5th Aug 1916. Rugby Volunteer Training Corps, Swearing-in Ceremony

RUGBY VOLUNTEER TRAINING CORPS.

SWEARING-IN CEREMONY.

An interesting ceremony was performed by Mr J J McKinnell, chairman of the Urban District Council, at the Benn Buildings, on Saturday afternoon, when eighty-seven members of the Rugby Company of the 2nd Battalion Warwickshire Volunteer Regiment were sworn in as soldiers under the new regulations. The proceedings took place in the Assembly Room, and the Chairman was supported on the platform by Lieut-Col Johnstone, Major Glover, Messrs W Flint, T A Wise, S B Robbins, R W Barnsdale, T M Wratislaw, H N Sporborg, T Hunter, and F M Davenport. The company, under the command of Mr C H Fuller (Commandant) and Mr L G Haigh, fell in at the Drill Hall, Park Road, and marched to the Benn Buildings.

The Chairman said, in the first place, he wanted on behalf of the Council and of the town, to give them a very hearty welcome. He thought they would all agree that it was most appropriate that that most important ceremony, which was the administering of the oath to a civic force, should take place in the building which was the centre of the management of the town. He had received apologies for absence from Lieut-Col Hood, Col Lewis, Hon E Parker, Brigadier-General Little, Mr A James, and Mr W L Larke. He would now ask them a short question, to which he wished them to answer “ Yes.” It was : “ Do you fully understand all the questions put to you on the official form of enrolment ? ” The men answered “ Yes ” ; whereupon Mr McKinnell requested them to take their hats off and to answer a longer question, which was in effect the declaration : “ Do you solemnly declare that the answers made by you to the questions set out on page 1 of the form of enrolment are true, and that you are willing, to be enrolled as members of the Volunteer Force of the Warwickshire Volunteer Regiment under the conditions laid down by the Army Council under the regulations for the Volunteer Force framed by them in accordance with the Statute Law relating to that Force ?” An affirmative answer was made, whereupon the Chairman administered the oath as under :-

“ I (–—) do sincerely promise and swear that I will be faithful and bear true allegiance to his Majesty King George V, and that I will faithfully serve his Majesty in Great Britain for the defence of the same against all his enemies and opposers whatsoever, according to the conditions of my service.”

This ceremony over, the Chairman said they were now soldiers, and he was proud to be the first one to congratulate them on behalf of their fellow-citizens. They had joined a very gallant and very noble army. The Volunteers had been unrecognised for months and months past, and at last the Government had thought well to take some notice of them, and to allow that, after all, they might possibly be of some use. Personally, he thought that a great mistake was made right at the very beginning in the nervousness and apprehensiveness of the War Office, who feared that if this Force was made too much of recruiting would suffer. He believed that the contrary would have been the effect. They honoured the Volunteers for plugging away (applause). Despite a great deal of very cheap wit on the subject of their age, despite the Government lukewarmness, and despite thousand and one more hindrances, they had gone steadily on making themselves efficient. He had heard what they had been doing, and he believed they put in a great deal of hard work, and he was sure there was not one among them who was not very glad he had done that hard work.

This question of the Volunteer movement was a very deep and vital one, because the men could, when they were fairly well trained, if the need arose, as it might possibly now arise, take the places of members of the Regular Forces, who would then be able to go and fight in France, Flanders, and elsewhere. In all probability things would get very critical before they had won the War. They were going to win, but it might be a bit of a squeeze, and heaven knew what was going to happen to anyone of them during the next twelve months.

Addressing those who had been ordered by the Tribunal, as a condition of exemption, to join that body, the Chairman said they must not think they were different from any other member of that Force. They were honoured just as much as the others. Those on the Tribunal knew, but others did not, all the reasons which stopped them from joining in the past ; and therefore, he did want to impress upon them that there was no distinction between them and other members of the Force (applause). This Force could do a most extraordinary good work in training those men who might have to be sent for soldiers, and who would then be three-parts trained when they went up. The oath they had taken only bound them to fight the enemy in the case of invasion of this country ; and this recognition by the Government ought to put a new life into their ranks. That swearing-in ceremony ought to be the starting point of fresh vigour both in men and efficiency. There ought to be a lot more men in their ranks, not only men of over military age, but the young men of 17 and 18 years who were employed in the town, and he earnestly hoped they would have a large influx of recruits in the near future.

Now they were enrolled as soldiers they must have some sort of uniform, arms, and equipment, and he understood they had certain sums in hand. However he would appeal to the public to support their funds with rather more liberality than they had done in the past. He was told they wanted £600. He hoped they would get it ; he thought they would, because they certainly ought to. They were extremely lucky to have such extraordinarily zealous and efficient officers, who worked very hard and also knew their job, and there was no man whom he would rather see as Commandant than Mr C H Fuller.

Major Glover said he hoped the enthusiasm that had been shown that day would not be allowed to evaporate ; but that they would induce others to follow their example. He thought that in a town of the size of Rugby there should be a large number of eligible men who could come forward. He was now Acting Commandant and Regimental and Battalion Adjutant ; and with regard to the first position, he was acting as a warming-pan for Col Johnstone, who, he knew, had received an invitation from the proper authorities to accept that post. He hoped Col Johnstone would accept that post, and then he (the speaker) would step back into the position that he could fill with greater credit to himself-that of Adjutant to the Battalion. In conclusion, he urged them to form a detachment of 250 in the town, so that they could have a company of their own. Hitherto they had been connected with Southam and Harbury, but it was now proposed to get these detachments affiliated to another corps.

Mr C H Fuller, on behalf of the Company, expressed thanks to the Chairman for the part he had played in that day’s ceremony, and to the other gentlemen who had attended. Their requirements could be expressed in two words, “ men ” and “ money.” He understood that men disqualified from service in the Army, who had to remain at home, had great difficulties to contend with, but they must have a certain amount of spare time, and he felt that in the crisis they were now in it was their duty to spend part of that spare time by joining their Corps. They must remember the men at the Front-that vast number that had given up money and everything. They must remember, also, that vast number who would never return, and that probably those present would live to see the final victory and to enjoy the triumphal peace. They had been given clearly to understand that they must not look upon the question of invasion as impossible even now ; and, therefore, it seemed to him that it behoved every man to do what he could to prepare himself for that event. It would very much strengthen their position ; and he hoped it could come about, if they could form a company of their own. He would ask each of them within the next fortnight to get one man who for some reason was unable to join the Regular Forces to join their Corps. There object would then be attained as regarded numbers ; and with regard to funds, he thought they could rely on the public to assist them if they showed they were willing to assist themselves, but could not do so to the full extent required. Eighty-seven men had taken the oath that day, and forms had been completed for 155 men to enrol who for various reasons were unable to be present. There had been a lamentable amount of apathy in that neighbourhood with regard to the Corps, more than in other places. Those eligible people who said the Force was not wanted were seeking an excuse for not joining, and he begged of everyone who was able to do his bit in this position-and it was a serious position they found themselves in—to do his best and join them and prepare to be ready. If they did that no man who was disqualified for active service would have anything to regret at the end of the War. To those who were preparing themselves he would commend as a motto the well-known lines :—

“ He also serves who only stands and waits.

