how very small is the payment which the French people receive from their Government for all this, when compared to the prices paid in England for the billeting of troops. In England the house-holder receives 3s a night for every officer who sleeps in his house, and in many cases there are several officers in the one house, and for every private soldier payment of 6d a night is made ; but here in this country the rate of payment is one franc (8d) a night per officer, and 1/2 d a night for each soldier ! When troops are stationed in any district in England, it means an enormously increased prosperity in that particular locality, or town, but here the inhabitants gain very little pecuniary benefit by our presence, for with the exception of eggs and vegetables bought from the small farms, any extras which the soldiers purchase are bought at our army canteens, a number of which are provided in every division. Yet the people, with but few exceptions, are as a rule kind and obliging, at any rate, such has been my experience, and why ? Because they fully realise that we are here to protect and safeguard their homes from a foe who is close to their very doors, and they know full well that the safety and welfare of their country is at stake, and on every French person’s lips to-day there is but one motto. It is this: ‘ Honneur et Patrie.’

“ A few days ago I passed through several French villages, and in each village, here and there, I noticed houses brightly decorated with evergreens and holly, whilst over the door in large letters the motto was printed. I asked the reason for this, and I was told that the recruits of the 1916 class were being called out, and soon I saw companies of lads marching away from their villages, as years ago their fathers marched, for there are practically no men to-day in France who do not know what it is to fight in the wars. How it thrilled my heart to see these lads ! Strong, healthy-looking youths, tramping along with their rifles on their shoulders, with heads held high, and a smile on their lips, leaving their homes, yet bravely hiding the aching hearts proud that at last the looked-for day had come for them, when they could don the uniform of their army. ‘ Honneur et Patrie.’ Such were the words over each home from which a son had gone forth, and the parents’ hands had put up those evergreens, had written the glorious motto. They, too, had hidden the aching heart. Is it not a matter of rejoicing, say they, for has not our boy gone forth to the war ? And in the silence of the night, as they whisper his name in their prayers, it will be as if they heard the voice of God answering ‘ Honneur et Patrie ‘ !

“ Ah, yes, this is the dominating thought throughout the length and breadth of France, the one thought influencing the actions of all its people. It is honour and country which makes one man eager to go forth to the battery or the trench. It is the self-same motto which makes his brother work earnestly and cheerfully in factory or workshops. In the workshops the same golden motive is inspiring labour. They know that they toil for something higher and nobler than wages. The other day I was speaking to a French interpreter, a member of one of France’s noblest families, like many another French nobleman serving to-day as a private in the army of France. He told me that his brother had large munition works near Paris, and that the workmen had petitioned that they might be allowed to work on Sundays. They stated, as their reason, that they felt they could not rest that day, whilst their brothers were fighting in the trenches ! Dare I say that the sanctity of the Sabbath is violated by labour undertaken from such a motive ?

“ Soon there is to be in Great Britain a very modified form of compulsory service. Whatever may have been our opinions on that subject in the past, to-day such a course is right because it is necessary. It is necessary for honour and country. Let that sublime thought silence the voice of opposition, and let those who are called upon to send forth their sons, remember the decorated homes of France !

“ ‘ Honneur et Patrie.’ May that, indeed, be the proud motto for all in our country during this year of 1916. I can wish no grander thing. May it be the sole motive underlying the sayings and actions of every politician who sits within the walls at Westminster. May that same motive lighten the labours of thorn who toil in our workshops, making both employers and men earnest and faithful. May it make the women of our country eager and proud to send forth their manhood, and may that same thought make our soldiers brave in the face of danger. May it also bring consolation to those who mourn ! ”

LETTERS FROM OLD MURRAYIAN8.

Mr W T Coles Hodges, headmaster of the Murray School, has received several letters from Old Boys with the Colours.

