Reynolds, Thomas Henry. Died 12th Aug 1917

Thomas Henry Reynolds was the eldest son of Thomas Henry and Mary Ann (nee Wells), and elder brother of George Ellis Reynolds  who had died on 31 July 1917 at Ypres.

Thomas was born in Rugby in 1879 and baptised at St Andrews Church on 7 December 1883. In the 1881 census he was with his parents and baby sister Mary in the household of his paternal grandmother Sarah and her second husband Thomas Hibbert in Pinders Lane.

In the 1891 Census he was aged 12 and named as Harry Reynolds, living at 14 Pinders Lane Rugby with his parents and 6 siblings. By 1901 Thomas was aged 22, a baker of bread, living at 61 James Street Rugby with his parents and 6 siblings including his younger brother George.

On 10th January 1904 Thomas aged 25 married Emily Perkins age 24 in St. Mary’s Church Clifton Rugby, and by 1911 they had 2 children, Eva Perkins Reynolds who was born in 1908 in Newton near Rugby and Henry Spencer Reynolds born in 1904 in Rugby.

Thomas Henry was a coal cake man and carter working for Ellis & Sons coal merchants, living in Newton in 4 rooms. Emily’s mother ran the Post Office in Newton together with her daughter.

Thomas’s army attestation of 10 May 1916 and his medal card state that he first joined the Royal Warwickshire Regiment as Private No 203552, was transferred to the 5th Battalion of the Royal Welsh Fusiliers and sent to France on 10 June 1917. He received a severe gunshot wound in the left leg on 28 July for which he was treated in the field, later being admitted to hospital at Etaples where he died on 12 Aug, aged 37. He is buried in Grave XXV M6A in Etaples Military Cemetery.

Thomas is mentioned together with his brother in the Rugby Advertiser of 18 August 1917 as being an Old Murrayan, formerly a clerk at Rugby Station in the goods yard of Ellis & Sons, coal merchants.

He received the British Empire and Victory medals. His widow was granted a pension of £1.2s.11d a week for herself and their two children, as well as his back pay of £2.8s.3d and War Gratuity of £3. Emily continued to run the Post Office on her own after Thomas’s death.

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

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30th Sep 1916. Further News from Switzerland

FURTHER NEWS FROM SWITZERLAND.

Our readers will recall a letter we printed about a month ago from Bandsman C Rowe, of the Welsh Fusiliers, who was a prisoner of War in Germany, and who was fortunate enough to be sent to Switzerland. Mr J R Barker, the hon secretary of the Rugby Prisoner of War Help Committee has this week received another interesting letter from Bandsman Rowe (who is at Leysin, Switzerland), dated September 14. He says :-

“ Last night I received your most welcome letter, and was so pleased to hear you received mine all right.

“ As regards giving you any news to interest your subscribers, about the best news-or I should say the worst—is that if the parcels stop, there is not much chance of our men leaving Germany alive. I was asked in each camp by my comrades not to forget to send a letter to each Fund which sends parcels and thank them on behalf of our lads in Germany. If the people could only witness our poor mens’ faces when they don’t appear on the packet roll which is posted up on the arrival of the mail, I’m positive that your fund would be soon swelled. Many of the men have been through those terrible times in 1914 and early 1915, and I can assure you, sir, that they are a brave lot ; they will face any hardships, but they won’t on any account work on anything connected with ammunition.

“ The men who suffer most are those down salt and coal mines. When they are sick they are placed in a room with no attention given them, and some horrible tales will be told after the war by those men. The parcels you send are just what our men require, but if you hear of a man on Commando, or Working Party, then it would be advisable to send something in place of bread, especially in the months of May until August. You will notice I am going well into next year, but it is best to he prepared. I have had a few letters asking me about the possibilities of the Germans looting our mens’ food. Well, sir, I am sure there is not much chance for that to happen, as the people are so much afraid of the Government. They were begging for bread when I left, so you can see they have put their pride in their pockets.

“ I must conclude now, sir, wishing your fund success, which it really deserves.—With best regards, I am yours sincerely, C ROWE.”

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

In our last issue we mentioned that the expenses in connection with the War Prisoners’ Flag Day included the cost of 3,500 flags. It should have been 35,000.

The remains of Lieut Rogers, of the Royal Flying Corps, who was killed as the result of a collision between aeroplanes near Rugby in August, were sent to Canada, and the interment took place, with full military honours, at Barrie, Ontario, on September 4th.

Pte J H Fazakerley, Signal Section attached to the R.W.R, who before joining up was a member of the teaching staff of the Murray School, in a letter to Mr W T Coles Hodges says : “ In our last little do—‘ Some Battle ‘ we call it—I had hardly any sleep for several nights, and in the later stages I had to exert will power such as I have never exerted before in my life to make myself run quickly under the fire of shells, machine guns, and rifles from shell hole to shell hole, my limbs being so weary ; and when we were relieved and we had retired behind the firing line—well, you bet we did that with the shells flying about—on a further march, I was not the only one who dropped from the line, an slept the sleep of the just for six solid hours in the sludge.” Pte Fazakerley adds that he received a copy of the School Magazine, “ The Murrayian,” and he had shown this to several friends, who were very pleased with its novelty and contents.

LOCAL CASUALTIES.

Mrs Cousins, 1 Windmill Lane, has received information that her husband, Corpl F Cousins, of the Machine Gun Corps, was wounded in the big advance on September 15th. His steel helmet no doubt saved his life. The shell, which fell at his feet, made a large hole in the ground, and killed two men of his gun team who stood a few yards away. He is going on satisfactorily in hospital at Shrewsbury.

Colonel and Mrs Wyley, of Coventry, received the sad news on Friday morning that their only son, Lieutenant Wyley, Adjutant R.F.A, had fallen in action. On Tuesday last, September 19th, he was struck by a shell. He was buried in the cemetery at Avebury, near Albert. He was educated at Dunchurch Hall and Balliol College, Oxford, where he steered the college boat in 1911 and 1912, and was a member of the college football XV. His father was also an Old Rugbeian, and has been for the best part of his life associated with the Volunteer and Territorial organisation of the County. He was a very popular officer, and the greatest sympathy is felt for him and Mrs Wyley in their loss.

PTE R BARTLETT.

Mrs Smith of Lower Hillmorton has received information that her son, Pte Reg Bartlett was killed in action on September 17th. Pte Bartlett was an old Elborow boy, and was working at the B.T.H at the time of enlistment in August, 1914. He had previously been wounded four times. His mother has four sons and one son-in-law serving in the army, and one son-in-law has been discharged.

ANOTHER COUNCIL EMPLOYEE KILLED.

Mrs Anderson, 76 Campbell Street, New Bilton, has received news that Pte John Hirons, of the R.W.R, died of shot wounds on his 21st birthday on September 13th. About a fortnight ago Mrs Anderson received a letter from the Chaplain stating that Pte Hirons was badly wounded, and the card announcing his death said he was quite cheerful up to the last. Pte Hirons, who was a native of New Bilton, and was educated at the Council School, was at the outbreak of the war employed as a road man by the Rugby Urban District Council. He had been at the front some time, and was wounded in May last.

DAYLIGHT SAVING.

At the end of this week we shall revert to Greenwich time. It will be necessary to put all our clocks and watches back one hour on the night of Saturday-Sunday, just as we put them forward one hour on the night of May 20-21. We have now had a summer’s experience of daylight saving, and although the Act is only a war time measure, the universal opinion is that it has been a great success, that the evils foretold by some regarding its adoption have not come about, and that the advantages, particularly to the workers, have been such that a reversion to the old state of things would be well-nigh impossible.

DEATHS.