Lieut-Col Johnstone then addressed the detachment, and said it was a great regret to him that, shortly after raising the second Battalion, he had to give up the command because of the other duties which were placed upon him. He had now been asked to take over the command of it again. After considering the matter, he really found that his duties were so heavy at the present time that, although he took the greatest interest in them, he felt he could not do justice to them. But he was going to his best. He accepted it (applause), and he would be glad to be with them again. all he asked was that they would put their backs into it, because if he found any slackers he would not want them. He wanted men who were going to try to do their work and to become soldiers in earnest. They did not know when they would be required. They might be required at any moment, and they must fit themselves for that moment. He thanked them for the kind manner in which they had received his return to the Company (loud applause).

The Chairman : Col Johnstone must be gratified by the way his return has been received.

Cheers for the King concluded the proceedings.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Second-Lieut B B Salmon, Manchester Regiment, killed, was in the football XV at Rugby School.

The numerous friends of Pte W T Satchell (Kilsby) of the Royal Warwicks, will be sorry to hear that he is lying seriously ill in the Canadian Hospital, near Maidenhead. There are every prospects of a final recovery, but it will be a long time before he regains health and strength completely.

SECOND-LIEUT F HUNTER HAS NARROW ESCAPES.

The name of Second-Lieut F Hunter, of the Gordon Highlanders, son of Mr T Hunter, J.P, Elmhurst, Hillmorton Road, appeared in the list of officers suffering from shell shock. The losses of the Battalion were heavy, and Second-Lieut Hunter had a remarkably narrow escape. A shell dropped at his feet and burst outwards, killing the men on either side of him and blowing him for some yards, but happily he was not touched by any of the fragments. He lost the use of his legs through shell shock, and was brought to London, and afterwards sent home to Rugby. Two days before this Second-Lieut Hunter had another narrow escape. He was standing talking to another officer, when they were espied by a German sniper, who shot the officer dead. Mr Hunter stooped to pick his friend up, and a bullet, evidently intended for him, passed through his pack, smashing his hair brush, &c.

LOCAL CASUALTIES.

The following young mm connected with the Rugby Baptist Church have been wounded in the great offensive : Will Spaggett (Manchester), Frank Burberry (Netley), Percy Harris (Rawtenstall), Bob Mayes (Leeds), and Corpl Horly (Birmingham).

Pte George Clarke, E Co, R.W.R, has written to his parents, who live at 98 Avenue Road, New Bilton, informing them that he is now in hospital suffering from a bullet wound in the left thigh. He adds that the bullet has not yet been extracted, but that he is going on well.

Mrs Rixom, 108 Claremont Road, has received intimation in letters from the War Office and Major C P Nickalls that her son. Bombardier F W Rixom, Rugby Howitzer Battery, was wounded at the back of the head, with shrapnel on July 29th. He is now in St George’s Hospital, Stockport, and is progressing favourably. This is the second time Bombardier Rixom has been wounded.

Rifleman H G King, of 16 Pinfold Street, New Bilton, who was wounded by shrapnel in the foot on June 26th, as reported in this paper three weeks ago, and was in hospital in France, has had his leg amputated below the knee, the bones being smashed and also poisoned. He is now in hospital at Liverpool, where he has been visited by his friends, who found him going on very well indeed.

TWO B.T.H MEN KILLED.

News was received at the B.T.H this week that Pte Arthur Hipwell, Leicestershire Regiment, son of Mr Arthur Hipwell, of Catthorpe, and Corpl Richards, of the R.W.R, have been killed during the recent fighting. Before the War Pte Hipwell was employed in the Turbine Department, and Corpl Richards was a draughtsman in the Drawing Office for several years.

CAPT C E ANDERSON.

Captain Charles Edward Anderson, the Gordon Highlanders, who was killed in action on July 21st, was the second son of the late William Henry Anderson and Mrs Anderson, of Rokeby House, rugby. He was born in December, 1890, and entered the Gordon Highlanders from Sandhurst in October, 1910, getting his first step in promotion in June, 1912, and his captaincy in April, 1915. He was wounded at the first battle of Ypres in October, 1914, and again slightly on July 14th last, but remained on duty, and was killed by a shell on the early morning of July 21st. Captain Anderson was a keen follower to hounds, and when on leave hunted with the Atherstone and North Warwickshire Hounds.
[Captain Anderson is listed on the Rugby Memorial Gates. His biography will be published at a later date]

SERGT J GILBERT, of BILTON.

Another respected member of the Warwickshire Territorials, Sergt John Gilbert, eldest son of Mr T Gilbert, of Bilton, died from wounds in a Brighton hospital on Tuesday. Sergt Gilbert, who was 32 years of age, was wounded while engaged with a Trench mortar battery on or about July 20th ; and in order, probably, to avoid causing alarm to his wife, who only a fortnight ago gave birth to a child, he wrote home minimising his injuries. On July 26th he was brought to England, and sent to a hospital at Brighton. Unfortunately blood poisoning set in, and developed so rapidly that Sergt Gilbert died before his relatives, who had been summoned by telegraph, could reach the hospital. Before the War he was employed by Messrs Hands, china dealers, Sheep Street. He was a member of the Bilton Working Men’s Club and the Bilton Brass Band. He leaves a wife and four children, to whom, and also his parents, much sympathy is extended in their sad loss.