Ptes C E Williams and E A Welch, C Section, Machine Gun Company, 143rd Infantry Brigade, write:—

“ We chaps of the Machine Gun are now no longer attached to our old Battalion, for we have been formed into a Machine Gun Company; find so we are away from the rest of they old “ E ” Company. However, we are still able to see them occasionally, and we are pleased to say that they all seem to keep in fairly good health. Would you kindly thank the Rugby Territorial Comforts Committee from the Rugby boys of the Machine Gun Company for all the gifts they so kindly sent us, which were handed on to us by Q.M.Sergt Tomlinson. They were much appreciated by all. At present, there are only two Old Murrayians in our section. The trenches are a little better now than they have been for a month or two. We still have our share of mud, but it is drying up a treat.

“ Fritz is as amiable as ever, only just lately he has begun to talk too much with his artillery. He always get paid back with interest, though, by our artillery, which includes the Rugby Howitzer Battery. We are out of the trenches now, but go in again shortly. While out, we have to man a gun for anti-aircraft purposes, and we are anxiously waiting for a Taube to come over, so that we can warm our gun up a little.”

W Holmes, a sailor boy on one of H.M. warships, has also written to Mr Hodges, stating that he is having a good time and is now at sea.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

In response to the appeal of the Rugby Womens’ Volunteer Reserve for fresh fruit and vegetables for the sailors—who have to depend upon gifts from friends for such luxuries—a gift ? held at the Murray School on Friday in last week, when neatly 7cwt. of produce, consisting of artichokes, parsnips, oranges, apples, beet, cabbage, onions, carrots, turnips, etc, were received. The gifts were afterwards packed up under the supervision of Captain , Moss and Quartermaster Dickinson, of the W.V.R.

NEW BILTON SOLDIER WOUNDED.

Mr C Pegg, of 1 Addison Road, New Bilton, received an official intimation that his son, Pte George Pegg, of the Leicestershire Regiment, was wounded on January 6th. Particulars of nature of the wounds have not yet come to hand.

 

PTE FREDK BAXTER DIES OF WOUNDS.

Pte Fredk Baxter, youngest son of Mrs Baxter, New Street, New Bilton, who, as we recently reported, was seriously wounded in the knee in France on January 7th, died as the result of his injuries in Colchester Hospital on Saturday. Pte Baxter, who belonged to the Royal Warwickshire Regiment, was out with a scouting party when a bullet passed through his knee, killing the officer in charge who was behind him. Pte Baxter was brought to England about three weeks ago, and it was ascertained that his injury was so serious that it was found necessary to amputate the limb. At first he made good progress, and it was hoped that he would ultimately recover, but towards the end of last week he became worse, and his mother was summoned on Saturday, but he died before she reached the hospital. He was 26 years of age, and joined the army after the outbreak of war. The body was brought to Rugby, and the funeral took place in the Cemetery yesterday (Friday) afternoon.

[Private Baxter is remembered on the Croop Hill War Memorial]

SCHOOLBOYS WITH ARMLETS.

We understand that every master of military age at Rugby School has attested or been rejected, and a number of the senior boys of the school may be seen wearing armlets, showing they, too, have done their duty in this connection.

RECRUITING AT RUGBY.

There have been very few enlistments under the Group System during the past week, but the majority of those who have presented themselves were single men. We would remind single men who have not yet attested that the Group System so far as they are concerned comes to an end this month, after which time they will be automatically absorbed into the Army.

POST OFFICE NOTICE.

REDUCTION OF DELIVERIES IN RUGBY.

On and from Monday, the 21st inst, there will only be two deliveries on weekdays in Rugby, at 7 a.m and 12.30 p.m. Sunday deliveries will remain for the present.

In the rural districts the deliveries are being limited to one daily, and these changes are being carried out as circumstances permit.

PROTECTIVE MEASURES AGAINST ZEPPELINS.

CONFERENCE IN BIRMINGHAM.

A DEMAND FOR EARLY WARNING.

