30th Mar 1918. Fatal Flying Accident in Rugby

FATAL FLYING ACCIDENT AT RUGBY.

The death took place at the Brookfield Nursing Home this (Tuesday) morning of Mr H N Van Duzer, an officer in the American Flying Corps, as the result of injuries received in an aeroplane accident on Sunday.

The deceased officer and another aviator had been flying over the town at a very low altitude, and at about 5.30, while they were over the Eastlands Estate, something apparently went wrong with Mr Van Duzers’ engine, which caused the machine to nose dive and crash to earth. Mr Van Duzer received shocking injuries to the head, arms and legs, and was conveyed to the Brookfield Nursing Home in an unconscious condition, from which he never rallied.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Pte W H Linnell, jun, R.E, son of Mr W H LINNELL, has been wounded in the leg.

Mr J A Middleton, son of Mr & Mrs Middleton, of Watford, near Rugby, has recently been gazetted Second-Lieutenant in the M.G Corps, after serving three and a-half years in Gallipoli and Palestine.

The death from wounds is reported of Lieut H C Boycott, Coldstreams, the International hockey full back. Boycott won many prizes at lawn tennis tournaments, was a brilliant cricketer, and a smart golfer, being the first secretary of the Northamptonshire Golf Club.

Sergt H Collins, son of Mrs Collins, 73 New Street, New Bilton, has been transferred from his interment camp at Wittenberg in Germany to Holland. Sergt Collins was taken prisoner of war in the early days, and had spent four Christmases in Germany. Food parcels have been regularly sent to him through the Rugby Prisoners of War Help Committee.

News has been received that Pte A W Bottrill, Coldstream Guards was killed in action on March 18th. Pte Bottrill, whose parents reside at 94 Bridget Street, was an old St. Matthew’s boy. He went to the front in the first month of the War, and was in the retreat from Mons and many of the subsequent heavy engagements, being badly wounded on two occasions. The Captain, writing to his friends, remarks : He has been all through the war without once going home, except on leave, which surely is a magnificent record. There are too few of our original Expeditionary force left to tell their glorious story, and now there is yet another gone.

THE GREAT GERMAN OFFENSIVE.
SLOWING DOWN.

Since Friday last week the British Armies on the Western Front have been fighting with traditional valour and endurance against the stupendous forces launched against them by the Germans in making their promised offensive movement. In the course of three or four days of the bitterest fighting, unprecedented in the annals of war, our front line troops had to give way in front of vastly superior numbers, but have systematically retired on prepared defences. The result is, we are on an average of 15 miles farther back on a frontage of 50 miles than when the attack commenced. There has never been in the history of the War a battle of such continued intensity, and the reason for this is very clear. There has not been one wave attack, but at least three, carried out on the German side by three relays of armies. The usual breathing space which has hitherto followed the most intense period of battle has been denied to our troops, for the simple reason that the German has no sooner exhausted on army than he has put in another, the fresh troops passing through the forces which have been exhausted and carrying on the battle without loss of time.

We are not for the moment interested in German losses. They have (remarks the well-informed London correspondent of the “ Birmingham Daily Post ”) undoubtedly been colossal. We cannot even console ourselves with the effect which those losses will have upon the people of Germany when they are revealed. The only thing which interests us is the question : “ Will the German succeed in breaking the British Army and destroying our power to continue the War ?” It is treason of the worst kind to rave about a British defeat. We are not defeated because we have given ground. We cannot be defeated until our Armies are broken. The German is defeated on the day the official despatch admits that he is checked and held. The German advance is perceptibly slowing, the intensely active front is becoming perceptibly restricted. Of the 96 divisions on the British front 73 have already been identified. Considerably more than a third of all the German’s strength in France is at Present in motion against our Armies, and that enormous force has been met, checked, and decimated by less than a third of the British Army. The people who draw comparisons between this offensive and the offensive against Italy or the big push against Russia are wide of the mark. In point of morale and armament of the defender there is no comparison. So far as reserves and readiness to meet the attack are concerned there is no comparison.

Thursday morning’s news was to the effect that the Allies are holding the line, and the fighting was more in our favour.

RUGBY FOOD CONTROL COMMITTEE.

