15th Dec 1917. On Christmas Day

ON CHRISTMAS DAY every household in Rugby and district is asked to make a collection at their Dinner Table to help to maintain a continuance of the very necessary food parcels for our unfortunate men who are

PRISONERS OF WAR.

The increase in the cost of the food parcels has caused a serious strain upon the funds of the Rugby Prisoners of War Committee, and it is felt that everyone will be glad of this opportunity of showing in a practical manner their sympathy with these poor fellows who are languishing in prison camps in Germany.

Please place your collection in the special envelopes which will be left your house and hand same to the authorised collector, who will call soon after Christmas.

If you going away this Christmas will you forward a donation towards this Special Effort to the Hon. Secretary : Mr. J. REGINALD BARKER, 9 Recent Street, Rugby.

EVERY PENNY COUNTS.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Capt T A Townsend, M.C, who was wounded at Cambrai on November 29th, is making satisfactory progress.

General Sir H S Horne, K.C.B, returned to the Front from East Haddon on Wednesday.

Lance-Corpl H F Hancox, who has been a prisoner of war and on the Rugby list of Prisoners of War Fund for 2½ years, has been transferred to Switzerland

Pte W Thomson, son-in-law of Mr & Mrs Mayes, Abbey Street has been wounded with shrapnel in the eye. They lost a son from wounds twelve months ago. Mrs Mayes has four brothers serving—three of them in France—and her husband has had two nephews killed in the War.

Mr T Horton, J.P, of Ashlawn, a late captain of the Northants County Cricket Club, is acting as a volunteer tram driver.

During the past ten weeks a total of £52,845 has been subscribed to the War Loans in Rugby, of which £7,680 was invested during the week ended December 8th.

Capt C N B Hurt, East Lancs Regiment, who has been appointed Assistant Controller of Statistics under the regional scheme of National Service at Headquarters, Leamington, has been presented with a silver cigarette-case by fellow-members of the Recruiting Staff at Rugby, where he has been stationed for the past two years. He was at Oxford when the War broke out, and, joining up immediately went, with his regiment to Gallipoli, where he contracted dysentery and enteric. He has played in the Derbyshire County Cricket XI.—Pte Bateman, a clerk on the staff, has also been the recipient of a present on leaving the town.

News has been received at the B.T.H that Lance-Corpl H P Arnold, of the Royal Engineers, was killed in action on November 28th. Prior to joining the Army he was employed in the turbine works.

News has been received of the death in action of Capt Leystens Llewellyn Greener, Royal Warwickshire Regiment (T.F), son of Mr Charles Greener, of Four Oaks, Captain Greener, who was 24 years of age, was educated at Rugby, where he was captain of the football fifteen and a member of the shooting eight. He joined the Territorials about eighteen months before the outbreak of the War, received his commission in the 6th Warwicks in February, 1913.

NAVAL HONOUR FOR ST MATTHEW’S OLD BOY.

Warrant-Officer E W Penney, an old scholar of St Matthew’s Boys’ School, has been awarded the Distinguished Service Medal for gallantry in the Battle of Jutland. He was on Admiral Beatty’s flagship Lion during the engagement, and the great skill and fearlessness effected essential repairs to the wireless installation while under heavy.

LIEUT-COL VISCOUNT FEILDING, D.S.O, AGAIN MENTIONED IN DESPATCHES.

In Sir Douglas Haig’s list of mentions this week we again find the name of Lieut-Col Viscount Feilding, D.S.O (Coldstream Guards), son of the Earl of Denbigh. This is the third time during the War Viscount Feilding has gained distinction.

MILITARY MEDAL.

In a list of awards of the Military Medal issued on Thursday the following names appear :—Pte W Green, Worcester Regiment (Ryton-on-Dunsmore), and Gunner (Acting Bdr) W R Clarke, R.F.A (Rugby).

PRINCETHORPE.

NEWS has been received that Pte C E Tuckey, 1st Royal Warwicks, previously reported wounded and missing, was killed in action on or about October 4th. He was the second son of the late Mr & Mrs Thomas Tuckey, of Princethorpe.

MONKS KIRBY.

Farrier-Sergt-Major Bishop of the Warwickshire Yeomanry, has received news of the death from wounds on November 15th of his brother, Sergt Percy Bishop, Berks Yeomanry, serving with the Egyptian Expeditionary Force. He was the son of the late Jonathan Bishop of this village.

CHURCH LAWFORD.