The conference of representatives of Midland authorities, convened by the Lord Mayor of Birmingham (Alderman Neville Chamberlain), to consider the question of the better protection of the Midlands in the event of further aircraft raids, was-held on Wednesday afternoon at the Council House Birmingham. The Lord Mayor presided, and there was a large and representative attendance of nearly 100 public gentlemen from all parts of the counties of Warwick, Worcester, and Stafford.

A resolution was passed calling on the military authorities to organise a system for giving an early warning of the approach of hostile aircraft and information as to subsequent movements inland. A committee was appointed to lay before the authorities the methods which the meeting considered would best the situation.

The meeting then proceeded to discuss the various methods to be adopted in giving warning to the public, and while so engaged a telegram was received by the Lord Mayor from the Under-Secretary of State for the Home Department, stating that “ the matter of organisation for conveying to police, factories, etc, information of movements of hostile aircraft being actively pressed forward by Field-Marshal Commanding-in-Chief Home Forces in co-operation with Post Office.”

TEST MOBILISATION OF BOY SCOUTS.

On Wednesday, February 2nd, a surprise mobilisation, was held of the town, troops of the Boy Scouts, the idea being to ascertain how soon the boys could turn out in the event of their being required in case of an air raid, to assist the public organisations such as the St John’s Ambulance Brigade, Red Cross Nurses, Fire Brigades, etc.

Although the Scouts were quite unaware when the mobilisation would take place, 50 responded to the call, and assembled on the B.T.H. Athlete Field. A number of the boys, of course, were prevented by overtime, and by evening classes, from taking part. After the mobilisation had taken place, the boys were practised in outpost and sentry duty under the following scheme :— Important military stores were supposed to be located in the field, the Scouts being deputed to defend same from hostile attack while some kind friends had previously undertaken to set as “ enemies ” and. endeavour to obtain access to these stores. Some of these spies were duly caught by the Scouts…

DEARTH OF PETROL

The supply of petrol available for the use of owners of private motor cars will in future be considerably restricted.

Nearly a month ago restrictions upon the supplies of petrol were foreshadowed by the British Petroleum. Company in a circular which they sent out. Now, by some companies at any rate a limit has been placed upon the number of gallons to be supplied to various districts. Hitherto the public have paid little attention to the warnings they have received that, in the national interests, private users should exercise the utmost economy. The restrictions upon the supply which have now been put into force do not affect the owners of vehicles used for commercial purposes.

THE MILK SUPPLY.

COTTAGERS & GOAT-KEEPING.

A very interesting circular has been issued by the Board of Agriculture and Fisheries, pointing out how in certain districts goat-keeping might be extended with advantage. It is well known (says the “ Lancet”) that many cottagers and others living outside the area of retail delivery find it difficult to obtain milk for their families. The large dairy farms are, as a rule, under contract to supply milk to distributing agencies in towns, or else they, turn their milk into cheese and butter. As the Board rightly says, all the objections which apply to the keeping of a cow by a cottager would be met in the case of a goat. The first; expenditure for its purchase is within his means, the housing accommodation is reduced to a minimum, the food costs little, and there is no great expense to be borne for the maintenance of the animal.

Even in the event of a cow’s milk supply being available, goats may profitably be kept to supply milk for domestic use. It is, as a rule, a most wholesome milk, and its flavour, if the food of the animal is regulated, is not any real drawback to its employment. Moreover, goat’s milk is easily digested by children, and especially infants, and, as is well known, it is fair lets likely than cow’s milk to contain tubercle bacilli of animal origin. The average goat will give at its flush three pints of milk a day, and, on the whole, calculations based on extreme cost of keep, outlay, and so forth, show that while a good supply of milk could be maintained, a very fair profit could be made. The suggestion is a valuable one, and the information contained in this circular as to how to start goat-keeping, as to the choice of breeds, as to breeding itself, housing, feeding, tethering, milking, and the care of the milk, and so forth, should be spread up and down the land.

