9th Nov 1918. An Unfounded Rumour

AN UNFOUNDED RUMOUR
PREMATURE REJOICING.

Feverish excitement was caused in the town on Thursday afternoon by the circulation of a rumour that an armistice had been signed at 2.30 p.m.

In several instances workpeople gave themselves up to jubilation, and work came to a standstill, until it was found later in the day that the statement had not come through an official source and was premature.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Capt George Alan C Smith, M.C, Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, who has been killed by a shell in France, was the elder son of the Master of Dulwich College. At Rugby he was head of his house (Mr G F Bradby’s), and played in the School XV for two seasons, captaining the team during his last term.

Lieut G T S Horton, Royal Hussars, son of Mr T Horton, J.P, Ashlawn House, near Rugby, has been awarded the Military Cross.

Sergt A J Chadwick, of Kilsby, who has been on active service since December, 1914, has been awarded the Military Medal for gallantry on the field.

Lance-Corpl W L Gilks, Yorks & Lancs Regt, son of the late Mr Lewis Gilks, farmer, Grandborough, has been killed in action. He enlisted in August, 1914, and had seen considerable foreign service.

The following Rugby men have been posted as missing :—Pte E Cox, Pte F Smyth, Pte C Spokes, and Pte W Boote, all of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment ; Ptes A Webster, Royal West Surrey Regiment ; A J Webster, London Regiment ; G Watkins, R.W.R, and H Cockerill, M.G.C, have been reported killed ; and Pte W H Newman, Royal Berks Regiment, has died of wounds. Lance-Corpl R G Salmon, M.G.C, has been taken prisoner.

Gunner F J Lines, youngest son of Mrs Lines and the late Mr Lines, 17 Spring Street, died of wounds on October 6th. He was an old Murrayian, 20 years of age, and before joining the army in August, 1916, he was employed by the late Mr C B Jones, hairdresser, Murray Road, who has also been killed in action.

Lance-Corpl H Evans (23), son of Mr W Evans, Thurlaston, formerly of Crick, has died at Norwich Hospital from pneumonia, contracted on active service. He joined the K.R.R on September 2, 1914, and saw a good deal of heavy fighting round Ypres. He was wounded at Hooge in 1915, and again on the Somme in 1916. He was subsequently invalided home, and afterwards was transferred to the Mechanical Transport, A.S.C. He contracted a chill while on duty, and after laying up for a few days he reported for duty too soon, caught another chill, and died on Wednesday. In peace time he was well known as a footballer and cricketer. An elder brother was killed in June last, and another brother is in France.

Pte Victor Cowley, son of Walter Cowley, 34 Poplar Grove, 1st Dorset Regt, has been reported missing since September 30. He joined up in September, 1914, had been twice wounded, and went to France for the third time in March last. He was an old St Matthew’s boy, and before the war was employed in the Winding Department of the B.T.H.

Pte Bernard Woodward, youngest son of Mr and Mrs T Woodward, 39 Stephen Street, has been wounded.

Ptc A Allen, Gloucester Regt, who was employed in the B.T.H Foundry before the war, died from wounds on October 25th.

The Northants Yeomanry, twice mentioned by the Earl of Cavan in his official despatches for distinguished service in Italy last week, is commanded by Sir Charles Lowther, formerly Master of the Pytchley Hounds, and includes amongst its officers Major T E Manning, captain of the Northamptonshire County cricket team.

The death occurred at Stratford-on-Avon, on Tuesday, of ex-Sergt Norman Kinman, of the Warwickshire Royal Horse Artillery, who was well known in athletic circles in the Midlands prior to the War. He was a prominent sprinter and an excellent Rugby footballer, doing fine work for Stratford-on-Avon as wing three-quarter. He gained his Midland cap, and also toured with Leicester. He volunteered at the outbreak of war, and was dis-charged in February of this year after a bad gas attack, having gained his Mons Star and Military Medal. He was 30 years of age.

MEMORIAL SERVICE FOR REV. R. W. DUGDALE.

A choral requiem in memory of the Rev R W Dugdale, curate in charge, who was killed in France recently, was celebrated at Holy Trinity Church on Saturday (All Souls’ Day). The celebrant was the Rev G H Roper, assisted by the Rev T H Perry. The 42nd Psalm was chanted at the beginning of the service, and the hymns were : “ Lord, it belongs not to my care,” and “ Let Saints on Earth.” At the conclusion of the service the Nune Dimittis was sung. The congregation included Mrs Hardy and Miss Dugdale (sisters), Canon Simpson, Capt & Mrs C P Evers, Messrs F J Kittermaster, C H Fuller, F Thompson, G E Over, W Brooke, A W Sheasby, W T Coles Hodges, C E L Wright, F W Cooke, W. M. and E R Giding. Senior P.M (representing the Lodge of Rectitude, Freemasons, of which the Rev R W Dugdale was chaplain), A Coaton, Mr & Mrs H Marple, Mrs C N Hoare, Miss Gray, Mike Tomlinson, Miss Dean, Miss Buckley, Miss Stuart, Mrs Stokes, Mrs Stanley, Miss Cope and Mrs Ray (representing Murray School, of which he was chaplain), Misses Hollowell, Miss Sargent, Miss Longstaff, Miss Lines, Mrs Beasley, &c.

DUNCHURCH.

The funeral of Leonard J Hopkins, aged 18 years, son of Mr and Mrs Wm Hopkins of Dunchurch, took place at Dunchurch on Tuesday last. Deceased, who was a private in the Devon Reserves, died after a short illness in Waveney Hospital, Ballymena, Ireland. Before joining the army he was employed as gardener at Thurlaston Grange, and a bunch of mauve chrysanthemums (his favourite flower) was sent by Mr Appleby, bearing the word, “These flowers he tended so carefully during his life are sent as a token of deep sympathy from all at Thurlaston Grange.” The funeral service was conducted by the Vicar, the Rev. E P Rowland, and the coffin was borne by four soldiers staying in the village.
Among the flowers were tributes from Mrs Mallam, Mr and Mrs Appleby, Mr and Mrs Dew, Mrs Borsley, Mr and Mrs Tomlin, and Mrs Busby. The deceased was very popular with the boys of the village, and in addition to the above were wreaths from “His Chums,” Pte R Jennings (serving in France), and the Scholars and Staff of Dunchurch Boys’ School. The people of the village fell the deepest sympathy with Mr and Mrs Hopkins in their bereavement.

LONG ITCHINGTON.

