3rd Jan 1919. New Bilton Man Killed by Aeroplane

NEW BILTON MAN KILLED BY AEROPLANE.
A CHRISTMAS TRAGEDY.

On Christmas Eve Pte Richard Thomas Wilson, Royal Air Force, son of Mrs Wilson, 1 New Street, New Bilton, was accidentally killed at Ramsey Upward Aerodrome. Pte Wilson was in charge of the night flares, and while he was assisting to guide an aeroplane to its landing place he was caught by one of the wings and so badly injured that he died within a quarter of an hour. The funeral took place with military honours at New Bilton on Monday. Representatives from deceased’s unit attended, and the firing party was provided by a detachment from the Rugby Company of the Volunteers.

Pte Wilson was 46 years of age, and was previously employed by Mr Shears as a plasterer’s labourer. He joined the Army six months ago.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Bombardier John Hirons, R.F.A, formerly employed in the B.T.H Lamp Factory, died in Italy from bronchial pneumonia on December 22nd.

Corpl W Haggar, Worcester Regiment, was reported missing on March 21st, and until last week his parents, Mr and Mrs J Hangar, 10 Alexandra Rd, Rugby, had received no tidings. They have now obtained through the Red Cross the following report from a returned prisoner of war :—“ On March 21st, about 11 a.m, I saw W Haggar killed by a bullet. He was hit in the heart, death being instantaneous. I was five yards away. We were compelled to leave the body in a shallow trench, as the Germans were pressing forward. It occurred on the St Quentin front. Corpl Haggar had just returned for the second or third time after being wounded.” Previous to joining up at the outbreak of war Corpl Haggar was employed at the B.T.H. He was awarded the Military Medal for gallant conduct in June, 1917. Two brothers are still serving in France.

TO WOUNDED SOLDIERS AND RELEASED PRISONERS.— By an advertisement in another column it will be seen that any released prisoner of war in Rugby or district are invited to the B.T.H employees’ Christmas Party.

AT the Rugby Cattle Market on Monday a number of surplus Army horses were submitted by auction by Mr W Wiggins. Some useful animals were included, and good prices were realised, the highest price being 82 guineas. Mr Wiggins will offer a similar consignment next week.

VICTORY BALL IN HONOUR OF LANCE-CORPL VICKERS, V.C.
A WARWICKSHIRE HERO.

On Thursday next a grand Victory ball in aid of the testimonial fund to Lance-CorpI Arthur Vickers, the first member of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment to win the Victoria Cross, will take place in the Co-op. Hall, Rugby. Similar balls have been held or arranged in other large centres in the county, and the promoters have secured the patronage of many leading residents.

It is interesting to recall that Lance-Corpl Vickers was at one time employed by the B.T.H Company at Rugby as a brass caster, and at that time he resided at 80 Railway Terrace. He will be present at the ball, and it is expected that Mr F O Roberts, M.P, will also attend. The testimonial fund already stands at about £500.

A contemporary says : “ Lance-Corpl Vickers, V.C, may be permitted to believe that the figure five is his lucky number. He is one of a family of five, stands 5ft. high (or low), was rejected five times before his acceptance for the Army, won the coveted decoration in the fifth month he was in France on the 25th September, 1915. Out of 850 who went into the assault only 55 returned. Truly, the lance-corporal may with justice regard life as a game of fives.”

VISIT TO B.T.H WORKS.

On Thursday Lance-Corpl Vickers paid a visit to the B.T.H Works, where he was received, on behalf of the Company, by Mr G Ralph. Mr S London, and several other officials. Mr J J McKinnell, J.P. C.C, was also present. L-Corpl Vickers was entertained to lunch in the spacious Works Canteen, and during an interval was introduced to the workpeople by Mr G A Maley, chairman of the Canteen Committee, who explained that Vickers was the first ex-employee of the Company to win the V.C. The gallant fellow was loudly cheered by the diners, and the pianist played “ See the Conquering Hero Comes.” After briefly returning thanks, Vickers was kept busy for some time autographing photographs. He with Mr McKinnell and Sergt-Major Blythe were afterwards shown round the Works by Mr Ralph.

NEWBOLD PARISH COUNCIL.
VILLAGE HALL SUGGESTED AS WAR MEMORIAL.

This question was again considered, and Mr Cox suggested that a parish meeting should be called to make suggestions, unless the Council were prepared with any scheme to lay before the parishioners. They wished to carry the whole parish with them as far as possible.—The Chairman : May we obtain money out of the rates ?—Mr Cox : No ; it must be raised voluntarily.—The Chairman : The erection of a village hall has been suggested.—Mr Cox : Yes ; such a thing would be very useful; but it means spending a lot of money, and unless the inhabitants subscribe generously it cannot be obtained.—After further discussion it was decided to adjourn the further consideration of the matter until the annual parish meeting in March, when suggestions from the parishioners will be invited.

DUNCHURCH.
CHRISTMAS CELEBRATIONS.- On Boxing Day all the school children of Dunchurch and Thurlaston, to the number of 200, were entertained at the Village Hall to a capital tea, provided mainly by the members of Mrs Arkwright’s working party, aided by the gifts of many kind friends. Each child received from a beautifully decorated Christmas tree a toy or useful article at the hands of Father Christmas, ably personated by Mr E Amos. The entertainment was a pleasant surprise to the children, and all the more enjoyable as being a return to pre-war conditions ; indeed to some of the younger ones it was altogether a new experience. The presence of a large number of men home on leave, and the return of several prisoners of war, added much to the joy of the festive season. The services at the Parish Church and at Thurlaston were well attended on Christmas Day. At the Bishop’s request, last Sunday was observed as a “ Day of Remembrance,” recalling the lessons and experiences of the war.

When they were expecting his return home the parents of Pte Rupert Barratt, 2/6 Royal Warwicks, of Brickhill Cottages, Cawston, who was taken prisoner on April 22nd last, were notified of his death at Tournai on July 12th. A week or so later after receiving this sad news Pte Barratt’s father succumbed to pneumonia after a few days’ illness.

RYTON-ON-DUNSMORE.
Pte F Ward, of the Oxford & Bucks Infantry, who has been a prisoner of war since 1915, is home on leave. Pte J T Tompkins, of the 12th Norfolks, who was wounded the day Jerusalem fell, has been home on a 12 days’ leave.

“ OUR DAY ” IN WARWICKSHIRE.

Mr W I Shaw, the hon treasurer of the British Red Cross Society in Warwickshire, states that the collections for “ Our Day ” in the county realised £8,227 8s 8d, as against £5,288 13s 1d in 1917, and £2,237 4s 1d in 1916. The collection in the Coleshill Division (per Mr T Clayton) was £1,500, a magnificent total. In Coventry city it was £1,256 ; in Kenilworth (per Mrs Rotherham) £511 15s 3d ; in Leamington £402 13s 10d ; in Rugby district £400, and in the Southam division £4400 6s 1d. In many districts the was doubled this year, and altogether the result was remarkably good, and reflects great credit upon the ladies and gentlemen who organised and conducted the collection.

A special appeal was made this year for “ Our Day ” for funds so urgently required for the needs of the British Red Cross Society, and sincere thanks are tendered to all those who by their efforts have made Warwickshire contributions such a notable success.

DISPUTE OVER JAM COUPONS.
LADY’S LETTERS TO RUGBY FOOD CONTROL COMMITTEE.

There was little business of public interest at the meeting of the Food Control Committee on Thursday, when there were present : Mr H Tarbox (in the chair), Mrs Dewar, Mrs Shelley, Messrs A Appleby, W Brooke, J Cripps, R Griffin, A Humphrey, C Gay, G H Mellor, F S Hodgkins, and W A Stevenson.

THE IMPROVED MILK SUPPLY.