At a meeting held on Thursday in last week there were present : Mr T A Wise (chairman), Mr H Tarbox (vice- chairman), Mrs Dewar, Mrs Shelley, Mrs Townsend, Mrs Peet, Messrs A Appleby, G H Cooke, C Gay, W A Stevenson, J Cripps, J H Meller, T A Smart, A Humphrey, R Griffin, and A T Watson.

Messrs Bluemel were given permission to purchase sugar for use in their factory canteen, which, it was said supplied meals to 300 workpeople daily.

The B.T.H Company applied for permission to purchase 40 lbs of sugar for the month ending April 20th for use as a lubricant for drawing wire in their lamp factory.—Mr Stevenson enquired how the company had obtained their sugar for this purpose in the past ?—The Executive Officer replied that they had been taking it from the supply allowed for their canteen, but he had informed them that this must not be done in the future.—Mr Stevenson enquired if the company would still be allowed the same quantity for their canteen ?—Mr Mellor said the past they had been drawing 3lbs per week from the canteen for this purpose, but the difficulty experienced in getting carbon for arc lamps had caused a great run on electric lamps, and an increased quantity of drawn wire was required, with the result that they were now using about 10lbs of per week for this purpose.—The permission was granted.

On the application of the L & N-W Railway Company, it was decided to allow the licensee of the Royal Oak, Brandon, to keep a quantity of tinned meat in stock for the use of fogmen.

A letter was read from the Divisional Commissioner with reference to the new wholesale price for milk, and suggesting co-operation between districts where similar conditions are uniformity of price. The Executive Officer read the price list as under :—April, 1s 3d ; May, 1s ; June, 1s ; July, ls 2d ; August, 1s 3d ; September, 1s 3d—average ls 2¾d.—In reply to a question, the Executive Officer stated that the resolution of the committee agreeing to the price remaining at 1s 9d per gallon till the end of April would have no effect, as it had not been confirmed by the Divisional Commissioner.—In reply to Mr Stevenson, it was stated that local committees had no control over wholesale prices.—The matter was referred to the Rationing Committee.

The Finance Committee reported that they had received £216 3s 1d from the Ministry of Food, which would meet all expenses incurred by the late Urban Committee up to December 31st. A cheque had been sent to the Urban Council for this amount, and it was decided to apply to the appointing authorities for a further grant.

SUGAR FOR JAM.
OUTLINES OF DISTRIBUTION SCHEME.

Following on the statement made by Lord Rhondda in the House of Lords with regard to the distribution of sugar for jam-making, the following announcement is made by the Sugar Department of the Ministry of Food :—

Forms of application can be obtained on and after March 23rd at the offices of the Local Food Control Committees, and must be returned on or before April 4th. Applications will considered only when they are made by persons actually growing the fruit which they wish to preserve. The form of application will require the applicant to state, among other things, the number of persons rationed for sugar as members of his household and the amount of fruit which he is likely to have available for preserving. The extent to which such applications can be met will be determined by the Director of Sugar Distribution in conjunction with the Local Food Committees.

Two classes of permit will be issued to applicants, one for soft fruit available between June 8th and July 31st, and the other for hard fruit available between August 1st and September 30th. “ Soft fruit ” will be taken to mean any fruits normally ready for preserving before the end of July, and in this category rhubarb may be included. “ Hard fruit ” will be taken to mean any fruits ready for preserving after July 31st, and in any area where vegetable marrows are usually preserved the local committee may in its discretion include them also in this category.

It has been decided that in no case shall the total amount of sugar for making jam for home consumption exceed 10lbs per head of the household. There will be many people, however, who will have fruit in sufficient quantities to enable them to use more sugar than this, and in these cases they will be invited to state what weight of fruit they are prepared to convert into jam on the understanding that they are to place the jam so made at the disposal of the local food committees at prices not exceeding the current wholesale prices.

It is most important that the application forms should returned on or before April 4th.

LOOKING AHEAD.
DISAPPOINTMENT FOR WEDDING PARTY.