The interment took place at the Parish Church, Bilton, on Thursday afternoon, the remains having been brought from Brighton on the preceding day. A large number of parishioners assembled at the church to show respect to the deceased and his family ; and although it was not possible to arrange for a military funeral, the wounded soldiers at Bilton Hall Red Cross Hospital supplied, as far as they could, the honours due to a departed comrade. A detachment of about 35 preceded the cortege from deceased’s former home at Bilton Hill. They lined the path to the church, and additional pathos was imparted to the scene when each one saluted, as well as wounds would permit, the coffin, covered with a Union Jack and the cap, tunic, and belt of the deceased, as it passed by. The Burial Service was read by the Rector, the Rev W O Assheton, R.D. Among those who assembled in the church and at the grave-side were : Mr T A Wise, J.P, Mrs West (Bawnmore, Mrs W Barnett, Mrs Assheton, Mrs F E Hands and Mr J Lee (Rugby), Miss Wilson (Bournemouth), Messrs G Wilson and W Wilson, Mr and Mrs F Betts and Mrs Elsom, Mrs Yates, Mr and Mrs H Freeman. Mrs E Smith, Mr and Mrs Manning, Messrs H J Hughes (representing the Working Men’s Club), G Evans, J Cripps, sen, G Birch, J Burton, and others. A number of beautiful floral tributes were sent by relatives and friends, including the members of the Working Men’s Club ; Mr Bedford’ ; Brass Band, of which deceased was formerly a member ; the Bilton Brass Band ; and the wounded soldiers who had collected flowers and made up a handsome cross, upon which they placed the inscription, “ From Wounded Comrades at Bilton Hall.”

DEATH.

HAYES.—On July 19th (killed in action). Signaller Frank Hinde Hayes, aged 19 years, youngest son of Mrs. Hayes, 86 York Street, Rugby.
“ The Lord gave, the Lord hath taken away ;
Even so His servants are tried.
Blessed be the Name of the Lord.”

BOUCHER.—On the 25th July, in hospital, of wounds received in action on 14th July, Captain Alan Estaeurt Boacher, Leicestershire Regiment, dearly loved younger surviving son of the Rev. Canon and Mrs. Boucher, of Frolesworth Rectory, Lutterworth, aged 21.

DICKEN.—July 20th, died of wounds in France, Lance-Corporal Signaller Sidney Harold Dicken, youngest dearly loved son of St. and Mrs. W. Dicken, Claremont Road, Rugby. Aged 22 years. Deeply mourned.

GILBERT.—Died from wounds received in France, Sergt. John T. Gilbert, the beloved Husband of Edie Gilbert, and eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. T. Gilbert, Bilton. Aged 32 years.

HIPWELL.—On July 23, 1916, Pte. John Henry Hipwell, No. 10,816, 6th Leicester Regt. (died of wounds), eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Hipwell, of Lilbourne, aged 23 years.
“ He gravely answered duty’s call,
His-life he gave for one and all.
But the unknown grave is the bitterest blow :
None but aching hearts can know.”
— From his loving father, mother, sister, & brother.

SMITH.—Killed in action on July 22nd, 1916, Eric-Arthur Rae Smith, Second Lieutenant, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, aged twenty-seven years. Youngest son of Arthur E. Smith, Pencarrow, Enfield, Middlesex, and late of Clifton-on-Dunsmore.

WHITE.—On the 19th or 20th July, killed in action, Sergt. W. H. White, 2nd 7th Batt. Royal Warwickshire Regiment, aged 19. Dearly beloved son of Mr. and Mrs. George White, of Dunchurch.

WHITE.—Killed in action in France, July 3, 1916, William Samuel, second son of Thomas and Many Sophie White, of 46 Manor Road, Rugby and grandson of the late Thomas Clarke, of Glencoonera, Irviaestown, Co. Fermanagh, Ireland, who was for 31 years, a well-known member of the Royal Irish Constabulary.
“ No useless coffin endowed his breast,
Nor in sheet nor in shroud they wound him ;
But he lies like a warrior taking his rest,
With no martial cloak around him.”

IN MEMORIAM.

ARIS.—In loving remembrance of Lance-Corpl Mark Aris, killed in action August 6, 1915.
“ Some day we hope to meet him ;
We know not when.
We shall clasp his hands in the Betterland,
Never to part again.”
—Ever in thoughts of his loving SISTERS & BROTHERS, (SID in France).

HOLLIS(Frankton).—In loving Memory of our dear son and brother “ Bert,” who was killed in action at the Battle of Chunuk Bair, August 10, 1915—Sadly missed.
“ For still for him high service waits,
Tho’ earth’s last fight is fought;
God did not give that martial soul
To end at last in nought
That stedfast soldier-heart was not
For this brief life alone;
‘Tis as a soldier he will stand
Before the Great White Throne.”

WOODWARD.—In loving memory of Lance-Corpl. A. Woodward, 7th S. Stafford Regiment, killed in action at Chocolate Hill, Gallipoli, August 7th, 1915.
“ He bravely answered duty’s call,
His life he gave for one and all,
But the unknown grave it the bitterest blow ;
None but aching hearts can know.”
-From his loving wife ; also father and mother.

25th Dec 1915. Derby Recruits Called Up

“ DERBY ” RECRUITS CALLED UP.

SINGLE MEN FROM 19 TO 22 TO JOIN THE COLOURS.

MOBILISATION TO BEGIN ON JANUARY 20TH.

Four groups under Lord Derby’s recruiting scheme have been called to the Colours by Royal Proclamation dated December 20. These men, the youngest of the unmarried recruits eligible for service (except those 18 years of age), are in

Group 2 (age 19-20) Group 4 (age 21-22)

Group 3 (age 20-21) Group 5 (age 22-23)

The men in the first group have not reached military age.

The Proclamation was issued on Saturday from the War Office, together with an announcement explaining the procedure to be followed. Men are required to present themselves for actual service on January 20. In order to facilitate matters a certain number of recruits will be called up for that date, another batch for the 21st, and so forth.

A notice giving fourteen days’ warning will be sent to each man stating when and where he should present himself, but it is pointed out that the exhibition of the Proclamation in public places is sufficient warning to the men concerned, even if they do not receive a private notice.

Claims for postponement to a later group must be made to the Local Tribunal not later than December 30.

Speaking at Bolton on Saturday Lord Derby declared that the pledge to married men would be carried out in the spirit as well as in the letter. All figures as to the number of men who had joined under the scheme were guesswork. He did not know the result himself.

RUGBY VOLUNTEER TRAINING CORPS.

ROUTE MARCH.

APPEAL TO “DERBY” RECRUITS.

