29th Dec 1917. Suggested Rationing Scheme for Rugby

SUGGESTED RATIONING SCHEME FOR RUGBY.

At a meeting of the Rugby Urban Food Control Committee on Thursday evening a sub-committee was appointed to formulate a rationing scheme for butter, margarine, lard, bacon, and cheese for the Urban and Rural Districts.

MARGARINE COMMANDEERED.

The Rugby Food Control Committee did not wait long before putting their new powers, enabling them to commandeer supplies of margarine, into force. The margarine queues on Friday and Saturday last were longer than ever, and there was every indication that similar scenes would experienced on Christmas Eve. Mr F M Burton, the Executive officer, however, ascertained that one of the multiple shops was expecting a consignment of four tons of margarine, and he immediately commandeered one and a-half tons, and distributed it among other grocers in the town. A notice to this effect was displayed in the window of the shop affected, and the police promptly broke up all attempts to form a queue. The action of the committee and the executive officer was greatly appreciated by many people, who were thus enabled to do their shopping with a degree of comfort which has been lacking for the past two months.

THE COLLECTION OF WASTE PAPER.

A meeting of the Rugby Waste Paper Committee was held on Thursday last week, Mr J J McKinnell, J.P, C.C, presiding. A grant of £10 was made to the Rugby Town Red Cross effort, and it was decided that at the next meeting the claims of the Prisoners of War Fund should have first consideration.—The Hon Secretary (Mr J Reginald Barker) reported that there had lately been an encouraging increase in the amount of waste paper collected by the boys of Elborow School and Murray School.—Mr McKinnell said that the Local Government Board had again urged the local authorities to collect all waste paper. Mr Barker had arranged to have every description of waste paper sorted and graded and sent to the paper mills for re-pulping, obtaining for the committee the maximum amount under the Government schedule of prices. They had, therefore, been able to devote considerable sums to local charities, and, in addition to the grant made at that meeting, had rendered substantial assistance to the Hospital of St Cross, St John’s Ambulance Brigade, the Hamilton Home, and the District Nursing Society. There were, however, other deserving objects which were in need of funds, and he trusted all who had waste paper of any kind would drop a postcard to Mr W T Simmonds, of Elborow School, or Mr W T Coles Hodges, of Murray School.

RAILWAY BOOKINGS.

During the days immediately preceding Christmas there was the usual exodus of workers from the town, and the number of travellers was well in excess of last year, when the Government’s exhortation to the people to avoid unnecessary travelling was loyally observed. At the L & N-W Railway Station bookings were very heavy to all parts of the United Kingdom ; and the Great Central Authorities also experienced exceptionally busy times. The majority of people travelling were munition workers and their families, and of the number of visitors to the town a large portion were soldiers home on leave.

CHRISTMAS ARRANGEMENTS AT THE POST OFFICE.

Owing to the scarcity of foodstuffs, the number of parcels despatched to the troops this year from the Rugby Post Office was not so large as usual ; but, nevertheless, during the busiest nights preceding December 14th—the last date for sending such parcels—as many as 80 odd mail sacks were sent off one night. There was, however, an enormous increase in the number of registered letters and small parcels of comforts. The labour question proved a great difficulty this year; but with the assistance of 28 extra postwomen and sorters and about a dozen spare-time workers, the rush was successfully dealt with. To relieve the counter pressure the Army allowances, amounting to over £1,000, were paid out for two weeks during the week preceding Christmas. On Saturday, Sunday, and Monday the counter staff was kept abnormally busy, and on Christmas Eve the number of parcels delivered in the town was unusually large, vis. 1,500 ; while the number on Christmas Day was 700. There was a falling-off this year in the number mainly confined to the residential quarters. In the working-class districts of the town the numbers were as large as ever.

Another unusual feature was the small quantity of poultry passing through the post, the customary ducks and geese giving places to more homely, but nowadays none the less welcome; piece of bacon.

For four days preceding Christmas the country mail motor vans were forced to make double journeys ; and although these ran rather late on several of the heaviest mornings, the times compared well with previous years.

SUNDAY POSTAL DELIVERY IN RUGBY.

To the Editor of the Advertiser

SIR,—Would it not be possible for Rugby to forego its delivery of letters on the Lord’s Day ? When we see so many women on the rounds we all know what it must mean in those homes, and they surely need their Sabbath rest as much as we do. In asking this I do not mean to ask that their pay shall be stopped for that day’s work, but that they should receive the same wage as now, and that we should forego our letters on that day.

London and many other large cities do without Sunday delivery, and so I think we should do the same. I believe it can only done by a resolution passed by the District Council. Will not some member propose such a resolution ? I believe he would find the whole Council ready to support him, and I am quite sure he would have the great majority of the townsmen with him. It is too much for a man to work seven days a week. What must it mean to these women ?—Believe me, sir, yours faithfully,

CYRIL T ASTON,
Vicar St Matthew’s Church.
St Matthew’s Vicarage, Rugby, Dec 24, 1917.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Dennis Over, youngest son of Mr Samuel Over, has passed out fifth in his company from the Royal Military College, Sandhurst, and has been gazetted to a commission in the Regular Army in the Royal Warwickshire Regiment.

Mr & Mrs C F Everett, 42 Claremont Road, have received news that their eldest son, Lance-Corpl Fredk Stanley Everett, of the Motor Transport, died from disease in the base hospital at Basra, Mesopotamia, on Sunday, December 16th. He was 21 years of age, and an Old Murrayian. Prior to joining the Army in January, 1916, he was employed as a goods clerk by the L & N-W Railway Company at Berkswell and Hampton. He was at one time a teacher in the Murray Sunday School and secretary of St Andrew’s Guild Cricket Club. He was also a member of St Peter’s Church Choir, and after the service on Sunday evening the “ Dead March ” in Saul was played to honour his memory.

MENTIONED DESPATCHES.

In Sir Douglas Haig’s despatches of November 7th appears the name of Sergt A W Hughes, Royal Engineers. Sergt Hughes was formerly employed at the B.T.H, and has been on the Western Front 2½ years. In July last he was the recipient of a “ card of recognition ” from the General commanding the Division for distinguished conduct.

ANOTHER ADDITION TO THE RUGBY PRISONERS OF WAR LIST.

Another prisoner of war has been added to the list of the Rugby Prisoners of War Committee, viz, Lance-Corpl W H Roberts, 2nd Machine Gun Company, who is interned at Lechfeld, Bavaria. This man was formerly employed at Messrs Bluemel Bros, Ltd, Wolston. Mr Barker has arranged for the standard food parcels and bread to be sent to him as from “ his former fellow employees,” as they have generously undertaken his adoption.

CHURCH LAWFORD.

MILITARY MEDAL.—This week Mrs F Cooke has received news that her brother, Corpl A Haynes, of the 28th Canadians, has been awarded the Military Medal.

MEMORIAL SERVICE.—On Sunday evening last a memorial service was held the Parish Church for Sergt S Batchelor, when a good number of the parishioners attended. The service was impressively conducted by the Rector (Rev H Smith), and one or two of Sergt Batchelor’s favourite hymns were sung. In his sermon at the evening service the Rector made allusion to the loss the parents and family, the parish, and the church had sustained by the death of Sergt Batchelor, and said it was such men that our country can ill-afford to lose. Amongst the many letters of sympathy which Mr & Mrs Batchelor have received several have come from the front, from the chaplain, the nurse, and from his lieutenant. The latter wrote:—“ Everybody who knew him recognised in him a good N.C.O and a good soldier every way.”

DUNCHURCH.

ROLL OF HONOUR.—Mr & Mrs Pearce, Coventry Road Dunchurch, have received intimation that their son. Pte W Pearce, K.R.R, is missing. This is the fourth son Mr & Mrs Pearce have lost in the War.