GREEN.—On the 3rd September, Pte. Albert Green, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, son of Mr. C. Green, of Lilbourne, killed in action in France.
“ He sleeps not in his native land,
But ’neath some foreign skies ;
And far from those who loved him best.
In a hero’s grave he lies.”

GRIFFITH.—On the 18th September, at New Zealand Hospital, Amiens, France, Rifleman L. GRIFFITH died of wounds. Aged 19.
“ Could we have raised his dying head,
Or heard his last farewell ;
The grief would not have been so hard,
For us who loved him well.
“ A light is from the household gone.
The voice we loved is still’d.
A vacant place is in our home,
Which never can be filled.”
—From his loving Brothers and Sisters, 74 South St.

LISSAMER.—Pte. WILLIAM ARTHUR LISSAMER, Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, youngest son of Thomas and Emily Lissamer, who was killed in action on the 15th September by shell fire.
“ He sleeps not in his native land,
But ’neath some foreign skies ;
And far from those he loved the best.
In a hero’s grave he lies.”
“ Death divides, but memory lingers.”
—From his loving FATHER and MOTHER.

OLDS.—In memory of Pte. G Olds, of Gaydon ; killed in action, August 30, 1916.
“ He gave his life for others.”

SMITH.—Killed in action in France, September 17th, 1916, REG., beloved son of the late W. H. Bartlett and Mrs. Smith, Hillmorton.—Deeply mourned by his loving MOTHER, DAD, BROTHERS, SISTERS, & TRIXIE.

IN MEMORIAM.

BARBER.—In loving memory of dear FRED, who was killed in action at Ypres on September 25th, 1915
—From his Mother, Sisters, and Brothers

FRANKTON.—In loving memory of our dear brother, Pte. FRED FRANKTON, who was killed in action on September 25, 1915.
“ He sleeps not in his native land,
But ‘neath some foreign skies ;
And far from those that loved him best,
In a hero’s grave he lies.”
—From his two SISTERS, SARAH & POLLY, & BROTHER WILL.

GREEN.—In ever loving memory of Private EDWARD (BERT) GREEN, who was killed in the battle of Loos, September 25th-27th, 1915.
—From his loving Wife.

HINKS.—In loving memory of my dear son, Pte. J. HINKS, 10546, Oxford & Bucks Light Infantry, who was killed in the Battle of Loos, September 25,1915 ; aged 24.
“ He sleeps not in his native land,
But ‘neath some foreign skies ;
And far from those that loved him best,
In a hero’s grave he lies.”
—From his MOTHER, FATHER, BROTHERS & SISTERS.

POWELL.—In ever-loving memory of our dear boy, Corpl HORACE POWELL, aged 20, who was killed at Loos, September 25, 1915.
“ Lost to sight, but to memory ever dear.”
— From all who loved him.

SNUTCH.—In loving memory of Rifleman H. SNUTCH, who was killed in action at Loos on September 25, 1915.—“ He gave himself for a wounded comrade.”
—From his MOTHER, FATHER & BROTHER.

STONE.—In memory of my dear husband, SIDNEY GEORGE STONE, who died of wounds received in action, September 28, 1915.—Not forgotten by his loving WIFE.

2nd Sep 1916. The Recruiting Officer Asks For Information

Rugby Advertiser, 2 September, 1916.
THE RECRUITING OFFICER, RUGBY, ASKS For INFORMATION
regarding the following men, as to whether they
(a) Have joined the Army ;
(b) Are excepted from the provisions of the Military Service Acts, 1916 ;
(c) Are in possession of a definite certificate or badge exempting them from liability for Military Service
(d) Are in a reserved occupation ;
(e) Have moved to another district ;
or any other information concerning them.
The above information is required to complete records in Recruiting Offices, and any communication will be treated in strict confidence.

LIST OF MEN FROM THE RUGBY SUB-AREA UNDER THE FIRST MILITARY SERVICE ACT. 1916.
The following are their last-known addresses :-
O. PICKLES, Railway Hotel, Rugby, age 28.
F. SMITH, 18 Gas Street, Rugby, age 29.
W. HEWITT, “ Zotha House,” Park Road, Rugby, age 30.
J. W. WALKER, 37 Wood Street, Rugby, age 30.
J. ROSS, Spring Hill, Rugby, age 18.
O. JACKSON, White Lion, Warwick Street, Rugby, age 38.
H. FRANCIS [or HEENEY], 186 Murray Road, Rugby, age 39.
T. W. ELLERTON, Bridget Street, New Bilton, age 24.
A. E. CAPEWELL, Wharf Farm, Hillmorton, age 34.
G. COOPER, Radford, age 39.
W. FIELD, Mount Pleasant, Stockton, age 27.
J. H. CARTER, 16 Oxford Street, Rugby, age 29, married.
J. TOMSON, 8 Abbey Street, Rugby, age 31, married.
A. H. WEST, Bishops Itchington, age 31, married.
A. THOROGOOD, “ Alpina,” Banbury Road, Southam, aged 32, married.
W. POMFRET, 49 James Street, Rugby, age 21, married.
A. A. BALL, Whitnash, aged 38, married.
W. CALLODENE, Licensed Hawker, Dodson’s Field, Rugby, age 40, married.
F. C. BATES, Station Road. Rugby, age 40, Rugby, married.
J. E. CRAMP, 18 Gas Street, Rugby, age 24, married.
J. W. BOSTON, 40 Railway Terrace, Rugby, age 40, married.
WM GEORGE TRUSSLER, 14 Sheep Street, Rugby, age 31, married.
G. THOMAS, 2 Elborow Street, Rugby, age 34, single.
W. H. BRERETON, 11 Rowland Street, Rugby, age 25, single.
P. COWLEY, 91 Abbey Street, Rugby, age 22, married.
J. W. WILLIAMS, 21 Worcester Street, Rugby, age 22, married.
T. BOYLES, 18 Gas Street, Rugby, age 26, married.
P. JOHNSON, Long Itchington, age 28, single.
W. T. HARREN, Butlers Marston, Kineton, age 24, married.
JOHN FITZSIMMONS, 121 Oxford Street, Rugby, age 32, married.
A. ARTHUR, 51 Manor Road, Rugby, age 37, married.
A. K. FRAZER, 3 Castle Street, Rugby, age 36, married.
H. SMITH. 36 Poplar Grove, Rugby, age 37, married.
H. WILSON, 50 King Edward Road, Rugby, age 28, married.

LIST OF MEN FROM THE RUGBY SUB-AREA UNDER THE GROUP SYSTEM.
The following are their last-known addresses :-
H. E. TREECE, 17 Boughton Road, Brownsover, age 26, married.
WILLIAM HENRY WALKER, Westhorpe, Willoughby, age 25, single.

It must be clearly understood that Lists of Men who have failed to report themselves are compiled after every endeavour has been made to trace them, both by the Military Authorities and the Police, who furnish a written report on each individual case.
Under these circumstances any mistakes made are owing to the default either of the employers or men concerned or their relatives, who have failed to notify the change of address as required by the National Registration Act.

F. F. JOHNSTONE, Lieut.-Colonel, Recruiting Officer.
2nd September, 1916.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Sergt-Major James Ward, late of the Old Manor House, Kilsby, serving in the Ammunition Column Brigade, Canadian Artillery, who recently was awarded the D.C.M, has now been promoted to a lieutenancy in the Trench Mortar Battery of a Canadian Division.

LOCAL CASUALTIES.