THE ROLL OF HONOUR.—Mr and Mrs Joseph Lane have now received official information that their son, Pte Ernest Lane (R.W.R), formerly porter at the Station here, was wounded and is missing from September 2nd last.—Mr and Mrs Fred Sabin have been advised through a letter from Pte T Sewell (his chum) that their younger son, Pte Edward Sabin (R.W.R), has been killed in action. His friend saw him fall, and was with him till death took place. The news has come as a great shock to Mr and Mrs Sabin, the latter of whom has been seriously ill with influenza.

SERGT RUSSELL WOUNDED.—News is to hand that Sergt F Russell (West Riding Regt) was wounded as he was leading his platoon into action on the 14th ult, a piece of shrapnel penetrating his left fore-arm. He was operated on, and is now at Nottingham. Sergt Russell, who served all through the Boer War, was called up as a Reserve in August, 1914, and has seen a great deal of hard and severe fighting in the present war.

WOLSTON.

DEATH OF CORPL L PAGE.—The news arrived at Wolston recently of the death of Corpl Lewis Page, Warwickshire Yeomanry, from dysentry in Egypt. Corpl Page was the third son of Mrs Page and the late Mr W Page, of Wolston, and was in his 35th year. Before hostilities commenced he was a member of the Warwickshire Yeomanry, and was in business as a hay and corn merchant. Much sympathy is felt for his mother and brothers and sister, and for his young widow, who resides at Coventry. Three brothers of the deceased are still fighting.”

SOLDIERS’ CHRISTMAS PARCELS.—The sum of £56 13s 3d has been collected in the parishes of Brandon, Wolston, and Bretford. The committee have sent 74 presents of 12s each to men abroad, and 24 of 5s each to men in England, and £4 4s 5d for parcels to the six prisoners of war. The total expenses were £2 0s 10d.

LIEUT-COL. H. H. PODMORE, D.S.O.

On Saturday afternoon a portrait of Lieut-Col H H Podmore, D.S.O, Northants Regiment, killed in action in December, 1917, was unveiled in the Temple Speech Room by the Headmaster, Dr A A David. The painting was by Mr Charles Miller, and it was presented to the School by the past and present members of Mr B B Dickinson’s house.
Mr R G C Levens, head of the house, formally presented the portrait in “pleasant memory of Col Podmore’s tutorship.”
Dr David accepted the gift on behalf of the School from “ the house which Hubert Podmore served, loved, and inspired.” He added that the memorial was happily conceived, and before unveiling it he wished to thank the past and present members of the house who had joined in the gift, and who desired—and rightly desired—to set it among the pictures of those whom Rugby remembered with gratitude and with honour. They were also grateful to the artist. His was a hard task, but be (Dr David) thought when they saw the picture they would agree that his insight and his skill had been equal to it. He had seen in the photograph, and revealed to them again, what they remembered in the man. Dr David then formally unveiled the portrait, and, having done so. he said :—“ I do not suppose any of us knows a man whose features and expression more faithfully imaged the character within. If the face is ever the window of the soul it was so in him. There was nothing that he had need to hide, therefore the window was not darkened. I wonder if those who follow us here will know from this picture what manner of man he was ? I think they will.”

“ FEED THE GUNS ” CAMPAIGN.

A great effort is being made to extend this campaign in the local villages, and in connection with it representatives of Rugby Rural District (North) and Monks Kirby Rural District Local Committee met at St Matthew’s Boys’ School, Rugby, on Saturday afternoon, last, when the Earl of Denbigh presided, supported by Mr E H Carter, O.B.E (hon county secretary), and Mr R H Myers (hon local secretary).—Mr Myers gave an account of the progress of the organisation, and intimated that final arrangements had been made for a gun to tour the villages during Gun Week (Nov 18-23), when it is hoped that a sum of at least £66,000 will be subscribed in War Bonds and War Savings Certificates.—Lord Denbigh urged those present not to relax their efforts, in view of the satisfactory military position, but to vigorously prosecute the financial campaign til final victory is obtained.

THE INFLUENZA EPIDEMIC.

There are signs this week that the influenza epidemic, which has claimed so many victims locally, is now on the wane, although unfortunately the death roll is still very high. Since the outbreak of the epidemic the number of deaths from influenza in Rugby and the immediate neighbourhood totals 86, of which 61 have occurred in Rugby and New Bilton. In Rugby alone 27 deaths from these diseases were registered last week, and another 14 occurred in the villages immediately adjacent to the town. Thirteen deaths were registered during the first three days of the present week. . . .

NEEDLESS ALARM.

Some alarm has apparently been caused in Cromwell Road by the proposal that the Mitchison Home is to be used as a hospital for influenza patients. Residents in that neighbourhood may feel assured there is no cause to be uneasy.

RUGBY MAN’S FOOLISH ACT.
UNLAWFULLY WEARING AN OFFICER’S UNIFORM.
A HEAVY FINE.

A remarkable story was told to the Mansfield Magistrates on Thursday last week in a case in which Percy Thos Tallis, a mechanical engineer, now on Government work at Coventry, living in Cross Street, Rugby, and whose father is an innkeeper in the town, was charged with unlawfully wearing the uniform of an officer of the R.A.F at Sutton in Ashfield on October 23rd. After being arrested by Insp Brooks, defendant made a statement, in which he said he received information that his brother, who had been seriously wounded, was lying in a military hospital at Nottingham. He went there to see him, his wife joining him the next day. On the 20th ult he made the acquaintance at a hotel of a man named Millus, who was wearing an officer’s uniform. He suggested that he (defendant) should put on a similar uniform and be photographed in it. He agreed to this, and after putting on the uniform they went into the streets, where Millus persuaded him to accompany him to Mansfield. He did so, and the next day, at Millius’s request, he consented to visit Mansfield again. They took tickets there, but alighted at Sutton, where he was arrested.
Mr W Gamble, who defended, pleaded guilty, but urged extenuating circumstances. When Millus saw defendant at the hotel he said, “Put on this uniform and be photographed in it.” Defendant several times refused to do so, and it was only after Millus said he belonged to the military police, and that no harm would result, that defendant consented. He went out with the intention of being photographed in the uniform, and then coming back and taking it off. but Millus persuaded him to go to Mansfield. It was evidently a case of a strong mind overcoming a weaker mental capacity. Defendant committed this foolish act, but Mr Gamble submitted that no real harm had been done. At Mansfield he found Millus was wanted on a charge, so the latter could afford to be reckless. Defendant bore an excellent character. This had been a lesson to him, and defendant would take care that he would not repeat such foolishness again.
The Chairman told defendant he had been guilty of a most foolish act, and had rendered himself liable to a much heavier penalty than the Bench proposed to inflict. He would have to pay £10, and they hoped this would teach him a lesson.—The money was paid.

