7th Nov 1914. War Casualties

Scout J Farn, 2nd Worcesters, has been wounded at the front. His brother, Driver W J Farn, was wounded at the Battle of the Aisne.

George Lines, a reservist in the Coldstream Guards, living at Newbold, has been wounded, and is reported to be in Sheffield Hospital. Lines was also wounded in the Boer War.

Lieut O’Connor, of the Cameronians, son of Mrs O’Connor, Overslade Manor, arrived home yesterday (Friday) with an injured ankle. He has a staff appointment in the 7th Division, and hopes in a few days to return to his duties.

The parents of Pte Harry Hales, 1st R.W.R, of Pinfold Street, New Bilton, have received official intimation that their son was killed in action on October 13th. Last week we reported that they had already received intimation, from a comrade of their son’s, of his death.

The death took place on October 31st, at Plymouth, of enteric fever, contracted on voyage whilst crossing with Canadian Contingent, of Aubrey, aged 20, younger son of Percy Ridley-Thompson, of Park Close, Bloxham, Banbury, and formerly of The Croft, Dunchurch. Deceased was an old pupil of Mr T Arnold Wise, of “ Oakfield,” Rugby.

Pte Harry Nash, of the 1st Northamptonshire, Regiment, son of Mr C Nash, the cemetery-keeper at Rugby, arrived home on Thursday. He looks very well, although he is still lame.

RUGBY OFFICERS WOUNDED.

The two sons of Mrs Anderson, of Rokeby Farm, Rugby, who have been in the fighting line, have been wounded, and as a result are now back in England. Lieut C E Anderson, of the Gordon Highlanders, was shot through the knee, and is now under treatment at the Empire Hospital, Vincent Square, London. His brother, Second Lieutenant R G F Anderson, of the Royal Welsh Fusiliers, was wounded in the head by shrapnel, and has been brought to his home at Rugby, where for the present he has to be kept very quiet, and is not allowed to see visitors. Mrs Anderson has another son in the army, Lieut W R W Anderson, 4th South Midland Howitzer Brigade, who is in camp at Great Baddow, Essex.

A WOUNDED RUGBY SOLDIER.

News reached Mr George Cook, of 13 Temple Street, Rugby, on Monday evening that his son, Ernest, who is a private in the Oxford and Bucks light Infantry, has been wounded, and is now in hospital at Tidworth, Wilts. Pte Cook went to the front with his regiment early in September, and on October 21st was wounded in the left leg and the right cheek. “ I hope to be on sick leave in Rugby before very long,” he says, and adds: “It is so different here to what it is in the trenches, for I am so comfortable.”—Before enlisting, Pte Cook assisted for a time at the School Armoury, and then worked at the locomotive engine sheds at Rugby. He was also in the Territorial Army before joining the Regulars.

B.T.H EMPLOYEE WOUNDED.

News has been received that Pte A J Vineall, of 65 Winfield Street, Rugby, has been rather badly wounded in the foot, and is at present in hospital at Leeds. On Tuesday he had several toes amputated, and on Wednesday, when visited by his wife, was still suffering from the effects of this, but appeared to be going on well. Pte Vineall, who was attached to the East Surrey Regiment, is a reservist, and has served 12 years with the colours, eight of which were spent in India. He also went through the South African War. Before being called up he was a fitter in the B.T.H foundry.

“ MISSING.”

Mrs H Flavell, of 14 Newbold Road, recently received intimation from the War Office that her husband, a reservist in the Coldstream Guards, was missing. She has, however, since received a post card from her husband, dated after the day mentioned in the War Office message, and the assumption is that he has become detached from his unit. Pte Flavell was an employee of the B.T.H Co.

WOUNDED WARWICKS FROM RUGBY HOMES.

In the fighting in the neighbourhood of Ypres, France, the 2nd Royal Warwickshire Regiment has taken a gallant part, and several men, whose homes are in Rugby and district, have been wounded.