There will be a ROUTE MARCH of the above Corps on SUNDAY, 2nd JANUARY, 1916, at 2.30 p.m., and the Commandant and Officers cordially invite all “ Grouped ” men under Lord Derby’s Scheme to join in this Route March and fall in at the DRILL HALL, PARK ROAD, as above stated.

It is hoped that the Route March will be accompanied by a Military Band, and on its return to the Drill Hall facilities will be given for “ Grouped ” men to become attached to, or enrolled members of, this Training Corps if they so desire, in order to, acquire some preliminary training.

An appeal is made to you to make a point of falling in,

SUNDAY, 2ND JANUARY, 1916,

2.30 p.m. at THE DRILL HALL.

Charles H. Fuller,

Commandant.

ENROLMENT SERVICE.—In connection with the 2nd Rugby Company of the Boys’ Brigade, the annual enrolment service was held at the Market Place Wesleyan Church on Sunday morning. The brigade fell in at the Recreation Ground, and under the command of Capt Faulkner and Lieuts Ternouth and Hartshorne, marched to the church, where the service, in which membership cards are distributed, and the Brigade is formally recognised, was conducted by the Rev Robinson Lang. Afterwards the boys were inspected by Staff-Sergt Knowles, H.A.C, a former officer of the Company, who expressed himself as well pleased with the bearing, of the members. The following particulars respecting the brigade were given during the enrolment service :—Past and present members who have joined H.M. Forces : 3 Officers, 2 Staff-Sergts, 16 N.C.O.’s, 3 Privates. One N.C.O (H Snutch) has been killed. One Officer and one Staff-Sergt offered under Derby scheme and rejected. One Officer (Capt J W Faulkner) and one Staff-Sergt offered under Derby scheme and accepted. Boys who have belonged for less than one year are not included in above return, which is of boys of from 1 to 5 years’ service in the Brigade.

INTERESTING GATHERING AT THE DRILL HALL.

After the rush of recruiting that has been going on for several weeks past, it was quite a relief to see the gathering at the Drill Hall on Tuesday, when a large number of ladies and gentlemen who have lately been busy writing out attestation forms, group cards, armlet receipts, etc, assembled to exchange views on the results of their voluntary labours, and receive the cordial thanks of Colonel F Johnstone and the Parliamentary Recruiting Committee, for the excellent work they had accomplished.

It must be borne in mind that several of the ladies and gentlemen present have been giving their services for quite a long time. They undertook the work of Registration, which kept them busy for weeks prior to the commencement of Lord Derby’s scheme, and the efficient way in which this work was done was, to a great extent, responsible for the success achieved by the Recruiting Officer and the P.R.C in completing the work of recruiting. No one felt this more keenly than Colonel Johnstone, who in a few words expressed his grateful thanks to all present, and also to those who were unable to attend, for the patriotic support given to him and to the country, for by their efforts they were in reality doing their duty and assisting in the defence of the Empire. He was sure that the brave men who were defending our hearths and homes in the trenches would also feel grateful to all the workers, who had assisted in enrolling men to give their assistance to help them defeat such a brutal and unscrupulous foe as the German Huns had proved themselves to be.

Mr M E T Wratislaw, in replying for the P.R.C and the voluntary workers, thanked Colonel Johnstone for his remarks, and stated that in his belief each and everyone felt that it was their duty to assist the old country in the time of trial, and were therefore only too pleased to do their little bit.

Mr Arthur Bell, one of the Hon Secretaries to the P.R.C. said that he felt that it would be unwise to allow such an opportunity to pass without thanking all, on behalf of his Co-Secretary and himself, for although the work had been strenuous for all, the duties had been made pleasant by the splendid co-operation of the ladies and gentlemen, who had given up their time in assisting. He was allotted one of the most pleasant duties of that evening in being requested by the workers to present to Mr E Riley a small token of their respect. Mr Riley had been closely engaged in the work from early morning until nearly midnight for about three months, and his extreme affability at all times was deeply appreciated by everyone with whom he was came in contact. On their behalf he was pleased to present him with a silver-mounted salad bowl and servers, a silver-mounted umbrella, and, now that he would probably have a little spare time for a smoke, they included a pipe in case, and the necessary weed to fill it.

Mr Riley suitably responded.

The remainder of the evening was spent in an enjoyable whist drive.

NEW LIGHTING RESTRICTIONS.

HOUSES, SHOPS, AND VEHICLES AFFECTED.

IMPORTANT NOTICES.

The following order as to lights in Rugby, Warwick, and Nuneaton has been issued by Capt Brinkley, Chief Constable of Warwickshire, in accordance with the provisions of an order made by the Secretary of State on December 15, 1915 :-

  1. Subject to the later provisions of this Order, all external lamps, flares, and fixed lights of all descriptions, and all aggregations of lights, whether public or private, must be extinguished, except such public lamps as in the opinion of the Chief Officer of Police are necessary for safety, and any other lights approved by him.

All lights which are not extinguished must be reduced to the minimum intensity consistent with safety, and shaded or obscured so as to render them invisible from above, and to cut off direct light in all directions above the horizontal.

  1. The intensity of the inside lighting of shops and shop fronts must be reduced or the lights obscured or shaded so that no more than a dull, subdued light is visible outside, and no part of the pavement or roadway or any building is distinctly illuminated thereby : in particular, all sources of light must be shaded with some opaque material so that all direct light therefrom is cut off from the windows and doors.
  2. In hotels, flats, dwelling houses and premises of all descriptions not coming under other provisions of this Order, inside lights must be so shaded or reduced, or the windows, skylights, or glass doors so screened by shutters or dark blinds or curtains, &c., that no more than a dull, subdued light is visible from any direction outside.
  3. In factories, workshops, and other such buildings which are illuminated at night, the roof areas and windows must be covered over or obscured, and the lighting intensity reduced to the minimum necessary for the safe and expeditious progress of work.

Provided that lighting may be maintained in armament works and other factories engaged in the manufacture of articles required for the fulfilment of Government contracts, to such extent as may be necessary for the safe and expeditious progress of work.