Pte H Perrin, elder son of Mr J Perrin, Victor’s Street, Rugby, who was invalided to England on June 28th suffering from influenza and acute rheumatism, his numerous friends will be pleased to learn that a letter has been received from Sister Chell, of Seafield Hospital, Blackpool, stating that he is now well on the way to recovery. Bandsman G A Walden, of the Worcester Pioneers, whose parents reside at 20 Campbell Street, New Bilton, is in hospital in France suffering from shrapnel wounds ; but letters from two officers of the company to which Walden belongs state that he is progressing favourably.

Second-Lieut Eric P St George Cartwright, Leinster Regiment (Machine Gun Section), youngest son of Mr Arthur Cartwright, late H.M Inspector of Schools for Northamptonshire District, was killed on August 13th. He was educated at Bilton Grange, Rugby, and at Charterhouse, where he was a member of the O.T.C.

Pte John Waring, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, was killed in action on July 27th. The soldier, who was aged 28, and single, was the son of Mr James Waring, of Bubbenhall. For many years he was engaged under the Warwickshire County Council in superintending road repair work.

B.T.H. MEN KILLED.

Pte C Cashmore, of the Oxford and Bucks L.I, reported missing since September 25th last year, is now regarded by the Military Authorities as having been killed on or about that date. He formerly worked in the foundry at the B.T.H.

NEWBOLD-ON-AVON.

WOUNDED.—Mrs H Smith, of Newbold. was notified on Saturday last that her husband, Corpl Horace Smith, of the Royal Engineers, had been wounded in the back and arm. Corpl Smith enlisted soon after the war commenced. He is in hospital in France, and is progressing favourably.

BRETFORD.

CORPL WELLS WOUNDED AGAIN.—Mr George Wells has been notified that his son, Corpl F A Wells, has been wounded again. He belongs to the Royal Warwicks (T.F), and had been in France again for some time, having recovered from his previous wounds. Another brother, Harvey Wells, has been suffering from shell shock ; whilst another is at the front. Much sympathy is felt for Mr and Mrs Wells.

A BRAVE FELLOW.—Particulars have been received in the village of the bravery of the eldest son of Mr Fred White, who for many years resided at Bretford. Bert White as a boy attended Brandon School, and left there for agricultural work. He eventually emigrated to Canada, and when war broke out he returned to fight for the Old Country, He was eventually rejected because of a crooked toe. However, this did not quench his ardour, for he had the toe taken off, and is doing good work with the Royal Engineers. His father and mother now reside at St George’s Road, Coventry. The people of Bretford and the teachers and scholars of his old school feel proud of him.

DUNCHURCH.

CASUALTIES.—Second-Lieut J D Barnwell, of the R.W.R, second son of Mr W D Barnwell, is now seriously ill with blood poisoning, and Mrs Barnwell is still in France with him.—Mr and Mrs Bull, Mill Street, have received intimation that their son in the 3rd Dragoon Guards has been wounded ; and Mrs Richardson, Tail End, has received similar news in regard to Pte R Richardson, K.R.R. Pte E Walton, of Thurlaston, same regiment, has also been wounded.

BRINKLOW.

REFUGEES.-A meeting of the subscribers to the Refugees’ Fund was held in the Church Room on Friday evening in last week. The Rev G A Dawson presided, and Mr W E Brown presented the audited accounts, showing a balance in hand of £1 14s. It was also explained that the family had left the village, and the man had been at work for some time ; and was, therefore, independent of any further support from the subscribers. The balance in hand (£1 14s) was unanimously voted to the Prisoners of War Fund. A very hearty vote of thanks was accorded to Mr Brown for the admirable manner the arrangements in connection with their guests had been carried out. In response, Mr Brown expressed his readiness to further any good cause during this time of national stress.

AN UNCENSORED LETTER FROM A PRISONER OF WAR.

A letter has this week been received by Mr. J. Reginald Barker, Hon, Secretary of the Rugby Prisoners of War Help Committee, from Bandsman C. Rowe, 1st Royal Welsh Fusiliers, a British prisoner of war, who has had the good fortune to be sent from Germany to Switzerland. Bandsman Rowe has been receiving help for some months from the Rugby Fund, and his letter is additional proof that the parcels of food sent every week to the local men who are war prisoners in Germany do actually reach them. It also emphasises the fact that unless these parcels are continued the men will undoubtedly starve. It therefore, hoped that the special effort the committee is making to raise funds to ensure the continuance of the weekly parcels of food and clothing will meet with a very generous response, that everyone in Rugby and the surrounding villages will give all they can possibly spare on Saturday next, September 2nd. Donations toward the Fund should be sent to Mr. Barker at 9 Regent Street, and same will be gladly acknowledged.

LEYSIN, SWITZERLAND.

August 14th, 1916.

DEAR SIR,—Just a line to ask you to discontinue any parcels to Germany, as you will see by the above address that I have had the splendid luck to get into a civilised country. I received your parcels during my stay in Germany, and beg to tender my sincere thanks to your subscribers and Committee for the good they are doing.

No one at home can believe the great appreciation our boys in Germany have towards the kind people who send the parcels. They are very anxious to know whether the parcels will always continue, as otherwise THEY WON’T COME OUT OF GERMANY ALIVE.

I have been in Germany twenty-one months, and endured the terrible hardships of the first six or eight months when no packets came through.

Only just lately, at Mannheim, the parcels were delayed on account of shifting from different camps, and consequently nineteen men out of my room were in HOSPITAL ON ACCOUNT OF EATING THE GERMAN FOOD. Most of them were wounded and out of Cologne Hospital. I will be only too pleased to answer any enquiries regarding the parcels, &c.

With my sincere thanks, I am, Sir,
Yours sincerely,
C. ROWE.

Mr. J. Reginald Barker,
Hon. Secretary,
Prisoners of War Help Committee,
9 Regent Street, Rugby.

ACHIEVEMENTS by the WARWICKS
HOW THEY CAPTURED A STRONG POSITION AND 600 PRISONERS.

During July and August, the Warwickshire Territorials were in the thick of the fighting in France, and had a very hard time of it, and, that is to be regretted, had many casualties ; but they covered themselves with glory. Their brave deeds have been eulogized in unqualified turns by the Special Press Correspondents, who have been privileged to visit the area in which the fighting has been going on. These citizen soldiers have been drawn from Birmingham and all parts of the county of Warwick, and have left all kinds of peaceful occupations to voluntarily undertake the training necessary to fit them for such an arduous campaign. The unanimous verdict of all the correspondents is to the effect that now that fighting is their trade, our Warwickshire lads are more than a match the best professional soldiers Germany can put up against them.

Early in July they formed part of the attacking force upon Anere, a little later they were in at capture of Ovillers-la-Boiselle, and afterwards led the great push towards Thiepval. They meritoriously carried out the work allotted to them, and captured one of the Germans’ strongest points, which had hitherto successfully resisted our attacks ; and they captured 500 prisoners, which one correspondent says was the big bag of the week.

In this particular operation the Warwicks were ordered to attack at a certain time, and after the usual artillery preparation, which was violently returned by the Germans, who used gas and tear shells, they went forward with an irresistible rush—in some places having to traverse 200 or 300 yards of open ground swept by machine guns before they could come to grips with Fritz. But their own machine guns and snipers, meanwhile, played great havoc among the defenders, and so terrific was the onslaught of the Warwickshire men that many machine gun crews (who, by the way, are among the bravest of German soldiers, and most stubborn) surrendered with a freedom which had never been observed before. But, nevertheless, there were several instances of typical Hun treachery after the hoisting of white flags—but with the inevitable result to the treacherous ones.

When the Warwicks had cleared the Germans from their trenches and dug-outs, and had a little time to look round, they discovered in the dug-outs and luxuriously equipped funk holes no lack of evidence in the way of half-consumed meals and luxuries, also cigars and cigarettes which had been partly smoked, that the Germans had no idea of being “ outed ” in such a hurry.

