5th Oct 1918. Margarine Shortage at Rugby

MARGARINE SHORTAGE AT RUGBY.

The non-arrival of the weekly supply of margarine last week, owing to the railway strike, occasioned considerable inconvenience locally. The majority of the grocers were left without supplies before the end of the week, and many of the late customers were unable to secure their rations. We understand that the supply arrived on Tuesday last, six days late.

RUGBY PRISONERS OF WAR COMMITTEE.

At the monthly meeting of the Rugby Prisoners of War Help Committee on Tuesday, Mr William Flint, C.C, presided. Also present: Mrs Lees, Mrs Anderson, Mr A E Donkin, J.P, Mr R P Mason, Mr J W Walton, Mr E Pepper, Mr F A W Shirley, and Mr J R Barker, hon organising secretary.

Mr Barker said the support given to the Fund from all quarters showed a most gratifying increase. The cost of the food parcels, etc, during the month of September was the highest on record, the amount being £517 14s. Yet it had been possible to meet this charge out of current subscriptions and donations, there being a surplus on the month of £2 8s 2d.

As an example of the great growth of the Fund, Mr Barker said the accounts showed that the cost of the food parcels, &c. during the-past three months amounted to £1,349 10s 6d, but so well had the Fund been supported that nearly all this amount had been raised during the same period, the deficit on the past three months’ working being only £73 15s 6d. A substantial sum could, however, be expected as a result of the recent effort organised by the General Help Society, which would wipe out this deficit and leave a good sum to carry forward towards the October parcels, which would not be less than £350.

There were now 142 local men to whom food parcels were being despatched, but he expected to have the addresses of the prison camps of eight other men very soon. Four men had been recently repatriated, who were taken prisoners at the end of March last. He regretted that these men were all badly wounded, and in consequence of the Germans not giving them proper medical and surgical treatment, in addition to half starving them, they reached England in a very serious condition. There had, of course, been no time for them to receive the food parcels which had been despatched to them from England, as in each of these cases the men had been removed from their prison camps for repatriation just before the arrival of their first parcels.

The Chairman said the splendid support the public of Rugby and District had given to the Fund had enabled them, in spite of the huge increase month by month to meet the cost of the food parcels without having to call on the British Red Cross Society to contribute anything towards the cost. He was sure the people of Rugby and district would do all they could to see that this splendid position was maintained.—Mr Shirley said he would like to associate himself with the Chairman’s remarks. He knew the working men of the district especially the railway men, were contributing splendidly, but he would like to see more organised weekly efforts from other works in the town.—Mr Barker said he thought the figures he had given showed that everyone was alive to the importance of regular and continued support. The month’s revenue was not made up by a few individual amounts, but by a very considerable number of small donations, as well as Works collections and organised efforts, so that if people were not subscribing in one particular way, they were doing it in some form or another.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Sapper S J J Hodges, R.E, and Pte J Hart, Wiltshire Regiment, both of Rugby, have been taken prisoners by the Germans.

Corpl W S Bosworth, Royal Engineers, son of Mr S Bosworth, Rowland Street, has been awarded the Croix de Guerre. He is an old St Matthew’s boy.

Lieut E M W Boughton, M.C. Royal Engineers, has received an immediate award of a bar to the Military Cross which he gained in the Cambrai offensive of last year.

As a result of an egg collection amongst the staff of Mr J J McKinnell’s establishment on Saturday 37 eggs were handed over to the Infirmary V.A.D for the wounded soldiers.

Lance-Corpl A Lester, Royal Engineers, 92 South Street, Rugby, was killed in action on August 17th. For upwards of 18 years he was employed as a platelayer in Rugby. He had served in France since February last.

Mr & Mrs S Mace, Lower Street, Hillmorton, have five sons in the Army. Four are still serving in France and one (Percy) was wounded and taken prisoner, and subsequently transferred to Switzerland. This is believed to be a record for the village.

Pte J J Hancocks, 1st Worcester Regiment, son of Mr & Mrs Hancocks, Hillmorton Wharf, who was reported missing on November 22nd last, is now presumed to have been killed on that date. He was employed at the Lodge Factory when he joined the Army on February 23, 1917, at the age of 21 years.

Pte W Lacey, R.W.R, son of Mrs F Holmes, 66 Rowland Street, has been wounded in the shoulder and neck. Pte Lacey, who is an old St Matthew’s boy, joined the Army in September, 1916. He was wounded in the following January. Fourteen months later he was invalided home with trench fever. He has an elder brother also serving in France.

Mrs G Cowley, late of Rugby, has recently received a letter from Major Eric Charles, commanding a battery of heavy gums in Italy, saying : “ Your son is one of the Subalterns in my battery. He has recently been responsible for a very brave act. The battery was being heavily shelled, a shell falling in the gun pit and setting alight to the camouflage, ammunition and the clothing of two of the wounded gun crew. Your son ran in and carried them out, thereby saving their lives.”

Lance-Corpl J A Maycock, M.M. Royal Warwicks, of Rokeby Cottage, Bennett Street, Rugby, was recently killed in a trench raid in Italy. He joined the Army three years ago, and was awarded the Military Medal for bringing in wounded men under heavy shell fire in November, 1917. He has also been twice mentioned in despatches. He was a member of Rugby Congregational Church, and also of the St John’s Ambulance Brigade. Prior to the War he was employed by Messrs Faulkner, St Matthew Street. He leaves a widow and two little children.

Recently the mother of the only child of the late Pte A W Bottrill received a cheque from his late father’s Captain, together with a letter, as follows :—Thank you so much for the photograph of the latest Coldstream recruit. He is very like his father, and I hope he will be as great a credit to it as his father was. I am sending these few pounds, which I hope you will put to the credit of your boy until the time when he joins the regiment. I hope your boy will be a great comfort to you and a worthy successor to his father. Pte Bottrill, who was killed in France on March 19th, was buried on his child’s third birthday. Lady Sybil Grant acted as godmother to the boy in consideration of the fact that his father was serving in the regiment at the time of the baby’s birth.

RUGBEIAN KILLED IN AUSTRALIA.—News has just been received of the death of Mr W Cox, late of 14 Market Street, Rugby, the result of a railway accident at Brighton, South Australia. Mr Cox emigrated to Australia nearly nine years ago. Two of his three sons have served for some time in the A.I.F. The eldest one at present in France, and the youngest had his discharge early this year after service in Egypt, the Dardanelles, and in France, where he was badly wounded.

HILL.
ROLL OF HONOUR.—News has come through from companions that Pte Henry Cockerill, of the M.G.C and of the Warwickshire Yeomanry, son of the late Mr T Cockerill and Mrs Cockerill, of Hill, was killed last week by a shell, which also very seriously injured a companion. After joining the Warwickshire Yeomanry, he went to Egypt three years ago, and was on the Seasowe Castle, which was torpedoed when the regiment returned to France.

STOCKTON.
OUR MEN.—The sad news has reached the village that Lander Mann, formerly a choirboy in Stockton Church, has made the great sacrifice on the Western Front. The family, who now live at Rugby, have many friends in the parish, and great sympathy is felt for Mr & Mrs Mann in their sorrow. The lad was 19 years old.—Wheeler C Cleaver is home on leave from France. He belongs to the now historic Tank Corps, which is doing go much to make victory at the present time.