Considerable amusement was caused at a meeting of the Rugby Food Control Committee on Thursday afternoon last week when a letter was read from a Craven Road grocer to the effect that a customer had ordered a 12-lb ham from him for a wedding which was to take place in few months’ time. He asked for permission to sell the ham, and keep it in stock until the event took place.—The Chairman (Mr T A Wise), in reply to Mr Mellor, stated that if the customer bought the ham he could possibly be prosecuted for hoarding. A person was not allowed go into a shop and buy what he wanted, and arrange with the trader to keep it in his warehouse until it was wanted, instead of the customer keeping it himself. That would get over the hoarding order at once : and, if they consented to this, it would open the door very wide.—Mr Cooke : If it means getting excess food we shall all be getting married soon.—The committee instructed the Executive Officer to reply that thy did not approve of the arrangement.

WOMEN’S INSTITUTES.

So many of these Institutes have now been started in Warwickshire, and have been so warmly received, that a County Federation has been formed in order to link them up together, and to co-ordinate the work generally. The first Federation meeting was held at Leamington last week, when a large number of delegates from the different villages where institutes have been successfully started attended. Lady Isabel Margesson, (hon secretary of the Worcestershire Federation), speaking on behalf of the London Federation Committee, explained the scheme. In her preliminary remarks Lady Isabel laid special emphasis on the revival of rural industries, and on the development of the whole of the rural life of the country. She pointed out that, although the great object of that development was Food Production, it was not restricted to that most important endeavour. The village institutes were the response of the women of the countrywide to the call to do their utmost for their own neighbourhood. Force and strength came from acting and meeting together, and results showed that every institute had its own character and individuality. Women’s institutes were NOT to interfere with, but to co-ordinate, the activities of a place. The Government concerned itself more and more with the homes and families of the land, and women’s institutes provided a homely organisation that could receive what the Government wished to give.

Several of the secretaries present spoke of the useful work done by the institutes, and Mrs Miller (Coundon, Coventry), gave an interesting account of a scheme in hand for promoting the toy-making industry.

The meeting, having unanimously decided to form a Federation for Warwickshire, proceeded to elect its officers and executive committee. Mrs Fielden (Kineton) was duly elected vice-president, the Mayoress of Leamington chairman, and Miss Bryson hon secretary.

The eight members of the committee proposed and elected were : Lady Likeston, Lady Nelson, the Mayoress, Mrs Fielden, Mrs Miller, Miss Fortescue, Miss Sargeaunt, and Miss Bryson.

It should be noted that anyone desirous of starting a women’s institute should apply to the War Agricultural Committee, Warwick. Once started, the institute is handed over to the care of the County Federation.

IN MEMORIAM.

BATCHELOR.—In memory of Pte. THOMAS BATCHELOR, of the 5th Royal Berks, who died of wounds in Germany, December 25, 1917.
“ God knows how we shall miss him,
And He counts the tears we shed,
And whispers, ‘ Hush, he only sleeps ;
Thy brother is not dead.’”
—Sadly missed by his loving Sisters Lizzie, Nellie, Ida, Hetty, and Beatie.

CLARKE.—In ever loving memory of Pte P. CLARKE, 31st T.R., who died in the Military Hospital at Dover, March 29th, 1917.
“ The flowers we place upon his grave,
May wither and decay ;
But the love we bear for him,
Will never fade away.”
—From father, mother, brothers, and Sisters at Kilsby.

TOMPKINS.—In memory of PRIVATE WILLIAM TOMPKINS, 24th T.R., dearly-loved youngest son of the late A. J. and Mrs Tompkins, Barby, died in Fulham Military Hospital, March 25th, 1917, aged 19 years.
“ Nobly he answered duty’s call,
And for his country gave his all.
A year has passed ; our hearts still sore,
Day by day we miss him more.
His welcome smile, his dear sweet face,
Never on earth can we replace.
—Sadly missed by his loving Mother, Brother, & Sister.

 

 

3rd Nov 1917. Value of the Acorn Crop

VALUE OF THE ACORN CROP.

The President of the Board of Agriculture and Fisheries again urges upon stock-keepers the great importance of making full use of the present abundant crop of acorns. Acorns are specially adapted for pig-feeding, and can be used most effectively and economically when pigs are allowed to gather them where they fall. While it will still be necessary to prevent the indiscriminate straying of pigs, the Home Office concurs with the Board in thinking that, if in consequence of this notice the number of pigs found straying on highways by the police should increase, proceedings against their owners should not be instituted except when direct negligence on the part of the owners is shown.