NEW RATION BOOKS IN USE.

The new ration books came into use on Monday, and for the next six months they will be the medium by which the available supplies of meat, fats, sugar, and jam will be equitably distributed among the population. Should the War come to an end during the period there is no likelihood that the necessity for rationing will cease. Organised distribution of food, in fact, will have to be continued for many months after fighting stops. No exception is likely to be taken to the maintenance of restrictions. Rationing from the first has worked smoothly in this country, and has been accepted as the fairest—and indeed the only—method of apportioning foods the supply of which is insufficient to meet the normal demand.
Only one change is associated with the use of the new book. Jam, marmalade, and honey are added to the list of rationed articles. It was originally intended that syrup and treacle should also be included; but Lord Bledisloe, the Director of Sugar Distribution, announces that there is no need to surrender coupons when buying these foods. In view of the quantities in which jam is customarily sold, the ministry of Food has arranged that the jam coupons in the ration books may be used in each case in the week marked on the coupon, or in any of the seven succeeding weeks. The red coupon numbered 1 for the week ending November 9th may be used at any time before December 29th. A customer, therefore, may hold his coupons over for seven weeks, and in the eighth week buy a 2-lb jar of jam with the eight coupons saved.

WARWICKSHIRE WAR AGRICULTURAL COMMITTEE.

The following reports have been made by the Executive Committee and the Women’s War Agricultural Committee to the County Council :—
The work of the harvest in this county has, generally speaking, been completed, notwithstanding the shortage of labour and bad weather experienced for the last six weeks. The inspection of farms has been continued, and in 34 cases cultivation orders have been issued. In three cases recommendations have been made to the Board of Agriculture to determine tenancies, and in two cases derelict land has been compulsorily taken for improvement. The total acreage ordered to be broken up is at present 35,103 acres.
Orders have been received from the Board of Agriculture for a re-survey of the county for the purpose of more carefully classifying the grassland and for obtaining particulars of all farms not properly cultivated. It is proposed to put this in hand forthwith. The committee continues its efforts to retain skilled men in their employment on the land, releasing for service only those who can best be dispensed with ; 1,402 soldiers from the distribution centre at Budbrooke Barracks are employed on the land. Additional camps have been established at Kingsbury and Mancetter. The total number of prisoners employed is 636, of which 507 are in the camps, 49 are billeted with farmers, and 80 are out with migratory gangs. Including the horses at the prisoner camps, there are 218 under the committee’s control. The number of tractors in the county is 73.
The organisation of threshing has been successfully carried out, district committees were formed, and districts allotted to threshing proprietors. Shortage of drivers has somewhat handicapped the work, but every endeavour is being made to rectify this.
During the past season Mrs Bedhall has given 92 demonstrations in fruit preservation, with an average attendance of 38. One week was devoted to training pupils to work the district canneries established in the county. Thirty visited have been made to such canneries for the purpose of giving further advice and assistance.
The appeal to school children to pick blackberries to be made into jam for the Army and Navy was taken up with keenness, and has been conducted with great success. Already 29 tons 7 cwt have born sent to jam factories.
The Women’s Agricultural Committee reported :—During the past quarter the principal work has been the formation of gangs of woman for threshing. These gangs consist of a number of women, varying from four to six, one of whom is invariably the forewoman. Twenty gangs are already at work, comprising approximately 90 women, and from reports already received they appear to be giving satisfaction. We are prepared to supply any further gangs that may be asked for. We have a total number of 406 girls working in the county at this time, and a welfare officer has been appointed from London to supervise their recreation and general well-being. The total number of L.A women trained in this county since April, 1917, is 261, a very large percentage of whom are still on farm work here, and we are greatly indebted to the farmers who have undertaken to help our committee in this way.

WARWICKSHIRE COUNTY COUNCIL.
LAND FOR EX-SERVICE MEN.

At a quarterly meeting of the Warwickshire County Council, held at Warwick on Tuesday, Lord Algernon Percy, presiding, the Small Holdings Committee presented a report on the provision of land for ex-service men, and recommended “that the Small Holdings and Allotments Committee be charged with the matter of dealing with the settlement of ex-service men on the land in the county, all the powers of the Council being delegated to them.”
Alderman Sir H R Fairfax-Lucy moved an amendment : “ That the County Council considers the proposals of the Board of Agriculture for the provision of land for ex-service men a most unsatisfactory one, as it does not enable these men to become the owners of their holdings, and that, further, they consider that the powers of borrowing for purchasing land and adaptation should be restored, and that they should be informed at an early date on what terms loans will be issued for that purpose.” He pointed out that under the policy of the Board of Agriculture County Councils could take up land only through the powers of the board to obtain loans, and this depended on the adoption of the system of a perpetual rent charge. He thought it was their duty to ascertain the demand for land, and this information could be obtained through the Territorial Force Association, which had relations with discharged soldiers. It would be the duty of the County Council to find loans for those who had experience and capital to take up land. It would be necessary for the Small Holdings Committee to continue to press for the re-establishment of their old powers.—The amendment was carried.

SHOP HOURS IN RUGBY.

The following copy of a letter, written by a Rugby housewife to the Secretary of the Housewives’ Committee, was sent to us last week too late for insertion :—
DEAR MADAM,—We understand your committee tried some time ago to get some consideration and convenience for busy workers to do their shopping. They are the majority ; they are the ready cash people ; yet all our wants and purchases have to be crowded into Friday night and Saturday afternoon, waiting in crowded shops, getting served in a take-it-or-leave-it-quick style. If there was a later hour—say, 7.30 on Tuesday—it would ease both server and served at the week-end.
Does it ever occur to traders that the shops are already closed morning, noon, and night to the workers for four whole days?
Can we who have twenty minutes to half-an-hour’s walk home and live the same distance from the town sandwich a tea-dinner and a wash in-between, and yet get in town even by seven o’clock ? No, not for a bit of cotton wool or a pound of oatmeal, or any other necessary for whatever illness or emergency is in the home. If we—the majority—have still to be put to this inconvenience, there is no need for the leisured minority to require four days in which to make their purchases.
Why not even things up a bit ?—Yours very truly,
“ A.E.W.”

DEATHS.

ELLARD.—On October 30th, at 29 Station Hospital, Cremona, Italy, Trooper W. J. ELLARD, 14th Corps, Northants Yeomanry, younger son of Z. J. Ellard, Barby, aged 27 years.

EVANS.—On November 6th, at the Military Hospital, Norwich, Pte. HARRY EVANS, the beloved second son of W. E. & A. M. Evans.—“ Blessed are the pure in heart, for they shall see God.”

