30th Sep 1916. Further News from Switzerland

FURTHER NEWS FROM SWITZERLAND.

Our readers will recall a letter we printed about a month ago from Bandsman C Rowe, of the Welsh Fusiliers, who was a prisoner of War in Germany, and who was fortunate enough to be sent to Switzerland. Mr J R Barker, the hon secretary of the Rugby Prisoner of War Help Committee has this week received another interesting letter from Bandsman Rowe (who is at Leysin, Switzerland), dated September 14. He says :-

“ Last night I received your most welcome letter, and was so pleased to hear you received mine all right.

“ As regards giving you any news to interest your subscribers, about the best news-or I should say the worst—is that if the parcels stop, there is not much chance of our men leaving Germany alive. I was asked in each camp by my comrades not to forget to send a letter to each Fund which sends parcels and thank them on behalf of our lads in Germany. If the people could only witness our poor mens’ faces when they don’t appear on the packet roll which is posted up on the arrival of the mail, I’m positive that your fund would be soon swelled. Many of the men have been through those terrible times in 1914 and early 1915, and I can assure you, sir, that they are a brave lot ; they will face any hardships, but they won’t on any account work on anything connected with ammunition.

“ The men who suffer most are those down salt and coal mines. When they are sick they are placed in a room with no attention given them, and some horrible tales will be told after the war by those men. The parcels you send are just what our men require, but if you hear of a man on Commando, or Working Party, then it would be advisable to send something in place of bread, especially in the months of May until August. You will notice I am going well into next year, but it is best to he prepared. I have had a few letters asking me about the possibilities of the Germans looting our mens’ food. Well, sir, I am sure there is not much chance for that to happen, as the people are so much afraid of the Government. They were begging for bread when I left, so you can see they have put their pride in their pockets.

“ I must conclude now, sir, wishing your fund success, which it really deserves.—With best regards, I am yours sincerely, C ROWE.”

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

In our last issue we mentioned that the expenses in connection with the War Prisoners’ Flag Day included the cost of 3,500 flags. It should have been 35,000.

The remains of Lieut Rogers, of the Royal Flying Corps, who was killed as the result of a collision between aeroplanes near Rugby in August, were sent to Canada, and the interment took place, with full military honours, at Barrie, Ontario, on September 4th.

Pte J H Fazakerley, Signal Section attached to the R.W.R, who before joining up was a member of the teaching staff of the Murray School, in a letter to Mr W T Coles Hodges says : “ In our last little do—‘ Some Battle ‘ we call it—I had hardly any sleep for several nights, and in the later stages I had to exert will power such as I have never exerted before in my life to make myself run quickly under the fire of shells, machine guns, and rifles from shell hole to shell hole, my limbs being so weary ; and when we were relieved and we had retired behind the firing line—well, you bet we did that with the shells flying about—on a further march, I was not the only one who dropped from the line, an slept the sleep of the just for six solid hours in the sludge.” Pte Fazakerley adds that he received a copy of the School Magazine, “ The Murrayian,” and he had shown this to several friends, who were very pleased with its novelty and contents.

LOCAL CASUALTIES.

Mrs Cousins, 1 Windmill Lane, has received information that her husband, Corpl F Cousins, of the Machine Gun Corps, was wounded in the big advance on September 15th. His steel helmet no doubt saved his life. The shell, which fell at his feet, made a large hole in the ground, and killed two men of his gun team who stood a few yards away. He is going on satisfactorily in hospital at Shrewsbury.

Colonel and Mrs Wyley, of Coventry, received the sad news on Friday morning that their only son, Lieutenant Wyley, Adjutant R.F.A, had fallen in action. On Tuesday last, September 19th, he was struck by a shell. He was buried in the cemetery at Avebury, near Albert. He was educated at Dunchurch Hall and Balliol College, Oxford, where he steered the college boat in 1911 and 1912, and was a member of the college football XV. His father was also an Old Rugbeian, and has been for the best part of his life associated with the Volunteer and Territorial organisation of the County. He was a very popular officer, and the greatest sympathy is felt for him and Mrs Wyley in their loss.

PTE R BARTLETT.

Mrs Smith of Lower Hillmorton has received information that her son, Pte Reg Bartlett was killed in action on September 17th. Pte Bartlett was an old Elborow boy, and was working at the B.T.H at the time of enlistment in August, 1914. He had previously been wounded four times. His mother has four sons and one son-in-law serving in the army, and one son-in-law has been discharged.