BRANDON.
ANOTHER SON WOUNDED.—Mr George Harris, who for some time has been in the employ of the L & N.-W Railway Company at Brandon Station, has received news that another of his sons has been wounded. Mr Harris had four sons, who willingly volunteered. One has already lost his life ; a second has just been released from hospital, after being there three years, half of which was spent in bed; the third son now lies in Bath Hospital. Two of his fingers have been amputated, and his left hand is badly damaged. Mr Harris’s fourth son is now with the Engineers in France. Much sympathy is felt for Mr Harris in his fresh trouble.

LONG ITCHINGTON.
OUR WOUNDED SOLDIERS.—Several more of the village boys are reported wounded. Pte Harold Priest, Warwickshire Yeomanry, is suffering from a shrapnel wound through his left arm. He is not yet 19 years old, and has only lately gone to the front.—Pte Thos H Tandy, Warwickshire Yeomanry, who was at home less than a fortnight since, is also wounded, but it is hoped not seriously.—Pte Ernest Lane, R.W.R, whose brother Frank was lately reported missing, and whose brother Arthur has been killed, is also wounded, and cannot yet be located. He was formerly porter at Long Itchington Station. Mr & Mrs Joseph Lane, parents of the foregoing, have also received an intimation that their second son, Pte Fred Lane (another former L & N-W employee), is in hospital wounded in the right arm.—Pte Chas Biddle, Gloucester Regiment. is also in hospital suffering from a shrapnel wound in the left knee.—Pte Wm Hyde, South Staffs, is reported badly gassed, having lost his speech and sight, but it is hoped only temporarily.

THE ROLL OF HONOUR.—The Long Itchington roll of honour now contains a list of 229 names of soldiers and sailors. Of these 27 have been killed in action, or have died on service, three are missing, four are prisoners of war, and 50 are known to have been wounded.

COVENTRY APPEAL TRIBUNAL .

Held on Wednesday. Present: Messrs H W Wale (chairman), K Rotherham, P G Loveitt, W Johnson, jun. and A Craig. Mr T Meredith was the National Service representative.

In support of his appeal for exemption on domestic grounds, Joseph Hayes Davenport, brick setter, Brockhurst (45, B2) explained that he was recently ordered to take up work of national importance by the National Service Department and he accordingly obtained work as a labourer at the B.T.H.—Mr Meredith urged that bricklayers were in great need in the army.— Application refused, but given 21 days to settle up his affairs.

Bourton Page (33, Grade 1), butcher, Wolston, applied for a further exemption. Mr C A Kirby represented appellant, and said his client, who was formerly a C2 man. had now been placed in Grade 1.—Mr Meredith, however, said he did not think the question of age or grade entered into this case. It was a fact that between Coventry and Lawford on the one hand, and Brinklow and Wappenbury on the other, there was no other butcher.—The Chairman : There is very little meat to distribute, but what there is the people are entitled to share.—Mr Meredith : It seems that if one butcher is not left the people in this district will starve, or, rather, have to go without meat.—The Chairman agreed, and also reminded the Tribunal that a very satisfactory agreement had been entered into by appellant and another butcher whereby the latter joined up and was guaranteed financial assistance.—Four months conditional exemption, and excused the V.T.C.

Mr H Eaden represented Charles Francis Graham Hancox (36, Grade III, sedentary), accountant, who asked for a further exemption. He explained that his client had fulfilled the condition imposed by the Tribunal—i.e, that he should work thirty hours a week on the land. This work was proving too much, however, and in consequence Hancox was forced to remain in bed half a day each week. Mr Eaden accordingly asked that the hours should be reduced to twenty per week.—The Tribunal agreed to this, and a .National Utility order was granted subject to this condition.

Arthur James Haddon, butcher (B1), 38 Lawford Road, was exempted till January 15th, and excused the V.T.C.

The cases of four bakers—Wm Walter Perkins Cowley (34, Grade 1), Cambridge Street ; Austin William Harris (40), 37 Pennington Street ; Marcus Ophir Russell (36, Grade II) ; and Edgar Matthew Bates (35, general service), 106 Park Road—were down for hearing, but Mr Meredith asked for an adjournment for 14 days. A conference was to be held at Rugby that day with regard to the Food Trade of the town, and he hoped that after this conference they would be entirely agreed as to who was essential and who was not.—The application was granted.

Samuel Dowell, hay, corn, and coal merchant (40), Stretton-under-Fosse, who had lodged an appeal against the decision of the Monks Kirby Tribunal, wrote explaining that he wished to withdraw the appeal because he had a protection certificate.—Mr Meredith said he could never understand what the man had appealed for. The reason why he was refused exemption by the Lower Tribunal was that he already held a conditional protection certificate, and dual protection was not allowed. It was a most extraordinary case.

WAR WORK VOLUNTEER SCHEME.

It has been decided to extend offers of enrolment for the “ Z ” class of work under the above scheme until further notice. instead of until October 1st, 1918, only, as previously announced.

Offers of enrolment from men for the “ Z ” class of work under this scheme will continue to be open under certain conditions to Grade 3 men of any age ; to Grade 2 men of 35 or over on January 1st, 1918 ; and Grade 1 men of 43 or over on January 1st, 1918. Offers of enrolment from men for “ ordinary class ” war work volunteer vacancies are open, under certain conditions, to men of Grade 3 of any age to Grade 2 men of 45 or over on January 1st, 1918.

Men who are enrolled for either class of vacancy under the scheme will, as previously announced, be protected from military service so long as they continue in employment as war work volunteers, provided that they prove to be within the grades and ages named above and satisfy the other necessary conditions.

Opportunities for enrolment under this scheme are available at every Employment Exchange, where full particulars of the scheme can be obtained. There are at present many thousands of vacancies under the scheme.

DEATHS.

LESTER.—In loving memory of Lance-Corpl. ARTHUR (DICK), dearly beloved husband of Mrs. Lester, 92 South Street, killed in France on August 17, 1918.
“ God takes our loved ones from our home,
But never from our heart.”
— From his sorrowing Wife and little daughter.

WALTON.—In ever-loving memory of our dear son and brother, Pte. EDWARD, killed in France on August 8, 1918 ; aged 20 years.
“ God knows how much we miss him,
More than loving words can tell ;
Not a day have we forgotten him
Since he bade us his farewell.
Daily in our minds we see him,
As we did in days of yore ;
But some day we hope to meet him
On that bright and golden shore.”
—Deeply mourned by his sorrowing Mother, Father in France, Brothers and Sisters.

WALTON.—In ever-loving memory of our dear grandson and nephew, Pte. EDWARD, Killed in France on August 8, 1918 ; aged 30 years.
“ We think of him in silence,
And his name we oft recall ;
There is nothing left to answer but his photo on the wall.”
—Not forgotten by his loving Grandmothers and Grandfather, aunts and Uncles.

IN MEMORIAM.

HOUGHTON.—In ever-loving memory of my dear husband, Pte. W. T. HOUGHTON, 1/7 R.W.R., who was killed in action on October 4, 1917.
“ There is a link death cannot sever,
Love and remembrance last for ever.”
—Never forgotten by his loving Wife and Child.

