6th May 1916. Remember Rugby Boys on Active Service

REMEMBER RUGBY BOYS ON ACTIVE SERVICE
AND
BUY A FLAG ON
SATURDAY, MAY 20th

This is an opportunity to help the Local Committee to send Comforts to Rugby Sailors, and Soldiers and to show your gratitude to the Rugby men who are fighting for You.

Keep alive warm thoughts of the home town in their hearts.

Offices & Supply Depot: Benn Buildings.

Hon. Organising Secretary : J REGINALD BARKER, who will gladly welcomes offers of help.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Second-Lieut K Westmacott Lane, R.F.A (T), 1st Worcester Battery, is reported dangerously wounded in France.

Lieut Allan Hand, 81st Provisional Battalion, T.F., is at present in hospital at Southend suffering from pneumonia.

Captain Leslie Cheape, of the Dragoons, the famous polo player, who is well known in the Rugby district, has been posted as missing.

Arrangements have, we understand, been made to use Bilton Hall, the residence of Mr Walter Barnewtt, as a Red Cross Hospital in place of Ashlawn, which was closed a short time ago.

Lieut-Colonel C Fane, D.S.O., of the Sherwoods, who was wounded in helping to quell the rebellion in Dublin formerly lived (as Captain Fane) at Brownsover Hall and Newton House, being well known in hunting circles in this locality.

Sergt Pattison, who since August last has been engaged in recruiting work at Rugby Drill Hall, has been ordered to rejoin his regiment, the Royal Warwicks. Sergt Pattison went to the front in the early days of the war, and was severely wounded, but he has now made a complete recovery. During his stay in Rugby he has, by his unfailing courtesy and geniality, made many friends, who will wish him good luck for the future.

FORTHCOMING PRESENTATION.

As already reported by us, Sergt Bale, of the 2nd Batt Royal Welsh Fusiliers, has been awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal for special bravery in France. We understand Colonel F F Johnstone has been requested to present the medal to Sergt Bale at Rugby, and the presentation will be made at 2.15 on Sunday afternoon next, the 7th inst in Caldecott Park, near the Drill Hall, at which time, and place the Rugby Volunteer Training Corps will parade. There is no doubt this presentation will create a good deal of local interest, as Sergt Bale is a Rugby man and son of Mr J Bale, Lagoe Place.

APPEALS UNDER THE GROUP SYSTEM.

Notices of appeal by attested married men in the Groups up to 41, called up under the proclamation posted last week, must be lodged with the Tribunals for the Rugby area not later than Monday next.

THE TRIBUNALS AT WORK.

RUGBY URBAN DISTRICT.

Held at the Benn Buildings on Thursday evening. Present: Messrs J J McKinnell (chairman), W Flint, L Loverock, and T A Wise. Major Neilson and Mr F M Burton represented the Military Authorities.

The case of an unattested dentist, which had been adjourned four times for an examination by a medical board, was first taken. Mr H Eaden represented appellant, and said the man had been medically examined and passed for garrison service at home. He was informed by the military doctor that the bread with which he would be served in the army would rapidly aggravate his complaint. He would also be given tea, which he now had to forego, and this would, make it impossible for him to go on. Mr Eaden said they would have to take the case on its merits, and he asked for an adjournment. Appellant was in partnership and the ramifications of the business were very widely extended, there being nine branches. Before the war they employed nine qualified men, but these had now bean reduced to three. They had also released several apprentices who had not yet finished their time. Their clients consisted of the lower middle class, who paid by instalments, and when a fair proportion of the money had been paid the work was done and the teeth supplied. Considerable sums were now in hand, and it would take six months to complete this work. His mother and an invalid sister were partly dependent upon him. They had unsuccessfully attempted to get someone to help carry on the work. A highly skilled man was required for this class of Work.—By Mr Burton : All the branches should be open each day, with an operator present, but as things were they had to be worked on a part-time basis.—There was also an appeal by the man’s partner, and he was called in and gave evidence of the difficulty of getting men.—Application refused.