WOLSTON.

PTE W BARKER KILLED.—Mr & Mrs N Barker received news on Sunday that their son, Pte W Barker, had died from wounds in France. Deceased volunteered early in the War for the Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, but was rejected owing chest measurement. Later on he joined the Royal Warwicks, and has been in the thick of the fighting. He was well known and respected in the district. His father has for many years been a member of the Wolston Parish Council, and occupied other public offices in the parish. Much sympathy is felt for Mr & Mrs Barker and family.

BRANDON & BRETFORD.

CORPL C DIPPLE WOUNDED.—Mr V Dipple has received news that his brother was wounded in the charge at Cambrai. Corpl Dipple was one of the Mons and Marne fighters, being attached to the 18th Hussars. His other brothers—Sergt F Dipple, R.F.A, is now stationed in Italy (he also was amongst the 1914 battles); while a third brother, Bombardier H Dipple, is also in Italy and a sister is a nursing sister in the Army.

WOUNDED SOLDIERS ENTERTAINED.

On Boxing Day the wounded soldiers at the Infirmary and “ Te Hira ” Red Cross Hospitals numbering about 120, were entertained by the Rugby V.T.C at the Howitzer Battery Drill Hall. Tea was provided by the Red Cross Society in the small rooms, which were nicely decorated and presented a warm and cosy appearance, and this was followed by an entertainment in the Large Drill Hall. Under the supervision of Sergt S H Weobley, the members of Corps had tastefully decorated the hall with flags and garlands. The stage was arranged in a series of arches, illuminated with coloured electric bulbs, and a large Christmas tree, upon which useful and suitable presents were hung, was also illuminated by movable electric lights, arranged by Sergt O H Watson. Quartermaster Alderson as Father Christmas presented each guest with a present from the tree. An excellent programme, consisting of instrumental and vocal items, was given ; and, in addition to members of the V.T.C and wounded soldiers, were songs by Quartermaster C Prior and Miss Phyllis Vann.

BILTON HALL RED CROSS HOSPITAL.

The wounded soldiers at this hospital has a very pleasant round of entertainment. On Thursday last week Corpl Hawkins and friends from Rugby gave a concert, and on Saturday Mr Giggs and party went over from Rugby for a similar purpose. Dinner on Christmas Day consisted of turkey, plum pudding, &c, given by friends ; and in the afternoon the soldiers and staff were entertained by a professional conjuror from London. On Boxing Day the Southam Amateur Dramatic Company attended, and gave a concert and theatricals. The Bilton Brass Band played carols at The Hall on Sunday, and again during dinner and tea on Christmas Day. The men enjoyed and appreciated everything immensely.

SEASONABLE WEATHER.

The weather during Christmas was, on the whole, bright and seasonable. In the previous week frost and snow gave promise of ideal conditions, but on Monday there was a considerable rise of temperature, with drizzling rain, which quickly converted the road surfaces into sticky mud, and the outlook was not at all promising. On Christmas Day, however, a keen wind from the North with spells of bright sunshine put the roads in good order again, and outdoor exercise was quite enjoyable, and the same may be said of Boxing Day.

DEATHS.

EVERETT.—On December 16th, at Basrah (Persian Gulf,) Lance-Corpl FREDERICK STANLEY EVERETT, of the Motor Transport, A.S.C., eldest and dearly loved son of Mr. and Mrs. Everett, aged 21. (Nature of illness not stated).—Rest in peace. Not lost, but gone before.
Father, in Thy gracious keeping,
Leave we now our dear one sleeping.

MATTHEWS.—In loving memory of PTE HARRY J. MATTHEWS, the only and beloved son of D. and M. A. MATTHEWS, of Napton, who died in hospital in France on Dec. 14th, 1917, aged 28 years.

 

Advertisements

15th Dec 1917. On Christmas Day

ON CHRISTMAS DAY every household in Rugby and district is asked to make a collection at their Dinner Table to help to maintain a continuance of the very necessary food parcels for our unfortunate men who are

PRISONERS OF WAR.

The increase in the cost of the food parcels has caused a serious strain upon the funds of the Rugby Prisoners of War Committee, and it is felt that everyone will be glad of this opportunity of showing in a practical manner their sympathy with these poor fellows who are languishing in prison camps in Germany.

Please place your collection in the special envelopes which will be left your house and hand same to the authorised collector, who will call soon after Christmas.

If you going away this Christmas will you forward a donation towards this Special Effort to the Hon. Secretary : Mr. J. REGINALD BARKER, 9 Recent Street, Rugby.

EVERY PENNY COUNTS.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Capt T A Townsend, M.C, who was wounded at Cambrai on November 29th, is making satisfactory progress.

General Sir H S Horne, K.C.B, returned to the Front from East Haddon on Wednesday.

Lance-Corpl H F Hancox, who has been a prisoner of war and on the Rugby list of Prisoners of War Fund for 2½ years, has been transferred to Switzerland

Pte W Thomson, son-in-law of Mr & Mrs Mayes, Abbey Street has been wounded with shrapnel in the eye. They lost a son from wounds twelve months ago. Mrs Mayes has four brothers serving—three of them in France—and her husband has had two nephews killed in the War.

Mr T Horton, J.P, of Ashlawn, a late captain of the Northants County Cricket Club, is acting as a volunteer tram driver.

During the past ten weeks a total of £52,845 has been subscribed to the War Loans in Rugby, of which £7,680 was invested during the week ended December 8th.

Capt C N B Hurt, East Lancs Regiment, who has been appointed Assistant Controller of Statistics under the regional scheme of National Service at Headquarters, Leamington, has been presented with a silver cigarette-case by fellow-members of the Recruiting Staff at Rugby, where he has been stationed for the past two years. He was at Oxford when the War broke out, and, joining up immediately went, with his regiment to Gallipoli, where he contracted dysentery and enteric. He has played in the Derbyshire County Cricket XI.—Pte Bateman, a clerk on the staff, has also been the recipient of a present on leaving the town.

News has been received at the B.T.H that Lance-Corpl H P Arnold, of the Royal Engineers, was killed in action on November 28th. Prior to joining the Army he was employed in the turbine works.

News has been received of the death in action of Capt Leystens Llewellyn Greener, Royal Warwickshire Regiment (T.F), son of Mr Charles Greener, of Four Oaks, Captain Greener, who was 24 years of age, was educated at Rugby, where he was captain of the football fifteen and a member of the shooting eight. He joined the Territorials about eighteen months before the outbreak of the War, received his commission in the 6th Warwicks in February, 1913.

NAVAL HONOUR FOR ST MATTHEW’S OLD BOY.

Warrant-Officer E W Penney, an old scholar of St Matthew’s Boys’ School, has been awarded the Distinguished Service Medal for gallantry in the Battle of Jutland. He was on Admiral Beatty’s flagship Lion during the engagement, and the great skill and fearlessness effected essential repairs to the wireless installation while under heavy.

LIEUT-COL VISCOUNT FEILDING, D.S.O, AGAIN MENTIONED IN DESPATCHES.

In Sir Douglas Haig’s list of mentions this week we again find the name of Lieut-Col Viscount Feilding, D.S.O (Coldstream Guards), son of the Earl of Denbigh. This is the third time during the War Viscount Feilding has gained distinction.

MILITARY MEDAL.

In a list of awards of the Military Medal issued on Thursday the following names appear :—Pte W Green, Worcester Regiment (Ryton-on-Dunsmore), and Gunner (Acting Bdr) W R Clarke, R.F.A (Rugby).

PRINCETHORPE.

NEWS has been received that Pte C E Tuckey, 1st Royal Warwicks, previously reported wounded and missing, was killed in action on or about October 4th. He was the second son of the late Mr & Mrs Thomas Tuckey, of Princethorpe.

MONKS KIRBY.

