25th Nov 1916. Military Funeral

MILITARY FUNERAL.

On Wednesday afternoon, in Rugby Cemetery, the burial took place, with military honours, of Corpl John Henry Gilbert Reynolds, 2nd Grenadier Guards, son of Mr T Reynolds, builder, Dunchurch Road, who died in Chichester Hospital on November 20th of wound’s received in action at the age of 25 years. This is the third of Mr Reynolds’s sons who have fallen in the war, and his only surviving son—Pte Ernest Reynolds, of the Royal Warwicks—is now in Birmingham Hospital, and obtained leave to attend the funeral. Previous to joining the army, Corpl Jack Reynolds was in the Metropolitan Police Force, and eight of his former friends from the Islington sub-division, under an Inspector, attended the funeral. A firing party from Warwick was also present, together with a bugler, who sounded the “ Last Post ” at the graveside. The Rev A W Bunnett, Westminster, conducted the service. In addition to the family mourners there were present : Rev J H Lees, Messrs C G Steele, T A Wise, S Cox, J Ferry, and L-Corpl J Norman, a Crimean veteran. The floral tributes, which were very beautiful, were sent by “ His sorrowing father, brother, and sisters ” ; “ In ever loving memory of my darling Jack, from Mabs ” ; “ A Tribute of respect from the officers and men of the Islington Sub-Division Metropolitan Police ” ; Mrs Stubbs and Gladys ; Mr and Mrs P Cooke ; Mr and Mrs Busby and Sergt and Mrs Sherwood ; Cousins Harry and Emily ; “ In affectionate memory of a brave soldier from his friends at Fairlawn ”; Mr and Mrs Pottrill and Marjorie ; Aunt Mrs Charlton and Aunt Mrs Burnham ; Sister and Nurses, K AI Ward, Graylingwell Hospital, Chichester ; “ In memory of a brave comrade, from the patients of K A1 Ward, Graylingwell” ; Uncle Harry, Aunt Rachel, and Aunt Lucy ; and Mrs W P Brooks, 78 Dunchurch Road, Rugby.

[For biography see last post]

RUGBY URBAN DISTRICT COUNCIL.

SYMPATHY WITH A BEREAVED TOWNSMAN.

The Clerk mentioned that he had received an intimation that Mr T Reynolds, of Dunchurch Road, had lost his third son in the recent fighting, who was to be brought from Chichester hospital to Rugby for burial. He remarked that it seemed an especially sad case, because Mr Reynolds had only four sons, three of whom were now dead, and the fourth was lying wounded in hospital in Birmingham.—Mr Wise, in proposing a vote of sympathy on behalf of the Council and the town with Mr Reynolds, said he did not know of any family in Rugby that had suffered so heavily in the war.—Mr Robbins seconded, and said just before war broke out Mr Reynolds lost his wife, and he knew of no harder case.—The Chairman said in the early days of the war Mr Reynolds was frequently speaking to him about his sons, who were very fine fellows, and he was sure the town would like them to pass that vote of sympathy.—The Council signified their assent to the proposition by standing up.—In his remarks, Mr Wise suggested that, if possible, the Council should provide the grave free, and, meeting later as a Burial Board, they decided to do this. The advisability of adopting a similar course in other cases of Rugby men dying through the war and brought home for interment was referred to the Cemetery Committee, together with a suggestion that a portion of the burial ground should be set apart for such interments.

FIREMEN AND THE WAR.

Some time ago (the Clerk said) the Council sent a petition to the Government supporting an application by the National Fire Brigades Union that members of Volunteer Fire Brigades should be exempt from Military service. This had failed, and the national Fire Brigades Union had written to inform the Council of the fact.-Mr Newman informed the Council that thirteen members of the Rugby Fire Brigade, had actually joined the colours, and two men were going, leaving 14 of the original members still in the Brigade, and five old members, who had come forward to help in the present crisis.

ROAD SERVICE IN FRANCE.