GILKS.—Killed in action on October 13th, Lance-Corpl. WM. L. GILKS, Yorks. and Lancs. Regt., aged 22.

HOPKINS.—On October 30th, at Ballymena, Ireland, of pneumonia, Pte. L. J. HOPKINS, the dearly beloved son of Elphinstone and Annie Hopkins, Dunchurch, aged 18 years.

LINES.—On October 6th, Gunner F. J. LINES, R.F.A., youngest and dearly beloved son of Mrs. Lines and the late Mr. H. Lines, 17 Spring Street, who died of wounds received in action in France ; aged 20. Never forgotten.

OLDHAM.—Killed in action on October 24th, in France, HARRY, fourth son of the late Stephen and Annie Oldham, 33 Stephen Street, Rugby (late of Long Lawford), aged 25 years.—Deeply mourned by his loving Mother and Brothers and fiancee Lottie.

PEARMAN.—On November 4th, at Warley Military Hospital, after a short illness of pneumonia, HERBERT CARL, elder and beloved son of Thomas and Ada Pearman, of Ryton-on-Dunsmore, in his 23rd year.

STIBBARDS.—On the 31st October, 1918, at the 1st Eastern General Hospital, Cambridge, Seaman HARRY FRANK STIBBARDS, B.Z. 11286, “Attentive III,” passed peacefully away after a short illness, contracting pneumonia. Much suffering patiently borne. Interred in Cambridge Military Cemetery.—Deeply mounted by all who knew him.

WEBSTER.—In memory of ARTHUR JAMES WBSTER, beloved son of Mr. &. Mrs. Webster, of 9 Old Station Square, Rugby, who was killed in action during the evening of September 28, 1918.
“ A loving son, a faithful brother,
One of the best towards his mother ;
He bravely answered his country’s call,
He gave his life for one and all.
We pictured his safe returning,
We longed to clasp his hand ;
But God has postponed our meeting
Till we meet in the Better Land.”
—From his loving Mother, Father, and Brothers and Sisters.

IN MEMORIAM.

ELKINGTON.—In proud and loving memory of our dear son and brother, JOHN THOMAS ELKINGTON (JACK), who fell in action “ somewhere in France ” on November 10th, 1916.—“ God’s Will be done.”
“ Just when his hopes were brightest,
Just when thoughts were best ;
He was called from this world of sorrow
To that Home of eternal rest.
Never a day but his name is spoken,
Never a day but he’s in our thoughts ;
A link from our family chain is broken ;
He’s gone from our home, but not from our hearts.
His loving smile, his cherry ways,
Are pleasant to recall ;
He had a kindly word for each,
And died beloved by all.”
—Too dearly loved to be forgotten by his Mother, Father, and Sisters, of Long Lawford, Brothers in France and Germany.

 

2nd Nov 1918. Influenza Epidemic, Over Fifty Deaths Locally.

INFLUENZA EPIDEMIC.
OVER FIFTY DEATHS LOCALLY.

The influenza epidemic has assumed serious proportions locally, and from October 14th till last Thursday morning no fewer than 52 deaths from either influenza or pneumonia occurred in Rugby and the immediate vicinity. Of these over 40 have been registered within the past 12 days. A peculiar feature of the malady is that the victims chiefly consist of young and robust persons, and largely among people whose means, one would surmise, would enable them to live as well as rationing regulations will permit and engaged in healthy occupations.

During the past week there have been 17 interments in Rugby Cemetery—a figure which has surpassed all past experience. In the preceding week there were 14 burials. Two grave-diggers are normally employed at the Cemetery, but so many graves have been required that six additional men have been taken on.

No less than about 900 employers of the B.T.H Company and 200 employees of Messrs Willans & Robinson’s are suffering from influenza and pneumonia.

The seriousness of the malady is intensified by the shortage of doctors and nurses, and in many instances whole families have been stricken down, and have had to depend on the casual help of neighbours.

The few doctors that remain are working at high pressure,and they are only able to visit the most serious cases.

Owing to the shortage of voluntary helpers, caused by the epidemic, the issue of the new ration books, which should be completed by Monday, November 4th, will not be completed, until Wednesday next at the earliest.

Several social functions, including a concert at the Speech Room and the Elborow School prize distribution and concert, have been postponed owing to the outbreak.

LONG ITCHINGTON.
THE INFLUENZA.—October, 1918, will long be remembered in Long Itchington as intensely exemplifying those well-known words : “ The pestilence that walketh in darkness.” There has been no blacker time in its annals since August and September, 1842, when two adults and nine children were in a few weeks carried off by scarlet fever. The present visitation of influenza has in less than a fortnight accounted for seven victims, most of whom were young and in their prime. Others still lie seriously ill, and while many are approaching convalescence, fresh cases are still failing almost daily. It has been well nigh impossible to procure adequate nursing, and in some instances patents have been kindly tended by kind-hearted neighbours, well-nigh as ill themselves. The Vicar (Rev H G Kane), whose own son has been seriously ill, has been most assiduous in visiting the sick and in administering comfort and consolation to the dying and the bereaved. Among those who have succumbed are : Mrs T H Webb, aged 33, who was only ill a few days, and leaves behind a husband, two little ones, and an aged mother. Much sympathy is felt for Mr Webb, who is well known and respected as the local carman of the L & N-W Railway. Miss Eva Jeffs, aged 19, only child of Mr & Mrs Wm Jeffs, who up to the time she contracted influenza looked the picture of health, but succumbed to pneumonia after only a few days’ illness. More recent deaths are those of Miss Violet Taylor, assistant mistress at the Schools for the past 18 years, who died on Sunday after only a few days’ illness. She was an exceedingly capable teacher, and her loss to the schools will be severely felt. The body was removed to Stratford-on-Avon for interment. On Monday occurred the death of Miss Hilda S Jeacock, who received her education and tuition at the schools here, and had also been an assistant mistress for the past 12 years. She, too, has proved an efficient teacher, and her loss is greatly deplored. Gunner F Leigh, R.G.A. is at present on service with the victorious British Army in France ; he has lost his little son Dennis, aged 2½ years. An exceedingly sad case is the death of Mrs Charles Evetts, who leaves behind a husband and eight little children. Dr Clague is unfortunately feeling the strain of continuous work night and day, and was himself obliged to knock up on Tuesday.

BRINKLOW.

INFLUENZA.—Their has been an increase in the number of influenza cases in the village during the last fortnight, and in consequence the schools have had to be closed for a time.

