29th Dec 1917. Suggested Rationing Scheme for Rugby

SUGGESTED RATIONING SCHEME FOR RUGBY.

At a meeting of the Rugby Urban Food Control Committee on Thursday evening a sub-committee was appointed to formulate a rationing scheme for butter, margarine, lard, bacon, and cheese for the Urban and Rural Districts.

MARGARINE COMMANDEERED.

The Rugby Food Control Committee did not wait long before putting their new powers, enabling them to commandeer supplies of margarine, into force. The margarine queues on Friday and Saturday last were longer than ever, and there was every indication that similar scenes would experienced on Christmas Eve. Mr F M Burton, the Executive officer, however, ascertained that one of the multiple shops was expecting a consignment of four tons of margarine, and he immediately commandeered one and a-half tons, and distributed it among other grocers in the town. A notice to this effect was displayed in the window of the shop affected, and the police promptly broke up all attempts to form a queue. The action of the committee and the executive officer was greatly appreciated by many people, who were thus enabled to do their shopping with a degree of comfort which has been lacking for the past two months.

THE COLLECTION OF WASTE PAPER.

A meeting of the Rugby Waste Paper Committee was held on Thursday last week, Mr J J McKinnell, J.P, C.C, presiding. A grant of £10 was made to the Rugby Town Red Cross effort, and it was decided that at the next meeting the claims of the Prisoners of War Fund should have first consideration.—The Hon Secretary (Mr J Reginald Barker) reported that there had lately been an encouraging increase in the amount of waste paper collected by the boys of Elborow School and Murray School.—Mr McKinnell said that the Local Government Board had again urged the local authorities to collect all waste paper. Mr Barker had arranged to have every description of waste paper sorted and graded and sent to the paper mills for re-pulping, obtaining for the committee the maximum amount under the Government schedule of prices. They had, therefore, been able to devote considerable sums to local charities, and, in addition to the grant made at that meeting, had rendered substantial assistance to the Hospital of St Cross, St John’s Ambulance Brigade, the Hamilton Home, and the District Nursing Society. There were, however, other deserving objects which were in need of funds, and he trusted all who had waste paper of any kind would drop a postcard to Mr W T Simmonds, of Elborow School, or Mr W T Coles Hodges, of Murray School.

RAILWAY BOOKINGS.

During the days immediately preceding Christmas there was the usual exodus of workers from the town, and the number of travellers was well in excess of last year, when the Government’s exhortation to the people to avoid unnecessary travelling was loyally observed. At the L & N-W Railway Station bookings were very heavy to all parts of the United Kingdom ; and the Great Central Authorities also experienced exceptionally busy times. The majority of people travelling were munition workers and their families, and of the number of visitors to the town a large portion were soldiers home on leave.

CHRISTMAS ARRANGEMENTS AT THE POST OFFICE.

Owing to the scarcity of foodstuffs, the number of parcels despatched to the troops this year from the Rugby Post Office was not so large as usual ; but, nevertheless, during the busiest nights preceding December 14th—the last date for sending such parcels—as many as 80 odd mail sacks were sent off one night. There was, however, an enormous increase in the number of registered letters and small parcels of comforts. The labour question proved a great difficulty this year; but with the assistance of 28 extra postwomen and sorters and about a dozen spare-time workers, the rush was successfully dealt with. To relieve the counter pressure the Army allowances, amounting to over £1,000, were paid out for two weeks during the week preceding Christmas. On Saturday, Sunday, and Monday the counter staff was kept abnormally busy, and on Christmas Eve the number of parcels delivered in the town was unusually large, vis. 1,500 ; while the number on Christmas Day was 700. There was a falling-off this year in the number mainly confined to the residential quarters. In the working-class districts of the town the numbers were as large as ever.

Another unusual feature was the small quantity of poultry passing through the post, the customary ducks and geese giving places to more homely, but nowadays none the less welcome; piece of bacon.

