20th Oct 1917. Street Lighting in Rugby

STREET LIGHTING IN RUGBY.

By permission of the Chief Constable, a number of lamps at the most important points in the centre part of town are now being lighting at night. The majority of these have to be extinguished at ten o’clock, but the remainder will be alight all night, subject to arrangements being made for them to be extinguished within a few minutes of the receipt of the Field Marshal’s warning. Needless to say, this concession is greatly appreciated by all who use the streets after dark.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Major F Glover is gazetted second in command of the 2nd Battalion, Warwickshire Volunteer Regiment.

Pte W Slater, of 36 Frederick Street, has been wounded in France, and is now in Kitchener’s Hospital, Brighton, where he is progressing favourably.

Lance-Corpl F E Boyes, Oxford and Bucks L.I, son of Mr J Boyes, 84 Railway Terence, has been reported wounded and missing on August 16th. He has been previously wounded twice, and had served in France over two years. This is the second son of Mr. Boyes, returned as missing this year.

Mrs Rathbone, 23 James Street, Rugby, has received official notification that her brother, Pte George Ruddle, was killed in action in France on September 3rd. He was an Old Murrayian.

Mr & Mrs Summers, of Long Lawford, have received news that their son, Pte A Summers, has been wounded in the back and is going on well.

Mr & Mrs Plumb have received news that their only son, Lance-Corpl J W Plumb, of the Machine Gun Corps, has been wounded. He is an Old St Matthew’s boy, and before he enlisted in September, 1914, worked for the Rugby Gas Company.

Corpl E P Moore, Machine Gun Section, who before joining the Army was employed in the Electrical Laboratory at the B.T.H, died from wounds received in action on October 6th.

SECOND-LIEUT K H WILLARD MISSING.

Second-Lieut Kenneth H Willard, Yorks and Lancs Regiment, attached to the Royal Flying Corps, second son of Mr T W Willard, 26 Bilton Road, has been officially reported missing as from October 12th. In a letter to Mr. Willard a fellow officer writes : “ He went out with six other machines on the 12th inst. to do a patrol, the leader being one of our best pilots. About 15 to 20 enemy machines were encountered, and a general mix-up ensued, in which your son was seen to be handling his machine and fighting in a most efficient manner. Although our machines were greatly out-numbered, they put up a great fight, but on returning to the aerodrome, It was discovered that your son was missing. No one saw him go down, and it is just possible that he may have been hit in the engine, and had to descend in the enemy lines.” Lieut Willard was educated at Rugby School and Sandhurst, and visited his parents a fortnight ago on his final leave before proceeding to the front.

CAPT. HON. HENRY FEILDING.

Captain Hon Henry Feilding, Coldstream Guards, the third and youngest son of the Earl and Countess of Denbigh, died of wounds on October 9th, aged 23. He had just been given command of his Company, and was leading them into action for the first time in the attack of October 9th. They had achieved their first objective when they came under heavy German artillery barrage. It was then that Capt Feilding was severely wounded by a shell. He was carried back to the casualty clearing station, where he had every possible care and attention, but the case was hopeless from the first. Recovering slight consciousness in the afternoon, he died peacefully and painlessly at 10.30 p.m. Father Crisp, R.C chaplain to the Forces, of Leicester, was with him at this period and gave him the last helps[?] of religion.

Captain Henry Feilding was educated at the Oratory School, Edgebaston, and Trinity College, Cambridge, where he held a commission before the war in King Edward’s Horse, with which he mobilised and went to France in April, 1915. He was later taken on the staff as A.D.C. to General Sir Henry Horne, with whom he went to Egypt in January, 1916. As he wished to with a fighting regiment, he resigned his appointment on the staff after six months, and transferred to the Coldstream Guards, with which he served at the front for 12 months.

His elder brother, Lieut-Commander Hon Hugh Feilding, R.N, was killed at the Battle of Jutland on May 31, 1916 ; whilst his eldest brother, Lieut-Col Viscount Feilding, D.S.O, has served in France since September 1914.

The C.O. Writes of Capt Feilding :—“ I cannot tell you what a loss he is both as a friend and a soldier. It was the first time that he commanded a company in action, and he was doing so well. He was full of enthusiasm for this first attack, and I only wish he could have seen the successful ending of such a great day for the regiment, but all officers of his Company fell wounded before reaching the final objective.”

A brother officer writes :—“ He was always so cheery and so full of fun, and was the life of our of mess, and in every way a most delightful companion. In his work he was always very thorough, and would take any amount of trouble over the men, with whom I always felt he was a great favourite. He will be terribly missed by everyone in the Battalion. I had such a cheery letter from him only a day or two ago, telling me he was just of to battle.”