A milk retailer wrote explaining that she was now receiving more milk than she required, and unless she was allowed to supply the B.T.H canteen again she would have to discontinue taking milk from one farmer. The worry of having too much milk was worse than having not enough.—The Executive Officer (Mr Burton) agreed that there was now a surplus supply of milk locally, due to the working of the Registration Scheme, and it was decided to allow any surplus to be equally divided between the B.T.H and W & R canteens.

The Executive Officer explained that in conformity with the instructions of the Ministry of Food, he had applied to all persons who received more than the specified quantity of sugar for preserving for the surrender of jam coupons. He wrote to Mrs Nickalls, of the Ridgway, amongst others, asking for the surrender of jam coupons. To this Mrs Nichalls replied : “ I think your letter is very extraordinary. I received 20lbs extra sugar and put aside half the jam—14lbs—for the Government. I then went to the Food Control and was told that they did not require the jam after all. You now require coupons for 40lbs of jam. All I can say is I have naturally used the coupons and have none to send. If I had had proper notice, of course I should not have used them.” The Executive Officer replied : “ Coupons equivalent to the amount of sugar granted over and above 6lbs per head of the household must be surrendered. I note that you say you have none to send. Surely this would apply to the coupons up to this week, as it would be an offence to use coupons now which are not available till later. If I this is so, I must ask you to forward the number of coupons required at your earliest convenience.” Mrs Nickalls then sent a postcard, as follows :—“ If you can show me the official Gorvernment notice from headquarters, you can have the coupons.”—Mr Burton added that he then ascertained the name of the retailer with whom she was registered, and he wrote asking him not to supply her with any more jam until further notice.—Mr Stevenson : In view of the correspondence, I move that a letter be sent demanding that these coupons be sent, and. failing this, that action be taken at once. We can’t be insulted like this.—Mrs Dewar said she quite agreed with the action of the Committee, but the unfortunate thing was that some of the smaller committees were not doing this.—The Executive Officer pointed out that the instructions of the Ministry on the point were very definite.—The Chairman said they could not allow this case to pass, or the dignity of the Committee would be upset altogether.—The resolution was carried.

ITEMS.

It was reported that from January 26 the sugar ration would be ¾lb per head.

The Executive Officer reported that the Divisional Commissioner was holding 10cwt of cheese for distribution in the district each month, and the basis of allocation was approved.—It was noted that at present cheese supplies were very short.

WILLANS & ROBINSON LTD.
IMPORTANT DEVELOPMENTS IN LOCAL INDUSTRY.

A development of importance to local industry is foreshadowed in the recent registration of a new Company, termed the English Engineering Co. with a capitol of £5,000,000. This Company  is formed to co-ordinate the interests of the Coventry Ordnance Works, Phoenix Dynamo Co, and Dick Kerr & Co. The latter Company recently acquired by purchase of shares predominating interest in Willans & Robinson’s and some minor concerns. Since the Coventry Ordnance Company represent mainly the interests of Cammell, Laird & Co, the Fairfield Shipbuilding Co, and John Brown & Co, it will be seen that this group becomes of first importance in the engineering world.

The new English Engineering Company will, as the central or parent company, represent a very  important coalition of purely British engineering manufacturers, and it is to be expected that the co-operation thus assured will make for increased production and employing power.

We understand that this development will not entail any changes in the local management of Willans and Robinson, and that Mr Davenport will continue his direction thereof.

DEATHS.

BOSWORTH.—On Dec. 5th, 1918, at the American Base Hospital, Toul, France, Private THOMAS BOSWORTH, 2nd Linc’s Fusiliers, of  pneumonia ; released prisoner of war ; aged 35 ; youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Bosworth, Lutterworth.—“ The Lord watch between me and thee when we are absent one from another.”

HAGGER.—In loving memory of Corpl. W. HAGGAR, 2/8 Worcester, fifth son of Mr. and Mrs. J. Haggar, Alexandra Road, Rugby, who was killed at St. Quentin, on March 21st, 1918 (previously reported missing). Aged 28.—“ Thy will be done.”—From Father, Mother, Brothers, sisters, and Ida.

HIRONS.—On December 22, 1918, at Facura 3rd Military Hospital, Italy, Bombr. JOHN, the dearly loved youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. R. Hirons, Kilsby, in his 29th year.—“ Thy will be done.”
—From his sorrowing Father & Mother, Brothers and Sisters.

IN MEMORIAM.

JOHNSON.—In loving memory of our dear brother, L/Corpl. GEORGE JOHNSON, of the R.W. Regt., who died of wounds in France on January 4, 1918.
“ Sleep on, dear brother, in a far-off land,
In a grave we may never see ;
But as long as life and memory last
We will remember thee.”
—Ever remembered by his loving Mother & Sisters.

SHEASBY.—In proud and loving memory of PRIVATE HORACE SHEASBY (HOD), of Napton, who died of wounds Dec 30th, 1917. Ever in the thoughts of May, and sadly missed by his best chum W Webb. R.I.P.

 

21st Sep 1918. Suggested Memorial to Rugby Men

RUGBY URBAN DISTRICT COUNCIL.

Several matters of more than ordinary intent, including a suggestion for Rugby a memorial to local soldiers killed and maimed in the War, was discussed at the monthly meeting of the Urban Council on Tuesday, when there were present : Messrs J J McKinnell (chairman), W Flint (vice-chairman), T A Wise, W H Linnell, R Walker, W A Stevenson, R S Hudson, T Ringrose, C J Newman, F E Hands, S Robbins, and H Yates.

WELCOME TO LIEUT NEWMAN.

Before proceeding to the formal business, the Chairman, on behalf of the Council, welcomed Lieut C J Newman on his return from active service, and also conveyed to him the sympathy of the Council in the death of his wife. The circumstances were peculiarly sad, and he wished Lieut Newman to realise how deeply his colleagues felt for him in his deep sorrow.—Mr Newman said he was pleased to be back again to do his duty for the public of Rugby, and especially the electors of the Central Ward.

SUGGESTED MEMORIAL TO RUGBY MEN.

An interesting discussion took place on the consideration of a letter from the Rugby Branch of the National Association of Discharged Sailors and Soldiers, asking the Council to assist them in providing an institute (where they could hold their meetings), a library, &c, for men discharged from the various forces.—The Chairman suggested that the letter be referred to the Estates Committee.—Mr Newman said he desired to raise the question of a war memorial to their local men. So far nothing had been done, except to arrange for a collection of photographs to be placed in the Library.—The Clerk (Mr A Morson, M.B.E) explained that other steps had been taken. Some time ago, at the suggestion of the Council, he invited the relatives of soldiers killed in the War to forward the names to him, and he now had a very long list.—Mr Newman contended that this was not going far enough. They should now consider the question of providing a fitting memorial to those who had been killed or maimed in the War, and a list of their names should be suitably preserved. Rugby did not lend itself to statuary ; and, after all, a statue was only a nine days’ wonder after it was unveiled. He therefore suggested that they should go further than this, and erect some houses, with all the modem conveniences and improvements for discharged soldiers who had been maimed in the War. In connection with this it might also be possible to erect an institute for the discharged soldiers.—The Chairman : It is a huge job.—Mr Robbins supported Mr Newman’s suggestion, and said if they did not aim at something big they would not get anything. Houses for discharged soldiers would be much more useful than a monument.—The Chairman suggested that they should deal with the subject matter of the letter first. If these discharged men had to wait until the Council had raised the money for providing an institute they would have to wait a long time. He proposed that the letter be referred to the Estates committee to see if that body could find suitable premises for them.—Mr Yates said he would like to have more information from the association as to what they had in mind. He had considered the question very carefully, and he was not in favour of providing any institute for setting these men apart from the rest of the civilian population. They wanted these men, when they returned to civil life, to take their part in the reconstruction of society with the rest of the community as far as possible, and they did not wish to set up any class feeling between those men who had been away and those who had not. If they only wanted a place to hold their meetings in it was the duty of the Council to find them one ; but he believed they were well provided for in that respect at present.—Mr Newman said he did not agree with these remarks. A discharged soldier had the right to ask for anything he liked, and why should he not be allowed to do as he liked ? When the War was over the discharged sailors and soldiers would be a force to be reckoned with, and they must do all they could to entertain them and provide them with decent surroundings, and not leave them in the streets to die like dogs, as they had done in the past. This was his sole idea in suggesting the provision of houses and an institute for these men.—The letter was referred to the Estates Committee.