In one dug-out there was in the midst of all the horror a comic episode, like that of a clown in tragedy. A curtain divided the dug-outs, and a Warwickshire man thrust his bayonet through it. Suddenly the curtain was drawn on one side and German soldier, yawning loudly and rubbing his eyes with the knuckles of one hand, stood there, as though to say, “ What’s up?” He had slept heavily through the bombardment and attack, and now, when he saw the English soldiers facing him believed he was dreaming. So the Warwicks took 400 yards of trenches along a front of 600 yards, and thrust the wedge closer to Thiepval.

The men were splendidly led, and the officers-among whom there were, unfortunately, many casualties—had nothing but praise for the fighting qualities of the rank and file.

Both the courage and skill of these Warwickshire troops (who have received official congratulations from Headquarters and most whole-hearted thanks from the Anzac troops fighting on their right) saved them from heavy casualties. Since then the Wilts and Gloucesters have had a similar opportunity, of distinguishing themselves and they rose to the occasion with equal success.

And these men are typical of our citizen army

COUNTY TRIBUNAL PUTTING ON PRESSURE.

Realising that men are still urgently required for the Army, the County Appeals Tribunal, sitting at the Benn Buildings, Rugby, on Friday last week, intimated, through the Chairman, that they had got to put on pressure. In several cases appeals were dismissed, and in others the period of exemption was reduced.

The members of the Tribunal present were : Messrs M K Pridmore, W Johnson, jun, P G Loveitt. Messrs M E T Wratislaw and F M Burton represented the Military Authorities, and Mr J E Cox watched the proceedings in the interests of agriculture.

A MUNITIONS ORDER.

The first case was that of Wm Tisot, scrap iron and metal merchant, 7 Lawford Road, New Bilton, whose appeal had been adjourned, and respecting whom a munitions order was now made.

OPPOSITION WITHDRAWN.

The Military representatives had appealed against the granting by the local Tribunal of temporary exemption till February 1st to Francis T H Oldham, art student, The Cedars, Long Lawford ; but, in view of a recent Army order, that youths are not to be called up before attaining the age of 18 years 8 months, they withdrew their appeal.

MAKING UP FOR LOST TIME.

“ I do as much work now in a day as I used to do in a fortnight,” said Wm Frank Holloway, (36, married), stud groom, Toft House, Dunchurch. Whose exemption to October 1st to enable his employer to make other arrangements was appealed against by the Military Authorities.—Mr Wratislaw said there were two other men on Mr Rodoconachi’s farm of less than 100 acres.—Mr Holloway said, in addition to attending to the hunter stud, he helped on the farm and assisted at any job that wanted doing.—Given to September 25th, with the warning that it was very improbable that further time would be granted.

A PROBLEM FOR OLD AGE PENSIONERS.

Fredk Ernest Wm Lowe (36, married), 112 Lawford Road, New Bilton, claimed exemption on various grounds, including that of being sub-postmaster, as which he paid on Fridays 37 old age pensions.-Mr Harold Eaden pointed out the serious inconvenience it would be to these aged people to have to walk up to the General Post Office at Rugby.—The Chairman : Which concerns them most—the Germans coming or having to go a few yards extra to get their pensions ? In his statement, Mr Lowe said it would mean absolute ruin to him to join the Army, as he would have to sell everything at a sacrifice.-Given till September 25th, the Chairman remarking that men were very urgently needed, and they had got to put on pressure.

DATE AGREED UPON.

Being only passed for Labour A, John Harry Clowes, stationary engine driver for Messrs Parnell & Son, 4 Chester Street, Rugby, asked for the renewal of a certificate of exemption granted by the local Tribunal.-Mr Eadon said the firm would be content with exemption till October 1st, and this date was agreed upon.

A MATTER OF OPINION.

As William Leslie Morgan (24, single), dentist, 5a Regent Street, Rugby, did not, for the second time, attend personally to support his claim (although represented by Mr Eaden), Mr Wratislaw intimated that he considered the man was a shirker.—Mr Eaden : I should be sorry to say that. On the other hand, he is a very busy man.—Appellant had been passed for home garrison duty only, and asked for either a substantial period of exemption, or for the liberty to withdraw his appeal and renew it when he received his papers calling him up.—The Clerk to the Tribunal pointed out that as appellant was an unattested man, the Tribunal could not take the latter course.—Appeal dismissed.

COAL MERCHANT TO JOIN THE COLOURS.

Temporary exemption till October 1st had been given to William Fredk Perrin (30, single), haulier and coal merchant, 177 Oxford Street, Rugby ; but the Military lodged an appeal, which was upheld on their promising not to serve the papers for a month.

BADGED.

Another Military appeal was that in respect of Thos Wm Harrowing, boysman at a school boarding house, 26 Manor Road, Rugby, who had been given till September 1st to find work of national importance.—Mr Worthington said the man was now working at the B.T.H, and was badged.—The Chairman : As long as he is badged he is all right.

THE SHIFTING OF ORANGE BOXES.

Asserting that he supplied vegetable food for over three-quarters of Rugby, Mr J Craze asked to be allowed to retain his foreman, Harry Hyde (27, married), 16 York Street, whose exemption till November 1st did not meet with military approval.

Mr Craze said a man not used to the business and over military age was not able to lift orange boxes. Both his sons and another man had gone into the Army, and he should be hopelessly at sea (in case of illness) without his foreman.—The Chairman said we had got into such a position that we could not help ourselves, and he told applicant that he would have to see if two girls could shift his orange cases.

The foreman appealed on domestic grounds, he having a mother to support ; but the Chairman assured him his case was nothing like so hard as some others.—Exempted till October 25th, and the Chairman told Mr Craze they were rather stretching the point because he had such a good record as to his sons.

BROWNSOVER FARMER AND HIS SON.

Daniel Lloyd, farmer, Brownsover, had claimed temporary exemption on behalf of his son, Evan Harrison Lloyd (23, and single), but neither attended the Tribunal.—Appellant, in a written statement, said if his son did not obtain exemption he should have no alternative to selling the stock and giving up the farm.—The appeal was dismissed.

ANOTHER DENTISTRY CASE.

John Gardner Hall, dentist and manufacturer of artificial teeth, 20a High Street, Rugby, who had been granted time to complete his business contracts, &c, was also absent when his case was called on, and his appeal was likewise dismissed.

DEATHS.

HUGHES.—On August 16, 1916, Rifleman John Hughes, aged 18, son of the late Arthur William Hughes, late storekeeper of Rugby Sheds. Killed in action. Rifleman John Hughes is a cousin of Driver W. Chadburn, in France.—“ He gave his young life for his King, and country.”-From MOTHER, SISTER and BROTHER.

MESSENGER.—Killed in action on August 5, 1916, in France, Private John Thomas Messenger, of the Australian Imperial Force, son of Mr. T. T. Messenger, Barby.

SHAW.—In loving memory of Pte J. C. Shaw, of the R.W.R., second son of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Shaw, of the Coventry Road, Dunchurch, who was killed in action in France on August 1, 1916 ; aged 26 years and 11 months.

“ No loved one stood beside him
To hear his last farewell ;
But we hope to meet in heaven,
And there for ever dwell.”
—From his loving MOTHER, FATHER, BROTHERS and SISTERS.

IN MEMORIAM.

LINES.—Killed in action, “ somewhere in France ,” Henry, the dearly beloved son of Mr. and Mrs. C. Lines, Napton ; aged 27 years.

“ We often sit and think of you,
And tenderly breathe your name ;
Nothing left of you to look at
But your photo in a frame.”
—Deeply mourned by his FATHER, MOTHER, BROTHER, SISTERS, and MAY.