HOUGHTON.— In loving memory of our dear one, Pte. W. T. HOUGHTON, 1/7 R.W.R., who was killed in action “ somewhere in France ” on Oct. 4, 1917.
“ We pictured your sale returning,
And longed to clasp your hand ;
But God postponed that meeting
Till we meet in that Better Land.”
—From his loving Mother, Brothers and Sisters.

LINDLEY.—In loving memory of my dear husband, Pte. J. LINDLEY, who was killed in action on October 5, 1917.
“ Could I have raised his dying head,
And heard his last farewell,
The grief would not have been so hard
For those he loved so well.
I think of him in silence.
And make no outward show ;
The heart that mourns most truly
Mourns silently and low.”
—From his loving Wife, Son and Daughter.

LUDFORD.—In ever-loving memory of Pte. C. H. LUDFORD (HARRY), who died of wounds in France on October 6, 1917.
“ There is a link death cannot sever,
Love, honour, and remembrance live for ever.”
— Ever in the thoughts of Monica.

30th Mar 1918. Fatal Flying Accident in Rugby

FATAL FLYING ACCIDENT AT RUGBY.

The death took place at the Brookfield Nursing Home this (Tuesday) morning of Mr H N Van Duzer, an officer in the American Flying Corps, as the result of injuries received in an aeroplane accident on Sunday.

The deceased officer and another aviator had been flying over the town at a very low altitude, and at about 5.30, while they were over the Eastlands Estate, something apparently went wrong with Mr Van Duzers’ engine, which caused the machine to nose dive and crash to earth. Mr Van Duzer received shocking injuries to the head, arms and legs, and was conveyed to the Brookfield Nursing Home in an unconscious condition, from which he never rallied.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Pte W H Linnell, jun, R.E, son of Mr W H LINNELL, has been wounded in the leg.

Mr J A Middleton, son of Mr & Mrs Middleton, of Watford, near Rugby, has recently been gazetted Second-Lieutenant in the M.G Corps, after serving three and a-half years in Gallipoli and Palestine.

The death from wounds is reported of Lieut H C Boycott, Coldstreams, the International hockey full back. Boycott won many prizes at lawn tennis tournaments, was a brilliant cricketer, and a smart golfer, being the first secretary of the Northamptonshire Golf Club.

Sergt H Collins, son of Mrs Collins, 73 New Street, New Bilton, has been transferred from his interment camp at Wittenberg in Germany to Holland. Sergt Collins was taken prisoner of war in the early days, and had spent four Christmases in Germany. Food parcels have been regularly sent to him through the Rugby Prisoners of War Help Committee.

News has been received that Pte A W Bottrill, Coldstream Guards was killed in action on March 18th. Pte Bottrill, whose parents reside at 94 Bridget Street, was an old St. Matthew’s boy. He went to the front in the first month of the War, and was in the retreat from Mons and many of the subsequent heavy engagements, being badly wounded on two occasions. The Captain, writing to his friends, remarks : He has been all through the war without once going home, except on leave, which surely is a magnificent record. There are too few of our original Expeditionary force left to tell their glorious story, and now there is yet another gone.

THE GREAT GERMAN OFFENSIVE.
SLOWING DOWN.

Since Friday last week the British Armies on the Western Front have been fighting with traditional valour and endurance against the stupendous forces launched against them by the Germans in making their promised offensive movement. In the course of three or four days of the bitterest fighting, unprecedented in the annals of war, our front line troops had to give way in front of vastly superior numbers, but have systematically retired on prepared defences. The result is, we are on an average of 15 miles farther back on a frontage of 50 miles than when the attack commenced. There has never been in the history of the War a battle of such continued intensity, and the reason for this is very clear. There has not been one wave attack, but at least three, carried out on the German side by three relays of armies. The usual breathing space which has hitherto followed the most intense period of battle has been denied to our troops, for the simple reason that the German has no sooner exhausted on army than he has put in another, the fresh troops passing through the forces which have been exhausted and carrying on the battle without loss of time.

We are not for the moment interested in German losses. They have (remarks the well-informed London correspondent of the “ Birmingham Daily Post ”) undoubtedly been colossal. We cannot even console ourselves with the effect which those losses will have upon the people of Germany when they are revealed. The only thing which interests us is the question : “ Will the German succeed in breaking the British Army and destroying our power to continue the War ?” It is treason of the worst kind to rave about a British defeat. We are not defeated because we have given ground. We cannot be defeated until our Armies are broken. The German is defeated on the day the official despatch admits that he is checked and held. The German advance is perceptibly slowing, the intensely active front is becoming perceptibly restricted. Of the 96 divisions on the British front 73 have already been identified. Considerably more than a third of all the German’s strength in France is at Present in motion against our Armies, and that enormous force has been met, checked, and decimated by less than a third of the British Army. The people who draw comparisons between this offensive and the offensive against Italy or the big push against Russia are wide of the mark. In point of morale and armament of the defender there is no comparison. So far as reserves and readiness to meet the attack are concerned there is no comparison.

Thursday morning’s news was to the effect that the Allies are holding the line, and the fighting was more in our favour.

RUGBY FOOD CONTROL COMMITTEE.

At a meeting held on Thursday in last week there were present : Mr T A Wise (chairman), Mr H Tarbox (vice- chairman), Mrs Dewar, Mrs Shelley, Mrs Townsend, Mrs Peet, Messrs A Appleby, G H Cooke, C Gay, W A Stevenson, J Cripps, J H Meller, T A Smart, A Humphrey, R Griffin, and A T Watson.

Messrs Bluemel were given permission to purchase sugar for use in their factory canteen, which, it was said supplied meals to 300 workpeople daily.

The B.T.H Company applied for permission to purchase 40 lbs of sugar for the month ending April 20th for use as a lubricant for drawing wire in their lamp factory.—Mr Stevenson enquired how the company had obtained their sugar for this purpose in the past ?—The Executive Officer replied that they had been taking it from the supply allowed for their canteen, but he had informed them that this must not be done in the future.—Mr Stevenson enquired if the company would still be allowed the same quantity for their canteen ?—Mr Mellor said the past they had been drawing 3lbs per week from the canteen for this purpose, but the difficulty experienced in getting carbon for arc lamps had caused a great run on electric lamps, and an increased quantity of drawn wire was required, with the result that they were now using about 10lbs of per week for this purpose.—The permission was granted.

On the application of the L & N-W Railway Company, it was decided to allow the licensee of the Royal Oak, Brandon, to keep a quantity of tinned meat in stock for the use of fogmen.

A letter was read from the Divisional Commissioner with reference to the new wholesale price for milk, and suggesting co-operation between districts where similar conditions are uniformity of price. The Executive Officer read the price list as under :—April, 1s 3d ; May, 1s ; June, 1s ; July, ls 2d ; August, 1s 3d ; September, 1s 3d—average ls 2¾d.—In reply to a question, the Executive Officer stated that the resolution of the committee agreeing to the price remaining at 1s 9d per gallon till the end of April would have no effect, as it had not been confirmed by the Divisional Commissioner.—In reply to Mr Stevenson, it was stated that local committees had no control over wholesale prices.—The matter was referred to the Rationing Committee.