The question of a war memorial was then considered, and the Chairman said he took it that they would desire it to be a Memorial to all who went out to fight for them, whether they came back from the War or not. He thought they would have to set up a special committee to deal with the matter, The first thing, however, was to get the money, and then they could decide what to do with it. He agreed with Mr Newman that Rugby did not lend itself to statuary, and he thought the suggestion that an institute should be provided was a very good one. However, if they had the money now they would not be able to spend it.—Mr Newman : There are ways and means for everything in this world.—The question was referred to the General Purposes Committee.

JAM MAKERS THANKED.

The Chairman said it would be within the knowledge of the members that since their last meeting a committee of local ladies had been very energetic in making jam for the military and the civil population. They had made 7,350lbs. and he believed that, with one exception, the whole of the work had been done voluntarily. He especially mentioned Mr W Barnett (chairman of the committee), Lady Rowena Patterson, and Mrs Nickalls in connection with this work, and a hearty vote of thanks was accorded to the committee ; also to the gas Company for lending the premises for making the jam, and Mr Alfred Over for providing storage facilities.

FRANCE’S DAY.

The following message was read from the President of the French Republic in reply to the congratulatory telegram sent to him on the occasion of the celebration of France’s Day, July 14th :—

“ The President of the French Republic is very much affected by the congratulations and good wishes which you have sent on the occasion of France’s Day, and thanks you warmly in the name of the French people, who are closely united to the British people in the defence of right and liberty.—R POINCARE.”

It was decided to have this letter, together with several others, including one from Admiral Beatty, framed and hung in the Council Chamber.

SUGGESTED COLD STORAGE.

A letter was read from the Rugby Food Control Committee, asking the Council to take immediate steps to provide a cold storage for Rugby District—Mr Robbins : Who has got to pay for it ?—Mr Wise pointed out that at present they had nothing of this kind in the town. He thought such a building would be very useful, and it might even be a paying investment. It was a question as to whether they would get permission to erect such a building, even if they decided to do so ; but he thought at present it was important that perishable foods should be stored in the localities where they were needed, and it would be a great boon to the community at large if such a building could be erected.—Mr Yates moved that the letter be referred to the Markets Committee. He believed it was necessary that they should have a cold storage in the town, because one thing they had learned from the shortage of commodities was the sinfulness of waste : and even when they did get more food it would be necessary to have somewhere to store that portion which was not required for immediate consumption.—Mr Wise promised that the Food Committee would assist the Council with any figures they could obtain from traders likely to use the storage.—The Chairman : If the town grows, as it will do sooner or later, we are bound to have a cold storage.—Mr Stevenson suggested that the letter should be referred to a Joint Markets and Plans Committee, and this was agreed to.

THE BATHS.

The Baths Committee reported that in view of the great need for economy in coal and light during the winter, the committee propose to further consider the re-opening of the slipper baths at their next meeting, but their present proposal is to open the baths on Wednesdays, Thursdays, Fridays, and Saturdays only, instead of the whole week.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Sergt T C Vickers, Yeomanry, Rugby, has been officially reported drowned ; and Pte W Everton, Tank Corps, Rugby, has died of wounds.

Rifleman A V Pitham, Rifle Brigade, Rugby has been wounded and captured by the Germans ; and Pte H Lawley, RW.R, has also been reported a prisoner of war.

Capt J Oscar Muntz, youngest son of Mr F E Muntz, of Umberslade, died of wounds on September 4th at the age of 42.

W F W Satchell, son of Mr & Mrs W F J Satchell, 94 Park Road, Rugby, has been granted a commission as Second-Lieutenant in the Royal Warwickshire Regt.

Pte Lewis Lewis, City of London Regiment, son of ex-P.C Lewis, 35 King Edward Road, was killed in France on August 8th. He was nearly 19 years of age, an old St Matthew’s boy, and an employee at Rugby Post Office. He joined the Army in October, 1917, and was drafted to France in April.

Mrs Hutt, 15 Bridget Street, New Bilton, has received news that her son, Pte J H Lines, Royal Berkshire Regiment, was killed in action on August 27th. He of was 19 years of age, and before joining the Army in July 1917, he was employed at the L & N-W Railway Loco Sheds. Another son of Mrs Hutt was killed in France last year.

Mr & Mrs N Austin, 3 Oliver Street, Rugby, have received official notice that their youngest son, Pte Cecil Austin, 1st R.W.R, was killed in action in France on August 30th. Pte Austin was only 19 years of age. He joined up on February 14, 1916, and went to France the following year. When he had only been there a few weeks he was invalided back with dysentery, and was in hospital five months. He only re-joined his regiment in July, and was sent to France for the second time the following week. His eldest brother, Wilfred Austin, has been serving in Egypt since January, 1915.

Intimation has been received by Mr H C Samson, Hillmorton Road, Rugby, that his son, Second Lieut O M Samson, died of wounds on the 17th inst. Lieut Samson was an assistant master at Rugby School (Army Class). He was an 0 for Blue at cricket, and also played for Somersetshire. At Rugby he was of great assistance to the Rugby Club, with which he frequently played. He also made one of a very successful Rugby hockey team captained by Mr F J Kittermaster for several years.

Corpl H Rogers, M.M, 1st Royal Warwickshire Regt., has recently been awarded the bar to the Military Medal for gallantry. The Major-General of his Division has also written congratulating him on his fine behaviour. Corpl Rogers, who is a native of Flore, Northants, and nephew of Mrs H Miller, 10 Alfred St, Rugby, has been twice wounded, and before the War was employed at Rugby L & N-W Railway Station.

Driver Jack Hillyard, A.S.C, son of Mr Charles Hillyard, 20 Frederick Street, Rugby, was killed on August 22nd. He was 24 years of age, and before joining up in October, 1914, he was employed as a vanman by Mr J J McKinnell. He served three years and three months in France, and only returned to the front a few weeks prior to his death. He was educated at New Bilton Council School. At one time Mr Hillyard had six sons in the Army ; two have been discharged, and three are still serving.

Mr and Mrs Southern, of 77 Windsor Street, have received a letter from the Commanding Officer of the Regiment notifying the death of their youngest son, Pte S Southern, in action on September 4th. His platoon went forward in the attack over a difficult piece of ground, and when it became inevitable that a message must be sent back he volunteered to carry it. He had very nearly got into safety when a bullet hit him in the head, causing instantaneous death. His loss to the Company (the officer adds) is a very real one. He was doing excellent work, was very popular, and they could ill spare him. Pte Southern was awarded the Military Medal on May 30, 1917. He joined up at the commencement of the War, previously being employed at the B.T.H Works. This is the second son of Mr & Mrs Southern who has fallen in the War.

Pte John James Brookes, R.W.R, eldest son of Mr John Brookes, 41 Lawford Road, New Bilton, was killed in action on August 30th. He was 22 years of age, and was a member of “ E ” Company when war broke out, and was mobilised with them. He had seen a good deal of heavy fighting, and had been wounded three times. Before the War he was a cleaner in the L & N-W Railway Loco Sheds.

Mr William Fleet, 98 Lawford Road, Rugby, has received news that has youngest son, Pte Cyril William Fleet, 6th Dorsets, died of wounds on September 10th. He was 32 years of age, and before joining the Army at the commencement of the War he worked at the Cement Works. He was gassed a short time ago, and only returned to France a fortnight before his death.