  1. The intensity of the lighting of railway stations, sidings, goods yards, &c, must be reduced to the minimum that will suffice for the safe and expeditious progress of work : the tops and sides of all external lights which cannot be dispensed with must be shaded or painted over.
  2. Passengers in railway carriages which are provided with blinds must keep the blinds lowered so as to cover the windows. The blinds may be lifted in case of necessity when the train is at a standstill at a station, but if lifted they must be lowered again before the train starts.
  3. With regard to lights on vehicles, the provisions of the Lights (Vehicles) Order of 15th December, 1915 (Statutory Rules and Orders No 1182), shall apply.
  4. In case of sudden emergency, all instructions as to the further reduction or extinction of lights given by or under the direction of a Competent Naval or Military Authority or the Chief Officer of Police shall be immediately obeyed.

This Order shall come into operation on 10th January, 1916.

The Orders of the 8th and 16th April, 1915, applying to the above-mentioned places are revoked from the 10th January.

UNIFORM REGULATIONS FOR VEHICLES.

The first part of the Order as to lights on vehicles extends the following provisions, which already apply in many areas, to the whole country outside the metropolitan area :—

(1) The lighting-up time for all vehicles is to be half an hour after sunset ;

(2) The requirement, to carry lights is extended to all vehicles using the roadway, including vehicles drawn or pushed by hand ; and

(3) All vehicles are required to carry a lamp showing a red light to the rear, and a separate lamp carried at the rear is made compulsory for all except hand vehicles.

As there may be a temporary shortage in the supply of lamps, the operation of the last requirement is postponed until February 10, 1916, in those areas where vehicles are not now required to carry rear lights. The definition of the word “ vehicle ” is : “ Any bicycle, tricycle, or velocipede, and any handcart, that is any vehicle drawn or propelled by hand.” The definition obviously includes perambulators, but it will probably be held that so long as perambulators keep to the footpath and do not use the roadway they will not require to be lighted.

PROHIBITION OF HEADLIGHTS.

Part II. of the Order relates to the prohibition of the use of headlights. and restrictions on other lights on vehicles, in certain areas. This part is of particular interest to the Midlands, many towns in which are included in the area to which it applies. The schedule includes the following places in Warwickshire :—Birmingham (City), Coventry (City), Leamington (Borough), Nuneaton (Borough), Rugby (Urban District), Warwick (Borough).

In these areas headlights are prohibited altogether. The restrictions as to other lights, such as side and rear lights, are :—

Electric Lamps.—The bulb must not exceed 12 watts, or give in use a greater candle-power than a 12-watt bulb as standardised for side-lights by the Engineering Standards Committee. The front glass, if circular, must not exceed 6 inches in diameter, and if rectangular, the longer side must also be obscured with one thickness of ordinary white tissue paper.

Acetylene Lamps—The burner must not consume more than 14 litres (½ cubic foot) per hour, and the above provisions as to the size of the front glass also apply. The whole of the front glass must be obscured with one thickness of white tissue paper or with paint, ground glass, or a disc of some other uncoloured material, so that the obscuring effect is not less than that of one thickness of ordinary white tissue paper.

Oil Lamps.—One burner only is allowed, and the wick must not be more than ¾-inch in width. Where the front glass has a lens or other device for concentrating the light or directing it towards the roadway, the front glass must be obscured in a similar manner to that provided in the case of acetylene lamps as above.

Side Panels. With the exception of small red or green side panels, these must be covered with some opaque material.

The material used for obscuring the light must not be wetted or treated in any other way to reduce its opacity.

URBAN DISTRICT COUNCIL OF RUGBY

NOTICE

CLEANSING OF FOOTPATHS.

THE Public are requested, owing to so many of the employees of the Council having joined H.M. Forces and the difficulty in obtaining the necessary labour, to assist the Council in keeping the Footpaths clean and to clear the Footpaths immediately after a fall of snow has taken place, by so doing they will minimise the inconvenience to pedestrians.

By Order,

JOHN H. SHARP,
Surveyor to the Council.
Surveyor’s Office,
Benn Buildings, Rugby.

 

 

17 Apr 1915. Rugby Territorials Ready For Anything

LETTER FROM THE FRONT.

T Wallace, who is with the Rugby Howitzer Battery at the front, writing to his mother, says they had a lovely passage across the Channel, and then a 24-hours’ journey by rail—after which he made up his mind never to say anything against English railways. He adds : “ We have not seen any Germans yet—only a few prisoners ; but we can hear the guns quite plain. We are in a place where the Germans have been over once and were driven out at the point of the bayonet. . . . I am looking forward to taking my clothes off to-night for the first time since Sunday, and getting some sleep. Don’t forget to send the Advertiser out. There is nothing else I want. We were well served out with clothing before leaving England. We are living in an old chapel—fairly comfortable—for the present. We don’t know how long it will be before our battery has a packet at the Germans—but I don’t think it will be long.”

RUGBY TERRITORIALS READY FOR ANYTHING.

Four old Murrayians attached to the machine gun section of the 1st-7th Royal Warwicks, at present “ somewhere in France,” have written to their old schoolmaster, in which they say :—“ So far we are all feeling fit and ready for anything. After leaving our training quarters in England we had a very pleasant voyage across the water, except for the fact that we were rather overcrowded in the boat. On landing we spent the first night under canvas, and left the following day for some unknown destination. We were 24 hours in the train, which unfortunately was not quite as luxurious as the old L & N-W Railway. They packed us in cattle trucks ; but still, we made it an enjoyable journey. Since leaving the train we have had various billets, such as barns and empty houses, which have plenty of ventilation, thanks to the German shells. During our short stay in one of the base towns we had plenty of trench digging, which served to keep us fit. We had our first spell in the trenches about five days ago, and spent the best part of Easter there. The Germans evidently did not forget that it was Easter, for they sent, us one or two nice eggs over in the shape of shrapnel. At present we are billeted in a town which is used for resting troops, a few miles behind the firing line. Taking it on the whole, under the present conditions we are enjoying ourselves and getting plenty of good food.”

RIFLEMAN DODSON.

Rifleman Dodson, of the Rifle Brigade, son of Mr Edward Dodson, of Newbold-on-Avon, who, as reported in the Advertiser last week, was killed on March 24th. Deceased, who was 22 years of age, was working at the Cement Works at the time he enlisted in September. He went to France about six weeks ago. He fell in a battle during which a friend from Cosford, who went out with him, was bayonetted and killed. He was a member of the Newbold II football team, of which he was vice-captain for two years, and he sometimes played for the first team.

RUGBY TOWN PLAYER KILLED IN ACTION.
PRIVATE GEORGE RICE.