The Finance Committee reported that they had received £216 3s 1d from the Ministry of Food, which would meet all expenses incurred by the late Urban Committee up to December 31st. A cheque had been sent to the Urban Council for this amount, and it was decided to apply to the appointing authorities for a further grant.

SUGAR FOR JAM.
OUTLINES OF DISTRIBUTION SCHEME.

Following on the statement made by Lord Rhondda in the House of Lords with regard to the distribution of sugar for jam-making, the following announcement is made by the Sugar Department of the Ministry of Food :—

Forms of application can be obtained on and after March 23rd at the offices of the Local Food Control Committees, and must be returned on or before April 4th. Applications will considered only when they are made by persons actually growing the fruit which they wish to preserve. The form of application will require the applicant to state, among other things, the number of persons rationed for sugar as members of his household and the amount of fruit which he is likely to have available for preserving. The extent to which such applications can be met will be determined by the Director of Sugar Distribution in conjunction with the Local Food Committees.

Two classes of permit will be issued to applicants, one for soft fruit available between June 8th and July 31st, and the other for hard fruit available between August 1st and September 30th. “ Soft fruit ” will be taken to mean any fruits normally ready for preserving before the end of July, and in this category rhubarb may be included. “ Hard fruit ” will be taken to mean any fruits ready for preserving after July 31st, and in any area where vegetable marrows are usually preserved the local committee may in its discretion include them also in this category.

It has been decided that in no case shall the total amount of sugar for making jam for home consumption exceed 10lbs per head of the household. There will be many people, however, who will have fruit in sufficient quantities to enable them to use more sugar than this, and in these cases they will be invited to state what weight of fruit they are prepared to convert into jam on the understanding that they are to place the jam so made at the disposal of the local food committees at prices not exceeding the current wholesale prices.

It is most important that the application forms should returned on or before April 4th.

LOOKING AHEAD.
DISAPPOINTMENT FOR WEDDING PARTY.

Considerable amusement was caused at a meeting of the Rugby Food Control Committee on Thursday afternoon last week when a letter was read from a Craven Road grocer to the effect that a customer had ordered a 12-lb ham from him for a wedding which was to take place in few months’ time. He asked for permission to sell the ham, and keep it in stock until the event took place.—The Chairman (Mr T A Wise), in reply to Mr Mellor, stated that if the customer bought the ham he could possibly be prosecuted for hoarding. A person was not allowed go into a shop and buy what he wanted, and arrange with the trader to keep it in his warehouse until it was wanted, instead of the customer keeping it himself. That would get over the hoarding order at once : and, if they consented to this, it would open the door very wide.—Mr Cooke : If it means getting excess food we shall all be getting married soon.—The committee instructed the Executive Officer to reply that thy did not approve of the arrangement.

WOMEN’S INSTITUTES.

So many of these Institutes have now been started in Warwickshire, and have been so warmly received, that a County Federation has been formed in order to link them up together, and to co-ordinate the work generally. The first Federation meeting was held at Leamington last week, when a large number of delegates from the different villages where institutes have been successfully started attended. Lady Isabel Margesson, (hon secretary of the Worcestershire Federation), speaking on behalf of the London Federation Committee, explained the scheme. In her preliminary remarks Lady Isabel laid special emphasis on the revival of rural industries, and on the development of the whole of the rural life of the country. She pointed out that, although the great object of that development was Food Production, it was not restricted to that most important endeavour. The village institutes were the response of the women of the countrywide to the call to do their utmost for their own neighbourhood. Force and strength came from acting and meeting together, and results showed that every institute had its own character and individuality. Women’s institutes were NOT to interfere with, but to co-ordinate, the activities of a place. The Government concerned itself more and more with the homes and families of the land, and women’s institutes provided a homely organisation that could receive what the Government wished to give.

Several of the secretaries present spoke of the useful work done by the institutes, and Mrs Miller (Coundon, Coventry), gave an interesting account of a scheme in hand for promoting the toy-making industry.

The meeting, having unanimously decided to form a Federation for Warwickshire, proceeded to elect its officers and executive committee. Mrs Fielden (Kineton) was duly elected vice-president, the Mayoress of Leamington chairman, and Miss Bryson hon secretary.

The eight members of the committee proposed and elected were : Lady Likeston, Lady Nelson, the Mayoress, Mrs Fielden, Mrs Miller, Miss Fortescue, Miss Sargeaunt, and Miss Bryson.

It should be noted that anyone desirous of starting a women’s institute should apply to the War Agricultural Committee, Warwick. Once started, the institute is handed over to the care of the County Federation.

IN MEMORIAM.

BATCHELOR.—In memory of Pte. THOMAS BATCHELOR, of the 5th Royal Berks, who died of wounds in Germany, December 25, 1917.
“ God knows how we shall miss him,
And He counts the tears we shed,
And whispers, ‘ Hush, he only sleeps ;
Thy brother is not dead.’”
—Sadly missed by his loving Sisters Lizzie, Nellie, Ida, Hetty, and Beatie.

CLARKE.—In ever loving memory of Pte P. CLARKE, 31st T.R., who died in the Military Hospital at Dover, March 29th, 1917.
“ The flowers we place upon his grave,
May wither and decay ;
But the love we bear for him,
Will never fade away.”
—From father, mother, brothers, and Sisters at Kilsby.

TOMPKINS.—In memory of PRIVATE WILLIAM TOMPKINS, 24th T.R., dearly-loved youngest son of the late A. J. and Mrs Tompkins, Barby, died in Fulham Military Hospital, March 25th, 1917, aged 19 years.
“ Nobly he answered duty’s call,
And for his country gave his all.
A year has passed ; our hearts still sore,
Day by day we miss him more.
His welcome smile, his dear sweet face,
Never on earth can we replace.
—Sadly missed by his loving Mother, Brother, & Sister.

 

 

24th Apr 1915. “ E ” Company at the Front

“ E ” COMPANY AT THE FRONT.

Pte L Stewart, one of the Advertiser employees who volunteered for active service and is with the 7th Warwickshire (Territorial) Battalion at the front, tells us in a letter we have received from him that their Easter Sunday spell in the trenches went off very well, but his Company had two wounded. About the middle of the week they were moved on to a town upon which bombs were dropped by enemy aircraft before they had been in the place half-an-hour, injuring several people. Barring a few colds, the health of the men was A1, and they had done all that had been asked of them. With full kit on, each man carries on average 70lb—the roads were rotten for marching, and their marches had been from eight to ten miles. In a subsequent letter, he writes :—“ Yesterday we made another move, and came across the Rugby Battery. From what they told me they were soon in action, and appear to have been giving a good account of themselves. I spoke to Major Nickalls (Spring Hill). He was quite pleased the old E Company (now C Company ) were so near. The respective headquarters are within a few yards of each other. C Company went into the trenches again last night for four days. You should see the country round here ; everywhere the place has been shelled—it must have been awful. I saw Mr C T Morris Davies (the well-known International hockey player) the other day. It’s really surprising who you meet.”