Pte Albert Thomas Gibbs, London-Irish Rifles, eldest son of Mr & Mrs A B Gibbs, 14 Kimberley Road, Rugby, has died while a prisoner of war in Germany. Pte Gibbs was employed on the L & N-W Railway. He enlisted about twelve months ago, and had only been in France a short time when he was taken prisoner. He was 35 years of age, and leaves a widow and two children. His younger brother, Flight Cadet David Gibbs, was recently killed in an aeroplane accident.

News has been received at Coombe Abbey that Lord Uffington, the Earl of Craven’s heir, is lying seriously wounded in France, and has had a leg amputated above the knee.

NEWBOLD-ON-AVON.
NEWS has been received that Corpl J Seymour, who in last week’s issue was reported wounded and suffering from enteric, has since died. He belonged to the Rugby Howitzer Battery at the outbreak of war, and has served with them since in France and Italy. He leaves a widow and two children, for whom much sympathy is felt.

WOLSTON.

LIEUT WILFRED COLEMAN WINS THE MILITARY CROSS.—News has just reached Wolston that Lieut Wilfred Coleman has been awarded the Military Cross for gallantry on the banks of the Marne, He is the only son of Mr & Mrs T P Coleman, of Marston Hall. When war was declared he was a member of the 1st, Troop of the Warwickshire Yeomanry. In April, 1916, he went out to Egypt, and from there to Gallipoli where he was wounded. He was afterwards among the Yeomanry in Egypt when so many of them were killed or taken prisoners. He was subsequently sent into training at Cairo for a commission, and was then attached to the 5th Devons with whom he has gamed his present honour. He has now been transferred to the Royal Air Force.

DEATH OF TWO SONS.—Deep sympathy is felt for Mr & Mrs Robert Clarke, who heard in two days of the death of two of their sons. Pte William Clarke, of the Oxon and Bucks L.I, had been missing since March 21st ; but a friend—Pte Harrison—has written to say that he saw him killed. On the next day a notification was received from the War Office that their youngest son—Pte Joseph Clarke, of the Coldstream Guards—was killed on August 22nd. Both sons were respected employees of Messrs Bluemel, and were well known in the district They had been in France for a long time.

LEAMINGTON HASTINGS.
KILLED.—Sergt J Major, son of Mr H Major, of Station Cottages, has been killed in action. He joined up at the outbreak of war, being the first recruit from the parish. A memorial service was held in the church on Sunday evening.

DUNCHURCH.
MR & MRS H PEARCE, Coventry Road, learn that their son, Pte W Pearce, K.R.R, who was badly wounded and was a prisoner of war, has been repatriated, and is in London, where he has undergone an operation to his head.

ITCHINGTON.

HARRY COCKERELL KILLED.—On Saturday official intimation was received by Mr & Mrs H W Cockerell that their only son, Pte Harry Richard Cockerell, R.W.R, was killed in action on the 1st inst.  A sympathetic letter from the chaplain attached to the regiment states that Pte Cockerell fell fighting gallantly in one of the most important engagements of the War, and was killed instantaneously by a shell. The rev gentleman adds: “ He will be much mused.” Before he was called up Pte Cockerell had joined his father in his business as plumber and decorator. He had gained the respect of all, and was greatly beloved by many friends. Sincere sympathy is accorded to Mr & Mrs Cockerell and family in their sad loss.

HARRY COOKE GASSED.—Mr & Mrs John Cooke have been informed that their eldest son, Rifleman Harry Cooke, Rifle Brigade, is in hospital in France suffering, from gas poisoning. He was quite blind for three days after the occurrence, but is progressing favourably. His younger brother, Rifleman Reg Cooke, K.R.R, reported missing last May, has not since been heard of.

DR CLAGUE TO REMAIN.—When Dr Clague was medically examined at Coventry in June last he was passed for service in Grade 1. At the end of August he received his orders to join the Army in October. On the 3rd inst. Long Itchington people solemnly protested against being left without a resident doctor. On the 11th inst. Dr Clague underwent a second medical examination at Birmingham, and has now been totally rejected as unfit for military service. His services as a medical man will, therefore, be retained in the village.

STOCKTON.
OUR MEN.—Cecil Wall has been wounded in the thigh, and is making satisfactory progress ; and Ernest Hall has been gassed, fortunately without very serious effects.

THURLASTON.
ON TUESDAY morning, Mr & Mrs W Hirons, Coventry Road, were notified that their fourth son, Pte G Hirons, R.W.R, had been killed. He was formerly in the employ of Mr J Johnson, J.P, Thurlaston, and was the finest young man in the village. He was 6ft in height and well-built, although only 19 years of age, and he was much respected by everybody in the parish. Mr & Mrs Hirons have another son—J Hirons—badly wounded in France. They had four sons in the Army till two of them were killed. The two remaining in the Army are members of the Warwickshire Police Force, one having been stationed at Sutton Coldfield, and the other at Shipston-on-Stour.

RUGBY & DISTRICT FOOD CONTROL COMMITTEE.

THE SHORTAGE OF MILK.
A letter was read from a milk retailer complaining that she was unable to get a proper supply of milk, and pointing out that unless the committee could help her she would be unable to allow her customers the quantity to which they were entitled.—Mrs Shelley said this was a very hard case. The woman was a widow and an invalid, and was dependent upon her business for a livelihood ; whereas some of the other retailers were employed at the works, and were still keeping their businesses going.—Mr Cooke moved that the whole milk question be re-considered by the Rationing Committee. He believed that the town was threatened with a milk Monopoly, and that the situation was very serious.—Mr Humphrey drew attention to the fact that large quantities of milk were used daily in the canteens at the B.T.H and Willans & Robinson’s, and he suggested that they should use instead either dry milk or condensed milk in barrels. The fresh milk could then be distributed amongst the public.—In reply to Mr Gay, the Executive Officer said the committee had no power to commandeer milk ; but. if necessary, they could take over the whole milk supply of the town.—Mr Gay supported Mr Humphrey’s suggestion, and proposed that the two firms be approached on the matter. The Chairman : We do not want to be trouble with the workmen if we do this ?—Messrs Gay and Cooke replied in the negative.—The Chairman : We do not want it to be said that we wish to rob the workman of his milk.—Mr Gay : With the average workman his wife and children come first. They will be quite willing to forego fresh milk in the canteen in order that the children may have it.—It was decided that the executive Officer should approach the two firms on this question. and that the Rationing Committee should meet to consider the whole question of milk supply.—Mr Stevenson : Will they consider the retail price ?—The Executive Officer : The price will have to be revised at the end of September.

OTHER ITEMS.
A quantity of second grade bacon has now been received, and it was pointed out that the price of this was 1s 8d per lb straight from the case, and 1s 10d per lb washed and dried.—Both the Executive Officer and Mr Humphrey remarked that this bacon is very nice, almost as good, in fact, as the better quality bacon.—Mr Cripps : Do not praise it too much, or it will be 2s per lb next week.

DEATHS.

AUSTIN.—In loving memory of our darling boy, Pte. CECIL AUSTIN, 1st R.W.R., youngest son of Mr. & Mrs. Austin, 3 Oliver Street, Rugby, who was killed “ somewhere in France ” on August 30, 1918 ; aged 19 years. One of the very best.—From Dad and Mother.

FLEET.—Officially reported having died from gunshot wounds in France on September 10th, Pte. CYRIL WILLIAM FLEET, aged 32, youngest son of William Fleet, 98 Lawford Road, Rugby.