OSBORN.—In loving remembrance of George Osborn, who died in the Dardanelles on August 30,1915.

“ I often sit and think of him,
And think of how he died ;
To think he could not say ‘ Good-bye ‘
Before he closed his eyes.”
BESSIE.

 

Wallace, Edward. Died 15th Jul 1916

Edward Wallace’s birth was registered in the second quarter of 1890 in Towcester. Edward was baptised on 1 June 1890 at Blakesley.

In 1891, he and his family still lived in Blakesley, Northamptonshire. The family comprised: father, William; mother Elizabeth; older siblings: Joseph aged 8; sister, Ethel aged 7; and brothers John and Walter, aged 5 and 3; and of course Edward aged 1. Edward’s father was a ‘Stud Groom’.

By 1901 the family had moved to live at 83 Sholebrook, Wittlebury Park, near Towcester, Northamptonshire. Edward’s father was still a stud groom. Edward was now aged 11 and had six more siblings, Herbert, Flora, Frank, Fred, Rose and Nelly. Then in 1903, his father died, the death being registered in Towceser; Edward’s widowed mother remained with the youngest children at 52 Whittlebury, Towcester. At some later date his widowed mother moved to Rugby, perhaps to join one of her children.

In 1911, Edward was 21 and boarding in Goldings Bothy, Great Wardley, near Brentwood, Essex, where he was a Domestic Gardener.

According to his Pension Records, a Short Service Attestation Form showed that on 24 August 1914, Edward signed up at Guildford to The Queen’s (Royal West Surrey) Regiment, with regimental number 542. He was posted into the 6th Battalion on 30 August 1914 but discharged being unfit for service, owing to chronic eczema, on 24 November 1914, having served 93 days.

Not content with being discharged, it seems that Edward tried again to ‘do his duty’. At some date following his discharge from the Queen’s Regiment, he joined up in Wrexham, Wales, as Private, No.37910 in the 1st Battalion, the Royal Welsh Fusiliers – perhaps assuming that his ‘unfit’ status wouldn’t be noticed.

1st Battalion, Royal Welch Fusiliers were in Malta when war broke out in August 1914. They returned to England, landing at Southampton on 3 September 1914. They joined 22nd Brigade, 7th Division who were concentrating in the New Forest, Hampshire. The Division landed at Zeebrugge on 7 October 1914, to assist in the defence of Antwerp, they arrived too late prevent the fall of the city and took up defensive positions at important bridges and junctions to aid in the retreat of the Belgian army. The 7th Division then became the first British Troops to entrench in front of Ypres, suffering extremely heavy losses in the First Battle of Ypres. By February 1915 the Division had been reinforced to fighting strength and they were in action at The Battle of Neuve Chapelle, The Battle of Aubers, The Battle of Festubert, The second action of Givenchy and The Battle of Loos.[1]

It is not known when Edward joined up for this second time, but he probably didn’t go to France until 1916, as he didn’t receive the 1914 or 1914-15 Star, and having to be trained, he probably missed the 1915 battles.

1st Battalion, the Royal Welch Fusiliers took part in several actions in the first weeks of the Battle of the Somme: the attack south of Fricourt on 1 July 1916 [1st Battalion was at the bend in the frontline in the vicinity of Fricourt and Mametz as part of the 7th Division;[2] they became forever associated with the terribly destructive action at Mametz Wood]; the attack to capture Quadrangle Trench on 5 July 1916 and the capture of Bazentin-le-Petit from 14 July 1916; the attacks on High Wood [14 to 15 July 1916], The Battle of Delville Wood [15 July to 3 September 1916]; …

With the 1st Welch apparently involved in so many actions, it is likely that Edward was involved in several of these battles, and that he was Killed in Action in or near Bazenin, High Wood or Delville Wood on 15 July 1916. The Commonwealth War Graves Commision recorded his death on that date, aged 26. They remember his name on Pier and Face 4A of the Thiepval Memorial.

The Thiepval Memorial, the Memorial to the Missing of the Somme, bears the names of more than 72,000 officers and men of the United Kingdom and South African forces who died in the Somme sector before 20 March 1918 and have no known grave. Over 90% of those commemorated died between July and November 1916. The memorial, designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens, was built between 1928 and 1932 and unveiled by the Prince of Wales, in the presence of the President of France, on 1 August 1932.

By the date that the CWGC listed the details on the Thiepval Memorial, Edward was described as ‘Son of Elizabeth Wallace, of 21, St. John St., Rugby and the late William Wallace’. At some date before 1911, Edward’s brothers, John, b.c.1886; and Frank, b.c.1896, had moved to Rugby to work as a ‘grocer’s assistant, and a ‘gas engineer apprentice’ respectively, and in 1911 were in lodgings at 74 Railway Terrace. It seems likely that their widowed mother, later moved to Rugby to join them, and submitted Edward’s name to be remembered on the Memorial Gate. Whether he ever lived in Rugby is uncertain, but he probably visited his brothers, and later his mother, and as he is also on the St. Philip’s memorial, perhaps he joined the family in Rugby for a time.

Edward Wallace was awarded the British War Medal and the Victory Medal.

As well as on the Rugby Memorial Gates, Edward is commemorated at St. Philip’s Church, Wood Street, Rugby.

Edward’s brother, Herbert, also died in WWI, on 8 June 1917, whilst serving as a gunner in the Machine Gun Corps (Heavy Branch); the Heavy Branch of the MGC was the first to use tanks in combat and was subsequently turned into the Tank Corps. He probably died of wounds as he is buried in the Dickebusch New Military Cemetery Extension, near Ypres, which was used ‘… by fighting units and field ambulances’.

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

– – – – – –

 

This article on Edward Wallace was researched and written for a Rugby Family History Group [RFHG] project, by Anne Rogers and John P H Frearson and is © Anne Rogers, John P H Frearson and the Rugby Family History Group, June 2016.

[1]         http://www.wartimememoriesproject.com/greatwar/allied/battalion.php?pid=7366

[2]         http://www.inthefootsteps.com/history/somme/welsh-somme/welsh-battalions.html

Bale, James William. Died 22nd Jun 1916

James William Bale was born in Rugby in 1891 to James and Emily (nee Payne). He was baptised at St Matthews Church on 22nd Feb. He was the 3rd of at least 5 children. The family lived at 1 Lagoe Place, but later moved to no. 9. He attended St Matthews school and when he left in 1904 he held a prominent place in the school sports

James joined the 2nd Bn., Royal Welsh Fusiliers (service no. 9339) in about 1907 and at the time of the 1911 census was based at Quetta, India. The regiment was transferred to France when war broke out. By the time of his death he had been “mentioned in despatches” and promoted to the rank of sergeant for bravery in the field.

In March 1916 he was awarded a DCM with the following citation:
“For conspicuous gallantry. When on patrol his officer was wounded. Corporal Bale at once sent his patrol in, went back, and brought his officer under fire which was directed at him. This is the second time he has rescued his officer on patrol.”

It was publicly presented to him in Rugby, when he was home on leave a few weeks before his death.

On 22nd June 1916, 2nd Bn, RWF were serving in the trenches near Givenchy, Pas de Calais, when the Germans exploded a large mine destroying 80 yards of the line. This was followed by an hour long bombardment. There were about 100 casualties. James William Bale was one of them.

He is buried in the Gorre British and Indian Cemetery in France.

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

13th May 1916. Rugby Soldier Decorated with the D.C.M.

RUGBY SOLDIER DECORATED WITH THE D.C.M.

PLEASING CEREMONY IN THE CALDECOTT PARK.