DEATH OF DR. RING.—The greatest regret has been occasioned in Brinklow and neighbourhood by the somewhat sudden death of Dr Charles E Ring, which occurred at his residence on Tuesday. He was seized with influenza towards the end of last week, but heroically attended to his patents until he was absolutely obliged to go to bed, and, in spite of the best medical attention and nursing, he succumbed as stated. Dr Ring commenced his practice in Brinklow about ten years ago in succession to Dr James Hair, and had become well known in the village and neighbourhood as a most competent medical practitioner, and as such has been very highly esteemed. During the last few years he has had charge of the Monks Kirby and Pailton district, and has also served for about two years in France and Salonika. He leaves a widow and three children.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Second-Lieut R Aubrey Hastings Lloyd. R.A.F, who was in Rugby School XV in 1916, has died abroad from wounds.

The names of two more employees of the B.T.H Company have appeared in recent casualty lists, viz : Pte P C Roberts, Oxon and Bucks Light Infantry, of the Foundry Department, died from wounds on October 18th, and Bombardier A Jones, Royal Garrison Artillery (carpenters’ shop), died from malarial fever on Oct 15th.

Pte G W Marsh, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, was reported missing on October 26, 1917. Official intimation has now been received by his friends that it is now concluded that his death took place on that date.

Lieut-Col H H Neeves, D.S.O, M.C (bar), Northumberland Fusiliers, son of Mr S Neeves, Langdale, Murray Road, has been wounded in the left elbow and hip, and is now in hospital in France. Lieut-Col Neeves, who joined the Army as a private, was seriously wounded at Arras last year, when he gained the D.S.O and bar to the M.C.

Another Old Murrayian and former member of Holy Trinity Choir—Pte A C Ward, R.W.R, son of Mr & Mrs C Ward, 121 Grosvenor Road—was killed in action on September 27th at the age of 19. Before joining the Army in August, 1917, he was employed as a clerk in the L & N-W Railway Goods Depot. He had been in France since April last. Three of his brothers are still serving in the Army.

Pte Fred Knight, Oxon and Buck L.I, of Bourton, who has been killed in action, was formerly employed by the Rugby Rural District Council as a roadman. He joined the Army at the beginning of the War, and had served in France three years.

THE REV R. W. DUGDALE KILLED BY A SHELL.

The sad news has come to hand that the Rev R W Dugdale, a curate of St Andrew’s, Rugby, was killed during a German barrage in the early hours of Wednesday last week while on duty in a regimental aid post.

Mr Dugdale was the younger son of the Rev Sydney Dugdale, Whitchurch, Salop. and was educated at Rugby and Oxford. He was ordained by the Bishop of Worcester at the Advent ordination in 1913, and commenced work in his Rugby curacy at Christmas. He remained on the staff of St Andrew’s and was in charge of Holy Trinity Church during 1914 till the summer of 1915, when he became a Chaplain to the Forces. He went to France in the following summer, and did good work at the Battle of Loos, for which he was awarded the Military Cross.

Mr Dugdale was fond of all athletic exercises. He was a great runner, and held an unbeaten record for the Crick Run. He was an active member of the Church Cricket Club and a close personal friend of the late R W Poulton (O.R.), the International football player.

The remains were buried on October 24th in the Military Cemetery at Candry, near Cambrai. There will be a memorial service in the Holy Trinity Church at 11 o’clock to-day (Saturday).

ABSENTEE.—At Rugby Police Court on Wednesday—before Mr A E Donkin—Pte Frank Batchelor, Machine Gun Corps, was charged with being an absentee since October 26th. He pleaded that he had had a lot of trouble at home, and that he intended to return early that morning, but he was prevented. As defendant had been through most of the heavy fighting, including the Retreat from Mons, and had been wounded four times, he was discharged on giving his word to return to his unit by the first train.

NEWBOLD-ON-AVON.
DIED OF WOUNDS.—Mrs A Allen has received news from the sister-in-charge of a casualty clearing station in France that her husband, Pte A Allen, of 1/5 Gloucester Regiment, was admitted to the clearing station on October 24th, severely wounded in the head, back, and buttocks, and died on October 25th. Pte Allen was 33 years of age, and before joining H.M Forces in April, 1917, was employed at the B.T.H Works. He leaves a widow and three young children, for whom much sympathy is felt.

DUNCHURCH.
DEATH OF SERGT RIDOUT.—The death occurred recently, at Austruther, county Fife, of Sergt Wm Ridout, of the 10th Battalion Royal Warwicks, one of the heroes of the Battle of Loos. When war broke out he was a member of the Territorial Force. He then joined the Warwicks, and soon attained the rank of sergeant. At the Battle of Loos he was badly gassed, from which he only made partial recovery, and was discharged. A cold aggravated the trouble, which he suffered from the effects of being gassed, and his end came with startling suddenness. When resident at Dunchurch, Sergt Ridout was one of the best players in the football team, and was much respected in the parish.

BRITISH AND FOREIGN SAILORS’ SOCIETY.—A flag day on behalf of this society was held at Rugby on Saturday, the arrangements being earned out under the auspices of the Young People’s Association of the Congregational Church. Mr W W Litchfield, of the Northamptonshire Union Bank, was the hon treasurer, and the Rev DJ Griffiths hon secretary. Unfortunately the influenza epidemic incapacitated about 35 friends who had promised help as flag-sellers, but those who were able to turn up worked with a will. The organising committee were Miss M Bullock, Miss Whitbread, Miss Baillie, Miss Anderson, Miss Craze, Mrs Gatecliffe, Mrs J Tame, and Mr Tom Daynes. The total of collections and subscriptions amounted to £64 18s 6d.

WAR BONDS.—During the week ended October 19th Rugby subscribed £10,330 for War Bonds, or about £500 less than the weekly quota expected from the town.

BOOKS AND MAGAZINES FOR SOLDIERS AND SAILORS.—During the month of September the books and magazines collected through the agency of the Post Office, and handed over to the various distributing organisations, filled 1,772 bags. Towards this number Rugby contributed 19 bags and Leicester 20. The demands of our soldiers and sailors are greater now than ever. The books and magazines should be handed across the counter of any post office, unwrapped and unaddressed, and within a few days the donors may rest assured they will be in the hands of our fighting men.

HOW TO FEED THE PIG.
NO OFFAL AFTER JANUARY.
The following official “ Advice to Pig Keepers ” has been issued :—

Since the Board of Agriculture in the spring urged both farmers and cottagers to keep pigs, and encouraged the formation of Pig Clubs in urban district where household waste could be collected, the situation has changed greatly for the worse. A large number of people throughout the country responded to the invitation of the Board, and effected a substantial increase in the number of pigs.

It has now, however, become necessary to pig keepers that even the small allowance of concentrated food hitherto allotted to pigs may not be continued beyond January 25, 1919.