Pte Wm B Wheeler, youngest son of Mr and Mrs J Wheeler, of 135 Abbey Street, Rugby, was wounded at Menin, near Ypres, on Trafalgar Day (October 21st), and is now in hospital at Portsmouth. He has a bullet ground in his right fore-arm, and says he received it where the heaviest and hardest fighting was going on. He adds in a letter to his parents :

“ It is hard fighting, I can tell you with those “ Jack Johnsons ” and shrapnel flying about in all directions. It’s a treat to be clear of them for a time. Whilst we were in a hospital in France, the German aeroplanes dropped two bombs just outside.” Describing the battle, he states: ” We were under heavy fire of big guns and so we retired for a short distance. Then we advanced still under the heavy firing, and moved so rapidly that we got within fifty yards of the German guns, thinking we were going to capture them, this being our intention, but as our artillery was giving a flanking fire, the officers would not take them. I was on the extreme right when I got hit.” Pte Wheeler mentions a number of comrades who were also wounded, and considers it is a wonder there are any of his Company left to tell the tale.

Lce-Sergt Wm Harper, whose home is at 20 Old Station, Rugby, is also wounded, being under treatment at a hospital at Aldershot. His parents went to see him on Thursday last week, and have a souvenir in the shape of a crumpled up whistle, which was struck by shrapnel and is considered to have saved their son’s life. His chief wound is in the arm, which was broken, and the flesh lacerated by a shell. Sergt Harper was ordered to the front with his regiment from Malta. Within six weeks of leaving Southampton for France he was back again wounded in the leg and arm. During the whole of the time from his embarkation at Malta until he was treated for wounds, he had not removed his clothes nor slept in a bed, and he has passed days without food and water, so strenuous and fierce has been the conflict in the trenches.

Pte F Batchelor, whose parents live at 35 Worcester Street, Rugby, is another soldier from the same regiment who has been wounded, he having been shot through the muscle of the right arm, on October 27th. He has this week been recuperating at Rugby, and told an Advertiser representative some of his experiences. He landed with his regiment at Zeeburghe, in Belgium, and first got into touch with the enemy near Ghent. He was one of a patrol party of 28 sent out to ascertain what force the enemy had in the neighbourhood, and that got to within 1½ miles of the German headquarters. The party was billeted in two houses, and then learnt with surprise that two doors away was a house occupied by 32 Uhlans. “We are in for a warm time,” remarked the officer, adding that each man was thenceforth to shift for himself. Refugees provided the soldiers with civilian clothing and walking sticks, and with their military dress tied up in bundles, the men mingled with the fugitives, and took train with them to Bruges, where they re-joined the column and marched to Ostend. The water here had been poisoned, and many dead fish floated on the surface. The troops entrained, intending to proceed to Antwerp, but news came of the fall of that city, and the column journeyed instead towards Ypres, and there joined the main French and Belgian armies.

“ C ” Company, to which Pte Batchelor belongs, was billetted in Zonnebeke, which place was left at 8.0 a.m, without a German in sight, but on returning at 1.45 p.m there was a large number of the enemy in the vicinity. The infantry took up a position behind a church, in which a number of wounded lay, and the position was vigorously shelled. Pte Batchelor was included in a patrol consisting of a lance-corporal and three men, who came upon a Uhlan in a tree, with platform and signalling equipment complete, his duty being to indicate what effect the German artillery was having upon the Allies positions. The patrol might have overlooked him had he not shouted out excitedly, “ English, mercy,” but he omitted to throw down his arms, and the patrol opened fire, and killed him.

Pte Batchelor had several narrow escapes. Although wounded, he was crawling along to the aid of a comrade shot in the abdomen, when the lance-corporal told him to go back for treatment, and went himself to the assistance of the man calling out, and promptly received five bullet wounds in his right arm. Having had his own wound dressed at the field station, Pte Batchelor proceeded with other wounded soldiers to Ypres, where 400 of them were looked after by the Sisters of a Convent. Subsequently he reached Boulogne, and crossed the Channel to Southampton. He was for a short time in Chatham Hospital, and in the next bed was lying Pte Osborne, of Hillmorton, who was shot in the cheek and ear, which has resulted in partial deafness. Pte Batchelor has seen some terrible sights, the most sickening being that of a comrade who received the full force of a shell, which blew away completely his head and left arm—a spectacle which filled all who witnessed it with a thirst for revenge. Lieut-Col Loring, though wounded in the foot, still continued to direct operations. He has since been killed in action. Pte Batchelor is now quite convalescent, and had orders to report himself at headquarters at Warwick yesterday (Friday).

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