Farrier-Sergt-Major Bishop of the Warwickshire Yeomanry, has received news of the death from wounds on November 15th of his brother, Sergt Percy Bishop, Berks Yeomanry, serving with the Egyptian Expeditionary Force. He was the son of the late Jonathan Bishop of this village.

CHURCH LAWFORD.

ROLL OF HONOUR.—Another of the brave lads from this village has made the great sacrifice. Sergt S Batchelor, of the Royal Warwickshire regiment, only son of Mr & Mrs J Batchelor, died on December 1st of wounds received in action in France. He joined up on January 13th, 1915, and was drafted out to the front in April of the same year. Although not born at Church Lawford, Sergt Batchelor is regarded as a native, as his parents came to reside in the village when he was about two years old. He was educated at the village school, and when he was old enough to start work he went to Mr J Brierley’s at The Hall, Kings Newnham, to assist in the garden, &c. From there he took the situation of gardener and coachman to the Misses Townsend, of Kings Newham, where he was at the time of enlistment. Sergt Batchelor was 28 years of age, and was a fine strapping fellows, standing 6ft, and broad in proportion. He was as good-hearted as he was big, was ever ready to give a helping hand where it was wanted, and always had a cheery word and smile for everyone. He belonged to the local Cricket and Social Clubs and the choir at the Parish Church, where he was a most regular attendant. He was a very steady, thrifty young fellow, a total abstainer and non-smoker, and a jolly, all-round, good fellow. More especially, perhaps, because of these traits of character, very great sympathy is felt with his parents in the loss of their son in his prime, and whose life had taken as a whole, might well be regarded as an example by many country lads.

DEATHS.

BATCHELOR.—In loving memory of Sergt. S. Batchelor of the 1st Royal Warwickshire Regiment (only son of Mr. & Mrs. J. Batchelor, of Church Lawford), who died from wounds received in action in France on December 1st, 1917 ; aged 28 years.
Bravely he answered his country’s call ;
He gave his life for one and all.
Father in Thy gracious keeping
Leave we now our dear one sleeping.

IN MEMORIAM.

GLENN.—In affectionate remembrance of my dear husband, JOHN GLENN, who died in France on December 8, 1916.

READ.—In loving memory of CHARLES GEORGE, the beloved son of Charles John and Minnie Read, who was killed in action in France on December 15, 1916 ; aged 22 years.—“ God takes our loved ones from our homes, but never from our hearts.”
—From his Father, Mother, Brothers, and Sisters.

 

20th Oct 1917. Street Lighting in Rugby

STREET LIGHTING IN RUGBY.

By permission of the Chief Constable, a number of lamps at the most important points in the centre part of town are now being lighting at night. The majority of these have to be extinguished at ten o’clock, but the remainder will be alight all night, subject to arrangements being made for them to be extinguished within a few minutes of the receipt of the Field Marshal’s warning. Needless to say, this concession is greatly appreciated by all who use the streets after dark.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Major F Glover is gazetted second in command of the 2nd Battalion, Warwickshire Volunteer Regiment.

Pte W Slater, of 36 Frederick Street, has been wounded in France, and is now in Kitchener’s Hospital, Brighton, where he is progressing favourably.

Lance-Corpl F E Boyes, Oxford and Bucks L.I, son of Mr J Boyes, 84 Railway Terence, has been reported wounded and missing on August 16th. He has been previously wounded twice, and had served in France over two years. This is the second son of Mr. Boyes, returned as missing this year.

Mrs Rathbone, 23 James Street, Rugby, has received official notification that her brother, Pte George Ruddle, was killed in action in France on September 3rd. He was an Old Murrayian.

Mr & Mrs Summers, of Long Lawford, have received news that their son, Pte A Summers, has been wounded in the back and is going on well.

Mr & Mrs Plumb have received news that their only son, Lance-Corpl J W Plumb, of the Machine Gun Corps, has been wounded. He is an Old St Matthew’s boy, and before he enlisted in September, 1914, worked for the Rugby Gas Company.

Corpl E P Moore, Machine Gun Section, who before joining the Army was employed in the Electrical Laboratory at the B.T.H, died from wounds received in action on October 6th.

SECOND-LIEUT K H WILLARD MISSING.

Second-Lieut Kenneth H Willard, Yorks and Lancs Regiment, attached to the Royal Flying Corps, second son of Mr T W Willard, 26 Bilton Road, has been officially reported missing as from October 12th. In a letter to Mr. Willard a fellow officer writes : “ He went out with six other machines on the 12th inst. to do a patrol, the leader being one of our best pilots. About 15 to 20 enemy machines were encountered, and a general mix-up ensued, in which your son was seen to be handling his machine and fighting in a most efficient manner. Although our machines were greatly out-numbered, they put up a great fight, but on returning to the aerodrome, It was discovered that your son was missing. No one saw him go down, and it is just possible that he may have been hit in the engine, and had to descend in the enemy lines.” Lieut Willard was educated at Rugby School and Sandhurst, and visited his parents a fortnight ago on his final leave before proceeding to the front.

CAPT. HON. HENRY FEILDING.

Captain Hon Henry Feilding, Coldstream Guards, the third and youngest son of the Earl and Countess of Denbigh, died of wounds on October 9th, aged 23. He had just been given command of his Company, and was leading them into action for the first time in the attack of October 9th. They had achieved their first objective when they came under heavy German artillery barrage. It was then that Capt Feilding was severely wounded by a shell. He was carried back to the casualty clearing station, where he had every possible care and attention, but the case was hopeless from the first. Recovering slight consciousness in the afternoon, he died peacefully and painlessly at 10.30 p.m. Father Crisp, R.C chaplain to the Forces, of Leicester, was with him at this period and gave him the last helps[?] of religion.

Captain Henry Feilding was educated at the Oratory School, Edgebaston, and Trinity College, Cambridge, where he held a commission before the war in King Edward’s Horse, with which he mobilised and went to France in April, 1915. He was later taken on the staff as A.D.C. to General Sir Henry Horne, with whom he went to Egypt in January, 1916. As he wished to with a fighting regiment, he resigned his appointment on the staff after six months, and transferred to the Coldstream Guards, with which he served at the front for 12 months.

His elder brother, Lieut-Commander Hon Hugh Feilding, R.N, was killed at the Battle of Jutland on May 31, 1916 ; whilst his eldest brother, Lieut-Col Viscount Feilding, D.S.O, has served in France since September 1914.

The C.O. Writes of Capt Feilding :—“ I cannot tell you what a loss he is both as a friend and a soldier. It was the first time that he commanded a company in action, and he was doing so well. He was full of enthusiasm for this first attack, and I only wish he could have seen the successful ending of such a great day for the regiment, but all officers of his Company fell wounded before reaching the final objective.”

A brother officer writes :—“ He was always so cheery and so full of fun, and was the life of our of mess, and in every way a most delightful companion. In his work he was always very thorough, and would take any amount of trouble over the men, with whom I always felt he was a great favourite. He will be terribly missed by everyone in the Battalion. I had such a cheery letter from him only a day or two ago, telling me he was just of to battle.”

A personal telegram of sympathy has been received from the King.

BRANDON & BRETFORD.

WOUNDED SOLDIERS.—News has reached Mr & Mrs Reuben Banbrook that their son has been wounded in the foot. He belongs the Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, and has been on foreign service for a considerable time. Mrs Banbrook has five soldier sons, of whom Pte James Banbrook has been gassed and Pte Bert Banbrook wounded twice.—Mr R Hart has received the news that his brother has been badly wounded. He was in the Regular Army before the War started, and been through most of the engagements. His ankle has been smashed and the other leg badly wounded.

CHRISTMAS PARCELS FOR PRISONERS OF WAR.

The Christmas parcels for prisoners in Germany will be despatched during the first week in November.