THE SALE OF POTATOES.

The Potato Order, which prohibits any person, except the grower, to sell potatoes without a license, came into force on Thursday. It is also necessary for retailers to exhibit price lists in their places of business.

RUGBY PRISONERS OF WAR FUND COMMITTEE.

The monthly meeting of this committee was held on Monday, Mr W Flint, c.c. presiding. There were also present : Mrs Blagden, Mrs Anderson, Mrs Wilson,. Mr G W Walton, Mr A W Shirley, Mr Pepper, and the Hon Secretary (Mr J Reginald Barker). The latter reported that since the last meeting there had been five additions to the list of prisoners of war, and he regretted say that there were the prospects of further increases in the near future. The acknowledgements from the men had much improved, and letters he had received and reports from Regimental Care Committees showed that practically all the parcels now reached the men. Apart from the newly captured men, all the others were now in regular communication. The only one who had been giving any anxiety of late was Driver F Furniss (A.S.C), of Rugby, of whom nothing had been heard for several months. During the week-end, however, Mr Barker said he had heard from Furniss, who in his letter said that he had received all his parcels from Nos. 1 to 55 inclusive, which were quite satisfactory, and adding that he was in good health. A number of efforts were promised during the winter months, which would assist the funds of the committee. He regretted that it had been found necessary to increase the cost of the standard food parcels from 6s to 8s owing to the rise in the price of commodities and materials and the necessity for making the parcels a little larger. This meant that, instead of £2 3s 6d per month per man, the cost would be £2 15s 6d, or a total charge of £216 9s per month inclusive for the 78 men. Fortunately for the fund 27 of these men were now fully adopted, and with small sums guaranteed on behalf of other men, there remained a balance of about £130 per month still to be found, provided, of course, it was the committee’s wish that they bear the increased cost. The subscriptions continued to come in splendidly, and during the past two months they had received more than sufficient to cover the cost of the parcels, thus being able to add slightly to the bank balance.

Mr Barker said he thought the committee and the subscribers to the fund would feel proud of the fact that they had been able to “ carry on ” without asking for financial assistance from the British Red Cross Society, who, who as they knew, had guaranteed the parcels. The committee would appreciate this more fully when he reminded them that the Chairman of that Society recently stated that they had to find £1,500 per day to make good the lack of funds and support given to other Prisoners of War Committees throughout the country. Mr Barker said he could not too strongly emphasise the fact that every subscription to the Rugby Prisoners of War Fund was virtually a subscription to the British Red Cross Society.

Mr Flint said that, in view of this report, he felt that it would be everybody’s wish that the committee completed the cost of the food parcels and bread, and therefore moved this resolution.—In seconding, Mr G W Walton said that, notwithstanding the many other demands upon the public, the Prisoners of War Fund received the support of everyone. There were many persons contributing every week in a quiet way, and he felt sure they would be able to secure sufficient funds to enable the increased expenditure to be made.—The resolution was unanimously carried.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Mr & Mrs Brett have received official intimation that their son, Pte A J Brett, R.A.M.C, was wounded in October 7th, and is in hospital in France.

Mr W Cowley, of 34 Poplar Grove, has been notified by the War Office that his son, Pte G V Cowley, of the Dorset Regiment, was wounded by shrapnel in the thigh in an advance near Ypres on October 4th. He is an old St Matthew’s boy, He was previously wounded in September 1915.

Pte C E Freeman, Royal Warwicks, was wounded on October 17th, sustaining a severe gun-shot wound in the chest. His home is at 17 Charlotte Street.

In the list of casualties published last week-end appears the name of Lieut W E Littleboy, of the Warwickshire Regiment. He was educated at Rugby School, and was a prominent member of the Football XV of three years ago.

A letter has been received from Second-Lieut Basil Parker, Machine Gun Company, who was recently reported missing, stating that he is a prisoner of war in Germany. He is a son of Mr E Parker, of the Avenue Road, New Bilton, and was formerly a teacher at St Matthew’s School.

Mr and Mrs Whitbread have now received definite news from the War Office that the only son, Second-Lieut Basil Whitbread, was killed in action on the night of the 22nd July, 1916. His body was found outside the lines and was buried at High Wood.