A personal telegram of sympathy has been received from the King.

BRANDON & BRETFORD.

WOUNDED SOLDIERS.—News has reached Mr & Mrs Reuben Banbrook that their son has been wounded in the foot. He belongs the Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, and has been on foreign service for a considerable time. Mrs Banbrook has five soldier sons, of whom Pte James Banbrook has been gassed and Pte Bert Banbrook wounded twice.—Mr R Hart has received the news that his brother has been badly wounded. He was in the Regular Army before the War started, and been through most of the engagements. His ankle has been smashed and the other leg badly wounded.

CHRISTMAS PARCELS FOR PRISONERS OF WAR.

The Christmas parcels for prisoners in Germany will be despatched during the first week in November.

The special parcel will be substituted for one of the six standard packages sent during November, and will include a rich Christmas pudding, roast beef, potatoes, sausages, cheese, and 50 cigarettes. If the relatives or “ adopters ” pay for this (the price is 8s) their names will be put on the parcels, but only one parcel can be sent to each man.

A larger parcel can costing 15s, will contain extras in the shape of turkey, bacon, butter, spaghetti, chocolate, tongue, and dried ginger.

Relatives of Rugby and district men desirous of sending one of these parcels in their own names should remit the cost, not later than Saturday next, the 27th inst, to Mr J Reginald Barker, hon secretary, Rugby Prisoners of War Help Committee, 9 Regent St, Rugby.

No person can send any foodstuffs direct to a prisoner.

ANOTHER RED CROSS SALE.

At a meeting of the Rugby District Farmers’ Red Cross Committee on Tuesday, presided over by the Rev R S Mitchison, it was thought that the time had arrived for another effort on behalf of the Red Cross Society, as there is a very pressing need of increased support, the expenditure being largely in excess of the receipts. Opinions were expressed that all classes of the community should join.

It was decided to ask the Rector of Rugby, the Headmaster of Rugby School, the representatives of the Urban Council, the Chamber of Trade, the Butchers’ Association, the Trades and Labour Council, influential gentleman, and others to join the Rugby District Farmers in a united effort to hold a Red Cross sale.

A preliminary meeting will be held on Tuesday, October 23rd, at 7 p.m., at the Eagle Assembly Room, Market Place, Rugby.

WOLSTON.

THE HOUSING QUESTION at Wolston in fast becoming a serious matter. There are already numerous couples living with their parents, and are having to store their goods—in one instance in a hovel. A number of the present houses have been condemned, and this further accentuates the shortage. It is felt by many of the working-men of the village that the 25 houses the District Council propose to build after the War will be quite inadequate. Much unrest is at present caused, and only within the last few days a soldier’s wife has been threatened with proceedings if she does, not leave, the cottage being wanted for someone else.

DEATHS.

BOOTE.—In loving memory of Pte. S. BOOTE (SID), 4th Worcestershire Regiment, who died of wounds in France on October 11, 1917. “ He did his duty.” —From his loving brother and sister, JACK & JEANNIE, and his little nephew, AUBREY.

CROMBIE.—In loving memory of Regimental Q.M.-S. W. CROMBIE, 1st K.O.S.B., who died of wounds in France on October 4, 1917. From all at 35 Oliver Street.

HAYES.—On October 10th, at 14th General Hospital, Wimereux, France, from wounds received in action, Coy.-Sergt.-Major G. H. Hayes, 265385 R.W.R, third son of Mrs. Hayes, 80 York Street, age 34 years. Also, on July 19, 1916, Pte. FRANK H. HAYES, 2215, who was killed in action “ somewhere in France.”—On earth divided, in death united.”—From his sorrowing Mother, Brothers and Sisters.

LANE.—On October 13th, BERTRAM CHARLES, the youngest son of Mrs. Lane, 76 Bath Street ; aged 24.

STAY.—ARTHUR GEORGE STAY, eldest son of F. Stay, 99 Grosvenor Road, Rugby, killed in action Sept. 21.

IN MEMORIAM.

BACHELOR.—In loving memory of my dear son, Pte ERNEST ANDREW BATCHELOR, Worcester Regiment, who was killed in action on October 24, 1916.
“ In a soldier’s lonely grave,
Beneath France’s blood-stained sod,
There lies my dearest son,
Resting in peace with God ;
Though rolling seas divide us,
And he sleeps on a pitiless shore,
Remembrance is a relic that shall live for evermore.”
—Never forgotten by his loving Mother, Father, Brothers and Sisters.

 

 

 

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