The special parcel will be substituted for one of the six standard packages sent during November, and will include a rich Christmas pudding, roast beef, potatoes, sausages, cheese, and 50 cigarettes. If the relatives or “ adopters ” pay for this (the price is 8s) their names will be put on the parcels, but only one parcel can be sent to each man.

A larger parcel can costing 15s, will contain extras in the shape of turkey, bacon, butter, spaghetti, chocolate, tongue, and dried ginger.

Relatives of Rugby and district men desirous of sending one of these parcels in their own names should remit the cost, not later than Saturday next, the 27th inst, to Mr J Reginald Barker, hon secretary, Rugby Prisoners of War Help Committee, 9 Regent St, Rugby.

No person can send any foodstuffs direct to a prisoner.

ANOTHER RED CROSS SALE.

At a meeting of the Rugby District Farmers’ Red Cross Committee on Tuesday, presided over by the Rev R S Mitchison, it was thought that the time had arrived for another effort on behalf of the Red Cross Society, as there is a very pressing need of increased support, the expenditure being largely in excess of the receipts. Opinions were expressed that all classes of the community should join.

It was decided to ask the Rector of Rugby, the Headmaster of Rugby School, the representatives of the Urban Council, the Chamber of Trade, the Butchers’ Association, the Trades and Labour Council, influential gentleman, and others to join the Rugby District Farmers in a united effort to hold a Red Cross sale.

A preliminary meeting will be held on Tuesday, October 23rd, at 7 p.m., at the Eagle Assembly Room, Market Place, Rugby.

WOLSTON.

THE HOUSING QUESTION at Wolston in fast becoming a serious matter. There are already numerous couples living with their parents, and are having to store their goods—in one instance in a hovel. A number of the present houses have been condemned, and this further accentuates the shortage. It is felt by many of the working-men of the village that the 25 houses the District Council propose to build after the War will be quite inadequate. Much unrest is at present caused, and only within the last few days a soldier’s wife has been threatened with proceedings if she does, not leave, the cottage being wanted for someone else.

DEATHS.

BOOTE.—In loving memory of Pte. S. BOOTE (SID), 4th Worcestershire Regiment, who died of wounds in France on October 11, 1917. “ He did his duty.” —From his loving brother and sister, JACK & JEANNIE, and his little nephew, AUBREY.

CROMBIE.—In loving memory of Regimental Q.M.-S. W. CROMBIE, 1st K.O.S.B., who died of wounds in France on October 4, 1917. From all at 35 Oliver Street.

HAYES.—On October 10th, at 14th General Hospital, Wimereux, France, from wounds received in action, Coy.-Sergt.-Major G. H. Hayes, 265385 R.W.R, third son of Mrs. Hayes, 80 York Street, age 34 years. Also, on July 19, 1916, Pte. FRANK H. HAYES, 2215, who was killed in action “ somewhere in France.”—On earth divided, in death united.”—From his sorrowing Mother, Brothers and Sisters.

LANE.—On October 13th, BERTRAM CHARLES, the youngest son of Mrs. Lane, 76 Bath Street ; aged 24.

STAY.—ARTHUR GEORGE STAY, eldest son of F. Stay, 99 Grosvenor Road, Rugby, killed in action Sept. 21.

IN MEMORIAM.

BACHELOR.—In loving memory of my dear son, Pte ERNEST ANDREW BATCHELOR, Worcester Regiment, who was killed in action on October 24, 1916.
“ In a soldier’s lonely grave,
Beneath France’s blood-stained sod,
There lies my dearest son,
Resting in peace with God ;
Though rolling seas divide us,
And he sleeps on a pitiless shore,
Remembrance is a relic that shall live for evermore.”
—Never forgotten by his loving Mother, Father, Brothers and Sisters.

 

 

 

5th May 1917. Increased Number of Tramps

RUGBY BOARD OF GUARDIANS.
INCREASED NUMBER OF TRAMPS.

The Master (Mr W Dickens) reported the number in the Institution to be 83, compared with 112 on the corresponding date last year, and 141 in 1915. Vagrants relieved during the fortnight numbered 41 ;corresponding period last year, 13 ; 1915, 20.

The Master said 27 of the men who passed through the tramp wards gave their occupation as labourers, but not agricultural labourers—at least, they did not seem able to dig. Two men gave their occupations as painters. There was also a gardener, a groom, a printer, a miner, etc. Of The men he could only recognise eight “ old hands,” many of the others seeming new to the road. He tried to ascertain the reason for their being on the road, and was informed by some that employers told them they were not allowed to employ anyone between the age of 18 and 69, whilst others said in places where there was plenty of work about they could not get lodgings. He was also told that people did not give to casuals as they used to do, and so they were obliged to enter the casual wards. From personal observation, there were very few of the men whom any farmer would employ, if their work in the garden was any criterion of their ability. The majority could not, or would not, handle a spade properly. To his mind there were only two bona fide working men in the whole lot. Rugby had held the record of having the lowest number of tramps in any institution in Warwickshire for the last two years, and he did not wish to have that record spoilt, so went carefully into the reason for the increase.—The Chairman said one reason for the increase might be that as the weather was now getting warmer and food was being rationed, some of the casuals thought they would look outside, and so were roaming about.

Mr Rowbottom said he was glad to hear the public had stopped giving to the tramps, which was the object of the work of the Vagrancy Committee. There was a reduction of 7,400 in the number of tramps in the county last year, and during the past three months the decrease had been 2,518. Last quarter Rugby lost its position in regard to the number of tramps passing through the wards. The Master said he had been rather worried about the increased number of tramps, as for the past four years they had been comparatively free at Rugby, and he wanted to know the reason why the numbers had so much increased.—Mr Eaton suggested that the Board should communicate with the manager of the Labour Exchange, or should send the tramps there to inquire for work.—The Master said he had watched the men working in the garden closely, and he did not think any farmer in the district would give such men the minimum wage, because they were not worth it, if their work in the garden was any criterion. One man of 60 told him he had never touched a spade in his life before, to which he (the Master) replied that he ought to to ashamed to himself.

RUGBY PETTY SESSIONS.
A WARNING.—Fredk Louch, blacksmith, 25 Russell Street, Rugby, was summoned for failing to deliver to the Recruiting Officer at Rugby a statement of all male persons of 16 years of age or over employed by him contrary to the Defence of the Realm Act.—Defendant admitted the offence ; and Lieut Wratislaw, for the Military, stated that in the middle of March Major Neilson went to defendant’s premises, and saw there the old Form DR17, setting out a list of his male employees between the ages of 18 and 41. Major Neilson asked defendant if he had sent a copy to the Recruiting Officer in accordance with the directions, and he replied in the negative. Major Neilson also pointed out that the form was obsolete, and a new form had been issued. He informed him that he must make out this new form, and send a copy to the Recruiting Officer. On March 21st Louch was again before the Appeal Tribunal in respect of his son, and he was then asked about sending in the form, and was reminded that he must do so. On April 21st Insp Lines visited defendant, and asked why the form had not been sent in ; and defendant replied that he was not aware that he had been warned. This case was taken to make it public that these forms had to be prepared and sent in, and defendant was selected because he had been warned, and had then refused to comply.—Defendant did not admit that he was warned ; at least, he said he did not understand that this was so. Major Neilson, assistant recruiting officer, having given evidence in support of Mr Wratislaw’s statement, the latter said the penalty was six months’ imprisonment or a fine of £100 ; but they did not wish to press the case, except that he neglected to send the form in after he had been warned.—Insp Lines also gave evidence.—The Chairman said the Bench would take a lenient view of the case, because the Military did not wish to press it, but it must be made perfectly clear that these forms had to be sent in. Recruits could not be called upon unless this was done, and there was now an urgent need for men. If employers neglected to do this it was a serious matter.—He would be fined 15s, including costs.