Another Territorial writes :—“ We are only about 400 yards from the German trenches, and I am writing these few lines in my little dug-out, under fire. We are having a fairly quiet time just now. We get a few German shells occasionally, just to let us know they are still alive. As we are so near the German trenches we have to keep one eye shut for sleep and the other on the alert. We expect to have about four days in and four out. We are all cheerful and in the pink, only for the food, for we have to eat biscuits for nearly every meal and they are as hard as bricks. The next time we come into the trenches I shall have to bring a couple of loaves with me. We get plenty of corned beef and biscuit, but we are getting about sick of these. All the houses round this district are blown to bits. Last week I had a walk round the cemetery to see the graves of our comrades who fell at the beginning of the war. They are buried three deep in ordinary wooden coffins, and a small cross, bearing their name and regiment, is erected over them. We also see small crosses scattered about the fields showing where soldiers are buried. Whilst I am writing this the sun is shining beautifully and the country looks grand. It makes one think of the fields at home. You would laugh to see us in our little dug-outs. They are built of sandbags, about a yard high, so you see we have to duck down and creep in.”

“ I am still in the best of health,” writes other man. “ France is a lot different to what I thought it would be. We are all enjoying being out here as the weather is lovely. The place we are staying at now has been very much shelled ; the Germans shell it now occasionally, but we don’t mind and take no notice at all. We see plenty of aeroplanes out here ; the best sight I have ever seen is the wonderful way in which the aeroplanes avoid the shells which are being constantly fired at them ; they must be piloted by expert airmen for the shells burst all round them. The crucifixes out here are a lovely sight, everywhere you go you see them ; it is a wonderful sight to see a place that has been shelled and the crucifix not touched.”

THE HOWITZERS AT THE FRONT.

Corpl A Sparks, of the 5th Warwickshire R.F.A (Howitzer) Battery, writing to a friend in Rugby, under date of April 14th, graphically describes the passage across the Channel. The Wednesday night after arrival was spent in camp, and next day they entrained for the front. After 20 hours’ travelling in cattle trucks they arrived at their destination—about three miles from the firing line. “ The only indication that a great war was in progress,” he say. “ was the continual booming of the guns and the burning of magnesium flares, which the Germans send up during the night to prevent surprise infantry attacks. Otherwise everything was quite normal. On Easter Sunday morning we had a Church parade and Holy Communion, so that you will see we spent this festival pretty well the same as you did at home. On Easter Monday night, in a pelting rainstorm, we took up our place in the firing line. On Tuesday night, just a week from leaving England, we were in action for the first time, and have been in action every day since. We have done some very good firing;. Major Nickalls has been thanked for the splendid support he has given to the infantry. On Sunday we had some “ Whistling Willies ” over our line and about 40 the next day. Fortunately no one in our battery was hurt, although I am sorry to say there were about ten wounded and five killed in another battery. The only casualty we have had in the brigade is one of the Coventry Battery killed.”

“ You would be astonished at the callousness of the natives round here. Even when firing is progressing it is a common sight to see the farmers doing their ploughing, etc. Even the women and children are walking about quite close to the guns, and apparently they can see no danger.”

TERRITORIALS’ FOOTBALL MATCH.

The Howitzer Battery played their first football match in France on Saturday, April 17th. Teams:— Gunners : A Goode, Major Nickalls, Spicer, Bombardier Jesson, Corpl Watson, Lieut Pridmore, Smith, Alsop, Asher, Laurceston, and Judd. Drivers : Mills, Sergt Dosher, Woolley, Corpl Shelley, Ashworth, Wood, Judd, Turner, Taylor, Dyer, Humphries. Referee: Gunner A Jobey. The match was played just behind the firing line. The Gunners proved to be dead on the target as per usual, leading 2-0 at the interval. The Drivers proved good stayers, pulling level early in the second half. After good all-round play, the Gunners snatched a victory five minutes from time. Scorers :—Lieut Pridmore, Smith and Asher, and Taylor (2).

LOCAL WAR CASUALTIES.

COSFORD: RIFLEMAN E. STEEL.

As mentioned in our last issue, news has been received from the War Office by Mr and Mrs Steel, of Cosford, that their son, Edward Steel, of the King’s Royal Rifles, was killed in action at Neuve Chapelle on March 16th. No particulars of his death have come to hand, and the only consolation that his aged father and mother have is that he died bravely fighting for his country. E. Steel, who was 27 years of age, joined Lord Kitchener’s Army on September 2nd, previous to which he was employed by the Midland Railway Company at No. 2 Length, Rugby. He was drafted from Sheerness on February 2nd to go to France with other young men of the villages around. He was much liked, and as he always lived at home with his parents, he will be sadly missed by them, as well as by all who knew him.

RUGBY SOLDIER SEVERELY WOUNDED.

Mrs H Bottrill, of Bridget Street, Rugby, has received news that her son, Pte Frank Henry Bottrill, of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment, was admitted to Boulogne Hospital on Easter Sunday, suffering from a severe bullet wound in the head, and as the result of an operation he has lost the sight of the left eye. Pte Bottrill who was a reservist, and is married and lives at Wellingborough, is an old St Matthew’s boy. His brother-Pte A W Bottrill, of the Coldstream Guards—was badly wounded on November 2nd, and has never really recovered from the effects of the wound. He has ,however, been back to the fighting line ; but the last news that was heard of him was that he was at Havre recuperating, although he expected to be soon drafted back to the trenches.

Mr T Thompson, of Willoughby, has had several interesting letters from his son, who is a member of the Northants Yeomanry. The regiment went out to the front last November, and was one of the earliest of the Territorial forces to go on active service. They have been in several actions, and, as may be supposed have not escaped without their share of casualties. They were in the battle of Neuve Chapelle, and fortunately the quick-firing gun team, to which he was attached, passed through the engagement without mishap. Previous to that they had been nine days in the trenches, and during that time they experienced some very cold weather. Trooper Thompson had one of his feet frost-bitten. He was sent back to the base hospital, where, unfortunately, he developed bronchitis in a somewhat severe form. His latest letters however, state that he is getting better, but it will be some time before he is quite convalescent.

 

WOLSTON.

THE LATE PTE F HOWARD.—A memorial service was held in memory of Pte F Howard, only son of Mr Fred Howard, of Wolston, who lost his life at Neuve Chapelle when fighting with the Worcestershire Regiment, as reported in our issue of the 10th inst. The service was conducted by the Ven Archdeacon T Meredith, and the large edifice was well filled by residents of Brandon and Wolston and the surrounding district ; whilst a number of soldiers home on furlough attended. The Brandon and Wolston Scouts were also present to pay their last respects to their departed comrade. The principal mourners were deceased’s father and sister, Miss Clara Howard. The proceedings were most impressive, and it was quite evident that the majority of the large congregation mourned the loss of so young a life, many of them being visibly affected. The form of memorial service was the one authorised for use in the diocese of Chichester. The hymns were : “ My God, my Father, while I stray,” “ When our heads are bowed with woe,” and “ God of the living in Whose eyes.” Before the service closed the Vicar gave a suitable address, and his remarks were listened to with rapt attention. At the close the organist, Mr W S Lole, played the “ Dead March.”