A single plasterer, who had already had one period of exemption, made a further application, and stated that his circumstances had not altered.—Mr Eadon represented appellant, and said at present he employed four married men, three of whom were attested. In the event of this application being granted, he would undertake not to appeal for either of these men.—The Military Authorities had suggested that appellant’s father could carry on the business, but Mr Eaden pointed out that this was quite impossible, owing to his age. Appellant had sub-contracts on Government work, which would extend over several months. It was an absolute impossibility for the business to be carried on if he had to go, and it would fall into the hands of his competitors.—Exemption till 15th June. Appellant was informed that the Tribunal would not be able to do any more for him, and if he took any more contracts it would be at his own risk.

Application for a single baker, aged 20 years, was made by a local baker, who himself had given up his business’ to get employment at a local munitions factory.—The Military recommended that the application be refused, and the employee should return to his business.-Applicant stated that the round now was only a small one, and he went to work on shells in July last.—Refused.

A Rugby butcher appealed on behalf of a single slaughterman, aged 23. The Military Authorities recommended that the application be refused, and added that co-operative arrangements must be made, if necessary by the Tribunal.—Mr A H Reeve, President of the Master Butchers’ Association, was also present, and said this man was included in the nine slaughtermen referred to at the last meeting.—Appellant said this was the only man he had, and he also assisted another butcher by doing all his slaughtering.-Exemption till October 1st. The Chairman expressed the hope that the Butchers’ Association would go into the matter, and really try to work with each other and release some of these men.—Mr Reeve said they would do so. He did not like appealing for these single men. He thought they all ought to go, and it was not their wish to keep him.—The Chairman asked if it would be possible to work with butchers outside the Association, such as the Co-operative Society. These were not normal times.— Mr Reave answered that there were so few men to do the town work.

IRISH REBELLION CRUSHED.

REBEL LEADERS SHOT.

Monday night’s official news from Ireland indicated that the rebellion there had been crushed. All the rebels in Dublin had surrendered, and the city was declared to be quite safe. In the country districts the discouraged remnants of the ” Irish Republican Army ” are giving themselves up to the mobile columns hunting them down. About 1,500 prisoners have been brought to England.

The Press correspondents were on Saturday morning enabled to make a tour of the troubled districts. It was found that the only real damage to the city has been done in Sackville Street, the lower part of which has been laid in ruins. Shells, bombs, rifle fire, incendiary fires, and wanton damage have all contributed to the general destruction with a terrible completeness. Great gaping spaces mark the spots where the fine Post Office another famous buildings once stood.

Mr Asquith announced in the House of Commons on Wednesday afternoon that three of the signatories to the proclamation of an Irish Republic — P H Pearse, Thomas J Clarke, and Thomas MacDonagh – having been tried by court-martial ans found guilty, were shot that morning. Three of the other prisoners were sentenced to three years’ penal servitude.

Mr Birrell tendered his resignation of the Chief Secretaryship for Ireland on Monday. The resignation was at once accepted. He confessed in the House of Commons on Wednesday that he had made an ” untrue estimate” of the possibilities of the Sinn Fein movement.

IN MEMORIAM.

CLIFTON.—In ever loving Memory of our dear son and brother Tom, who was killed in action on May 9th, 1915, somewhere in France.

“ One year has passed, our hearts still sore
Day by day we miss him more;
His welcome smile, his dear sweet face
Never on earth can we replace.
” We often sit and think of him,
And think of how he died;
To think he could not say good-bye
Before he closed his eyes.”
—Sadly missed by his loving mother, father, brother, and sisters.

STEBBING.—In loving memory of our dearly beloved son, Sydney Reginald, died of wounds in France, 4th May, 1915. Buried in Hazebrouck Cemetery.— From his lonely Mother, Father, Sisters & Brothers.

The twelve months’ old wound is still open, and our hearts bleed daily for the loss of one so dear to all.

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