ALLEDGED THEFT BY A SOLDIER.—Wm. Warne, gunner, R.G.A, Portsmouth, was charged with stealing from a box in bedroom in a house at Clifton, between 2 p.m on April 14th and 6 p.m on April 24th, six £1 Treasury notes, £5 in gold, and £6 14s in silver, the property of Edith Rollin, Clifton.—Defendant pleaded not guilty.— Prosecutrix stated that she lived at Clifton with her mother, and on April 14th she had £31 in a box in her bedroom. At 6.30 p.m on April 24th she went to the box to get some money, and she then found that £17 had gone. She had known defendant since October, when he was billeted at Clifton. He visited her house frequently, and he had heard her mother say that she had some money. One Saturday night she changed some gold for him, and defendant then saw one of the boxes where she kept her money. At six o’clock on April 16th, when she came home, she saw defendant in the house, and she understood that he had been there since four o’clock. On Wednesday, April 18th, she and defendant were at a friend’s, and defendant informed her that he had no money, and did not know when he would have any.-Cross-examined, witness admitted that her cousin stole 5s from her five weeks ago, but a fortnight ago the money, in respect of which this charge was taken, was quite safe.—Mrs Rollins stated that on April 16th defendant visited her house, and asked her to post a letter for him. She did so, and left him alone for ten minutes. On another occasion she left Warne alone while she went to fetch some water.-Lilian Holman stated that on April 15th defendant informed her that he had no money.—Detective Mighall said he arrested defendant as an absentee, and informed him that he was enquiring about the money. Defendant denied all knowledge of it, but on searching him witness found he had £4 in notes in a book and a receipt for £1 16s which he had sent to a tailor.—In defence, Warne said he had had money in his possession ever since he had been in the district. He did not tell the previous witnesses that he had no money. He brought the £4 from camp. Some of this was what he had saved from his Army pay, and the other represented his winnings at cards.—Violet . Rose Cashmore said when defendant came into the district early in April he informed her that he had some money. She had been keeping company with him, but had never seen him with any money.—The Chairman said the Bench felt that there was a very strong suspicion against him but for lack of evidence the case would be dismissed.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Corpl L G Archer, K.R.R, of 13 Bennett Street, and an old St Matthew’s boy, was wounded in the big advance, and his arm has been amputated.

2nd Lieut. J P Angell, R.F.C, eldest son of Mr and Mrs J Angell, 166 Lawford Road, has been awarded the French Military Medal for Distinguished Service while he was Sergt. Major, and has received congratulations from His Majesty the King. Mr Angell has two other sons serving with the Colours.

THE LATE LIEUT AUBREY CHAPLIN.

Mrs Chaplin. “ The Firs,” Bilton Road, Rugby, has received the following telegraphic message from the Keeper of the Privy Purse in reference to the death of her son, who was killed on April 8th :—“ The King and Queen deeply regret the loss you and the Army have sustained by the death of your son in the service of his country. Their Majesties truly sympathise with you in your sorrow.”

LOCAL CASUALTIES.

Pte F Heath, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, is in hospital at Gloucester suffering from several wounds and shell shock.

Pte Charles Batchelor, of the Royal Warwicks, whose parents live at Addison Terrace, Bilton, was killed in action on April 11th. He was 19 years of age and had only joined up about four months. He was formerly in the Turbine Department at the B.T.H., and was an active member of the Bilton Working Men’s Club, and the Cricket Club.

Trooper E J Reeve, of the Warwickshire Yeomanry, son of Mr A H Reeve of North Street, Rugby, has been wounded.

Mr S Neeves of Murray Road has received official intimation that his son, Captain H H Neeves, of the Northumberland Fusiliers, has been admitted to Hospital with gun shot wounds in left shoulder.

PTE ALFRED SHORNEY.

Another member of Murray School, Pte Alfred Shorney, died of wounds received in action on April 10th. Pte Shorney was a grandson of the late Mrs Hillgrove, of the Squirrel Inn.

RIFLEMAN M BURTON.

Rifleman Montague Burton, K.R.R, son of Mr and Mrs E T Burton, 35 Avenue Road, New Bilton, was killed in action on April 10th. Rifleman Burton was educated at St Matthew’s School, and was afterwards employed at the B.T.H Works. He enlisted at the outbreak of the War, and was sent to the front in 1915. Last year he was wounded and invalided home, where he remained for several months, and since his return to France he has been through much severe fighting.

BROADWELL.

KILLED IN ACTION.—On Tuesday Mrs Walter Green received official intimation that her husband of the Royal Warwicks had been killed in action. Deceased was the youngest son of Mr Henry Green, and leaves one child.

DEATHS.

BATCHELOR.-In loving memory of Lance-Corpl. C. BATCHELOR, of 7 Addison Terrace, Old Bilton, who was killed is action in France on April 11, 1917.
“ Sleep on, dear brother, in a far-off grave :
A grave we may never see ;
But as long as life and memory last
We will remember thee.”
—From FATHER and MOTHER, SISTERS and BROTHERS.

BOLTON.—Pte. R. F. BOLTON, 8th Canadian Battalion, son of Mr. and Mrs. R. H. Bolton, Staverton, officially reported killed in action on April 2nd ; aged 24.

BURTON.—Rifleman M. Burton, K.R.R.C, dearly beloved and only son of Mrs. E. T. Burton and of the late E. T. Burton, of 35 Avenue Road, New Bilton, killed in action in France on April 10, 1917.— Deeply mourned by his MOTHER and SISTER.

COLEMAN.—Killed in action on April 10th, at France, Lance-Corpl. G. B. COLEMAN, the dearly beloved son of Thomas and Sarah Coles, Binley ; aged 23 years.
“ Had we but one last fond look
Into his loving face,
Or had we only got the chance
To kneel down in his place,
To hold your head, our own dear son,
While life’s blood ebbed away,
Our hearts would not have felt so much
The tears we shed to-day.
So ready to answer the call to the brave,
Although you now rest in a far distant grave.
More or better could any man give
Than die for his country that others might live.”

CLEAVER.—On April 24th, in France, WILLIAM THOMAS CLEAVER, eldest son of Joseph Cleaver, of 17 East Street, Rugby ; aged 31.
“ Somewhere in France there is a nameless grave,
Where sleeps our loved one among the brave ;
One of the rank and file, he heard the call,
And for the land he loved he gave his all.”

COX.—On April 20th (died of wounds in Palestine), FREDERICK WILLIAM, Corporal in the Warwickshire Yeomanry, aged 23 years ; second son of Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Cox, of Lodge Farm, Lawford Road, Rugby.

GOODYER.—Died in France on April 4th of wounds received in action, MAURICE EDGAR, eldest son of Mr and Mrs. Goodyer, The Gardens, Long Itchington, aged 20 years.

LIDDINGTON.—Died in hospital in France on April 26th from wounds received in action, WALLACE, second son of F. W. and Kate Liddington ; aged 31.

SCOTTON.—On April 9th (on active service), FRANK SCOTTON, third son of Theophilus Scotton ; aged 25.

SHORNEY.—Died in France on April 10th of wounds received in action, ALFRED, the second and dearly beloved son of Mrs Shorney, Rose and Crown, Basingstoke.

IN MEMORIAM.

DEMPSEY.—In loving memory of Sergt. P. DEMPSEY, K.O.S.R, who died of wounds in France on April 30, 1916.

STEBBING.—In affectionate remembrance of SYDNEY REGINALD, our dearly beloved son, who died of wounds in France on 4th May, 1915. Buried in Hazebrouck Cemetery.
“ In health and strength he left his home
To fight in lands afar ;
But it pleased the Lord to bid him come,
And before His throne appear.”
—From his still sorrowing FATHER, MOTHER, SISTERS & BROTHERS.