The composition of cow’s milk and goat’s milk is much the same, although goat’s milk is superior as regards fat, which is an advantage. Human milk differs chiefly from goat’s and cow’s milk in that it contains a much smaller proportion of mineral salts and casein.

 

TO RELATIVES OF WOUNDED SOLDIERS.

AN OFFER FROM CHICHESTER.

Mr Robert Bottrill, of Rugby House. Chichester, wishes to be informed when Rugby soldiers are patients in the Graylingwell War Hospital. If relatives will communicate with him, he says he. will be very pleased to visit such soldiers and to take them motor rides ; also, if any friends of the wounded would like to visit them at Chichester, Mr Bottrill offers to provide them with a bed, etc. He adds : “ I believe we have had several Rugby boys here, and I have missed them.”

Mr. Bottrill is a native of Rugby, which explains his desire to show kindness to wounded soldiers from homes in the town who may be staying in the Graylingwell Hospital.

10th Jul 1915. News from the front – Missing and Killed

REPORTED MISSING.

News has been received that Pte G W Coleman, of the 5th Battalion Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, son of Mr Walter Coleman, a carpenter in the employ of Messrs Foster & Dicksee, living at New Bilton, is missing. The message came from a friend of Pte Coleman, who writing to his own father, asked that Mr Coleman should be informed that his son did not answer to the roll call when the Company left the trenches on a recent date. This is corroborated by another correspondent, who states that when coming out of the trenches Pte Coleman was killed. The young fellow was one of the many who enlisted from the B.T.H Works and had only been at the front a few weeks.

OFFICER FEARS HE IS KILLED.

Writing to the parents, on July 1st, Captain Webb, the officer commanding the Company, states:—“ I very much grieve to say that your son, Pte W G Coleman, is missing since a charge we made on the night of the 22nd. While in the cases of one or two missing men, they have been found wounded in various hospitals which they reached from the battlefield, I think it would not be wise or just to yourself to build on the hope that such is the case of your son. I fear he is killed, and I am more than deeply sorry for you. It is a terrible thing, and the suspense is awful. We made a charge and were driven back. Countless deeds of bravery were done, and all the wounded were brought in and some of the dead. Still, several men are missing, one an officer, and I’m afraid we must give them up for dead. Perhaps, when we again advance we shall be able to clear the matter up, and I will at once let you know if I am spared. The officers and men offer you their deepest and sincerest sympathy, and will do all in their power to put an end to your suspense.”

Mr Coleman has also received a communication from the Infantry Record Office at Warwick, dated July 5th, stating that a report had been received from the War Office to the effect that Pte W G Coleman was posted as “missing ” after the engagement in France on June 22nd.

NEWBOLD-ON-AVON.

ANOTHER NEWBOLD MAN MISSING.

Mr and Mrs Williams, Newbold, have received a communication from the War Office that their son, John Williams, a private in the 4th Battalion Rifle Brigade, is missing, nothing having been heard of him since the 10th of May. Rifleman Williams joined the army at the commencement of the war, and was drafted to the front about twelve weeks ago. He was 20 years of age, and previous to joining the army was employed at the Newbold Works of the Rugby Portland Cement Company.

STRETTON-ON-DUNSMORE.

THE ROLL OF HONOUR.—Another young man, the third from the village, has given his life for his country. News was received by the parents of Charles Hancox, of the London Road, some days ago that he was dangerously wounded, and was lying in the base hospital in France. This was soon followed by news of his death. He was a good-natured lad, and was much liked by his companions. Great sympathy is felt for his parents in their trouble. A memorial service was held in the Parish Church on Sunday last, at which there was a full congregation. Suitable hymns were sung, and a touching, inspiring address was given by the Vicar.

RUGBY SOLDIER WOUNDED BY SHRAPNEL.