LINES.—In ever-loving, memory of my dearest and youngest son, Pte. J. H. LINES, of the Royal Berks., who was killed in action on August 27th “ somewhere in France ” ; aged 19 years.
“ We do not forget him, nor do we intend ;
We think of him daily, and will to the end.
We miss him and mourn him in silence unseen,
And dwell on the memory of days that have been.”
“ In the midst of life we are in death.”
—Not forgotten by his sorrowing Mother, Father, Brothers and Sisters.

WHITE.—Killed in action in France on July 29th, Pte CHARLES WHITE, 1st Batt. Royal Warwickshire Regt., second son of the late William White, formerly of Willoughby, and Ann White, Carterton, Clansfield, Oxon ; aged 33.

IN MEMORIAM.

CASHMORE.—In loving memory of our dear brother, Pte. CHARLES CASHMORE, 5th Oxon 7 Bucks L.I.
“ Three years have passed,
No one knows
What was this gallant hero’s end
No wooden cross or mound to show
Where he fell fighting against the foe.”
—From his ever-loving Sister, Nell, Violet, and brother George.

CUFAUDE.—In loving memory of No. 40549 EDWARD HENRY CUFAUDE (Yelvertoft) who fell in action on Hill 70 on September 22. 1917.
“ May we in Thy sorrows share,
For Thy sake all peril dare,
Ever know Thy tender care.

GREEN.— In ever loving memory of EDWARD (BERT) GREEN, who fell at the Battle of Loos, September 23-27, 1915.
—Sadly missed by his wife and children.

GRIFFITH.—In loving memory of LLEWELLYN GRIFFITH, who died of wounds on September 18, 1916.—“ Gone from sight, but to memory ever dear.”—From loving Brothers and Sisters—74 South Street.

HOPKINS.—In loving memory of FRANK, the youngest son of Henry Hopkins, late of Long Lawford, killed in action in France on September 18, 1915.
“ He bravely answered duty’s call ;
He gave his life for one and all ;
But thee unknown grave is the bitterest blow,
None but our aching hearts can know.”
—Never forgotten by his loving Father, Sisters, and Brothers.

NEAL.—In loving memory of Bombardier FRANK NEAL, R.F.A., who died of wounds on September 19, 1916.—Never forgotten by his loving sister Carrie.

THOMPSON.—In loving memory of our dear brother LEVI, who was killed in action in France on September 23, 1917.—Not forgotten by his Brothers and Sisters, Will, Tom, Emma, Fanny.

 

30th Jun 1917. Lord Roberts Memorial Workshops

LORD ROBERTS MEMORIAL WORKSHOPS FOR DISABLED SOLDIERS & SAILORS.

RUGBY & DISTRICT TRIBUTE DAY Saturday, July 7th.

At the beginning of the present War it was realised, both by Lord Roberts and by the Committee of the Society, that in order to deal with the numbers of soldiers and sailors returning disabled it would be necessary to greatly extend the original Workshops Scheme. Various plans were discussed, but while the matter was still under consideration the great Field-Marshal passed away in the midst of his troops.

A SUITABLE MEMORIAL.

As the question of a suitable Memorial was raised, it was felt that by using the money subscribed to carry out Lord Roberts’ own suggestions and ideas with regard to the Workshops no greater and more lasting Memorial, could be given to him. After consultation, therefore, with the Countess Roberts, who gave the proposal her warmest support, it was decided to start the Lord Roberts’ Memorial Fund for Workshops for Disabled Soldiers and Sailors, and arrangements were at once made to acquire a large Factory in London, with the idea that from this centre a large manufacturing business could be established, which would give employment to all disabled men who wished to profit by the scheme.

TOY-MAKING the STAPLE INDUSTRY.

After due consideration, the Committee decided to start Toy-making as the staple industry, to this way serving two purposes, for there was no time to lose in setting about the capture of this pre-eminently German trade.

Machinery for making wooden toys was duly installed, and the services of suitable instructors obtained.

By the end of 1915 over 80 different varieties of toys had been produced in large quantities, over 100 disabled men were employed, the public interest was aroused and the future of the Workshops as a manufacturing centre was assured.

So far so good ; but the business men in charge of the work saw much farther. They saw the need of not only providing employment for these men, but of providing a market for their goods—of manufacturing in such a way that the articles made could be sold to the trade at a trade price.

In this way—and in this way only—could they hope to make the Workshops pay their own way in the future, for it was obvious that, as the Society proposed to provide permanent employment a self-supporting industry was the only thing to be contemplated.

A STIFF PROBLEM.

The problem was a stiff one. Almost every day batches of disabled men were arriving, each knowing that good work and good pay were assured him the moment he entered the Workshops. Those who had started early were now becoming experts, and the quantity of toys being turned out was enormous.

It became apparent that London alone could not deal with the constant demands for employment, and it was decided to open Provincial Branch Workshops under the control of London, thus enabling the men to work, if they desired it, in their own localities.

ECONOMIC VALUE OF SPECIALIZATION.

That the foundation of these Branches would require an immense amount of capital—a great deal more than had originally been subscribed—was obvious from the outset, as each one must be thoroughly equipped and suitably prepared before even one disabled man could be sent there. But, on the other hand, as specialisation was to be the keynote of the idea, the centre could eventually save money by arranging to manufacture goods which would assist the other Branches and the Main Workshops, and at the same time manufacturing completed articles for sale. In this way the proposed metal working Branch at Birmingham would not only make lead soldiers and other metal toys, but would provide all metal parts, hinges, bolts, dies, &c., which are wanted in the manufacture of wooden toys in London, Bradford, the Printing Branch, would print all the catalogues, posters, stationery, &c., for all the centres, and at the same time could take outside orders in abundance. And so on with every other branch.

The Workshops would thus avoid paying out to other firms what they would necessarily demand as profit, and at the same time be enabled to build up several quite distinct and important industries.

YOUR HELP IS WANTED-NOW.

The disabled men are applying in large numbers for admission, and we want your help to give them what they ask.

The Workshops provide not for the present only, but for the whole future life of these brave men. They take them as they come, lame and halt, from the battlefield, and make of them efficient, capable workmen—not receivers of charity, but valuable units of a huge industrial and economic scheme.

LOCAL SUPPORT.

Rugby’s Tribute Day is fixed for Saturday, July 7th, Mr. J. J. McKinnell, C.C., chairman of the Rugby Urban District Council, being President of the effort, and he has entrusted the organisation to Mr. J. Reginald Barker.

Every penny that can be got is wanted now. The smallest amount is not too small, but big sums are wanted too. Do not let the Workshops be held up and the work curtailed for lack of your help. Send every penny you can spare to the Hon. Treasurer, Mr. R. P. MASON, Manager, London City and Midland Bank, Rugby, and do all you can to assist the Fund in helping Rugby’s effort towards success. These Workshops are the most practical, way of finding work for our permanently disabled men in the War.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Second-Lieut O M Samson, of Rugby, has been gazetted temporary lieutenant in the R.G.A.

M House and P D Stokes, who about two years ago were prominent members of Rugby School XV, have recently been killed in action. M House was also a member of the XI.

Capt Charles H Alexander, of the Trench Mortar Section, Australian Imperial Forces, was killed in action in France on June 8th. For some years Capt Alexander was a member of the staff of the B.T.H Company, and subsequently went out to Australia, where he joined the Australian Forces on the outbreak of war. He was a brother of Mrs John Martin, of Clifton, and brother-in-law of Mr Fred Clough, of Hillcrest, Hillmorton.

Sapper G Smith, Royal Engineers Signals, son of Mr & Mrs Smith, 12 Acacia Grove, has been appointed to a temporary commission as second-lieutenant in the Special Reserve of Officers, and posted to the 3rd Royal Warwickshire Regiment. Mr Smith, who was a member of the Old Volunteer Force, was mobilized at the beginning of the War, and proceeded to France with Rugby “ E ” Company. He is a member of the permanent staff of the Post Office and an Old Murrayian.

AN OLD SCHOOL SERVANT KILLED.