Batchelor, Ernest Andrew. Died 24th Oct 1916

Ernest Andrew Batchelor was born in 1887 and baptised in October 1887 at St Andrews Church in Rugby.

At the time he lived at 13 Chapel Street Rugby. He was the son of Andrew Batchelor who was born in 1855 in Rugby and died in 1931 in Rugby, and Elizabeth Batchelor (nee Quinney) born 1856 and died 1938 in Rugby. Andrew Batchelor was a labourer.

In 1891 the family still lived at 13 Chapel Street, and Ernest lived there with his parents and his sisters Lucy and Frances and brothers William, Albert and Arthur.

In 1901 the family had moved to 2 Little Elborow Street and he now had two more brothers Walter and Frank and two more sisters Ethel and Fanny. Later his parents moved to 35 Worcester Street. He attended St Matthews School in Rugby and later worked at a firm in Birmingham.

Ernest enlisted in the First World War at Birmingham and served as Private No 18519 in the 10th Battalion of the Worcestershire Regiment. The 10th Battalion was formed in Worcester in September 1914 as K2 and came under the orders of the 57th Brigade in the 19th `Western Division. They landed in France on 18th July 1915

He enlisted originally on 26th August 1907 but discharged due to sickness on 30th December 1914. He later rejoined the Regiment and served in France & Flanders. During 1916 the Regiment fought in various battles, the Battle of Albert, the attacks of High Wood, the Battle of Pozieres Ridge and the Battle of Ancre Heights. Ernest died on 24tlr October 1916 in the Battle of Morval during the Battle of the Somme, and his body was not recovered. He is commemorated on Pier & Face 5A and 6C of Thiepval Memorial.

An officer of the Regiment wrote to Ernest’s parents that – “He was one of our best bombers, and always cheerful and good-hearted”.

At least three of his brothers enlisted to fight in the First World War. Frank Batchelor, born 1893, enlisted in 1911 in the Royal Warwickshire Regiment and served in the war from 4th October 1914 and discharged 6th February 1920. During 1911 two other brothers, Arthur Batchelor and Walter Batchelor enlisted in the Royal Warwickshire Regiment

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HM

19th Jun 1915. A Local Artilleryman’s Exeriences

A LOCAL ARTILLERYMAN’S EXPERIENCES.

Corpl F Prestidge, of the R.F.A, has written a very interesting letter to his sister at Thurlaston, in which he says:—“ I have a bit of interesting news for you this time, as three days before I received your parcel we were shelled out of our billet in — Only one was hit, and that was the sergeant-major, who is in England now ; but the poor horses caught it severely. We had half of them inside a yard and half at the back of some houses in the open ground. Strange to say, those in the semi-covered position caught it hot, and those outside were practically unhurt. We all slept in a factory about 200 yards away, and at about five o’clock in the morning we were roused by hearing shells bursting close to, and as they seemed to get nearer, of course, we rushed out and made for the horses. I made for the yard where my horses were picketted, and what a sight I saw. A shell had burst just behind my horses, which were tied to a picketing rope round the wall. Some of the poor things had broken loose, and lay about the yard with legs broken and all sorts of wounds. I went off and got my sub-section together, and in a very short time we had all that could walk away at a safe distance, but of the 27 in my sub-section five were dead and twelve were wounded. It will show how curious is the bursting of a shell when I tell you that my gun team were all standing together, and both the leaders were killed, while the ‘ centres’ were only slightly wounded, and the wheelers were scarcely touched, although the shell burst directly behind the team I suppose if it had happened half-an-hour later I should not be writing this now, as we should all have been with the horses, getting ready for exercise.”

A DAY’S WORK OF THE HOWITZER BATTERY.

A bombardier in the Rugby Howitzer Battery sends home an account of a day’s work in action :—“ Two mines under the German trenches were successfully exploded ; rifle, machine gun, and artillery fire was opened on the German trenches, immediately the explosion took place. The mountain guns swept the ground behind the crater at a range of 150 to 300 yards. For some time after the explosion nothing could be observed owing to the heavy cloud of dust and smoke. When the atmosphere had cleared it was seen that the north-west corner of the parapet for quite 30 yards was completely demolished. The firing of the Howitzers was particularly effective. They obtained six direct hits on the enemy’s near parapets, and placed the remaining rounds into the trenches. Almost immediately after the explosion the enemy replied with rifle grenades from their trenches, and at 10.26 a.m their guns opened upon — Our Howitzers fired 10 rounds on the enemy’s communication trenches, five of which dropped in the trenches. The enemy retaliated by shelling with ‘Black Marias’ and ‘White Hopes.’ Working parties of the enemy appeared, and were constantly driven to shelter by our machine guns and artillery fire, but the mounds of earth thrown up by the explosion afforded them a good deal of cover, and rendered observation and effective machine gun fire somewhat difficult. During the afternoon our artillery fired intermittently at enemy’s working parties. A forward observing officer reported that one large working party was completely exterminated by a shell from the Howitzer Battery.”

RUGBY MAGISTERIAL.

THURSDAY.—Before T Hunter, Esq.

ABSENT WITHOUT LEAVE.—Jack McCarthy was charged with being absent without leave from the 2nd Battalion of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment, stationed at Colchester.-Detective Mighall said he received information that defendant came to Rugby in uniform, but was afterwards seen about in civilian clothes. Witness spoke to him on the previous day, and he admitted being absent from his regiment without leave, so he was taken into custody.-Superindent Clarke said he had received a wire stating that an escort would arrive that day.- Defendant was remanded in custody to await the escort, was given permission by the Magistrate to resume his regimentals.

ABSENT WITHOUT LEAVE.—Pte J Batchelor, of the 7th Royal Warwickshire Regiment (T.F.), residing at 7 Union Street, Rugby, was charged at Rugby Police Court, on Friday, before T Hunter, Esq, with being absent without leave from the depot, Rugby Drill Hall.-Detective Mighall gave evidence of arrest and after Supt Clarke had read a letter from the Officer commanding ordering his arrest, defendant, who belongs to the Company acting bridge-guard in the town, was remanded to await an escort.

RECRUITING AT RUGBY.

Recruiting at Rugby has been rather slacker this week. The following have been attested:- E R Earle, A.S.C(M.T) ; E H Paget. W Abbott, F Morrey, E J Robinson, G A Carse, W Green, and J E Wright, Rugby Forties Co (R.E) ; R Parker, F S Hooker, R.W.R ; J Allen, Army Veterinary Corps ; J L Jeffrey, R.A.M.C ; S Toon, Dorset Regiment ; W C F Alsop, Signal Co Royal Engineers ; and A L Lloyd, Army Pay Corps.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

The Rev H E Stevens, formerly a curate at the Parish Church, Rugby, and afterwards vicar of St Oswald’s, New Bilton, is serving as a chaplain in the Navy.

The Rev A R Whatmore, formerly of Rugby, who has been engaged in the theatrical profession for some time, has offered his services and been accepted in the work of making shells and ammunition. Mr Whatmore could not join the army through his inability to pass the doctor.

Mr P J James, who, when in Rugby a few years ago was a prominent member of the Rugby Cricket Club, and since going out to Adelaide played regularly for South Australia as a fast bowler, has recently arrived in England to enlist in the army. He joined the 9th Service Battalion of the Lincolnshire Regiment as a second lieutenant, and is quartered at Grimsby. Previous to that he did some training at Sevenoaks, Kent.

Last week Mrs C Hyde, of 2 Rokeby Street, Rugby, received news that her son, Second-Lieut H W Hyde, of the 3rd Royal Sussex Regiment, attached to the 2nd Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, who, as we reported recently, has been missing since May 15th, was prisoner of war in Germany. Unfortunately, however, later information was to the effect that an error had been made, and that no definite news of Lieut Hyde was forthcoming, although a brother officer has written stating that he believes he was killed during the heavy fighting about May 15th.