For four days preceding Christmas the country mail motor vans were forced to make double journeys ; and although these ran rather late on several of the heaviest mornings, the times compared well with previous years.

SUNDAY POSTAL DELIVERY IN RUGBY.

To the Editor of the Advertiser

SIR,—Would it not be possible for Rugby to forego its delivery of letters on the Lord’s Day ? When we see so many women on the rounds we all know what it must mean in those homes, and they surely need their Sabbath rest as much as we do. In asking this I do not mean to ask that their pay shall be stopped for that day’s work, but that they should receive the same wage as now, and that we should forego our letters on that day.

London and many other large cities do without Sunday delivery, and so I think we should do the same. I believe it can only done by a resolution passed by the District Council. Will not some member propose such a resolution ? I believe he would find the whole Council ready to support him, and I am quite sure he would have the great majority of the townsmen with him. It is too much for a man to work seven days a week. What must it mean to these women ?—Believe me, sir, yours faithfully,

CYRIL T ASTON,
Vicar St Matthew’s Church.
St Matthew’s Vicarage, Rugby, Dec 24, 1917.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Dennis Over, youngest son of Mr Samuel Over, has passed out fifth in his company from the Royal Military College, Sandhurst, and has been gazetted to a commission in the Regular Army in the Royal Warwickshire Regiment.

Mr & Mrs C F Everett, 42 Claremont Road, have received news that their eldest son, Lance-Corpl Fredk Stanley Everett, of the Motor Transport, died from disease in the base hospital at Basra, Mesopotamia, on Sunday, December 16th. He was 21 years of age, and an Old Murrayian. Prior to joining the Army in January, 1916, he was employed as a goods clerk by the L & N-W Railway Company at Berkswell and Hampton. He was at one time a teacher in the Murray Sunday School and secretary of St Andrew’s Guild Cricket Club. He was also a member of St Peter’s Church Choir, and after the service on Sunday evening the “ Dead March ” in Saul was played to honour his memory.

MENTIONED DESPATCHES.

In Sir Douglas Haig’s despatches of November 7th appears the name of Sergt A W Hughes, Royal Engineers. Sergt Hughes was formerly employed at the B.T.H, and has been on the Western Front 2½ years. In July last he was the recipient of a “ card of recognition ” from the General commanding the Division for distinguished conduct.

ANOTHER ADDITION TO THE RUGBY PRISONERS OF WAR LIST.

Another prisoner of war has been added to the list of the Rugby Prisoners of War Committee, viz, Lance-Corpl W H Roberts, 2nd Machine Gun Company, who is interned at Lechfeld, Bavaria. This man was formerly employed at Messrs Bluemel Bros, Ltd, Wolston. Mr Barker has arranged for the standard food parcels and bread to be sent to him as from “ his former fellow employees,” as they have generously undertaken his adoption.

CHURCH LAWFORD.

MILITARY MEDAL.—This week Mrs F Cooke has received news that her brother, Corpl A Haynes, of the 28th Canadians, has been awarded the Military Medal.

MEMORIAL SERVICE.—On Sunday evening last a memorial service was held the Parish Church for Sergt S Batchelor, when a good number of the parishioners attended. The service was impressively conducted by the Rector (Rev H Smith), and one or two of Sergt Batchelor’s favourite hymns were sung. In his sermon at the evening service the Rector made allusion to the loss the parents and family, the parish, and the church had sustained by the death of Sergt Batchelor, and said it was such men that our country can ill-afford to lose. Amongst the many letters of sympathy which Mr & Mrs Batchelor have received several have come from the front, from the chaplain, the nurse, and from his lieutenant. The latter wrote:—“ Everybody who knew him recognised in him a good N.C.O and a good soldier every way.”

DUNCHURCH.