Mr W Evans, of Catthorpe, has received official notice that his son, Pte William Evans, Royal Warwicks, was killed in action by a German shell on June 10th. He was for over two years a footman with Dr David at the School House, Rugby, and a member of the School Servants’ Cricket Club. At the time he joined—January, 1915—he was a butler at Eton College. He was seriously wounded by shrapnel on September 3rd on the Somme at the taking of Ginchy. After being in hospital three months, he returned to France in January, and had seen some severe fighting since then with the Warwicks. The Officer of his Company, writing to the parents, states that Pte Evans was killed while taking stores up to the line. As one of the Company runners, he had always shown a splendid spirit—a fine, brave boy throughout. His straight, upright character was respected and admired by all the men, and all felt his loss very keenly. Mr Evans’ second son, who is in the K.R.R, has been wounded twice and discharged as medically unfit, and his third son is serving at the Front in a Machine Gun Corps.

STOCKTON.

ROLL OF HONOUR.—Mr James Green, of Calcutt, Stockton, has received news that his son, Sergt Charles Green, R.F.A, was killed in action on June 9th. He enlisted in September, 1914, went to France the following July, and straight into action with his Battery. He went through every engagement the Battery took part in, and was wounded at the Somme in August, 1916. Since then he has been slightly wounded three times—once in the thigh by a bullet, which he pluckily extracted with his jack-knife ; once in the check, causing a nasty flesh wound ; and then again on the heel by a shell. He has also been gassed, and suffered from frozen knees, and was temporarily buried with others by the bursting of a shell. This was only a week prior to the hit that ended fatally. Letters from the Major and Lieutenant of his Battery speak highly of him as a brave and fearless soldier, and say his last action, doubtless, saved the lives of several of his comrades.

ANOTHER LOCAL PRISONER OF WAR.

Another prisoner of war has been added to the list of the local committee, viz, Lance-Corpl C J Colley, 7th Royal Fusiliers, who is interned at Wahn. He was reported missing on April 21st, and it was not until Sunday last that he was further reported prisoner of war. His parents live at Coton House. Mr J R Barker, hon. secretary, has arranged for the standard food parcels and bread to be sent to him on behalf of the committee.

The many friends of Pte A E Hirons, of Churchover, will be glad to learn that news has at last been received of him. A letter received from another prisoner of war at Soltan says :— “ All the parcels have turned up ; it was owing to the frequent changes of address that they went astray. As soon as a parcel arrives I acknowledge and thank you for it. The chief difficulty is the address. We cannot let you know, of course, when we move and the parcels go adrift. I work in the post office here, and three weeks ago found no less than 23 parcels for Pte Hirons’ which I immediately sent on. Everything is done in order that the parcels reach their owners.”

CONCERT.—The wounded soldiers of the Rugby Infirmary Hospital gave a most enjoyable entertainment in their mess-room on Thursday last week, under the presidency of Mr W Dickens, The Commandant and most of the staff, as well as several friends from the town, attended. The programme, which was a long and varied one, was sustained throughout by the “ boys,” and every item was deservedly encored. Sergt Till (East Lancs Regiment), a fine baritone singe, was in splendid voice, and his rendering of “ Thora ” (by special request) was especially good. Others who contributed largely to the success of the evening and who deserve a word of praise were : Sergt Evans, Corp Beckett and Bostock, Ptes Heath and Holme, and “ Wee Geordie,” who impersonated Charlie Chaplin.

SPOTTED FEVER.—A fatal case of spotted fever has occurred in the Rugby rural district. All precautions have been taken.

A REGULATION has been published prohibiting an occupier of an agricultural holding in Great Britain selling or parting with possession of any horse used or capable of being used for the cultivation of the holding except with the authority of a license granted by the Board of Agriculture.

DEATHS.

EVANS.—On June 10th, WILLIAM EVANS, the beloved eldest son of W. E. & A. M. Evans ; killed in action by a German shell in France.- “ Greater love hath no man than this that he laid down his life for his friends.”
“ Thy will be done.”

GREEN.—Killed in action in France on June 9th, Sergt. CHARLES GREEN, beloved son of James and Flora Green, of Calcutt, Stockton ; aged 28.
“ Not dead to those who loved him,
Not lost, but gone before ;
He lives with us in memory,
And will for evermore.”

IN MEMORIAM.

ASTILL.—In loving remembrance of Pte. HERBERT ASTILL, who died of wounds received in action on June 29th, 1915.—From his sorrowing MOTHER and SISTERS.

COOMBES.—In loving memory of my dear husband, Pte. ARTHUR COOMBES, who died of wounds in King George’s Hospital, London, June 30, 1915.
“ Farewell, dear wife, my life, is past ;
You loved me dearly to the last,
Grieve not for me, but to prepare
For heaven be your greatest care.”
Also my dear son ARTHUR, who died February 26th, 1915. From loving WIFE and MOTHER.

CHATER.—In ever-loving memory of our beloved and only child, Rifleman W. H. Chater, R.B., of Dunchurch, who was killed in action at Ypres on June 30, 1916.—“ No lips need speak where the heart mourns sincerely.”—From FATHER and MOTHER.

CHATER.—In affectionate remembrance of Rifleman W. H. Chater, 12th Rifle Brigade ; killed in action at Ypres on June 30, 1916.—“ They miss him most who loved him best.”—From ADA.

COOPER.—In loving memory of 9178 Sergt. JOHN COOPER, 1st Yorks, and Lancs. Regiment ; killed in action in France on July 1, 1916.
“ Sleep on, dear brother, in a far-off grave :
A grave we may never see ;
But as long as life and memory lasts
We will remember thee.”
—From MOTHER, SISTER, and BROTHER.

30th Sep 1916. Further News from Switzerland

FURTHER NEWS FROM SWITZERLAND.

Our readers will recall a letter we printed about a month ago from Bandsman C Rowe, of the Welsh Fusiliers, who was a prisoner of War in Germany, and who was fortunate enough to be sent to Switzerland. Mr J R Barker, the hon secretary of the Rugby Prisoner of War Help Committee has this week received another interesting letter from Bandsman Rowe (who is at Leysin, Switzerland), dated September 14. He says :-

“ Last night I received your most welcome letter, and was so pleased to hear you received mine all right.

“ As regards giving you any news to interest your subscribers, about the best news-or I should say the worst—is that if the parcels stop, there is not much chance of our men leaving Germany alive. I was asked in each camp by my comrades not to forget to send a letter to each Fund which sends parcels and thank them on behalf of our lads in Germany. If the people could only witness our poor mens’ faces when they don’t appear on the packet roll which is posted up on the arrival of the mail, I’m positive that your fund would be soon swelled. Many of the men have been through those terrible times in 1914 and early 1915, and I can assure you, sir, that they are a brave lot ; they will face any hardships, but they won’t on any account work on anything connected with ammunition.

“ The men who suffer most are those down salt and coal mines. When they are sick they are placed in a room with no attention given them, and some horrible tales will be told after the war by those men. The parcels you send are just what our men require, but if you hear of a man on Commando, or Working Party, then it would be advisable to send something in place of bread, especially in the months of May until August. You will notice I am going well into next year, but it is best to he prepared. I have had a few letters asking me about the possibilities of the Germans looting our mens’ food. Well, sir, I am sure there is not much chance for that to happen, as the people are so much afraid of the Government. They were begging for bread when I left, so you can see they have put their pride in their pockets.

“ I must conclude now, sir, wishing your fund success, which it really deserves.—With best regards, I am yours sincerely, C ROWE.”

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

In our last issue we mentioned that the expenses in connection with the War Prisoners’ Flag Day included the cost of 3,500 flags. It should have been 35,000.

The remains of Lieut Rogers, of the Royal Flying Corps, who was killed as the result of a collision between aeroplanes near Rugby in August, were sent to Canada, and the interment took place, with full military honours, at Barrie, Ontario, on September 4th.