Pte Ernest Tomlinson, son of Mr and Mrs E Tomlinson, of 20 James Street, Rugby, is lying in Norwich Hospital suffering from a scalp wound, caused at the front by shrapnel. He was employed as a fitter at the B.T.H Works, and enlisted on September 2nd in the King’s Royal Rifles. He was sent to France in May, and within three weeks, whilst trench digging, was rather badly injured by a shrapnel shell. He has lost, for the time being at all events, his speech, and the use of his right hand, so that the news received by his parents has come through other sources, a soldier in an adjoining bed having sent particulars. It is gratifying to learn that Pte Tomlinson is improving, and hopes are entertained that in time his speech will be restored. He is understood to be suffering from shock as well as from wounds. Mr and Mrs Tomlinson have a younger son, William, serving his country at the front, also in the King’s Royal Rifles, but attached to a different battalion. He has been in the fighting line for some weeks now, and his last letter, received on Monday, stated that he was quite well.

FORMER MEMBER OF THE BOYS’ BRIGADE WOUNDED.

News has been received by Mr and Mrs Hayward, of 43 Lodge Road, that their son, Pte George Hayward, of the Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, has been wounded and having been in hospital for some time is now at a convalescent home at Hampton-in-Arden. Pte Hayward was for 11 years a member of the 1st Rugby Company the Boys’ Brigade, and when he enlisted in August was employed at Messrs Willans & Robinsons Works. He was shot in the fighting in Flanders, one bullet entering his cheek, injuring his jaw and affecting his eyesight, and another lodging in his hip, after passing through the water-bottle that formed part of his equipment.

MEMBER OF RUGBY HOWITZER BATTERY ACCIDENTALLY SHOT.

A BROTHER’S PAINFUL EXPERIENCE.

The painful task of travelling from the front to break the news of his brother’s death this week befell Gunner George Sutton (Newton), of the Rugby Howitzer Battery. From what we can gather, the Howitzer Battery recently returned to a rest camp, and on Sunday evening it was reported that a man had been shot. Gunner Sutton, proceeded to the spot to see who was the victim, and was horrified to find his younger brother, William, a driver in the Ammunition Column, lying dead. As the result of an enquiry it was established that death was due to accident, and Gunner Sutton was graded several days’ leave of absence to convey the sad tidings to his parents. The circumstances were detailed in a letter from Capt Saunders, of the Ammunition Column, which Gunner Sutton brought home :-“ It is with much regret that I have to inform you that your son, William Sutton, was found shot at about 10 p.m on the 4th of this month. A Court of officers enquired into the circumstances very carefully, and from the evidence decided that death was due to accident, and that there was no question at all of foul play. The funeral was conducted by an Army Chaplain of the Roman Catholic Church, and a cross is being provided with an inscription suitably worded. The N.C.O’s and men of the Ammunition Column are ordering a wreath and the grave will be well cared for. It has been arranged for your other son to proceed home on leave to-day, and I hope this will help to comfort you in your loss. Please accept the sympathy of officers of the Ammunition Column, in which your son was serving.”

Driver Sutton, who was the second son of Mr Wm. Sutton, was 21 years of age, and had been a member of the Battery about two years. Previous to the war he was employed by Mr Scott Howkins, and was very popular, and highly respected by all who knew him.

NEW BILTON RECRUIT DIES OF SEPTIC FEVER.

Sympathy will be felt with Mr and Mrs Pegg, of 1 Addison Road, New Bilton, in the death, on Thursday, from septic fever, at Felixstowe Military Hospital, of their son Harold, the youngest of three who had responded to their country’s call. Deceased was a printer’s apprentice, in the employ of Mr George Over, and about two months ago enlisted in the Bedfordshire Regiment He was only 19 years of age, and expressed a liking for the military life so far as he had become conversant with it. He was very popular with the men in Mr Over’s printing office, and all have signed a letter of sympathy with Mr and Mrs Pegg in their sad bereavement.

RUGBY HOWITZERS COMPLIMENTED.