The casualties in the 7th Warwickshires reported up-to-date are : One killed and 12 wounded.

A non-commissioned officer writes :— “ The Battalion has now come out of the trenches for four days. During the four days the Battalion has lost one killed, a chap from Coventry, and about 12 wounded, although I don’t think any of them are very serious. The 5th Battalion have had three killed. We relieved the Dublin Fusiliers when our Battalion went in, and now the 8th Battalion Royal Warwicks are relieving us. Most of the the firing takes place at night ; there’s not much doing during the day, except artillery fire. The Howitzer Battery are pretty close to us, and it was reported yesterday (April 14th) that they had put three of the German guns out of action. While in the trenches many of the chaps had some very narrow escapes. One of the German shells burst in “ A ” Company’s trenches, also one in “ B ” Company’s, fortunatley without hurting anyone. I think myself the Battalion has been very fortunate at having so few casualties. We are now in ——, so that we have now been in both the countries where the fighting is.”

RECRUITING AT RUGBY.

Recruiting has been rather more satisfactory at Rugby during the past week, and twelve have been attested, the majority for the Army Service Corps. Their names are :—A.H C : L Morris, J C Munton, C H Brown, T W Summers, F Summers, J Ingram, P Kimberley, D Jonathan, S New. Remounts : A Penn. K.R.R : M E Goodyer. Army Veterinary Corps : J W Harris.

 

12th Dec 1914. Rugby’s Splendid Example

THE NEED FOR MORE MEN.

Few districts can boast of such an excellent record as Rugby with regard to the response to the call for men to join the colours. Since the outbreak of hostilities upwards of 2,000 men (two battalions) have joined Lord Kitchener’s Army, and there is no doubt that, had it not been for the cold water thrown on recruiting by the War Office during the boom these figures would have been considerably enhanced. Rugby’s 2,000 compares very well with the figures of any other district in the United Kingdom, and had all districts done as well as this pro ratio to population, Lord Kitchener would already have secured more than his two million men, and there would have been no necessity for the household census and the persistent talk of conscription. Not only have the numbers from Rugby been good, but the men themselves have been excellent, and commanding officers of the depots to which they have been sent have spoken in high terms of their fitness and respectability. Since the advent of the engineering works to the town, a large proportion of the population has consisted of young men, and it the very cream of these who have responded to the country’s call-fine, clean, healthy, fellows, for the most part, who, we confidently believe, will, if they have the opportunity, nobly maintain the honour the town of their birth or adoption. The recruits have been drawn from all sections of society, and the members of the local trades unions have responded remarkably well. No less than 345 members of the unions affiliated to the Rugby Trades and Labour Council have enlisted, and this figure is very satisfactory considering that many of the members are over enlistment age, and also that the members of the largest union, the N.U.R, are not allowed to enlist.

Then, too, the villages in the district have nothing to be ashamed of in this respect, every man having enlisted from some of the smaller communities. The 2,000 recruits for Lord Kitchener’s Army, however, does not exhaust Rugby’s contribution to the national forces, as when the Army and Navy were mobilized, several hundreds of reserves were called up, notably from Rugby and New Bilton.

The Rugby Howitzer Battery and E Company R.W.R have volunteered for foreign service practically to a man, and hope to leave England very shortly.

Now that the figures from Rugby have passed the two thousand mark, it may be of interest to give a list of the regiments which the Rugby men have entered. The King’s Royal Rifles are easily ahead. With regard to the Royal Warwick Regiment, a considerable number attributed to that regiment joined at the commencement of the war for general service, and may thus have been transferred to other units. The reason that the number from Rugby joining this famous regiment is comparatively small is that it was quickly filled up, and local men had to choose other infantry regiments, the Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, which has recently suffered considerably, being the most popular of these. The figures are :-

King’s Royal Rifles  466

Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry  315

Royal Warwickshire  275

Royal Field Artillery  249

Royal Engineers  130

Cavalry (including 35 in Hussars, and 34 in Lancers)    87

Army Service Corps    56

Royal Berkshire Regiment   50

South Staffordshires    38

Worcestershire  31

Royal Amy Medical Corps  28

Royal Garrison Artillery  24

Rifle Brigade 19

Guards (6 Coldstreamers, 12Grenadiers)  18

These figures do not include men who enlisted prior to August 20th, and a number who were accepted for miscellaneous units. Many men in the Rugby recruiting area have also enlisted at other recruiting offices.

Other regiments chosen by local men were : Remounts, Army Ordnance Corps, Gloucesters, North Staffs, King’s Own Scottish Borderers, Royal Wiltshires, Royal Fusliers, Northamptonshire Regiment, Northumberland Fusiliers, Dorsets, Norfolks, East Yorks, East Lancs, Royal -sh[?], Seaforth Highlanders, Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, Life Guards, Dragoons, Leicestershires,and Birkenhead Bantams.

Although Rugby has done well, however, it can do better still, and we feel certain that there are hundreds of young fellows who have no ties, whose duty it is to answer to the call of the country in her hour of need. The whole of the infantry regiments are now open to receive suitable recruits, and also the R.A.M.C, the A.S.C, cavalry of the line (except the 1st and 2nd Life Guards), and the Royal Engineers.

All who wish to enlist should apply at the Drill Hall, Park Road (at the earliest possible date), where they will be promptly attended to by Co.-Sergt Winchcombe. and advised as to the best arm of the service for them to join.

The figures for the past week are better than have been experienced for some time, and 28 recruits have been accepted at Rugby. This number includes 11 from Priors Marston, who enlisted on Wednesday afternoon. Among this party were four brothers named Haynes, of whom three, W J, W F, and A F were accepted and one rejected ; and the patriotic mother of these lads remarked to the recruiting officer: “ If I had a dozen sons I should feel it my duty to let them all go.” Two of their cousins also enlisted. Sergt Handley, Coldstream Guards, has been assisting Colour-Sergt Winchcombe during the past week, and has already rendered very useful service.

RUGBY SHUNTER PROMOTED ON THE FIELD.

Thomas Loveridge, who before joining the Royal Warwickshire Regiment was employed as a shunter on the L & N-W Railway at Rugby, has been promoted to the rank of sergeant on the field for saving the Welsh Fusiliers at a critical moment. His portrait appeared in “ The Daily Sketch ” yesterday (Friday).

LOOKING FORWARD TO THE SHELLS AGAIN.

A lance-corporal, in the Welsh Fusiliers, writing to his parents in Rugby under, date November 27th, says :-“We are having a well-deserved rest for eight days ; then we go back again to the trenches. It has started to thaw a bit, and it makes the roads and trenches awfully muddy and very hard to bring the guns into action. I am writing this in a cafe which has been wrecked by the Germans. They have looted all the large shops-anything that is no good they burn. The shelling is not so severe ; but the snipers are still active. They are mostly all crack shots. We are in a large town now. The Germans keep flashing their searchlights on the town to see if reinforcements are coming. Many of our chaps have got colds caused by the wet trenches. The Indian troops are doing some good work. They are so hot-headed they want to charge the Germans all the time. It has gone a little warmer, but we still long for a good    fire. This town is crowded with refugees. They can tell you some awful stories of the Germans wrecking their homes. We go back to the trenches in five days, and shall look forward to the shells again.”