What is the pig keeper to do ? The farmer has at command a certain quantity of home-grown food ; he may be able to spare some roots, he may have chat or damaged potatoes. With these and a small daily allowance of tail or damaged grain he can keep his pigs growing, without even the allowance of offals to which he is entitled until January. No man ought to feed pigs on meal alone. Pig clubs can still command the waste that is being collected. With that and the allowance of offals they can still obtain they will be able to maintain their pigs until January. They must use their own judgment as to whether they can keep them any longer, or whether they must kill off some before that date in order to have food enough for the rest. Many cases are reported to the Board when pigs are being kept successfully on waste alone, and this is possible where the pigs are not too young.

The cottager is, perhaps, in the worst case. He must do the best he can in his own circumstances. Up to January he can still buy offal ; he has his small and damaged potatoes and a certain amount of waste and garden produce. He must get the pig on as far as he can with that, and at the worst kill it before the supply gives out.

The Board are being constantly asked whether they want pigs kept. They want every possible pig kept, but they cannot promise any food beyond January ; and they, therefore, cannot advise anyone to continue to keep pigs who does not see some way of providing for them out of local resources. The price of pork and bacon is high, and is not likely to fall. There will be a great demand for young pigs as soon as food becomes available again. These are the plain facts ; the Board want pigs, and believe in pig production, but cannot obtain any food for them from the outside. But they urge every pig keeper to make the best shift he can.

DEATHS.

RING.—On the 29th ult., CHARLES A. EDMONSON RING, F.R.C.S.E., late Capt. R.A.M.C., the beloved husband of Grace E Ring, of Brinklow, Rugby, and eldest son of C. A. Ring, late R.N., of Pandora, Seaview, Isle of Wight—of pneumonia, aged 39.

ROBERTS.—On October 18, 1918, at King George’s Hospital, London, Pte. P. C. ROBERTS, Oxford & Bucks Light Infantry ; died of wounds received in action in Italy, in his 28th war.
—Deeply mourned by his Sisters and Brothers.

IN MEMORIAM.

GARDNER.—In loving remembrance of our dear and only son, Pte CHARLES GARDNER, R.M.L.I., who died from wounds received in action in France on October 28, 1917.
—Ever remembered by his loving Mother & Father.

KNIGHT.—In unfading memory of FRED, the dearly beloved son of Thomas and Emily Knight, of Bourton, killed in action on October 23, 1918 ; aged 27 years.
“ At duty’s call he went to France ;
Like other lads to take his chance.
He fought for home and Country,
God knows he did his best,
And now he sleeps in Jesus,
A soldier laid to rest.”
—From sorrowing Father, Mother, Brothers, Sisters, and Gertie.

MARSH.—In ever-loving memory of Pte. W. G. MARSH, who died in France on October 26, 1917.
“ Days of sadness still come o’er us,
Tears in silence often flow,
Thinking of the day we lost him :
Just a year ago.
Too far away thy grave to see,
But not too far to think of thee.”
—From his loving friends, Mr. & Mrs. Underwood and Family.

PARKER.—In loving memory of EDWARD JOSEPH, the beloved son of Mr. & Mrs. T. Parker, of Dunchurch, who died of wounds received in action on November 3, 1914.—At rest.—Not forgotten by Father, Mother, Brothers and Sisters.

THOMAS.—In ever loving memory of our dear nephew, Pte. W. H. THOMAS (Willie), killed in action October 24, 1917.
—Never forgotten by Aunt Amy & Uncle Will.

 

Dugdale, Richard William. Died 23rd Oct 1918

Richard William DUGDALE was born on 9 November 1889 in Salisbury, Wiltshire.  He was the second son of the Rev. Sidney Dugdale, from Eccles, Lancashire, a ‘Clerk in Holy Orders’.  His mother, Edith, was the daughter of W. B. Marshall and was born in Egremont, Cheshire.  He was baptised on 11 December 1889, at St. Martin’s church, Salisbury, Wiltshire.

In 1891 the family were living at The Lodge, Manor Road, Milford, and Richard was then one year old and had an elder brother, John S Dugdale who was four and also born in Salisbury.  There were five servants ‘living in’.

Richard William Dugdale, Memorials of Rugbeians who fell in the Great War, Volume VI, Page 91.

In 1901, Richard was a pupil at Woodcote House, South Stoke, Woodcote, near Wallingford.  The family was now living at Westbury, Wiltshire, where the family lived at All Saint’s Vicarage, Alfred Street.  His father was a ‘Priest, Church of England’.  There were now two younger daughters, Margaret H, aged 9, born in Salisbury, and Edith J, aged 7, born in Motcombe, Dorset.  The family could still afford five servants.

In 1903, his mother died, aged 43.  Her death was registered in Westbury, Wiltshire.

Richard moved on to Rugby school, where he studied from 1903 to 1908.[1]

He was a keen sportsman, and when at Rugby, he had his football cap for two years, and several times played for the XV.  He was in the Shooting VIII for his last three years and Captain in his last year; in 1907 he helped to win the Ashburton Shield.  He was also a member of the Running VIII for three years and Captain in 1908, when he established a record for ‘the Crick’ by winning it in 1 hr. 12 mins. 20 secs.  He also had his Cap for two years.[2]

He followed his elder brother, J. S. Dugdale from Rugby to Oxford University as an exhibitioner at Corpus Christi College.  He gained a 2nd in Classics Moderations in 1910; and a 2nd in Literae Humaniores in 1912; He was Treasurer of the Debating Society in 1908, and was also an excellent oarsman, and rowed at for his college in Torpids, Eights and at Henley.  He had also been a member of the University Contingent of the Officers’ Training Corps.  He gained his BA in 1912; and then travelled in India.  He took his MA in 1915.

The 1911 census described him simply as an ‘Undergraduate Oxford’, and he was at home that night with the family at The Rectory, Whitchurch, Salop.

His father had remarried on 3 May 1905 with Phyllis Price – the marriage being registered in Paddington Q2, 1a, 51.  His address was then given as Lower Beeding Vicarage, Horsham.  Her father was Richard Edwards Price, the Rector of Llanymynech.  By 1911 there were two more daughters of that second marriage – Dorothy Mary, 4, born in Lower Beeding, Sussex, and Penelope Phyllis, 1, born in Whitchurch.

The various birth places and census locations show the career moves of a vicar in that period.  The number of servants also suggests that his ‘livings’ were good, and that public school fees could also be afforded.