Pte J H Fazakerley, Signal Section attached to the R.W.R, who before joining up was a member of the teaching staff of the Murray School, in a letter to Mr W T Coles Hodges says : “ In our last little do—‘ Some Battle ‘ we call it—I had hardly any sleep for several nights, and in the later stages I had to exert will power such as I have never exerted before in my life to make myself run quickly under the fire of shells, machine guns, and rifles from shell hole to shell hole, my limbs being so weary ; and when we were relieved and we had retired behind the firing line—well, you bet we did that with the shells flying about—on a further march, I was not the only one who dropped from the line, an slept the sleep of the just for six solid hours in the sludge.” Pte Fazakerley adds that he received a copy of the School Magazine, “ The Murrayian,” and he had shown this to several friends, who were very pleased with its novelty and contents.

LOCAL CASUALTIES.

Mrs Cousins, 1 Windmill Lane, has received information that her husband, Corpl F Cousins, of the Machine Gun Corps, was wounded in the big advance on September 15th. His steel helmet no doubt saved his life. The shell, which fell at his feet, made a large hole in the ground, and killed two men of his gun team who stood a few yards away. He is going on satisfactorily in hospital at Shrewsbury.

Colonel and Mrs Wyley, of Coventry, received the sad news on Friday morning that their only son, Lieutenant Wyley, Adjutant R.F.A, had fallen in action. On Tuesday last, September 19th, he was struck by a shell. He was buried in the cemetery at Avebury, near Albert. He was educated at Dunchurch Hall and Balliol College, Oxford, where he steered the college boat in 1911 and 1912, and was a member of the college football XV. His father was also an Old Rugbeian, and has been for the best part of his life associated with the Volunteer and Territorial organisation of the County. He was a very popular officer, and the greatest sympathy is felt for him and Mrs Wyley in their loss.

PTE R BARTLETT.

Mrs Smith of Lower Hillmorton has received information that her son, Pte Reg Bartlett was killed in action on September 17th. Pte Bartlett was an old Elborow boy, and was working at the B.T.H at the time of enlistment in August, 1914. He had previously been wounded four times. His mother has four sons and one son-in-law serving in the army, and one son-in-law has been discharged.

ANOTHER COUNCIL EMPLOYEE KILLED.

Mrs Anderson, 76 Campbell Street, New Bilton, has received news that Pte John Hirons, of the R.W.R, died of shot wounds on his 21st birthday on September 13th. About a fortnight ago Mrs Anderson received a letter from the Chaplain stating that Pte Hirons was badly wounded, and the card announcing his death said he was quite cheerful up to the last. Pte Hirons, who was a native of New Bilton, and was educated at the Council School, was at the outbreak of the war employed as a road man by the Rugby Urban District Council. He had been at the front some time, and was wounded in May last.

DAYLIGHT SAVING.

At the end of this week we shall revert to Greenwich time. It will be necessary to put all our clocks and watches back one hour on the night of Saturday-Sunday, just as we put them forward one hour on the night of May 20-21. We have now had a summer’s experience of daylight saving, and although the Act is only a war time measure, the universal opinion is that it has been a great success, that the evils foretold by some regarding its adoption have not come about, and that the advantages, particularly to the workers, have been such that a reversion to the old state of things would be well-nigh impossible.

DEATHS.

GREEN.—On the 3rd September, Pte. Albert Green, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, son of Mr. C. Green, of Lilbourne, killed in action in France.
“ He sleeps not in his native land,
But ’neath some foreign skies ;
And far from those who loved him best.
In a hero’s grave he lies.”

GRIFFITH.—On the 18th September, at New Zealand Hospital, Amiens, France, Rifleman L. GRIFFITH died of wounds. Aged 19.
“ Could we have raised his dying head,
Or heard his last farewell ;
The grief would not have been so hard,
For us who loved him well.
“ A light is from the household gone.
The voice we loved is still’d.
A vacant place is in our home,
Which never can be filled.”
—From his loving Brothers and Sisters, 74 South St.

LISSAMER.—Pte. WILLIAM ARTHUR LISSAMER, Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, youngest son of Thomas and Emily Lissamer, who was killed in action on the 15th September by shell fire.
“ He sleeps not in his native land,
But ’neath some foreign skies ;
And far from those he loved the best.
In a hero’s grave he lies.”
“ Death divides, but memory lingers.”
—From his loving FATHER and MOTHER.

OLDS.—In memory of Pte. G Olds, of Gaydon ; killed in action, August 30, 1916.
“ He gave his life for others.”

SMITH.—Killed in action in France, September 17th, 1916, REG., beloved son of the late W. H. Bartlett and Mrs. Smith, Hillmorton.—Deeply mourned by his loving MOTHER, DAD, BROTHERS, SISTERS, & TRIXIE.

IN MEMORIAM.

BARBER.—In loving memory of dear FRED, who was killed in action at Ypres on September 25th, 1915
—From his Mother, Sisters, and Brothers

FRANKTON.—In loving memory of our dear brother, Pte. FRED FRANKTON, who was killed in action on September 25, 1915.
“ He sleeps not in his native land,
But ‘neath some foreign skies ;
And far from those that loved him best,
In a hero’s grave he lies.”
—From his two SISTERS, SARAH & POLLY, & BROTHER WILL.

GREEN.—In ever loving memory of Private EDWARD (BERT) GREEN, who was killed in the battle of Loos, September 25th-27th, 1915.
—From his loving Wife.

HINKS.—In loving memory of my dear son, Pte. J. HINKS, 10546, Oxford & Bucks Light Infantry, who was killed in the Battle of Loos, September 25,1915 ; aged 24.
“ He sleeps not in his native land,
But ‘neath some foreign skies ;
And far from those that loved him best,
In a hero’s grave he lies.”
—From his MOTHER, FATHER, BROTHERS & SISTERS.

POWELL.—In ever-loving memory of our dear boy, Corpl HORACE POWELL, aged 20, who was killed at Loos, September 25, 1915.
“ Lost to sight, but to memory ever dear.”
— From all who loved him.

SNUTCH.—In loving memory of Rifleman H. SNUTCH, who was killed in action at Loos on September 25, 1915.—“ He gave himself for a wounded comrade.”
—From his MOTHER, FATHER & BROTHER.

STONE.—In memory of my dear husband, SIDNEY GEORGE STONE, who died of wounds received in action, September 28, 1915.—Not forgotten by his loving WIFE.

21st Nov 1914. Local War Notes

It is stated that the Leicestershire Yeomanry are now in the fighting line.

C Spicer and A E Lorriman have joined the Rugby Howitzer Battery. The latter was formerly a member, but went away to America, and returned to England in order to re-enlist.

Mr R Herron, of Rugby, who for the past two years has been in training at a Baptist Theological College, has joined the Royal Army Medical Corps. He is a competent ambulance man, and has already been promoted to the rank of sergeant.

We understand that the whole of the Belgian refugees, with one exception, living at 17 Hillmorton Road, have obtained employment, three of them at the B.T.H Works at Rugby, and two others at Birmingham. A boy is also working at the shop of a tradesman in the town.

Members of the St John Ambulance Brigade are doing useful service in accompanying wounded Belgian soldiers from the Red Cross Hospital who are able to get out for walks in the vicinity of Rugby. On three days a week they are doing this, the walk generally occupying about an hour, and the men greatly appreciate the kindness shown.

The Rugby Co-operative Society’s employees have sent warm mufflers, helmets, and socks, together with supplies of cigarettes, to their comrades, 18 in number, who have joined Lord Kitchener’s Army. The gifts have been very much appreciated, and letters of thanks have been received, saying they were just the articles that were required.