The Rev R F Morson, M.A, elder son of Mr & Mrs Arthur Morson, who has for the past 4½ years been assistant priest at St Silas the Martyr, Kentish Town, London, has offered his services as a chaplain to H.M Forces, which have been accepted. He has been ordered to Salonica.

At the Rural District Tribunal on Thursday conscientious objection was pleaded by a Bilton youth, 18, single, who asked to be allowed either to undertake work with (1) the Friends’ War Relief Committee ; (2) Friends’ Ambulance Unit, general service section ; (3) full-time work on the land ; or (4) that the case should be referred to the Pelham Committee. He had previously been temporary exempted in order that he might complete his education. He was given conditional exemption on joining the Friends’ Ambulance Unit, general service section.

CORPL C H TOMPKINS.

News has been received at the B.T.H that Corpl C H Tompkins, of the Oxon and Bucks Light Infantry, who prior to the War was employed by the Company, died on October 23rd from wounds received in action.

BRANDON.

ROLL OF HONOUR.—Mr & Mrs Reuben Banbrook, of Brandon, have received the news that their son, Pte Banbrook, of the Royal Warwicks, is in hospital in Mesopotamia suffering from sand fly fever. Out of their five sons who enlisted two others are still suffering from wounds. Pte S Banbrook was for several years in the stables at Brandon Hall.—Pte G. Newman, Royal Warwicks, has been wounded in the right foot. He formerly worked at market gardening for Mr Gupwell.—Mr & Mrs Thomas Halford have been notified of the death of their second son, Pte S G Halford. He has been missing for more than 12 months. Much sympathy is felt for the parents, who some short time back lost another son. Deceased was formerly in the employ of Mr J Rankin, of Brandon Grounds Farm, where his father was employed for many years.

BINLEY.

Mr & Mrs J L STEVENS have received news of the death of their elder son, Pte J A Stevens, of the Machine Gun Company. Before entering the Army he was employed at Binley Colliery, and his father was in the employ of the Earl of Craven as a keeper, and resided at Piles Coppice.

BILTON.

REPORTED MISSING.—Miss E Watts has received official notification that her nephew, Private C Eccles, Royal Warwicks, has been reported missing as from October 4th. He was in the great push on the Yser in which Lance-Corpl Houghton, also of Bilton, lost his life.

ROYAL RED CROSS AWARD.

The King has been pleased to award the Royal Red Cross to Miss Kathleen Bolam, superintendent, Ashlawn and Bilton Hall Red Cross Hospital, for valuable services rendered. We believe this is the first V.A.D member in Warwickshire to receive this honour which Miss Bolam has thoroughly earned and deserves.

DEATHS.

BYERS.—In loving memory of Corpl ANGUS BYERS, 1st K.O.S.B, who was killed in action on September 20, 1917, “ somewhere in France.”—Deeply mourned. From all at 82 Rowland Street.

GRENDON.—Killed in action on the Vimy Ridge on April’s 9th, Pte. WM. GRENDON, 2nd Canadian mounted Rifles, aged 31 ; dearly loved only son of J. & A. M. Grendon, late of Grandborough.

MILLS.—In ever-loving memory of JOSEPH MAWBY, eldest son of Mr. & Mrs. T. Mills, Marton ; killed in action on October 23rd ; aged 23.
“ Had we been asked, how will we know
We should say, ‘ Oh, spare this blow,’
Yes, with streaming tears, would say,
‘ Lord, we love him—let him stay,’
He bravely answered duty’s call,
He gave his life for one and all ;
But the unknown gravest is the bitterness blow,
None but his loved ones will ever know.”
—From his sorrowing Father, Mother, Sisters, Brothers, and Percy.

 

11th Sep 1915. Dogged Determination to Win

DOGGED DETERMINATION TO WIN.

Second-Lieut A K Bennett, of Elmdon House, Rugby, writes home from the Dardanelles in a letter dated 24th August (at which date he was fighting in the Anzac region), as follows:

“ We are now in the thick of it. I was sent of last night to piquet a line at a place called ‘Dead Man’s Hollow.’ We had to dig ourselves in under a perfect hail of bullets. We kept on digging up dead Turks, which stank like poison. It is fair murder out here : just this very instant one of our men has dropped with a wound in his thigh. They are using us as R.E and ordinary infantry. Our men stick it quite well.