Sunday was a great day for Sergt Bale, of the 2nd Battalion Royal Welsh Fusiliers, whose home is in Lagoe Place, Rugby. Arrangements had been made to present him in Caldecott Park with a Distinguished Conduct Medal, awarded for bravery in France, and the occasion partook somewhat of the character of a civic function, there being present Messrs J J McKinnell (Chairman), W Flint (Vice-chairman), T A Wise, W H Linnell, T Ringrose, H Yates, R W Barnsdale, and W A Stevenson (members of the Rugby Urban District Council). Col F F Johnstone, recruiting officer at Rugby, consented to make the presentation, and the local Volunteer Training Corps paraded, under Company Commander C H Fuller ; also the Royal Defence Corps (late the 5th South Lancashire Regt), with Lieut Gandy in charge ; and the 1st Company Boys’ Brigade, under Capt W F Wood. These formed a “ hollow square ” on the greensward, and cleared a space for the ceremony, which was witnessed by a large concourse of people.

DEEDS OF GALLANTRY.

Colonel Johnstone, in making the presentation, said the medal was given to N.C.O.’s and men of H.M forces performing gallant duties beyond their ordinary duties. The special duty performed by Sergt Bale was that on February 9th, 1916, he was ordered out with a reconnoitring party, consisting of one officer, one sergeant, one corporal, and four men, to ascertain the strength of the enemy’s trenches, what they contained, and what entanglements there were before those trenches. The party proceeded about 9.30 at night, and after they had been out an hour or so the sergeant and one of the privates got wounded. Corpl Bale (as he was then) took these men, one by one, under the enemy’s fire, into a place of safety. The whole patrol then returned to the trenches, and, after a certain amount of rest, Lieut McKay and Corpl Bale volunteered to go out again and finish their reconnoitring duties. When they got up to the wire entanglements, the officer was wounded through the thigh. Corpl Bale went to the assistance of his officer, taking him up, under fire, and carrying him back into the trenches. Now, those acts of bravery really deserved the Victoria Cross (hear, hear). Those deeds reflected very much upon the soldier-like conduct of Corpl Bale, and he had pleasure in pinning the decoration upon his breast. He felt sure all would agree with him in thinking Corpl Bale richly deserved this promotion to the rank of sergeant and also the Distinguished Conduct Medal (applause). Having pinned the medal on the solders tunic, Colonel Johnstone said he trusted the gallant deeds would long live in their memories, and that when the young men present were called upon to do their duty in the face of the enemy they would emulate the example of Sergt Bale (cheers).

MR MCKINNELL’S TRIBUTE.

Mr J J McKinnell, as Chairman of the Urban District Council, congratulated Sergt Bale, in the name of the town, on the great honour he had achieved. They felt that he had conferred lustre upon the name of Rugby, and he wanted Sergt Bale to understand that his fellow-citizens were extremely proud of him (cheers). The town of Rugby, which they all loved so much, had, he thought he might say, with becoming modesty, earned a good name in the last troublous months that we had passed through. He believed Rugby did very well all through the time of recruiting, and he was sure her sons, who had gone forth to fight in the various theatres of war, would acquit themselves creditably, and they sent Sergt Bale forth with their best wishes that his future would be covered with more laurels (applause).

HUMOROUS PREDICTION RECALLED.

Cheers having been given for Sergt Bale, Capt W F Wood made a short speech. It afforded him more pleasure than he could find words to express to be present at that ceremony, especially as Sergt Bale was one of his old boys (applause). It was some ten years since Sergt Bale joined the Brigade, and proved himself to be a hard worker. That morning he had met a soldier and a sailor, who reminded him that at the Llandudno camp some years ago he told Sergt Bale he would live either to be hanged or to earn the Victoria Cross (laughter and applause). He thought Sergt Bale was on the right way to win one or the other (laughter).

Sergt Bale expressed his thanks for the honour that had been done him, and his pleasure to have been so much congratulated during the three weeks he had been on leave. Sergt Bale then reviewed his exploits in France, including the retreat from Mons, and the circumstances under which, in addition to winning the medal, he had been twice mentioned in despatches.

ANOTHER PRESENTATION.

Colonel Johnstone then presented the Donegal Bronze Medal to Corpl Murray, of the 3rd Platoon of the Rugby Volunteer Training Corps, given by the National Rifle Association, for a creditable total of 397 points out of a possible 450, and entitling the holder to take part in the Donegal Competition at Bisley.

Mr McKinnell, addressing the V.T.C., said they had been working now for some months, and he thought they had received very little encouragement from the Government. Their fellow-citizens had, perhaps, regarded them with a sort of kindly curiosity, but they had gone on working steadily; they had given up their evenings and their Sundays in order to train themselves to be of use to their country in any supreme crisis, which they hoped would never come ; and latterly they had turned out of their comfortable beds in the middle of the night in order to help their fellow-citizens. He wanted the Corps to understand that their fellow-citizens thought well of them, and appreciated the work they were doing (applause).

Company Commander C H Fuller, on behalf of the Training-Corps, thanked Mr McKinnell for his kind words.

Cheers were given for Colonel Johnstone, who, in acknowledgment, said he very much appreciated the way in which recruits came forward first of all. There were not so many to come forward now, but under the new system to be commenced he hoped they would have more, and that many others would follow the example of the brave Sergeant and would come back to the country with the V.C. or the D.C.M. (hear, hear).

Sergt Bale was then played back to his home in Lagoe Place by the band of the Boys’ Brigade, and afterwards enjoyed a motor car drive with several friends.

At the Empire Picture Palace on Monday night Sergt Bale was presented by B Morris, on behalf of the management, with a wrist watch.

Sergt Bale belonged to the 1st Rugby Company Boys’ Brigade for four years, and was a bugler in the band. He left at the age of 16 to join the army, and is one of about 300 old members of the Brigade now serving in H.M. Forces by land or sea. Up to the present there have been few casualties amongst them.

The V.T.C. spent the afternoon in useful exercises in the fields between Hillmorton and Barby, returning at 8.30 p.m.

WARWICKSHIRE TERRITORIALS.

The 35th meeting of the Warwickshire Territorial Force Association was held on Monday at Birmingham, the Earl of Craven presiding. The War Office letter, dated April 10 last, regarding the administration of the Volunteer Force by the County Association was considered, and on the motion of Colonel Wyley, seconded by Colonel G M Seabroke, a resolution was passed agreeing to undertake the administration of the Volunteer Training Corps in the county on the county basis, and a committee was appointed for the purpose.

Colonel Lewis, Commandant of the Warwickshire Volunteer Training Corps, said they had in Warwickshire five battalions of infantry, a very useful corps of electrical engineers, and a small cycle corps. The 1st Battalion had now the names of nearly 900 members on its books, the second something like 1,500, the third had never been higher than 700, the fourth about 700,and the fifth about 800. Later enlistments had denuded these figures, but he hoped that if an appeal were made the city battalions would have 600 members each to start with, and the county battalions more. In all there were about 1,350 men clothed, armed, and equipped. There was no machinery for maintaining that state of equipment.

It was mentioned that 19 non-commissioned officers and men of the Warwickshire Territorials had received D.C.M. medals, and the payments, numbering 15,525 had been made in respect of separation allowances to wives, children, and dependants of soldiers. The cost of administration was considerably less than the maximum sum fixed by the Government.

Colonel Marsh said there ought to be some arms to be had from Ireland.—Colonel Lewis: The Territorial Force has already applied for them.

The question arose as to the payment and the granting of separation allowances to members of the Volunteer Force in the event of its mobilisation. The opinion was expressed by one member that if the Force was mobilised to repel an invading enemy they would automatically receive the Army pay under the term “ deemed on actual military service.”—Colonel Wyley said the question of pay, allowances, etc, was a matter for future consideration.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

War casualties among London and North-Western Railway men number 3,683, of whom 725 have died.