After taking his degree at Oxford, Richard trained for ordination to the Clergy at Bishop’s Hostel in Farnham, Surrey and was ordained Deacon at Worcester in December 1913 and a Priest a year later.   He served as a Curate at Rugby from 1913 to 1915.

Some of his activities whilst a Curate in Rugby can be found in the local paper and there are many complementary obituaries with information on his life and military career.

Trinity Church. On Good Friday the Rev R W Dugdale conducted children’s hour service at this Church, and the Rector. Rev M Blagden, preached at a special evening service, which was conducted by Mr Dugdale.  This church, in common with the other churches of the parish, was tastefully adorned with spring flowers by ladies of the congregation. There were good congregations, and the preachers were the Rector (Rev C M Blagden) at Matins, and the Rev R W Dugdale evensong.’[3]

He was briefly in trouble in Rugby, ‘R W Dugdale, Clerk in Holy Orders, 9 Horton Crescent’ – with many others was summonsed for having a dog without a licence – ‘The Rev R W Dugdale wrote explaining that he forgot to take out the licence – fined 10s.’[4]

Richard Dugdale took his MA at Oxford in May 1915 and at the presentation of shields and medals for the Rugby School Football Union the Rev R W Dugdale had sent apologies as he ‘had gone to Oxford to take his MA degree.’[5]

HOLY TRINITY DEDICATION FESTIVAL. The dedication festival in connection with Holy Trinity Church held on Tuesday. The festival commenced with celebration of the Holy Communion at 8 a.m, at which there was a fair congregation.  The Rector (Rev C M Blagden) was he celebrant, assisted the R W Dugdale (priest in charge). Matins was said at 10 a.m. and full choral evensong at p.m.  There was a large congregation for this service, and the whole of the parochial clergy attended. The three choirs of Holy Trinity, Andrew’s, and St Peter’s Churches were present, and the singing, as usual on such occasions was of high order.  … The first part of the service was taken by the Rector, and the second part by the Rev R W Dugdale …’.[6]

He was re-elected secretary, although he was ‘now in France’, for the Rector’s ‘Lectures to Men’ – and that last year had given three of the lectures himself.[7]

When War broke out, his request for leave to go and fight was refused by the Archbishop, but in June, 1915, he was accepted as an Army Chaplain and commissioned as a ‘Chaplain 4th Class’.  He went to France on 10 September, 1915, to join the Expeditionary Force, and straight into the Battle of Loos, and was attached in succession [in various reports] to the West Yorkshire, the Middlesex and the Cheshire Regiments, to the 5th Army Infantry School, to the Royal Flying Corps (13th Wing), and, in June, 1918, to the 1st Battalion, the Norfolk Regiment.

On 3 March 1917, Chaplain Reverend Richard William Dugdale, [later] attached to the Norfolk Regiment was awarded the Military Cross for conspicuous gallantry in tending the wounded under fire.  The official record had stated:

Reverend R. W. Dugdale, C.F., Army Chaplains’ Department. ‘He tended the wounded under very heavy fire without the slightest regard for his own personal safety.  He located wounded men in the most advanced positions and guided stretcher parties to bring them in.’[8]

He had been with the Norfolk Regiment for four months of fierce fighting when he met his death.  He went up to the assembly position to be with the men for the night before an attack near Solesmes.  The enemy put down a heavy barrage on the Brigade and he was killed on 23 October 1918. Age 28.

The Acting Colonel of the Norfolk Regiment wrote:-

He was certainly far and away the best Chaplain I have ever met, and one of the best fellows. The men just loved him, and no wonder.  He was indefatigable in his efforts to increase their comfort, and the greatest help to me in this respect.  His conduct in action – and he never missed a show – was always most gallant, and by his efforts the sufferings of our wounded were greatly reduced. In every fight he worked unceasingly, helping the Regimental Medical Officer in his Aid Post, and the stretcher bearers getting wounded men in.  He will be sadly missed in the Regiment.  We all feel we have lost not only our Padre, but a personal friend.

He was killed in action at Belmont 22/23 October 1918, age 28. However, according to the Battalion War Diary,[9] [see below] the Battalion was at Bethencourt.  His Commanding officer later wrote:

He was killed instantly by a shell which exploded in the Regimental Aid Post where he was sitting.  By the death of this young officer, the Church, the State and the Army have lost a valuable promising life.[10]

He was buried initially on 24 October 1917 in the Cawdry German Cemetery and his body was later concentrated [moved] to Grave Reference: IV. G. 22. in the Caudry British Cemetery.

Caudry is a town some 13 kilometres east of Cambrai on the south side of the main road (N43) to Le Cateau.  Caudry town was the scene of part of the Battle of Le Cateau on the 26 August 1914, and from that date it remained in German hands until the 10 October 1918, when it was captured by the 37th Division.  It had been a German centre for medical units, and during October 1918 and the following five months the 21st, 3rd, 19th and 49th Casualty Clearing Stations passed through it.  The British Cemetery was originally called the German Cemetery Extension and was begun in October 1918 by the New Zealand Division and carried on by the Casualty Clearing Stations.  It was completed after the Armistice by the concentration of graves from the German Cemetery.

A Choral Memorial Service in memory of the Rev R. W. Dugdale, curate-in-charge, who was killed in France was celebrated at Holy Trinity Church on Saturday 2 November 1918.[11]  Those present included his sisters, Mrs Hardy and Miss Dugdale, and the article noted that he had also been the Chaplain to the Lodge of Rectitude Masonic Lodge and to Murray School

As well as receiving the Military Cross [MC] for Conspicuous Gallantry, Richard William Dugdale was awarded the British War and Victory Medals and the 1915 Star.

His father Cecil was latterly living at Aston Hall, Aston on Clun, Shropshire, and the Register of Effects noted payments of £31-10-0d on 5 February 1919; £12-12-0d in December 1918; £2-4-2d in October 1918 and £9-10-0d in December 1918.  There did not appear to be any War Gratuity – perhaps it was only for fighting personnel and not for Chaplain’s Staff.[12]

He is commemorated on the Rugby Memorial Gates in Hillmorton Road, Rugby; and in the Rugby School Memorial Chapel.  He is listed on the Corpus Christie College Roll of Honour ‘DUGDALE, The Revd Richard William (CCC 1908-1912)’.[13]

In St Alkmunds Church, Whitchurch, North Shropshire there is an Ornate Wooden Altar Screen.