“ The nights are very trying, however, for one’s nerves. There is not one step you can take without the fear of being mown down by machine guns or snipers.

“ I am quite well, but very tired. A wash, shave, or sleep is out of the question. The mail is the only enjoyment we get out here. France must be a picnic to this show. Now as I look in front of me I can see a large bay, and monitors are coming close into the shore to fire over our heads. They do excellent work round here.

“ I was taking a party of men to help to shift the wounded the other day, when a huge shell burst just over us. It was like having your back blown through your chest.

“ If you could never imagine how we are situated. The landing here must have been a miracle. Dust blows down our throats and parches them ; we may march miles up gullies and down saps without a drop of water. Every step you take feels as if a great piston was sticking the top of your head, and you simply keep on like a machine.

“ I have made up my mind to come through this lot somehow. Things are going on as well as can be expected, and we all fight on with the dogged determination to win.

RUGBY ENGINEER INJURED AT THE DARDANELLES.

Sapper T A Ramsey (Rugby), who is with the Royal Engineers at the Dardanelles, writing home, says :—“ We are again in the thick of it. We have been here only a few days, but in that time I have seen a lot, and also done something. The place where we are now cannot be compared with the one where we were before. The other place was a girls’ school compared with this. Ten of us were an a dangerous job a few nights ago. We had to go out in front of our trenches and bring the barbed wire fence (entanglements) in. It was a job, and we were under fire the whole time. Two of the party were wounded in this operation, and Sapper Ramsey continues : ” This was on a night previous to an attack at early dawn. We had to stand by all night, and most probably you will have seen from the papers how it came off before you get this letter. We have got plenty of work to do here, both good and dangerous, but I am glad to say all our company are standing it well, and I am feeling grand and in fine condition, and not in the least down-hearted and miserable.”

0n August 22nd Sapper Ramsey wrote stating that he was on a hospital ship owing to an accident which occurred to him on the previous Monday. While he was at work in a well he was injured in the ear and head by a pick, and unfortunately septic poisoning had set in. He anticipated undergoing an operation that afternoon.

RUGBY SOLDIER WOUNDED IN THE DARDANELLES.

Mr J W Colcutt, 6 Abbey Street, has received news that his son, Pte Ed Colcutt, 2nd Hants, was wounded in the ankle and heel by shrapnel bullets in the first week in August in the Dardanelles. Pte Colcutt, who enlisted at the outbreak of war, throwing up a clerical appointment in the B.T.H Lamp Factory to do so, is at present in a hospital at Alexandria, and is doing well.

WOLSTON.

FRANK ELLIOTT REPORTED KILLED.-Private Frank Elliott, the youngest son of Mr Charles and Mrs Elliott, of Brook Street, is reported to have been killed on the 10th August. The parents have not yet received official intimation from the War Office. They obtained the news through the following letter :—“Dear Mrs Elliott,-I am sending you a line, as Frank, being a great pal of mine here—and I am very sorry to say that his duty was finished on the 10th August—was shot through the heart, and died almost instantaneously, after a very gallant fight. Please excuse me writing, but I thought you would like to know. I am still safe, and trust to keep so. I think this is all. From yours, &c, T WALLACE.” Only on the 9th of August Frank Elliott was reported by a wounded soldier to have carried another wounded soldier two miles to a place of safety. While living at Wolston he was a member of the Brandon and Wolston Football Club, and played a good game at half-back. He was fighting at the Dardanelles.

GERMAN PRISONERS TALK ABOUT OUR ARTILLERY AND — PEACE.

A letter has been received from Lance-Corpl G H Tompkins, who is serving with the 5th Battalion Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry in Flanders, as follows :- “ Where we were was the hottest fire in the whole line. Sleep was out of the question. Old soldiers told us they had never been through anything like it before. . . . Last Saturday our battalion paraded, and our Colonel addressed us for the work we had done, and said he must mention the special work done by six men. I was the sixth man, and I was commended for sticking to my post under heavy shell fire and cheering my men up. After it was over most of the men shook hands with me, and my sergeant-major told me he had put in my name for another stripe. . . . The prisoners we have taken tell us that the chief of topics of conversation in their trenched are our artillery—and peace.” Lance-Corpl G H Tompkins, before the war, was employed in the Coventry Works of the B.T.H Company.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Mr J S Brown, Coventry, having urged the Postmaster-General to reduce the parcel charges to the Expeditionary Force, has received a letter stating that as a considerable increase in the number of parcels would immediately follow reduction, it is not practicable to proceed further with the question which Mr Brown raised.