Second Lieut K W Lane (son of the Rev F D Lane, formerly Vicar of Clifton) who, as reported last week had been dangerously wounded, is progressing favourably.

Viscount Feilding, D.S.O, Coldstream Guards, son of the Earl of Denbigh, has been promoted to a captaincy.

The following appointments have been gazetted :—South Midland Brigade : Major (temporary Lieut.-Col) F C B West to be Lieut.-Col. 17th December, 1914. Capt (temporary Major) C P Nickalls to be Major. 17th December, 1914.

The Postmaster-General announces that the despatch of matches by post to the troops has resulted in numerous fires which have destroyed a large quantity of mails. It has consequently been necessary to entirely prohibit their despatch to any destination. The friends of Lieut Allan Hand, 81st Provisional Battalion, T.F, will be pleased to hear that he is now well on the way to recovery. He was taken ill with measles near the end of March, pneumonia subsequently developed, and for a time he was in a very critical condition, and had to undergo an operation.

Mr S E Rogers, who has been with the B.T.H Company for many years, and who joined the 5th Warwickshire Howitzer Battery in August, 1914, has been transferred to the 6th Somerset Light Infantry, to which regiment he has been gazetted as Second Lieutenant. It will be remembered that his brother, H G Rogers, of hockey renown, held a commission in the Somersets at the time of his death last June in the Dardanelles. Two other brothers, F G and W J, are also joining the army, the first-named a cadet at the Royal Military College, Camberley, and the latter (also a well-known hockey player) just back from the West Coast of Africa, to enter the London Scottish Regiment.

Several old Rugbeians have recently arrived in England with the Canadian contingents, including Walter Hillyard, a former employe at Messrs Frost’s and an ex-member of ” E ” Company; and the brothers Albert and Walter Francis. A grandson of the late Mr Richard Over, of Rugby, is also with the contingent.

Lieut F J Hadden, Remount Squadron, an old Rugbeian, who died of pneumonia on May 5 in Egypt, was before the war a tea-planter in Ceylon, where he was well known in connection with all sports, notably racing and polo. He was 55 years of age.

CAPT H PODMORE AWARDED THE D.S.O.

Rugbeians, past and present, will welcome the announcement which has been made this week that Capt H Podmore, O.R, an assistant master at Rugby School, has been awarded the D.S.O. for conspicuous gallantry in the field. The news was received in a letter from Lieut-Col W T Wyndowe, commanding the 6th Battalion Northants Regt, and which reads : “ We have just got the news that Capt Podmore has got the D.S.O for gallantry and devotion to duty on the morning of the 13th April, when his company, after enduring an intense bombardment, repulsed a raid that the enemy attempted on our front line. Though he had only one, the young officer doing duty with the company, they stuck to their parapets like heroes, inspired by the coolness and entire disregard of danger of their commander.” A really good fast bowler, Capt Podmore frequently assisted the Rugby Cricket Club some two or three seasons ago. His father was a fine Rugby football player, and represented Oxford v Cambridge in the first Rugby match between the Varsities.

ANOTHER ST. MATTHEW’S OLD BOY KILLED.

Notification has just been received of the death of Pte H P Watts, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, who was killed in action on April 5th. The mother of Pte Watts, who lives at 10 Bridget Street, New Bilton, has received a message of sympathy from Lord Kitchener. Pte Watts was educated at St Matthew’s Boys’ School, and is the fourteenth old boy of that school to be killed in action. He was 23 years of age, and was working at the Newbold Cement Works when he enlisted. He left England at the end of October.

B.T.H MEN REPORTED KILLED.

Information has reached Rugby that Bombardier E Cox, of the Rugby Howitzer Battery, was killed by a shrapnel shell on Thursday week. Gunner Cox was formerly a charge hand in the Turbine Department at the B.T.H, and was well known and generally respected in the works. He came to Rugby six or seven years ago as a fitter. Major Nickalls, in a letter reporting Bomb Cox’s death, says : “ I and my officers, N.C.O’s, and men grieve for the loss of not only a grand man and a fearless soldier, but one who had endeared himself to us all by his splendid devotion to duty, his great ability, his untiring energy, and unfailing cheeriness. He set a great example to the Battery, and, speaking as his Battery Commander, I am deeply grateful to him for all his good work.”

Official news has been received at the B.T.H that Pte Bert Blake, of the Wiltshire Regt, who was reported to be missing on June 16th last, was killed in action on that date. Prior to the war Pte Blake was employed in the Purchasing Department of the B.T.H.

Mr and Mrs J Gurney, late of Catthorpe, now living at 67 Cambridge Street, Rugby, have received official intimation of the death of their son, Lance-Corpl John Thomas Gurney, Royal Warwickshire Regt, who had been reported missing since April 25, 1915. He was employed at the B.T.H before the war, and was called up on Reserve.

CALLING UP THE LAST MARRIED GROUPS.

The new proclamation, calling the remaining groups of married men to the colours was posted in Rugby yesterday (Friday). It refers to men in groups 42 to 46, and the commencing date of the call is June 13th. A further proclamation calls up men of group 24 as they attain the age of 19, and the same date applies.

CONSCIENTIOUS OBJECTOR ARRESTED AND RELEASED.

A peculiar situation arose out of the arrest of a conscientious objector named Horace Kingston, gardener, of Hillmorton, who failed to answer a summons to join the Colours on Monday. He was brought before a magistrate (A S Donkin, Esq), and admitted that he was an absentee under the Military Service Act, but added that he was a Christadelphian and a conscientious objector. He would refuse to obey any orders from the Military authorities.-Mr Donkin: You know you are liable to be fined £25 ?—Defendant : Yes, but I can’t help that.-He was remanded to await an escort and fined £2, which was ordered to be deducted from his Army pay.-After the Magistrate had left the Court a sergeant from the recruiting station arrived, and asked for the man’s release, explaining that they had received instructions that he was not to be arrested.-The Assistant Clerk pointed out that the man had already been fined £2, which could not be altered.

THE LATE PERCY HEFFORD.-Mr and Mrs W F Wood have had erected in the cemetery a handsome memorial stone with a double grave kerb in memory of their son, Percy Hefford, second officer of the ill-fated Lusitania. Sunday was the first anniversary of the sinking of the vessel, and flowers were placed upon the grave space by relatives and friends. They included a tribute from the widow, now living in Philadelphia.

IN MEMORIAM.

BERRIDGE.—In loving Memory of my dear son, George Edward Berridge, Barby, who was killed in action somewhere in France, May 13th, 1915.
“ One year has passed, oh how we miss him.
Some may think the wound has healed ;
But they little know the pain and sorrow
Deep within our hearts concealed.”
—From his loving Mother and Brother.

KEEN.—In loving Memory of our dear son and brother, Arthur William, killed in action, May 9th, 1915.

PORTER.—In ever loving Memory of our dear son and brother George, who was killed in action on May 8th, 1915, at St Elei.
—Sadly missed by his loving Mother, Father, Brothers and Sister.

SLEATH.—In loving Memory of Trooper Sam Sleath, of the Leicestershire Yeomanry, who fell in action, May 13, 1915, at Ypres, aged 22 years.
“ He sleeps not in his native land,
But ‘neath some foreign skies ;
And far from those who loved him best,
In a hero’s grave he lies.”
-From his loving Mother, Father, Sister, and Brothers.