Followers of Association football in Rugby and district will hear with regret that George Rice, one of the half-backs of the Rugby Town Club, has been killed in action. Pte Rice, who was a reservist in the Royal Welsh Fusiliers, and who, previous to being called to the colours, was employed as a polisher at the B.T.H, Coventry, was 28 years of age, and leaves a wife and three children. Rice was a popular player, and a clever half-back, and before, signing on for the Rugby Club he did good service for Lord Street Juniors and Longford, and possessed a handsome set at medals, comprising Winners ; Two “ Midland Daily Telegraph,” one Birmingham Junior, four Coventry and Warwickshire League Championship, two Bedworth Nursing Cup, two Rugby Hospital Cup. Runners up: One Coventry and Warwickshire League, two “ Midland Daily Telegraph,” two Foleshill Nursing Cup, and the Coventry Nursing Cup.

RUGBY TERRITORIAL INJURED.

Bombardier A J Vingoe, of the Rugby Howitzer Battery, has written to his wife, residing at 10 Kimberley Road, Rugby, stating that he has been invalided to England and is now in hospital at Southend, as the result of injuries received “ somewhere in France ” on Easter Monday. Bombardier Vingoe was with the advance party of the battery, which was expecting to go into action on the following day, when he fell down some steps in a barn and fractured his arm. Previous to the war, Bombardier Vingoe, who is believed to be the first local Territorial to sustain injuries, was employed as an instrument maker at the B.T.H.

RECRUITING AT RUGBY.

The following have been accepted at the Rugby Drill Hall during the past week :—Royal Warwick Regiment, J Varney, A Farmer, and V G Paremain ; A.S.C, E H Blinco, E Badby, J Bansfield, H S Pemberton, and C Hart. Butchers and bakers are required for the Army Service Corps, and also men for the Royal Warwickshire Regiment.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Dr WHEELER, North Street, Rugby, is serving with the Royal Army Medical Corps, and Dr Grant, of Albert Street, is serving with the Highland Light Infantry.

Harry Douglas, son of Mr and Mrs Douglas, of 87 Cambridge Street, also late of the Rugby Town Fire Brigade, has been invalided home through injuries received while serving in the Royal Field Artillery.

The 9th (Service) Battalion of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment, quartered at Blackdown, Surrey, did an exceptionally good performance in the recent musketry course, coming out top of the 13th Division of Lord Kitchener’s New Army. The weather was not conducive to good shooting, and the men had to use the new service rifle, to which they were not well acquainted. In the “ A ” Company of the Battalion, who scored most points in the course, there are a good many Rugbeians.

Pte Clifford, 2nd Grenadier Guards, attached to the 1st Irish Guards, who was serving in the Rugby Police Force when be was recalled to the Colours last August, has been shot through the left hand. Pte Clifford, who has been at the front from the commencement of the war, is the third member of the Rugby Police Force who has been wounded, the others being Pte Higginson, of the 2nd life Guards, and Pte Nicholls, Gloucesters. Pte Clifford, who had resolved to enlist in the army, had only a few days to serve in the Police Force when he was called up.

G P Rathbone, youngest son of Mr W T Rathbone, Hillmorton, who enlisted in the 3rd Birmingham City Battalion in October, has received a commission as second lieutenant in the 11th North Staffordshire Regiment. He is at present undergoing a course of instruction at Leeds University previous to joining the regiment.

NEW BILTON MAN WOUNDED A SECOND TIME.

Mrs H Anderson, 39 Pinfold Street, has received news that her son, Pte John Elson, of the Northumberland Fusiliers, was wounded by a bullet in the arm, on April 3rd, in the field, and is at present in hospital at Guildford. Pte Elson, who is a reservist, and was employed by a local builder before the war, has himself written to his mother stating that he is progressing well. This is the second time he has been wounded in this war, the first occasion being several months ago, when he sustained a rather serious gunshot wound in the back and side.

MORE SOLDIERS AND MILITARY WORKERS BADLY NEEDED.

The Chairman of the Urban District Council has received a letter from Colonel Browne, commanding the sixth recruiting area, urging that more men for the Royal Warwickshire Regiment are badly needed, and stating that if we are to carry this war through successfully and quickly every man of eligible age ought either to be under arms, making munitions of war, or serving their country in some capacity.

Colonel Browne appeals through the Chairman of the Urban District Council to the small employers of labour to release every available man, and expresses the opinion that if these employers realised the very critical position of the very existence of their business owing to the war they would co-operate in every way.

Colonel Browne acknowledges how splendidly Rugby has done, but urges that more men are still wanted.

RUGBY VOLUNTEER TRAINING CORPS.

There are now upwards of 250 members of this organisation in Rugby, and it is hoped that all the other men who are eligible will come forward and join the Corps. The duties the Corps is now asked to undertake, which were outlined in a recent issue, make it extremely urgent in the national interests that a strong and efficient force should be raised. However urgent a man’s private business is it is desirable that all should recognise that the existence of that business depends upon the safety of the country, and that they should be prepared to devote a small portion of their time in assisting to preserve this safety.

RUGBY YEOMEN ON THE WAYFARER.

The “ C ” Squadron of the Warwickshire Yeomanry have left their war station for a foreign destination and sailed last week-end.

The Squadron, which includes the Rugby Troop, passed through Rugby Station on Thursday midnight en route for the port of embarkation.

Amongst those on board the Wayfarer, which is supposed to have been torpedoed or mined when off the Scilly Isles, and was subsequently beached at Queenstown, were at least three members of the Rugby Yeomanry Troop-Troopers Farndon, Ellis Reeve, and Biddle. Mr A H Reeve, butcher, of North Street, had a telegram from his son on Monday to say he was safe.

A Falmouth contemporary states that the Wayfarer left Avonmouth with equipment and some men on board. Interviewing one of the rescued yeomen, a correspondent states that at 2.15 on Sunday afternoon a frightful explosion was heard. Steam and smoke rose to a tremendous height, and there was big smashing of glass. The hay which was on board for the horses was blown everywhere. The men took to the boats—one of which contained nearly 50—and rowed about until they were picked up. The men had to get away from the Vessel in what they stood up in and for the rest all was lost, including in some instances a fair amount of money.

The main body of yeomen sailed on another vessel.

SWINFORD YEOMAN REPORTED DROWNED.

A report has reached Swinford that Trooper E R I Powell, son of the Rev J G Powell, vicar of Swinford, has been drowned. It is stated that the boat in which he and others were making their escape from the Wayfarer after the explosion capsized.