ROLL OF HONOUR.—Mr & Mrs Pearce, Coventry Road Dunchurch, have received intimation that their son. Pte W Pearce, K.R.R, is missing. This is the fourth son Mr & Mrs Pearce have lost in the War.

WOLSTON.

PTE W BARKER KILLED.—Mr & Mrs N Barker received news on Sunday that their son, Pte W Barker, had died from wounds in France. Deceased volunteered early in the War for the Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, but was rejected owing chest measurement. Later on he joined the Royal Warwicks, and has been in the thick of the fighting. He was well known and respected in the district. His father has for many years been a member of the Wolston Parish Council, and occupied other public offices in the parish. Much sympathy is felt for Mr & Mrs Barker and family.

BRANDON & BRETFORD.

CORPL C DIPPLE WOUNDED.—Mr V Dipple has received news that his brother was wounded in the charge at Cambrai. Corpl Dipple was one of the Mons and Marne fighters, being attached to the 18th Hussars. His other brothers—Sergt F Dipple, R.F.A, is now stationed in Italy (he also was amongst the 1914 battles); while a third brother, Bombardier H Dipple, is also in Italy and a sister is a nursing sister in the Army.

WOUNDED SOLDIERS ENTERTAINED.

On Boxing Day the wounded soldiers at the Infirmary and “ Te Hira ” Red Cross Hospitals numbering about 120, were entertained by the Rugby V.T.C at the Howitzer Battery Drill Hall. Tea was provided by the Red Cross Society in the small rooms, which were nicely decorated and presented a warm and cosy appearance, and this was followed by an entertainment in the Large Drill Hall. Under the supervision of Sergt S H Weobley, the members of Corps had tastefully decorated the hall with flags and garlands. The stage was arranged in a series of arches, illuminated with coloured electric bulbs, and a large Christmas tree, upon which useful and suitable presents were hung, was also illuminated by movable electric lights, arranged by Sergt O H Watson. Quartermaster Alderson as Father Christmas presented each guest with a present from the tree. An excellent programme, consisting of instrumental and vocal items, was given ; and, in addition to members of the V.T.C and wounded soldiers, were songs by Quartermaster C Prior and Miss Phyllis Vann.

BILTON HALL RED CROSS HOSPITAL.

The wounded soldiers at this hospital has a very pleasant round of entertainment. On Thursday last week Corpl Hawkins and friends from Rugby gave a concert, and on Saturday Mr Giggs and party went over from Rugby for a similar purpose. Dinner on Christmas Day consisted of turkey, plum pudding, &c, given by friends ; and in the afternoon the soldiers and staff were entertained by a professional conjuror from London. On Boxing Day the Southam Amateur Dramatic Company attended, and gave a concert and theatricals. The Bilton Brass Band played carols at The Hall on Sunday, and again during dinner and tea on Christmas Day. The men enjoyed and appreciated everything immensely.

SEASONABLE WEATHER.

The weather during Christmas was, on the whole, bright and seasonable. In the previous week frost and snow gave promise of ideal conditions, but on Monday there was a considerable rise of temperature, with drizzling rain, which quickly converted the road surfaces into sticky mud, and the outlook was not at all promising. On Christmas Day, however, a keen wind from the North with spells of bright sunshine put the roads in good order again, and outdoor exercise was quite enjoyable, and the same may be said of Boxing Day.

DEATHS.

EVERETT.—On December 16th, at Basrah (Persian Gulf,) Lance-Corpl FREDERICK STANLEY EVERETT, of the Motor Transport, A.S.C., eldest and dearly loved son of Mr. and Mrs. Everett, aged 21. (Nature of illness not stated).—Rest in peace. Not lost, but gone before.
Father, in Thy gracious keeping,
Leave we now our dear one sleeping.

MATTHEWS.—In loving memory of PTE HARRY J. MATTHEWS, the only and beloved son of D. and M. A. MATTHEWS, of Napton, who died in hospital in France on Dec. 14th, 1917, aged 28 years.

 

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