ANOTHER COUNCIL EMPLOYEE KILLED.

Mrs Anderson, 76 Campbell Street, New Bilton, has received news that Pte John Hirons, of the R.W.R, died of shot wounds on his 21st birthday on September 13th. About a fortnight ago Mrs Anderson received a letter from the Chaplain stating that Pte Hirons was badly wounded, and the card announcing his death said he was quite cheerful up to the last. Pte Hirons, who was a native of New Bilton, and was educated at the Council School, was at the outbreak of the war employed as a road man by the Rugby Urban District Council. He had been at the front some time, and was wounded in May last.

DAYLIGHT SAVING.

At the end of this week we shall revert to Greenwich time. It will be necessary to put all our clocks and watches back one hour on the night of Saturday-Sunday, just as we put them forward one hour on the night of May 20-21. We have now had a summer’s experience of daylight saving, and although the Act is only a war time measure, the universal opinion is that it has been a great success, that the evils foretold by some regarding its adoption have not come about, and that the advantages, particularly to the workers, have been such that a reversion to the old state of things would be well-nigh impossible.

DEATHS.

GREEN.—On the 3rd September, Pte. Albert Green, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, son of Mr. C. Green, of Lilbourne, killed in action in France.
“ He sleeps not in his native land,
But ’neath some foreign skies ;
And far from those who loved him best.
In a hero’s grave he lies.”

GRIFFITH.—On the 18th September, at New Zealand Hospital, Amiens, France, Rifleman L. GRIFFITH died of wounds. Aged 19.
“ Could we have raised his dying head,
Or heard his last farewell ;
The grief would not have been so hard,
For us who loved him well.
“ A light is from the household gone.
The voice we loved is still’d.
A vacant place is in our home,
Which never can be filled.”
—From his loving Brothers and Sisters, 74 South St.

LISSAMER.—Pte. WILLIAM ARTHUR LISSAMER, Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, youngest son of Thomas and Emily Lissamer, who was killed in action on the 15th September by shell fire.
“ He sleeps not in his native land,
But ’neath some foreign skies ;
And far from those he loved the best.
In a hero’s grave he lies.”
“ Death divides, but memory lingers.”
—From his loving FATHER and MOTHER.

OLDS.—In memory of Pte. G Olds, of Gaydon ; killed in action, August 30, 1916.
“ He gave his life for others.”

SMITH.—Killed in action in France, September 17th, 1916, REG., beloved son of the late W. H. Bartlett and Mrs. Smith, Hillmorton.—Deeply mourned by his loving MOTHER, DAD, BROTHERS, SISTERS, & TRIXIE.

IN MEMORIAM.

BARBER.—In loving memory of dear FRED, who was killed in action at Ypres on September 25th, 1915
—From his Mother, Sisters, and Brothers

FRANKTON.—In loving memory of our dear brother, Pte. FRED FRANKTON, who was killed in action on September 25, 1915.
“ He sleeps not in his native land,
But ‘neath some foreign skies ;
And far from those that loved him best,
In a hero’s grave he lies.”
—From his two SISTERS, SARAH & POLLY, & BROTHER WILL.

GREEN.—In ever loving memory of Private EDWARD (BERT) GREEN, who was killed in the battle of Loos, September 25th-27th, 1915.
—From his loving Wife.

HINKS.—In loving memory of my dear son, Pte. J. HINKS, 10546, Oxford & Bucks Light Infantry, who was killed in the Battle of Loos, September 25,1915 ; aged 24.
“ He sleeps not in his native land,
But ‘neath some foreign skies ;
And far from those that loved him best,
In a hero’s grave he lies.”
—From his MOTHER, FATHER, BROTHERS & SISTERS.

POWELL.—In ever-loving memory of our dear boy, Corpl HORACE POWELL, aged 20, who was killed at Loos, September 25, 1915.
“ Lost to sight, but to memory ever dear.”
— From all who loved him.

SNUTCH.—In loving memory of Rifleman H. SNUTCH, who was killed in action at Loos on September 25, 1915.—“ He gave himself for a wounded comrade.”
—From his MOTHER, FATHER & BROTHER.

STONE.—In memory of my dear husband, SIDNEY GEORGE STONE, who died of wounds received in action, September 28, 1915.—Not forgotten by his loving WIFE.

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