On Sunday afternoon the Salvation Army Boys’ Band (under the leadership of Mr Whitmore) played patriotic airs and the various National Anthems for an hour at the Red Cross Hospital for the benefit of the wounded Belgian soldiers. The visit was greatly appreciated, and the soldiers sent to the band by way of thanks an illuminated card, the handiwork of one of their number-a graceful act of acknowledgement that the band fully reciprocated.

A QUICK PROMOTION.

George Edward Middleditch, a premium apprentice who was employed in Rugby Erecting Shop, serving his time to fitting, and enlisted in the Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry Regiment in August last, has done particularly well. He showed ability and quickly rose to the rank of sergeant. This week he has received his discharge papers from this regiment and offered a commission, which he has very naturally accepted. Middleditch has gone to his home in Devon for a brief rest, and awaiting instructions from the War Office as to the regiment to which he is gazetted. Before leaving Rugby for home he visited the erecting shop to say “ good-bye ” to the workmen, who took the opportunity to warmly congratulate him on his well-merited promotion.

WAR CASUALTIES.

Pte. Arthur Hill, a reservist in the Royal Horse Artillery, who previous to the war was employed by Messrs Willans & Robinson, has written to his former land lady, Mrs Judd, of 21 Dale Street, stating that he has been wounded.

Mrs Meadows, of Inwood’s Cottages, near Bilton Grange, this week received news of her son, Pte J T Meadows, 1st Northants Regiment, who is now lying wounded in Duchess of Westminster’s Hospital in Paris, but he hopes before long to be able to return home.

Pte G T Wills, of the North Staffordshire Regiment, who resides at 57 Jubilee Street, New.Bilton, and who, as reported last week, had been wounded, was an Old Elborow Boy, and a member of the Rugby Parish Church Choir during the rectorship of the late Mr Murray. He served for one year and ten months in the South African campaign, and has written to his wife informing her that he is in a hospital at Versailles, is being well looked after, and going on as well as can be expected.

We understand that Mrs H Flavell, of 14 Newbold Road, who a few week ago received official intimation that her husband, Pte H Flavell, a reservist in the Coldstream Guards, had been posted as missing, has since received a communication from him stating that he is well.

WOUNDED AND PRISONER OF WAR.

Pte A Hirons, of the 1st Coldstream Guards, of whom nothing had been heard for some time, has written to his landlady, Mrs Green, of Hillmorton, informing her that he has been wounded in the back and been taken a prisoner by the Germans. Pte Hirons, who is a native of Churchover, served three years in the Guards, and had been on the reserve twelve months. Before mobilization he was employed in the Loco Department at the L & N. W. Railway Station, Rugby.

HOW A RUGBY SOLDIER’S LIFE WAS SAVED – A COMRADES DEVOTION.

Pte A Glen, reservist of the King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry, and a native of Rugby, has arrived home, on sick leave, suffering from three wounds received in the trenches at La Basse, and tells the story of how his life was saved by the devotion of a comrade.

Pte Glen, who is the caretaker of the Conservative Club in Abbey Street and is well known in town, stated in an interview with our representative that the first battle he was engaged in was at Le Cateau. About a month ago his brigade was ordered to relieve another section in the trenches at La Basse. Their position, however, was located by a spy, and the Germans immediately started business with their “Jack Johnsons.” A church steeple near the British lines was set on fire by the shells, and fell into the trenches, causing great havoc. Several hayricks were also fired, and by the light from these the Germans were able to easily locate the British, and then rake them with such a shower of shells that they were forced to retire, their places being taken by Indians. Pte Glen received a bullet wound in the head, and was also struck on the neck and shoulder by a fragment from a “ Jack Johnson,” and thus was unable to leave. A comrade remained behind to render assistance, and whilst he was bandaging Pte Glen’s head was fatally struck by a shell, which would otherwise have struck the wounded man. When Pte Glen came round in the morning the dead body of his faithful chum was laying across his back. According to Pte Glen, matters are going very well for the Allies in the Western Theatre. He added, optimistically, “ We are winning safe as eggs, slow, but sure, and at big price. There is no doubt about that. The Germans have machine guns made of papier mache ; and these, in addition to being very effective, are easily carried by one man, and thus give them a great advantage. The rifle fire of the German infantry as a body is poor ; but the companies of sharp shooters do great mischief. One significant fact struck Pte Glen very forcibly, and that was the great deterioration in the quality of the German troops now being brought into action. At the commencement of the campaign the German infantry consisted of fine set-up men ; but the troops now opposed to the British consist, for the most part, of boys from 18 to 20 years of age and old grey-headed men. Pte Glen, who was also wounded in South Africa, said[?] that he only saw one Rugby man at the front, Pte S Cockerill, of his regiment, who has also been wounded.

NEW BILTON RESERVIST WOUNDED.

Mr H Berwick, a reservist in the 1st King’s Own Regiment, has returned to England wounded, and has written to his former landlady, Mrs Smith, of 123 Lawford Road, New Bilton. In this he states that after the retirement from Mons the British took up positions on a hill, and were ordered to prepare for a night or early morning attack. They were preparing to do this when at about 400 yards away a very deadly fire commenced with a few rapid shots from what we call their ” safe deliveries ” (siege guns), which were right in among our Brigade. It was found out after we had been forced to retire that the enemy had a whole Army Corps and had been carefully watching our movements. They had, it is estimated, eight machine guns all turned on one battalion, and I am sorry to say that battalion was mine. That was our first experience, and where we lost 540 officers, N.C.O’s and men. I received a hit in the shoulder by shrapnel, the first shot they fired, which also dislocated my shoulder.” After alluding to the German use of dum-dum bullets and the abuse of the white flag,” the writer says, “ I must confess that their (German) gunners are fine shots. So would you if you were near them. If It was not for their Susie Greens (big guns), I think the English Boy Scouts could beat them, as I think their infantry is absolutely bad.” Describing a German charge at Armentierres, he states that they had been contiguously attacked by the Germans at night and early morning, and the R.E. put some wire entanglements about 200 yards in front of the British trenches, and they then waited for the Germans. We spotted them at about 600 yards, and let them come on until they got to 300 yards. Then they seemed to hesitate. All of a sudden there went up a sort of downhearted yell, and on they charged – if we can call it a charge. It was simply lovely, a great big grey mass with their heads down, and could not see where they were coming until they got on to our wires. Some of our lads thought they were on a fair ground, as their great round heads looked just like cocoanuts.” Among the places where the writer saw heavy fighting were Mons, Marne, Aisne, St Margarette, St Omar, Lille, and Armentierres.

HILLMORTON SOLDIER KILLED IN ACTION.

About a fortnight ago Mrs. G. Thorneycroft, of Hillmorton, wife of Pte. Thorneycroft, of the 1st Royal Warwicks, received the following note, written on the back of a letter she had enclosed in a package of cigarettes to her husband :-” I am very sorry to have let you know that your husband met his death on the battlefield. His letters have been opened and the cigarettes have been given to his friends. We all sympathise with you in your great loss.” The letter was undated, and was only initialled. Mrs Thorneycroft has since been in communication with the military authorities, and on Wednesday received official intimation that he was killed in action on October 23rd. Pte Thornycroft served nine years with the colours, during which time he served in India and also went through the South African War, one of his most treasured possessions being Queen Victoria’s chocolate box. He had been in the reserve for seven years, and previous to being called up was employed by Mr Whittaker, the builder. He was about 36 years of age and highly respected in the village, where much sympathy is expressed for his widow.

RECRUITING AT RUGBY.

During the past week 20 recruits have enlisted at Rugby Drill Hall, bringing the total figures up to 1962, exclusive of a considerable number who have gone from the town to other recruiting offices. Men are still urgently required for the various regiments of infantry of the line.-Recruiting, for the Howitzer Battery Reserve has been proceeding at Rugby and Coventry this week, and we understand that the number required has now been raised.