6th May 1916. Remember Rugby Boys on Active Service

REMEMBER RUGBY BOYS ON ACTIVE SERVICE
AND
BUY A FLAG ON
SATURDAY, MAY 20th

This is an opportunity to help the Local Committee to send Comforts to Rugby Sailors, and Soldiers and to show your gratitude to the Rugby men who are fighting for You.

Keep alive warm thoughts of the home town in their hearts.

Offices & Supply Depot: Benn Buildings.

Hon. Organising Secretary : J REGINALD BARKER, who will gladly welcomes offers of help.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Second-Lieut K Westmacott Lane, R.F.A (T), 1st Worcester Battery, is reported dangerously wounded in France.

Lieut Allan Hand, 81st Provisional Battalion, T.F., is at present in hospital at Southend suffering from pneumonia.

Captain Leslie Cheape, of the Dragoons, the famous polo player, who is well known in the Rugby district, has been posted as missing.

Arrangements have, we understand, been made to use Bilton Hall, the residence of Mr Walter Barnewtt, as a Red Cross Hospital in place of Ashlawn, which was closed a short time ago.

Lieut-Colonel C Fane, D.S.O., of the Sherwoods, who was wounded in helping to quell the rebellion in Dublin formerly lived (as Captain Fane) at Brownsover Hall and Newton House, being well known in hunting circles in this locality.

Sergt Pattison, who since August last has been engaged in recruiting work at Rugby Drill Hall, has been ordered to rejoin his regiment, the Royal Warwicks. Sergt Pattison went to the front in the early days of the war, and was severely wounded, but he has now made a complete recovery. During his stay in Rugby he has, by his unfailing courtesy and geniality, made many friends, who will wish him good luck for the future.

FORTHCOMING PRESENTATION.

As already reported by us, Sergt Bale, of the 2nd Batt Royal Welsh Fusiliers, has been awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal for special bravery in France. We understand Colonel F F Johnstone has been requested to present the medal to Sergt Bale at Rugby, and the presentation will be made at 2.15 on Sunday afternoon next, the 7th inst in Caldecott Park, near the Drill Hall, at which time, and place the Rugby Volunteer Training Corps will parade. There is no doubt this presentation will create a good deal of local interest, as Sergt Bale is a Rugby man and son of Mr J Bale, Lagoe Place.

APPEALS UNDER THE GROUP SYSTEM.

Notices of appeal by attested married men in the Groups up to 41, called up under the proclamation posted last week, must be lodged with the Tribunals for the Rugby area not later than Monday next.

THE TRIBUNALS AT WORK.

RUGBY URBAN DISTRICT.

Held at the Benn Buildings on Thursday evening. Present: Messrs J J McKinnell (chairman), W Flint, L Loverock, and T A Wise. Major Neilson and Mr F M Burton represented the Military Authorities.

The case of an unattested dentist, which had been adjourned four times for an examination by a medical board, was first taken. Mr H Eaden represented appellant, and said the man had been medically examined and passed for garrison service at home. He was informed by the military doctor that the bread with which he would be served in the army would rapidly aggravate his complaint. He would also be given tea, which he now had to forego, and this would, make it impossible for him to go on. Mr Eaden said they would have to take the case on its merits, and he asked for an adjournment. Appellant was in partnership and the ramifications of the business were very widely extended, there being nine branches. Before the war they employed nine qualified men, but these had now bean reduced to three. They had also released several apprentices who had not yet finished their time. Their clients consisted of the lower middle class, who paid by instalments, and when a fair proportion of the money had been paid the work was done and the teeth supplied. Considerable sums were now in hand, and it would take six months to complete this work. His mother and an invalid sister were partly dependent upon him. They had unsuccessfully attempted to get someone to help carry on the work. A highly skilled man was required for this class of Work.—By Mr Burton : All the branches should be open each day, with an operator present, but as things were they had to be worked on a part-time basis.—There was also an appeal by the man’s partner, and he was called in and gave evidence of the difficulty of getting men.—Application refused.

A single plasterer, who had already had one period of exemption, made a further application, and stated that his circumstances had not altered.—Mr Eadon represented appellant, and said at present he employed four married men, three of whom were attested. In the event of this application being granted, he would undertake not to appeal for either of these men.—The Military Authorities had suggested that appellant’s father could carry on the business, but Mr Eaden pointed out that this was quite impossible, owing to his age. Appellant had sub-contracts on Government work, which would extend over several months. It was an absolute impossibility for the business to be carried on if he had to go, and it would fall into the hands of his competitors.—Exemption till 15th June. Appellant was informed that the Tribunal would not be able to do any more for him, and if he took any more contracts it would be at his own risk.

Application for a single baker, aged 20 years, was made by a local baker, who himself had given up his business’ to get employment at a local munitions factory.—The Military recommended that the application be refused, and the employee should return to his business.-Applicant stated that the round now was only a small one, and he went to work on shells in July last.—Refused.

A Rugby butcher appealed on behalf of a single slaughterman, aged 23. The Military Authorities recommended that the application be refused, and added that co-operative arrangements must be made, if necessary by the Tribunal.—Mr A H Reeve, President of the Master Butchers’ Association, was also present, and said this man was included in the nine slaughtermen referred to at the last meeting.—Appellant said this was the only man he had, and he also assisted another butcher by doing all his slaughtering.-Exemption till October 1st. The Chairman expressed the hope that the Butchers’ Association would go into the matter, and really try to work with each other and release some of these men.—Mr Reeve said they would do so. He did not like appealing for these single men. He thought they all ought to go, and it was not their wish to keep him.—The Chairman asked if it would be possible to work with butchers outside the Association, such as the Co-operative Society. These were not normal times.— Mr Reave answered that there were so few men to do the town work.

IRISH REBELLION CRUSHED.

REBEL LEADERS SHOT.

Monday night’s official news from Ireland indicated that the rebellion there had been crushed. All the rebels in Dublin had surrendered, and the city was declared to be quite safe. In the country districts the discouraged remnants of the ” Irish Republican Army ” are giving themselves up to the mobile columns hunting them down. About 1,500 prisoners have been brought to England.

The Press correspondents were on Saturday morning enabled to make a tour of the troubled districts. It was found that the only real damage to the city has been done in Sackville Street, the lower part of which has been laid in ruins. Shells, bombs, rifle fire, incendiary fires, and wanton damage have all contributed to the general destruction with a terrible completeness. Great gaping spaces mark the spots where the fine Post Office another famous buildings once stood.

Mr Asquith announced in the House of Commons on Wednesday afternoon that three of the signatories to the proclamation of an Irish Republic — P H Pearse, Thomas J Clarke, and Thomas MacDonagh – having been tried by court-martial ans found guilty, were shot that morning. Three of the other prisoners were sentenced to three years’ penal servitude.

Mr Birrell tendered his resignation of the Chief Secretaryship for Ireland on Monday. The resignation was at once accepted. He confessed in the House of Commons on Wednesday that he had made an ” untrue estimate” of the possibilities of the Sinn Fein movement.

IN MEMORIAM.

CLIFTON.—In ever loving Memory of our dear son and brother Tom, who was killed in action on May 9th, 1915, somewhere in France.

“ One year has passed, our hearts still sore
Day by day we miss him more;
His welcome smile, his dear sweet face
Never on earth can we replace.
” We often sit and think of him,
And think of how he died;
To think he could not say good-bye
Before he closed his eyes.”
—Sadly missed by his loving mother, father, brother, and sisters.

STEBBING.—In loving memory of our dearly beloved son, Sydney Reginald, died of wounds in France, 4th May, 1915. Buried in Hazebrouck Cemetery.— From his lonely Mother, Father, Sisters & Brothers.

The twelve months’ old wound is still open, and our hearts bleed daily for the loss of one so dear to all.