CASUALTIES AMONG L & N-W RAILWAYMEN.

According to the April number of the “ L & N-W Railway Gazette,” there were 1,058 casualties reported among L & N-W Railway men with the Forces between February 19th and March 15th. The list includes the following :—Killed: H R Barwick, East Anglian Engineers (Wolverton). Died from wounds: T C Tooth, Bucks Territorials (Wolverton); C Manning, Northamptonshire Regiment (Rugby). Wounded or sick: J W Windsor, 1st Worcester Regiment (Rugby) : F White; 3rd Worcester Regiment (Northampton) ; C J Houghton, 1st Bedford Regiment (Bletchley) ; W Rawlins, Duke of Cornwall’s L.I (Northampton) ; J Taylor, Middlesex Regiment (Wolverton) ; C Rose, Royal Field Artillery (Wolverton) ; W J Cooke, Oxford and Bucks L.I (Wolverton) ; J H Busson, Army Service Corps (Rugby).

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR.

THE DRINK QUESTION.

SIR,—It is gratifying to read in your last issues Mr R Dumas’ opinion that drinking habits have not interfered with the work of the B.T.H Company. I would claim for the Rugby Land Society a large share in bringing about so satisfactory a result. That society in all their conveyances have prohibited any buildings erected on their plots being used as public-houses, with the result that in all the streets they have laid out the residents are freed from the temptations that are so frequent in the central and older part of Rugby,

It is somewhat curious that in the older parts the licensed houses are to be found in groups of three, and here and there two adjoin one another.

The site of the licensed house in Oxford Street was obtained independently of the Land Society.

April 14th.            J W KENNING.

SHOP ASSISTANTS AND THE WAR.

DEAR SIR,—As a shop-assistant (and grocer, too), may I write in defence of myself and assistants generally and try to show to a certain class of people who are never tired of throwing out silly sarcastic remarks, devoid of all humour, as to why we shop-assistants are not supposed to be enlisting in the numbers that we might. Let me refute that statement, for I know grocery firms in Rugby who have sent 20% and over of their employees to the colours. This means a very serious handicap to the carrying on of “ Business as usual.”

No doubt more could be spared, if certain section of the so-called “ patriotic ” public would be patriotic enough to have a little more consideration for the short-handed tradesman, who, and justly too, is obliged to keep up, if possible, a full staff to deal competently with his customers—the patriotic (?) section, who wave flags, and shout “ Enlist! enlist ! ” to the man who calls for orders ; and then telephones three and four times a day for goods to be “ sent at once ! ” or “ I shall go elsewhere ! ” Is it likely that master men are going to release their trained assistants when they are open to such competition as this ? And do these particularity patriotic persons stop to think if they are giving up themselves half so much as they are expecting these shop assistants to give up ?

How many shop-assistants are being dealt with in the same manner as are the recruits from the Works here in Rugby, who, I believe, receive a third pay (or half-pay, if married), and an open place when they return ?

This is a matter purely for the master-men I know, but it make a vast difference in the quality of our patriotism, and it eases the road to the Drill Hall. Not that I maintain that shop-assistants should be treated in the same liberal manner, but it is, just a point in my argument that should not be lost sight of when sneering at shop-assistants for not enlisting.

I and others often get sneered at by the very people who are keeping us here, who spend enough on one dinner of the week to pay a dozen of we assistants a part of our pay while fighting our battles, and their’s.

Let these people help to send us, we are ready and eager to go, ready to give up not only our positions, but, maybe, our lives. Let us go as their “ special ” soldiers, as they cannot go themselves. If this is too much for them to do, if this is too “ real ” a way for them to show their patriotism for our dear old country, then do not sneer at the shop-assistant, if he also puts self first. Give him a little more encouragement, a little more real help, and show him that you are really patriotic, then you will be surprised at the vast number of shop assistants who are willing to join the army and do their “ little bit.”— Believe me, Dear Sir, Yours faithfully,

B. L. H. (THE GROCER’S MAN).

 

27th Mar 1915. Rugby Volunteer Training Corps

RUGBY VOLUNTEER TRAINING CORPS.

TWO DIFFICULTIES ELUCIDATED.

The present membership of the Volunteer Training Corps for Rugby is 235, More would, no doubt, have joined but for two points on which there has recently been information given of value to those interested in the movement. In the first place, men have been deterred from joining owing to the impression that they were not likely to be asked to perform any serious duties. With regard to this objection, we may state that the War Office has recently enquired from the Central Association of Volunteer Training Corps if the members of the various corps would do local patrol work, and how many men would be able to go away to undertake similar duties elsewhere. Further, that War Office has asked how many men would be able to go away for service in other parts of England in the event of invasion. Lord Crewe has expressed the hope that those corps would become a permanent organisation when the war is over, so that it may now be taken for granted that the value of such corps is recognised, and that those in authority are anxious to know what the members are able to do.

Another difficulty had been the declaration members are expected to sign. On this point Mr B B Cubitt, assistant secretary to the War Office, has written as follows respecting the declaration :—

“ This undertaking is not a mere formality, and the man signing it is expected to fulfil his obligation. If a man who may be called upon is not in a position to fulfil his engagement he can leave the corps.”

Mr Tennant, speaking in the House of Commons on March 1st, said : “ In cases where good and sufficient reasons are not shown a man ought not to be allowed to take the lesser obligation when he ought to fulfil the greater obligation of serving with the colours.” As to their powers, Mr Tennant pointed out that they could only use the power of persuasion. He also expressed appreciation of the self-sacrifice of the men who had joined the corps.

Col H R Vaughan, writing from the War Office on the question of railway men, points out that a railway employee, even if he joined a corps, could not be asked to join the Army unless he had the permission from his employers to go. There can be no doubt that the same condition applies equally to men who are engaged in Government contract work.

A County Committee for Warwickshire has now been formed by the Lord-Lieutenant and Col Wyley, of Coventry, has been appointed County Commandant.

ORDERS FOR NEXT WEEK.

RUGBY VOLUNTEER TRAINING CORPS.

“A” Company.