No less than seventy-seven men from the parish of Bulkington are serving with the colours, and almost every family in the village is represented.

NEWBOLD-ON-AVON.

REPORTED MISSING.—Mr G Grant, Newbold, has received a notification from the War Office that his son, Harry, has been reported missing from the 9th of May, He belonged to the Rifle Brigade, and joined at the commencement of the war. Mr Grant has two other sons who joined at the same time, one of them being wounded some time ago, and is still in hospital.

RUGBY FOOTBALLER RECEIVES A COMMISSION.

Job Greenwood, son of the late Mr W Greenwood, schoolmaster of Newbold-on-Avon, who was acting as Pay Sergeant to D Company of the 2/7 R.W.R, stationed at Colchester, has received a commission in the 8th Service Battalion of the Northampton Regiment, He leaves for Pembroke on Monday, in order to take a course of instruction for officers. It will be remembered that Joe Greenwood played football both for Rugby and Newbold.

CORPL POTTERTON PROMOTED.

Corpl Potterton, of the 2nd battalion Rifle Brigade, whose home is at 32 Regent Street, Rugby, was promoted on June 2nd to the rank of Sergeant, whilst serving at the front. Sergt Potterton was formerly employed at the B.T.H Works, where he was prominently associated with the Athletic Club, and the news of his promotion will be received with pleasure by all who knew him.

TWELVE WOUNDS AT ONE TIME.

Mrs G Colledge, of Brinklow, received a letter from her son, Pte Phil Colledge, of the Royal Welsh Fusilers, who has been twice wounded, and is now in hospital at Liverpool. Mrs Colledge has three sons serving. Pte Colledge writes:-“ Dear Mother,—You will see by this letter that the Germans have been touching me up a bit. I had twelve wounds, but none were very bad, only my legs ache so much. I had five in my legs and thighs, three in my arms, one in my chest, one in my face, and two little ones in my back.

NEW BILTON SAILOR SAVED FROM H.M.S MAJESTIC.

Amongst the survivors of H.M.S Majestic was Mr W H Cranch, a gun layer, whose home is at 37 New Street, New Bilton. Mr Cranch, who is in the Royal Fleet Reserve, is at present on a short visit his wife and family, who are naturally overjoyed at his providential escape. Seen by a representative of the Rugby Advertiser on Thursday, Mr Cranch stated that his ship was struck on the port side by a torpedo at ten minutes to seven on the morning of May 27th. A loud explosion immediately occurred, and the rush of water caused the old battleship to heel over at an angle of 45 degrees, and within two minutes she was completely bottom upwards. The sea was dotted with hundreds of sailors swimming for their lives. Fortunately a number of French trawlers, which had been engaged in transport work, were close to the scene, and the large majority of the men were quickly taken on board these ; while others were rescued from wreckage or swam ashore to the Seddul Bahr Beach. Mr Cranch was fortunately picked up by a French tug, and taken on board a French destroyer, which subsequently proceeded to Lemnos. The rescue work was carried out very expeditiously, and the longest period anyone was in the water was about 20 minutes. The Majestic had been engaged in the task of forcing the Dardanelles from the commencement, and Mr Cranch stated that she was struck by shells—which did little damage—on numerous occasions. She was one of the ships that covered the splendid landing of the Colonial troops at Gaba Tepe, and at the time that she was torpedoed she was flying the Admiral’s flag, which had been transferred from the Triumph, sunk two days earlier.

THE RUGBY FORTRESS COMPANY OF ROYAL ENGINEERS.

It is gratifying to learn that this Company is now almost at full strength, 88 having been enrolled to date. Several tradesmen, four blacksmiths, four masons, and one wheelwright, are still required, however ; and it is advisable that anyone wishing to join the Company should do so at once, because the men now enrolled are making excellent progress, and any not joining now may run the risk of being left behind when the Company leaves Rugby.

BELGIAN REFUGEES.

The Chairman of the Belgian Refugee Committee reported, amongst other things, as follows:

Acting on the recommendation of the War Relief Committee, we, the Central Refugee Committee for Warwickshire, have appointed the following representatives in the Petty Sessional Divisions of the county and co-opted them members of our committee : Father Ryan for Alcester, Mr Sale for Atherstone, Lady Catherine Berkeley for Brailes, the Rev J A Watson for Burton Dassett, Colonel Monckton for Coleshill, Mr Bolding for Henley-in-Arden, Mr van den Arend for Rugby, Mr Lattey for Southam, and Mr Ashfield for Stratford. Miss Leigh, one of the original members of our committee, acts for us in Kenilworth. We also engaged the services of a Belgian interpreter, Mons Laurent. This gentleman met by appointment our local representative, and with them visited the refugees in their homes, taking down on printed forms their occupations and wages in this country and their former employment in Belgium, and bringing reports to us of any cases where either the refugees or those looking after them wished for our assistance or advice. Upwards of 50 towns and villages were visited in this way, representing 648 Belgians, and we have been able in many cases to advise and make suggestions for the benefit of the parties concerned. As a case in point, we discovered a man in South Warwickshire who had been without work for six months. We removed him and his wife to Warwick and he is now employed at the Emscote Mills. The Government Belgian Commission with a view to ascertaining the feasibility of starting large workshops in each county for securing suitable employment for the Belgians, requested us to fill up a tabulated form, showing the occupations of the Belgians in their own country and also stating whether they were employed here. The result showed that except in the case of moulders and fitters, of whom we have 33 (all working in Rugby) there were not sufficient numbers engaged in any one trade to warrant the setting up of workshops in this area.

The Commission then asked us to let them have particulars of all the unemployed men in our district; these we returned as 45, mainly consisting of professional men or those incapacitated from work. Of those employed besides the moulders and fitters there are 28 engaged on farm work, 15 in gardens, 16 in motor works, 13 it the Ordnance works, 7 as domestic servants, and the rest as clerks, teachers, carpenters, tailors, and tanners. We have just received a list of fresh arrivals from the police, numbering 87, mainly fitters and moulders who are working at Rugby.

The actual number of Belgians now under our supervision—not including the 87 new arrivals just mentioned, is 801. There are also 27 nuns and 24 independent Belgians.

As regards the local work done by our committee, we have 21 refugees of the artisan class at the Myton Hostel, the men being employed at the Emscote Mills, where they get good wages, one-third of which they pay towards their maintenance. We have had the same family at the Nelson House for five months ; the man has been apprenticed at a motor works, and we hope soon to get him a job.

A very generous gift of frozen meats and dry goods has been received from Australia through the Sidney Consignments Committee for distribution among our local refugees.

On the whole I am able to report that the condition of the refugees in the committee’s area is satisfactory, no cases of neglect have come under our notice, and they are much more contented than they were at first owing to suitable employment having been found for so many.

27th Mar 1915. Rugby Volunteer Training Corps

RUGBY VOLUNTEER TRAINING CORPS.

TWO DIFFICULTIES ELUCIDATED.

The present membership of the Volunteer Training Corps for Rugby is 235, More would, no doubt, have joined but for two points on which there has recently been information given of value to those interested in the movement. In the first place, men have been deterred from joining owing to the impression that they were not likely to be asked to perform any serious duties. With regard to this objection, we may state that the War Office has recently enquired from the Central Association of Volunteer Training Corps if the members of the various corps would do local patrol work, and how many men would be able to go away to undertake similar duties elsewhere. Further, that War Office has asked how many men would be able to go away for service in other parts of England in the event of invasion. Lord Crewe has expressed the hope that those corps would become a permanent organisation when the war is over, so that it may now be taken for granted that the value of such corps is recognised, and that those in authority are anxious to know what the members are able to do.