Driver C W Packwood, of the Rugby Howitzers, now serving in France, son of Mr C J Packwood, of St Matthew Street, in a recent letter home states that after three months in the firing line the section of which he belongs is now in a rest camp, the change being appreciated, especially the privilege of sleeping once again in a bed. Driver Packwood also says that the Rugby Battery has been very highly complimented on their accurate firing by the officers they have come in contact with, and the word of praise has naturally had a cheering effect upon the men.

VOLUNTEERS FOR THE FRONT.

L J D Pepperday, son of Mr J H Pepperday, of High Street ; P Morson, son of Mr Arthur Morson, of Newbold Road ; and Neville and Roland Bluemel, sons of Mr C Bluemel, of Moultrie Road, were included in a draft of 150 who volunteered for the front to fill up gaps in the 1st Battalion of the Hon Artillery Company. The draft left for France on Thursday last week.

WARWICKSHIRE YEOMANRY IN EGYPT.

Trooper E Amos, youngest son of Mr W Amos, farmer, Dunchurch, writing home from Alexandria, says :- We go out for bugle practice every morning at 6, mounted. This gives us a good chance to have a look round. We see the corn crops growing, chiefly maise, all in bloom now (middle of June) and six feet high, any amount of tomato fields, and the plants seem loaded ; then you see the fig trees and the banana trees. We also see a tremendous lot of cotton coming down the Nile in barges, pulled by men instead of horses. We have had a job this last week unloading wounded off the ships from the Dardanelles. There are thousands of them, mostly Australians, but there are a lot of soldiers who were billeted in and around Rugby. There are a lot of fine hospitals here, and that is why they keep bringing so many wounded.

PLUCKY RESCUE BY A RUGBY ATHLETE.

The “ Yorkshire Observer ” records a plucky act recently performed by Lance-Corpl Arthur Gibson, now in training with the Royal Engineers at Salisbury Plain, who was until he enlisted on the staff at Messrs Willans & Robinson’s Works, being employed in the drawing office. It appears that Lance-Corpl Gibson was on a visit to a sister at Morecambe, when he noticed that a boy, who was bathing, was in difficulties. Promptly divesting himself of his tunic, he plunged into the water ; and although the tide was running strongly, he brought the lad safely to shore. He was complimented on his bravery at the time, but quickly disappeared, and it was not until some time later that his identity was established.

It will be remembered that whilst Mr Gibson was at Rugby he assisted the Football Club as a wing three-quarter. He also took part in Association six aside matches played on Willans’ Athletic Ground, being included in the team that represented the Drawing Office, and assisted Messrs Willans & Robinson’s side in their inter-firm football with the B.T.H representatives. Mr Gibson’s old comrades at Rugby will be interested to learn of his plucky rescue, and glad it has not been allowed to escape public attention altogether.

AIR RAIDS.

RUGBY FIRE BRIGADE.

A preliminary drill took place on Wednesday last, Messrs Baker, Highton, Robbins, and the Central Garage Company lending cars, and a number of Boy Scouts attended. Everything worked smoothly, and it is hoped that fires (if any) caused by a raid will be speedily extinguished.

It is desirable to have motor-cars, because those already engaged may not be available at the moment.

The Chief Officer hopes that at least four more cars will be offered for a preliminary drill on Thursday 22nd inst., at 8 p.m. More scouts are also required, and only one drill is necessary.

RECRUITING AT RUGBY.

The following have been accepted at the Drill Hall, Park Road, during the past week :—W J Hirons and H W Appleton, 220th (Rugby) Fortress Company, R.E ; C A Davis, R.W.R ; G J Smith, Cheshire Regiment ; H J Ford, Oxon and Bucks L.I ; T W Ingram, Royal Inniskilling Fusliers ; F Hawkins, Seaforth Highlanders ; W J Holliday, Royal Berks ; R W Cave, Army Veterinary Corps ; D A Leist, A.S.C ; A Townsend, Military Mounted Police ; J P Betts, Royal Engineers.