Till further notice.—No. 1 Platoon : Outdoor drill, Wednesdays (fall-in top Barby Road, town end), 8 0 p.m. Big School, Fridays (except Good Friday), 8.0 p.m.—No. 2 Platoon : Outdoor Tuesdays (fall-in top Murray Road, 7.30 p.m. ; Drill Hall, Thursdays, 8.0 p.m.- No. 3 Platoon : Outdoor Wednesdays and one other day as arranged.—No. 4 Platoon : Outdoor, Tuesdays (fall-in top Murray Road), 7.30 p.m ; Drill Hall, Fridays, 8.0 p.m.

Saturdays, fall-in 2.30 p.m top of Barby Road.

Shooting Range is open at Drill Hall, 7.30 to 9.30, every week-day except Saturday.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Seventy members of the Rugby Conservative Club are at present serving with the colours in various capacities.

It is estimated that the extra money put into circulation in Rugby during the stay of the soldiers was about £8,000 per week—probably more.

The 7th Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment, which includes the Rugby Infantry Company, left Essex this week, presumably for foreign service.

Harold Loverock, second son of Mr Lewis Loverock, who has been in South Africa for the past three years, has joined the Natal Light Horse, and is at the Front in German South-West Africa.

Maurice Howkins, son of Mr W Howkins, of Hillmorton Grounds, who recently received a commission as second lieutenant in the 1st London Brigade Royal Field Artillery, has now been gazetted second lieutenant in the Royal Horse Artillery.

A son of Mrs Wheeler, of 135 Abbey Street, has been promoted to the rank of sergeant in the Oxon and Bucks Light Infantry (Cycling Section). He is at present at Bradford-on-Avon, Wilts. Mrs Wheeler has three sons serving their country—two in the Royal Warwicks and one in the Oxon and Bucks Light Infantry. The latter has served 7 1/2 years in Africa.

Pte Alfred Hawkins, of the Northamptonshire Regiment, son of Mr A Hawkins, of Harborough Magna, was wounded in the arm by shrapnel on March 11th, and is at present in a hospital at Rouen. His parents received a letter on Thursday, stating that he was progressing favourably.

Lce-Corpl G A Barrett, of the 5th Rifle Brigade, an old St Matthew’s boy, who, as stated in the Advertiser last week, had been wounded, is at present in a hospital in England. We understand that he has been seriously wounded in the lungs, and some time will necessarily elapse before he makes a complete recovery. His father, Mr F T Barrett, of 17 Stephen Street, visited him last Saturday, and Lce-Corpl Barratt has since, written a very cheerful postcard. Lce-Corpl Barrett, who formerly worked for Messrs Frost, joined the army on the outbreak of the war, and had only been at the front a short time before he was wounded. A rumour gained currency during the week that he had succumbed to his wounds, but this, happily, proved to be untrue.

Pte Albert Batchelor, of the 2nd Royal Warwickshire Regiment, son of Mr and Mrs B Batchelor, of 34 Arnold Street, Rugby, is again an inmate suffering from wounds received at the Front. On Saturday, March 6th, he was wounded at 10.30 a.m, and lay 8 1/2 hours before receiving attention. He is now at the Sailors’ Rest, Ramsgate. Pte Batchelor, who is an old St Matthew’s boy, was previously incapacitated in October with a bullet wound in the neck and shrapnel in the knee. His brother Oscar is a despatch rider in Lord Kitchener’s Army.

Lce-Corpl Sidney Hubert Hadfield, 1st King’s Royal Rifles (third son of Mr J Hadfield, of 4 Charlotte Street, Rugby), who was seriously wounded in the right leg, by shrapnel near Mons at the commencement of the war, has arrived home for a short time. The unfortunate young fellow, who is only 26 years of age, has been in a London Hospital for the past six months, but, despite the best of attention, it is feared that he is doomed to be a cripple for life. His general health has also been adversely affected, and he has been sent home to effect, if possible, an improvement in this before undergoing an operation. He has served eight years in the army.

WAR CASUALTIES.

Regret will be felt in Rugby by many people to learn of the death of Sapper Ernest Lawrence Manton, of the East Anglican Royal Engineers. A native of Bedford, Sapper Manton, whose age was 24, was employed for a time at the B.T.H Works. He then took a situation in Coventry, though still residing in Rugby, journeying to business each morning. He was also engaged to be married to a Rugby lady, with whom much sympathy will be felt. The last letter received from him stated that he expected to take part in a big battle next day, and it was probably in the fighting at Neuve Chapelle that he was killed.

Sapper Manton was a member of Bilton Football Club, for whom he kept goal. During last summer he won first prize in a billiard handicap at the Regent Street Billiard Rooms, and for several months was a member of St Matthew’s Church Choir.

From a Bedford contemporary we learn that deceased was the younger of two brothers who were in the Royal Engineers. He had been in the Bedford Engineers for four years, and has resigned, but on the outbreak of the war he rejoined his old regiment, and went to the Front with the 1st Company. His mother received a letter from Second-Lieut O H Keeling, of the E.A.R.E, stating that her son was killed in action on March 10th. “ He was in my section,” the officer continued, “ and in him the section has lost one of the best of its men. I have heard something of the sacrifice he made when volunteering in August. He was always so cheery and ready to do his duty. Only last week he struck me particularly in this respect, when he was working in mud and water up to his knees—working at draining a trench that others might walk dry shod in it. Please let me offer my sincere sympathy to you in your great loss, but I hope your sorrow may be in some way lessened by the thought that he died for his country.”

RECRUITING AT RUGBY.

There has been a marked improvement in recruiting at Rugby during the past week, and 16 men have been attested. Suitable men are now required to be trained for non-commissioned officers in the 13th R.W.R ; and wheelwrights, shoeingsmiths, and saddlers are also wanted. Those who have enlisted this week are: Cavalry, S Dyson ; R.E, H Baines ; A S.C, H J Rowe, T Burns, R J Reaves, and H S Jude ; R.F.A, W G Fuller, J Cox and W Cox ; Northants, E Smith and G Southern ; 13th Gloucesters, W Moore ; Middlesex, A Page, R Philpott, and W A Walker ; Royal Welsh Fusiliers, W E Bennett.

REJECTED AT LEICESTER, ACCEPTED AT RUGBY.

The “ Leicester Daily Post ” for Wednesday remarks, with reference to the slackness in recruiting in that city, that it is stated that in Leicester and Leicestershire there have been a larger proportion of rejects than in other adjoining areas for medical reasons which to the would-be soldiers did not seem quite sufficient, and that from the beginning of the war up till now many men unable to enlist there have been accepted at Rugby.