Another difficulty had been the declaration members are expected to sign. On this point Mr B B Cubitt, assistant secretary to the War Office, has written as follows respecting the declaration :—

“ This undertaking is not a mere formality, and the man signing it is expected to fulfil his obligation. If a man who may be called upon is not in a position to fulfil his engagement he can leave the corps.”

Mr Tennant, speaking in the House of Commons on March 1st, said : “ In cases where good and sufficient reasons are not shown a man ought not to be allowed to take the lesser obligation when he ought to fulfil the greater obligation of serving with the colours.” As to their powers, Mr Tennant pointed out that they could only use the power of persuasion. He also expressed appreciation of the self-sacrifice of the men who had joined the corps.

Col H R Vaughan, writing from the War Office on the question of railway men, points out that a railway employee, even if he joined a corps, could not be asked to join the Army unless he had the permission from his employers to go. There can be no doubt that the same condition applies equally to men who are engaged in Government contract work.

A County Committee for Warwickshire has now been formed by the Lord-Lieutenant and Col Wyley, of Coventry, has been appointed County Commandant.

ORDERS FOR NEXT WEEK.

RUGBY VOLUNTEER TRAINING CORPS.

“A” Company.

Till further notice.—No. 1 Platoon : Outdoor drill, Wednesdays (fall-in top Barby Road, town end), 8 0 p.m. Big School, Fridays (except Good Friday), 8.0 p.m.—No. 2 Platoon : Outdoor Tuesdays (fall-in top Murray Road, 7.30 p.m. ; Drill Hall, Thursdays, 8.0 p.m.- No. 3 Platoon : Outdoor Wednesdays and one other day as arranged.—No. 4 Platoon : Outdoor, Tuesdays (fall-in top Murray Road), 7.30 p.m ; Drill Hall, Fridays, 8.0 p.m.

Saturdays, fall-in 2.30 p.m top of Barby Road.

Shooting Range is open at Drill Hall, 7.30 to 9.30, every week-day except Saturday.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Seventy members of the Rugby Conservative Club are at present serving with the colours in various capacities.

It is estimated that the extra money put into circulation in Rugby during the stay of the soldiers was about £8,000 per week—probably more.

The 7th Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment, which includes the Rugby Infantry Company, left Essex this week, presumably for foreign service.

Harold Loverock, second son of Mr Lewis Loverock, who has been in South Africa for the past three years, has joined the Natal Light Horse, and is at the Front in German South-West Africa.

Maurice Howkins, son of Mr W Howkins, of Hillmorton Grounds, who recently received a commission as second lieutenant in the 1st London Brigade Royal Field Artillery, has now been gazetted second lieutenant in the Royal Horse Artillery.

A son of Mrs Wheeler, of 135 Abbey Street, has been promoted to the rank of sergeant in the Oxon and Bucks Light Infantry (Cycling Section). He is at present at Bradford-on-Avon, Wilts. Mrs Wheeler has three sons serving their country—two in the Royal Warwicks and one in the Oxon and Bucks Light Infantry. The latter has served 7 1/2 years in Africa.

Pte Alfred Hawkins, of the Northamptonshire Regiment, son of Mr A Hawkins, of Harborough Magna, was wounded in the arm by shrapnel on March 11th, and is at present in a hospital at Rouen. His parents received a letter on Thursday, stating that he was progressing favourably.

Lce-Corpl G A Barrett, of the 5th Rifle Brigade, an old St Matthew’s boy, who, as stated in the Advertiser last week, had been wounded, is at present in a hospital in England. We understand that he has been seriously wounded in the lungs, and some time will necessarily elapse before he makes a complete recovery. His father, Mr F T Barrett, of 17 Stephen Street, visited him last Saturday, and Lce-Corpl Barratt has since, written a very cheerful postcard. Lce-Corpl Barrett, who formerly worked for Messrs Frost, joined the army on the outbreak of the war, and had only been at the front a short time before he was wounded. A rumour gained currency during the week that he had succumbed to his wounds, but this, happily, proved to be untrue.

Pte Albert Batchelor, of the 2nd Royal Warwickshire Regiment, son of Mr and Mrs B Batchelor, of 34 Arnold Street, Rugby, is again an inmate suffering from wounds received at the Front. On Saturday, March 6th, he was wounded at 10.30 a.m, and lay 8 1/2 hours before receiving attention. He is now at the Sailors’ Rest, Ramsgate. Pte Batchelor, who is an old St Matthew’s boy, was previously incapacitated in October with a bullet wound in the neck and shrapnel in the knee. His brother Oscar is a despatch rider in Lord Kitchener’s Army.

Lce-Corpl Sidney Hubert Hadfield, 1st King’s Royal Rifles (third son of Mr J Hadfield, of 4 Charlotte Street, Rugby), who was seriously wounded in the right leg, by shrapnel near Mons at the commencement of the war, has arrived home for a short time. The unfortunate young fellow, who is only 26 years of age, has been in a London Hospital for the past six months, but, despite the best of attention, it is feared that he is doomed to be a cripple for life. His general health has also been adversely affected, and he has been sent home to effect, if possible, an improvement in this before undergoing an operation. He has served eight years in the army.

WAR CASUALTIES.

Regret will be felt in Rugby by many people to learn of the death of Sapper Ernest Lawrence Manton, of the East Anglican Royal Engineers. A native of Bedford, Sapper Manton, whose age was 24, was employed for a time at the B.T.H Works. He then took a situation in Coventry, though still residing in Rugby, journeying to business each morning. He was also engaged to be married to a Rugby lady, with whom much sympathy will be felt. The last letter received from him stated that he expected to take part in a big battle next day, and it was probably in the fighting at Neuve Chapelle that he was killed.

Sapper Manton was a member of Bilton Football Club, for whom he kept goal. During last summer he won first prize in a billiard handicap at the Regent Street Billiard Rooms, and for several months was a member of St Matthew’s Church Choir.

From a Bedford contemporary we learn that deceased was the younger of two brothers who were in the Royal Engineers. He had been in the Bedford Engineers for four years, and has resigned, but on the outbreak of the war he rejoined his old regiment, and went to the Front with the 1st Company. His mother received a letter from Second-Lieut O H Keeling, of the E.A.R.E, stating that her son was killed in action on March 10th. “ He was in my section,” the officer continued, “ and in him the section has lost one of the best of its men. I have heard something of the sacrifice he made when volunteering in August. He was always so cheery and ready to do his duty. Only last week he struck me particularly in this respect, when he was working in mud and water up to his knees—working at draining a trench that others might walk dry shod in it. Please let me offer my sincere sympathy to you in your great loss, but I hope your sorrow may be in some way lessened by the thought that he died for his country.”

RECRUITING AT RUGBY.

There has been a marked improvement in recruiting at Rugby during the past week, and 16 men have been attested. Suitable men are now required to be trained for non-commissioned officers in the 13th R.W.R ; and wheelwrights, shoeingsmiths, and saddlers are also wanted. Those who have enlisted this week are: Cavalry, S Dyson ; R.E, H Baines ; A S.C, H J Rowe, T Burns, R J Reaves, and H S Jude ; R.F.A, W G Fuller, J Cox and W Cox ; Northants, E Smith and G Southern ; 13th Gloucesters, W Moore ; Middlesex, A Page, R Philpott, and W A Walker ; Royal Welsh Fusiliers, W E Bennett.

REJECTED AT LEICESTER, ACCEPTED AT RUGBY.

The “ Leicester Daily Post ” for Wednesday remarks, with reference to the slackness in recruiting in that city, that it is stated that in Leicester and Leicestershire there have been a larger proportion of rejects than in other adjoining areas for medical reasons which to the would-be soldiers did not seem quite sufficient, and that from the beginning of the war up till now many men unable to enlist there have been accepted at Rugby.