“ A SPLENDID SIGHT.”

Pte J Bale, 2nd Battalion Royal Welsh Fusiliers, who is with the Expeditionary Force, has written to his parents, residing at 2 Lagoe Place, Rugby, and says: “You saw in the Rugby Advertiser what was going on during the 16 days up till the time that lance-corporal out of our Battalion wrote to his mother. He and I are the only two in the 2nd Battalion who come from Rugby, and I can tell you it was all perfectly true. Both of us have had our comrades shot down beside us ; we have both been very lucky, and we have not stopped a bit of shell or a bullet from a German sniper. They fire at us at a very short range,and some of them are excellent shots with their rifles, and I am certain they must say the same about us, for as soon as any one of them shows a little of himself out of the trench he goes down like a log of wood. One Saturday night during last month they made several attacks on us, but as soon as they showed themselves out of the trenches to make a fierce attack we let them have it. We fired into them as fast as our rifles would let us, and it was raining to make things worse : but when it was day light the result was a splendid sight-from the German trenches to ours was a thick line of Germans, all stiff and cold ; some of them had got up to our barbed wire, and they were lying across it like ‘ dirty washing.’ All this happened during the 25 days we were in the trenches, without a rest, wash and shave, and brush up. The result of these 25 days to the Battalion was about 300 killed and wounded. We had three days’ rest after that, and now we have taken up some different trenches, where the fighting is not quite so fierce. We are all happy and singing all day long.”

In another letter Pte Bale says :- “I was pleased to see that the good old St Matthew’s School is still thinking of the ‘old boys.’ There are a lot of names of ‘ old boys ‘ that I know on the programme, but I don’t think many are out here yet. . . At present I am sitting in my trench, which is not very pleasant, as we had snow a few days ago. It has been freezing ever since, and I can assure you we are nearly frozen out. The fighting now is pretty calm, but the weather is cold.”

AN ENJOYABLE PICNIC.

Pte A Bottrill, 1st Coldstream Guards, son of Mr H Bottrill, 94 Bridget Street, who, as we reported recently, is an inmate of a hospital at Versailles, suffering from wounds, has written home. He says : “This last month in Belgium has been so hot that it was been as much as we could do to look after our lives, fighting day after day and night after night, and no sleep. It has been like a nightmare, and at times I thought I should go mad, with dead and dying men on all sides. When I got hit I didn’t think I should get away alive, as there were shells on all sides, and the Germans had got through one part of our line.

Several times I had to lie down because the bullets were coming so thick, and I thought escape was impossible. That is how I kept going until I took cover in a wood, where I found several dead Frenchmen and horses ; but, thank God, I am alive. We have had some losses, but there is one consolation : we have made those infernal Germans squeal more than once, and if they have warmed us up we have done in about ten times as many. But they have got to know us now, and they say we Coldstreamers are ten times worse than hell-and that’s hot enough. On Oct 29th we fought back to back, and on the day I got hit we finished up after a most adventurous and enjoyable three picnic (I don’t think).” Further on Pte Bottrill says : “ When my chum, who is in here wounded, rode a cow from the firing line you would have laughed. The general and home staff officers were watching his antics from a farm building, and had a good laugh over it. My friend says he didn’t care ; it was quicker than walking if it did make him sore.”

HAPPY AT THE FRONT.

Pte F Collins, of the Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, in a letter from the front to his uncle, Mr T Wilson, of Spring Street, received on Wednesday morning, states : “You cannot understand how much a letter will cheer us Tommies up at the front, especially when no news is forthcoming. You will be pleased to hear that I am quite well and in the beet of health, and I must tell you that we are all very happy up at the front in spite of all hardships. They will not discourage us one little bit. One would think we were out here for sport, and not for the war, according to the spirit of the troops. We have been provided with new warm clothing, &c, since we have been back in billets, having a well-earned rest after coming out of the trenches. This regiment has evidently been in for some severe fighting. A casualty list published on Tuesday contained the names of no less than 55 men killed.

WAR CASUALTIES.

OLD MURRAYIAN’S NOBLE DEATH.

In reply to a letter from a local gentleman asking for details of the death of Gunner Thrasher, son of Mrs A Henson, 6 Charlotte Street, Rugby, Major C C Robertson, 11th Battery R.F.A, writes :- “ This man was killed in action whilst gallantly serving his gun under fire, his death being instantaneous and without suffering. He was shot by a bullet through the heart. Please convey my sincere sympathy to his mother, and say that she may be proud of the conduct of her son, who was doing his duty manfully and well. It will be a comfort to her to know he was spared all suffering and pain.” Gunner Thrasher, whose death we reported recently, was only 20 years of age and a late pupil of the Murray School, which may well be proud of numbering such a gallant lad among its “ old boys.”

NEW BILTON MAN KILLED IN ACTION.

Much sympathy will be felt for Mrs C Dagley, of 11 Bridget Street, New Bilton, who on Saturday evening received official intimation that her third son, Pte Charles Jackson Dagley, 2nd Dragoon Guards (Queen’s Boys), had been killed in action on October 31st. Pte Dagley, who was only 22 years of age, was the son of the late Mr Charles Dagley, and had been in the Army nearly five years. Previous to enlisting he was employed at Messrs Willans & Robinson’s. His elder brother is at the front with the Coldstream Guards.

OLD ST MATTHEW’S BOY SEVERELY WOUNDED.

Mr F J A Sparks, “ Oakville,” Stephen Street, Rugby, has received a postcard from one of the hospitals at the front, stating that Bandsman J Milne, of the Scottish Rifles, has received a severe wound of the spine, causing paralysis. His condition is grave, but there is no immediate danger. Bandsman Milne is an old St Matthew’s boy, and his father, the late Colour-Sergt Milne, was for many years an instructor to the Rugby School Officers’ Training Corps.

14th Nov 1914. Soldiers’ Stories From The Front

A Lance-Corporal in the Welsh Fusiliers, whose parents are Old Rugbeians, writing from the trenches on November 4th, says :-“ We have been in the trenches now for 14 days, and it is awful. They are shelling us continually all day. Our regiment has lost about 300 killed and wounded so far. Just about 50 yards in front of our trench there are plenty of Germans that we killed about ten days ago. The shells are doing all the damage. I have got a German helmet for a souvenir if I come safely through it. I am lucky, as the chap next to me got killed the first day. . . . It is a shame to see old people and little children trudging along the road with no home. You can see our troops giving them something to eat when possible. I saw a Rugby Advertiser to-day ; I notice it has got some soldiers’ stories in it. I will keep you interested when I come home with them. . . . . I could do with a wash-have not had one for 16 days. We are all the same. . . . You should see the damage the Germans do to the villages. You can’t realise it. There is a church facing us—smashed to bits by shells. Every night you can see flares in the sky. It is the Germans building up their reputation by burning up the villages. Every day a drove of aeroplanes comes over us looking for our position so as to bring effective fire on to us.”