Divided Into Ten Squares By Gold Painted Relief Border Of Leaf Motif.  Whole Surrounded By Wider Border.  Outer Border Has Relief Of Grapes And Vine Leaves In Gold With Blue Background.  Inscription Along Top Of Screen In Gold Lettering With Blue Background, and an Inscription ‘A.M.D.G.[14]  In Memory Of Richard William Dugdale M.C. C.F.[15]  Killed In France 23 Oct 1918.’[16]

He is also commemorated by carved figures on the Lych Gate of Holy Trinity Church.[17]  This was built as a War Memorial and dedicated after the war.  The carved figures which were part of the design were added later and a report then appeared in the Rugby Advertiser.[18]

Holy Trinity War Memorial – The Lych Gate War Memorial was recently completed and the figures … have been placed in position.  The figures are the gift of the Dugdale family, in memory of Richard William Dugdale, T.C.F. who was priest-in-charge at the Holy Trinity Church from 1914 to 1918. …

One of many tributes read,
Most loveable, most gentle, and most strong, he was the ideal type of Christian priest.  The loss to the Church and to those who would have come under his spell is even greater than the loss to his friends and to those who have known him and treasure his memory.  His enthusiasm for reform, his humanity, and his strength of purpose assured him a future rich in honour and full of benefit to his country.  Cut short on the eve of victory, his life is an inspiration and example, and his death an earnest of the truth by which he lived.

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

– – – – – –

 

This article on Rev. Richard William DUGDALE was researched and written for the Rugby Family History Group [RFHG] project, by John P H Frearson and is © John P H Frearson and the RFHG, July 2017.

[1]      His uncle, John Marshall Dugdale, was a rugby union international, who represented England in the first international rugby match in 1871, and whose three sons, Richard’s cousins, were also all at Rugby School.

[2]      From his obituary in the Lives of Rugbeians.

[3]      Rugby Advertiser, Saturday, 10 April 1915.

[4]      Rugby Advertiser, Tuesday 13 April, and Saturday 17 April 1915.

[5]      Rugby Advertiser, Saturday, 29 May 1915.

[6]      Rugby Advertiser, Saturday, 5 June 1915.

[7]      Rugby Advertiser, Saturday, 16 October 1915.

[8]      Whitchurch Herald, 2 November 1918.

[9]      The National Archives, WWI War Diaries (France, Belgium and Germany), 1914-1920, Norfolk Regiment, 5th Division, Piece 1573/1-2: 1 Battalion Norfolk Regiment.

[10]     Whitchurch Herald, 2 November 1918.

[11]     Rugby Advertiser, Saturday, 9 November 1918.

[12]     UK, Army Registers of Soldiers’ Effects, 1901-1929, for R W Dugdale

[13]     https://www.ccc.ox.ac.uk/Roll-of-Honour-1914-1918/ .

[14]     A.M.D.G.: ‘Ad Majorem Dei Gloriam’, the Latin motto of the Society of Jesus (Jesuits), meaning, ‘For the greater glory of God.’

[15]     C.F. – Chaplain to the Forces.

[16]    http://www.iwm.org.uk/memorials/item/memorial/13687.

[17]     Whilst the church was demolished after a fire, the Lych Gate has been preserved.

[18]     Rugby Advertiser, 4 November 1921.

10th Mar 1917. Rev R W Dugdale awarded the Military Cross

REV R W DUGDALE AWARDED THE MILITARY CROSS.

Local Churchpeople will be pleased to hear that the Rev R W Dugdale (Curate-in-charge of Holy Trinity Church), who is acting as temporary chaplain to the Forces, has been awarded the Military Cross for conspicuous gallantry at Beaurcourt. The Rev R W Dugdale rendered most valuable assistance to the wounded under very heavy shell fire, without the slightest regard to his own personal safety.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Bandsman H Fisher, of the Inniskillings, who was billeted with Mr Wetherington, 13 Windsor Street, has been awarded the Serbian Silver Medal also bar to Military Medal for gallantry and distinguished service in the field/

Sir Spencer Maryon Wilson, Bart., has kindly lent his residence, “ Fitz-Johns,” on the Barby Road, which will be fitted up by Mr Arthur James, of Coton House, as a Military Auxiliary Hospital.

The deed for which Edwin Welsh, of the Machine Gun Corps, son of Mr E Welsh, 23 Oxford Street, has been awarded the Military Medal has been described to his father in a medal from an officer at the front, who says that on February 4th, during an intense enemy barrage, which was followed by a raid, Welsh kept his gun firing all through. In spite of the fact that the team had suffered very severe casualties, he bravely fought his gun, causing a great number of casualties. The writer adds :   “We of the —- Machine Gun Company wish to congratulate you on the behaviour of your son, who has brought honour to himself, pride to his people at home, and distinction to his company.”

At the Coventry Munitions Tribunal on Tuesday complaints were made against – Claridge, 57 Manor Road, Rugby, that he left work without leave, and also left his machine running with a heavy shell not properly clamped in the machine. The foreman said that had the shell worked out a little further the consequences to the men and to property would have been serious. Claridge was fines 30s.

DEATHS.

HEWITT.—ELLIS JOHN (JACK), R.W.R., killed in action, February 26th, youngest and dearly beloved son of Mr. & Mrs. Hewitt, Dunchurch Road, Rugby.

PRATT.—In loving memory of Pte. F. C. PRATT, Oxford and Bucks L.I., of Bilton, Rugby, who died of wounds (received in action) at a Military Hospital in France, March 1st ; aged 20 years.

RICHARDSON.-On February 28th, MAURICE LEWIS GEORGE RICHARDSON, Second- Lieutenant South Lancashire Regt., attached Royal Warwickshire Regt., only son of the Rev. Lewis & Eva Richardson, Binley Parsonage.

SOLOMON.—Killed in action, in German East Africa, on January 17, 1917, SIDNEY JAMES, eldest son of the late Josiah Solomon, of Truro, and of Mrs. Solomon, Vicarage Road, Rugby, in his 42nd year.

IN MEMORIAM.

FIDLER.-In loving memory of Pte. W. G. FIDLER, 1797, R.W.R., who was killed in France, March 7, 1916.

“One year has passed since Jesus called him,
How we miss his cheerful face ;
But he left us to remember,
Never on earth can we replace.”
-From his FATHER, MOTHER, SISTERS and BROTHERS, Harborough Magna.

FIDLER.-In loving memory of my dear hubby, WILL killed in France, March 7, 1916.

“Had I but one last fond look
Into his loving face,
Or had I only got the chance
To kneel down in his place,
To hold his head, Dear Hubby,
While your life blood ebbed away.
My heart would not have felt so much
The tears I shed to-day.
So ready to answer the call to the brave,
Altho’ you now rest in a far distant grave
More or better could any man give
Than die for his country that others might live.”
-Ever in the thoughts of his loving wife, EDNA, 24 Woodbridge Road, Moseley, Birmingham.