The Surveyor had received a letter respecting the endeavour to raise 10,000 men for road service in France, and asking the Council’s hearty co-operation in an effort to provide a Warwickshire Company of 250 men, also pointing out that all able-bodied men up to 50 years of age, used to pick and shovel, would be eligible.—Mr Yates pointed out that several of the Council’s employees who had worked on the roads were now serving, and they might do useful work on the roads in France.—The Chairman : We have several in the Rugby Fortress Company, the steam roller driver included.—Referred to Highways Committee.

The Electric Lighting Committee reported that they had given directions that the free supply of current to houses occupied by the Belgian Refugees Committee be discontinued. Reports had been received alleging wrongful use of current supplied to a consumer, and they recommended that proceedings be taken against the man.—The report was agreed to.

RUGBY VOLUNTEER CORPS.

As announced on another page, an entertainment is to be held at the Co-operative Hall on Thursday and Friday next in aid of the Corps funds, and we are informed that the demand for tickets has made it necessary to increase the number of reserved seats. An impression, however, appears to be prevalent that the Corps does not require funds, but that the Government will find all the necessary equipment. No regulations on this point have bet been promulgated by the Government, but it is clear that they will not provide Complete equipment nor funds for general running expenses, which will have to be met by voluntary effort. It is to help this fund that members and friends have organised the forthcoming concert.

Lord French, speaking at the Guildhall Banquet, said : “ We must always act and appear as if we believe and know invasion to be possible, and then we shall never be taken by surprise.”

Although the fact is not so generally known, the whole of the Special Constable Force for air raid service in the town is provided by the Corps. These men turn out at all hours of the night when Zeppelins visit our shores. Such services cannot be over-rated, and this alone should be sufficient to earn the support of every worthy citizen in this appeal for funds.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Pte Miles Berry, R.A.M.C, son of Mr and Mrs Berry, of Brownsover (late of Stockton), has been awarded the D.C.M.

Mr H Lupton Reddish has received intimation that his son, Pte H W L Reddish, of the H.A.C (Infantry), was wounded in the right arm and knee on Tuesday week by shrapnel while attacking. He has undergone an operation, and is going on satisfactorily. He is now in hospital in France.

Among those who were decorated on Saturday last by H.H the King for distinguished service in the field was Lieut H S Harrison, son of Mr H P Harrison, of Guilsborough (formerly of Hillmorton), who received the Military Cross for conspicuous bravery in leading his men and constructing a “ block ” in a sunken road under very heavy and persistent enemy fire.

Mr O M Samson, an assistant-master at Rugby School, and Well known as a cricketer—Somerset County and Rugby Club—has joined the Officers* Cadet Battalion at Topsham, near Exeter, to learn gunnery. His place in the Army Class has been filled by a member of the School.

Mc[?] Harry Pratt, of School Street, who has been in France since May with a section of the Royal Flying Corps, is now promoted to 1st Air Mechanic, dating from October 1st.

Rugby Prisoners of War Christmas Parcels.—The Rugby Prisoners of War Help Committee have this week despatched their Christmas parcels to the local men in prison camps in Germany. The contents included : 1lb tea, one tin cafe au lait, one tin condensed milk, 1lb sugar, one fruit pudding, one Christmas pudding, one tin of ox-cheek and vegetables, one tin salmon, one tin of sausages, one packet of chocolate, one tin of peppermints, one tin mustard, one card darning wool and needle, 100 cigarettes, and 1lb tobacco. There were 65 parcels.

THE KING AND HIS ARMIES.—To follow on the famous Somme picture at the Empire this week we understand Mr Morris has booked the second War Office official film of the series. It is entitled “ The King Visits his Armies in the Great Advance,” and will be presented about the middle of December.

IN MEMORIAM.

PEARCE.-In loving memory of WALTER, the dearly loved son of H. & C. Pearce, of Dunchurch, who was killed on H.M.S. Bulwark, November 26, 1914.
“ There is a link death cannot sever,
Sweet remembrance lasts for ever.”
—From his FATHER and MOTHER.

ROWE.—In loving memory of Pte. Geo. H. Rowe, who died from exposure at Gallipoli on Nov. 28, 1915.
“ Thy will be done was hard to say,
When one we loved was called away.”
—From his ever-loving WIFE, CHILDREN & FATHER.

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