Sergt Freemantle, 123rd Battery R.H.A, writes under date October 29th :—“ We are all well here and getting plenty of supplies up. Only just a few “ Jack Johnson’s ” to keep us company. The weather is fine, but cold. The day has been favourable again for us. One of our Batteries, 80th R.F.A, is reported to have wiped a whole German Battalion out. The German prisoners are surprised when they are told that the Germans have not captured London or Paris. All prisoners say how pleased they are to be taken by the English. One boy, about 17 years old, walked into our trenches, with a dixie full of chicken stew. He had lost his way, so one can imagine his surprise when we collared him. I have not received one mark up to now, although our Battery had bad luck at Mons, Le Cateau, Sossoins, Aisne. The Germans have been trying to find us now for days, but I don’t think they can hit anything now only houses. The Indian troops with us seem to frighten them. The only thing that grieves us most are the snipers. They sit on haystacks or trees and have pot shots at us. One of our fellows (known in Rugby) was sent to find a sniper in the Brewery at —. He found three civilians with a maxim. They are now very happy. Our Battery, 123rd R.F.A, has been repaying old debts. We suffered at Le Cateau, but now we have turned the tables. We have five Legion of Honour men in our Brigade.

A Rugby man, a private in the South Wales Borderers, writing home on October 25th, says :-” You will read in the papers about the quantity of shells bursting around us day and night, and those who come out of it are lucky. We lost a great lot of officers and men on the 21st-my birthday, which will be one to remember. With God’s help I hope to be with you soon, as I think they (the Germans) must see by now that they are a beaten army, and the sooner they give in the better. We had 31 days in the trenches under fire, and then two days and nights riding in a train—if you can call it so with forty in a truck with our equipment, so you can guess it was a treat—and right into the firing line again.”

Capt Mortimer, of the 27th Battery, 32nd Brigade, R.F.A, who was for several years the Adjutant of the Rugby and Coventry Howitzer Batteries, has been awarded the Cross of a Chevalier of the Legion of Honour for saving the guns by “ man handling ” them under heavy fire, at Ligny, in France, on August 26th. On the same day a D.S.O was awarded to one of the officers of the Battery and D.S.M to seven of the men.

WOUNDED.

Pte A W Bottrill, 2nd Co. 1st Coldstream Guards, has written to his parents, residing at 94 Bridget Street, Rugby, stating that he is in hospital suffering from rheumatism and a shrapnel bullet wound in the shoulder. He was being transferred to Versailles, near Paris. Pte Bottrill, who is a reservist, was employed in the Turbine Department of the B.T.H, and was called up on August 5th—two days after his marriage. In one of the postcards he has sent home he states that he has heard from some of the Royal Warwicks that his brother Frank, who is a reservist in that regiment, was wounded, but so far the parents have received no confirmation of this.

Pte G John Wills, a reservist of the North Staffs. Regiment, has written informing, his wife, who lives at 77 Jubilee Street, that he has been wounded. He says : “ I have had a rough time since I wrote last. We have been shelled night and day, and the Germans have been trying to break through time after time. We took up some fresh trenches to relieve another regiment, and in front of them were scores of dead Germans. Our company’s turn to go into them came on the night of Nov. 1. They shelled a few times up till five o’clock ; then they let loose (talk about being in hell, that’s not in it !) as hard as they could with their guns on our few trenches ; then, when they had finished, they attacked us. I got wounded in the arm and shoulder, not severely, and don’t know how I got out. I am at a field hospital.”

Pte Chas King, 1st R.W.R, of 47 Pinfold Street, New Bilton, has written to his mother to the effect that he was wounded in the muscle of the right arm on October 27th, but is “ still carrying on.” He has previously been in hospital with gout, caused by service in the trenches. Pte King is a reservist, and has seen active service in India among the Afridis. Pte King mentioned that he had seen nothing of the three Rugby men—Corpl Hancox, Pte W G Goodman, and Pte W Busson, who had been reported as missing from the R.W.R. ; but pointed out that units were continually becoming detached.

Mr W J Farn, of the Mechanical Transport, Department, A.S.C, who was wounded at the Battle of the Aisne, has received a card from his brother, Scout J Farn, of the Second Worcester Regiment, stating that he has been wounded, and is in a base hospital. Scout Farn, who, like his brother, went through the Battles of Mons, Marne, and the Aisne, was, before he enlisted, in the employ of Mr Bradby, Barby Road. Driver Farn’s leave of absence expired this week, but this has been extended because he has not fully recovered from his wound. While at the front he had several exciting experiences, and witnessed the annihilation of about 2,000 Germans in a British ambush, and also the treachery of the Germans with the white flag when opposed to the Northamptonshire Regiment in the trenches, and the speedy retribution with the aid of a machine gun which overtook the Germans.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Both the Leicestershire and the Northants Yeomanry Regiments have gone on foreign service.

Rather more than 100 recruits are required to complete the 7th (Reserve) Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment, which is fixed at 600.

The Warwickshire Yeomanry are still in their Berkshire quarters, but with everything ready to go abroad at a few hours’ notice when required. The order may come at any moment, or they may remain for some time yet.

The 7th Warwickshire Territorial Battalion is busily preparing to join the Expeditionary Forces, orders for which may be expected any time after the end of the month.

THE 7th BATTALION, R.W REGT.

There have been considerable changes in the personnel of the 7th Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment in the last few weeks. Col Freer Ash is not now in command, having been gazetted to the 8th Reserve Battalion. The whole battalion has been, to a certain extent, reorganised. The main body are in Essex, and are taking part in work of an important character, the nature of which, owing to the censorship, cannot be disclosed. A part of the battalion are still doing guard duty at a Government ammunition factory near London.

RECRUITING AT RUGBY IMPROVING.

Although the figures of recruits in the town during the past week show a considerable improvement on those of recent weeks, the numbers are by no means so satisfactory as could be desired. Since Friday last week 20 have been attested for the New Army, as against eight the previous week. The recruiting sergeant is very optimistic, however, and is of opinion that there will shortly be another boom, as many villages in the neighbourhood have so far hardly been affected at all by the call for men.

A detachment of about 50 men of the National Reserve, who in future will act as bridge guards, has arrived.

A RUGBY SAILOR’S GRATITUDE.

A local sailor on H.M.S Zephyr, torpedo destroyer, writes :—“ Dear Sir,—I should like to give a word of thanks to the Rugby people for getting subscriptions up for warm clothes for the North Sea flotillas, as I am a Rugby man and doing patrol duty in the North Sea. I think they are much needed for the coming winter. No one would hardly realise what we have to go through in all weathers, night and day, with hardly any sleep, risking our lives where there are such a lot of floating mines. We have been very busy getting rid of them. We found out and sunk 19 in one day, so you see the risk we are under. We are very grateful to Admiral Powlett for what he is doing on our behalf, and hope the funds will increase. The writer goes on to say : I hope I shall be able to have a go at the Germans before long, as I should not be satisfied with myself to be blown up with a mine. They get frightened as soon as they see our ships, and run for all they are worth. There’s no doubt we shall spend Christmas in the Navy this year, when I was hoping to be back with the wife and family ; but, never mind, we are not down-hearted, and hope to finish them off before long. I get the Advertiser sent to me every week, and see how things are going on. Good luck to the North Sea Flotilla Fund.”