The “ Pals Company,” as such, has ceased to exist. Under the four-company system Rugby and Leamington each provide two platoons to form “ C ” Company. The Leamington platoons are Nos. 11 & 12.

St Thomas’s Hospital possesses a bed endowed anonymously in memory of Tom Hughes, the inscription being as follows :-“ March, 1899. Anon. Tom Hughes’ bed. In memory of Tom Hughes, Q.C, author of ‘Tom Brown’s School Days.’ Born 1823, died 1896.”

The Minister of Munitions has made an Order under section 4 of the Munitions of War Act, declaring 180 additional establishments, including Bluemels (Wolston), as controlled establishments under the Act as from Monday last. A total of 715 establishments have now been declared as controlled under the Act from the date of the first Order, July 12th to September 6th inclusive.

Mr Allan Hand, Conservative agent for the Rugby Division, is leaving Rugby on Sunday for a destination “ somewhere ” on the East Coast to join the 81st Provisional Battalion as second lieutenant. Mr Hand would have been accepted for foreign service some time ago, but was suffering from varicose veins, for which he underwent an operation last October, but it did not result in an entire cure. The War Office is now accepting for home service men who were not considered physically fit for active service.

There is no longer any secret as to the intentions of the Government in relation to men of recruitable age—from 19 to 41 years of age. Their names are available, as a result of national registration, and local authorities are busily engaged in transferring the necessary particulars to the much-discussed pink forms. These will shortly be handed to the military authorities, who will take steps to organise recruiting on much more extensive lines than at present. The voluntary system will, of course, be strictly adhered to.

The recent notice issued by the War Office in reference to rifles and ammunition has, it is stated, been received by Volunteer Training Corps with derision. The War Office has graciously announced that Volunteers will be permitted to purchase rifles and ammunition, but they attach a condition that rifles must not cost more than £2 10s, and ammunition not more than £5 per 1,000 rounds. It is pointed out that at the present time it is impossible to get a reliable weapon at the price mentioned. Ammunition, too, costs at least £6 per 1,000 rounds.

OLD MURRAYIAN ROLL OF HONOUR.

News has just been received at the Murray School that two other Old Murrayians, both of whom are well known to the younger generation of “ old boys,” have made the supreme sacrifice—Walter Ransome, who left the town about 12 years ago, was a steward on the Good Hope, and went down with the vessel in the battle in the Pacific ; and Rifleman Harold Evans, K.R.R, was killed in France on August 7th.

RECRUITING AT RUGBY.

The past week has been another good one so far as recruiting is concerned, and 17, the majority being Rugby men, have been attested at the Drill Hall, as under :—F Corbett, F H Potton, J Bennett, 0 Askew, J Bryan, P A Gilks, C Griffin, C J Wilson, F J Blundell, T Kenny, 220th Fortress Co, R.E ; A G Horsefall, R.A.M.C ; J Ellis, L New, A.S.C ; E Haynes, R.F.A ; A Burton, R.G.A ; T Kirby and H G Busson, Royal Warwicks.

THE RUGBY FORTRESS COMPANY.

Mr J J McKinnell. chairman of the Rugby Urban District Council, has received the following letter from the War Office under date September 8th :-

“ SIR,—I am commanded by the Army Council to offer you and those associated with you their sincere thanks for having raised the 220th (Army Troops) Company (Rugby), Royal Engineers, of which the administration has now been taken over by the Military Authorities.

The Council much appreciate the spirit which prompted your offer of assistance, and they are gratified at the successful results of the time and labour devoted to this object, which has added to the armed forces of the Crown the services of a fine body of men.

The Council will watch the future career of the Company with interest, and they feel assured that when sent to the front it will maintain the high reputation of the distinguished Corps of which it forms part.—I am, sir, your obedient servant, “ B B CUBITT.”