ROLL OF HONOUR.—Another of the brave lads from this village has made the great sacrifice. Sergt S Batchelor, of the Royal Warwickshire regiment, only son of Mr & Mrs J Batchelor, died on December 1st of wounds received in action in France. He joined up on January 13th, 1915, and was drafted out to the front in April of the same year. Although not born at Church Lawford, Sergt Batchelor is regarded as a native, as his parents came to reside in the village when he was about two years old. He was educated at the village school, and when he was old enough to start work he went to Mr J Brierley’s at The Hall, Kings Newnham, to assist in the garden, &c. From there he took the situation of gardener and coachman to the Misses Townsend, of Kings Newham, where he was at the time of enlistment. Sergt Batchelor was 28 years of age, and was a fine strapping fellows, standing 6ft, and broad in proportion. He was as good-hearted as he was big, was ever ready to give a helping hand where it was wanted, and always had a cheery word and smile for everyone. He belonged to the local Cricket and Social Clubs and the choir at the Parish Church, where he was a most regular attendant. He was a very steady, thrifty young fellow, a total abstainer and non-smoker, and a jolly, all-round, good fellow. More especially, perhaps, because of these traits of character, very great sympathy is felt with his parents in the loss of their son in his prime, and whose life had taken as a whole, might well be regarded as an example by many country lads.

DEATHS.

BATCHELOR.—In loving memory of Sergt. S. Batchelor of the 1st Royal Warwickshire Regiment (only son of Mr. & Mrs. J. Batchelor, of Church Lawford), who died from wounds received in action in France on December 1st, 1917 ; aged 28 years.
Bravely he answered his country’s call ;
He gave his life for one and all.
Father in Thy gracious keeping
Leave we now our dear one sleeping.

IN MEMORIAM.

GLENN.—In affectionate remembrance of my dear husband, JOHN GLENN, who died in France on December 8, 1916.

READ.—In loving memory of CHARLES GEORGE, the beloved son of Charles John and Minnie Read, who was killed in action in France on December 15, 1916 ; aged 22 years.—“ God takes our loved ones from our homes, but never from our hearts.”
—From his Father, Mother, Brothers, and Sisters.

 

17th Jun 1916. The Postponed Bank Holiday

THE POSTPONED BANK HOLIDAY.

The suspension, by Royal Proclamation Whit-Monday as a Bank Holiday to avoid any interruption in the supply of munitions of war was patriotically observed by the public. The sacrifice of outdoor pleasure could not be regarded as serious, as the weather was cold and wet. In conformity with the wishes of the Government there were no holiday facilities on the railways. The weather on Sunday and Monday was characterised by cold winds and rain, which made fires in the house necessary and acceptable. The temperature was about 18 or 20 degrees below the proper level for the date. Such a Whit-Monday has not been experienced since 1891, when snow fell and the thermometer stood at 42 degrees at noon. But that was in May, nearly a month earlier in the season, so that allowing for the difference in time Monday was relatively colder, and it is not surprising that recourse was had to overcoats, furs, and fires—ten days from midsummer ! The bitter conditions affected all the eastern counties, the coast in particular being exceedingly cold, while the west and north were a little better.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

News has been received by Mrs Watts, Benn Street, Rugby, that her husband, Sergt E Watts, of the 6th Oxon and Bucks L.I, has been wounded in France, and is now in hospital at Bradford.

Lieutenant the Hon Henry S Feilding has been transferred from K.E Horse Special Reserve to the Machine Gun Corps.

Lieut J A Maddocks, son of Mr Henry Maddocks, barrister-at-law, has been killed in action. He was in his twentieth year, and the oldest of six sons. He was educated at Oakfield, Rugby, and also at University College, London.

Miss Dora McLelland, who was trained at the Hospital of St Cross, Rugby—and is still on the staff—has been mentioned in the Birthday Honours for Nurses, first-class Royal Red Cross decoration. Miss McLelland is at present working in the Territorial Force Nursing Service.

R V Wilson (Old Laurentian), son of Mr J G Wilson, York Street, Rugby, has joined the H.A.C Infantry Division. The Old Laurentians have supplied a great many members to this distinguished Company.

The relatives of W H Brain have now received official news from the Admiralty, stating that he was drowned when his ship—the “ Indefatigable ” — was lost in the North Sea Battle.

ST MATTHEW’S BOY IN THE SEA FIGHT.

Mr R H Myers, headmaster of St Matthew’s Boys’ School, has received the following interesting letter from an “ old boy,” P.O Telegraphist E W Penney:—

“ I thought you would like to know that I managed to come safely through our recent battle without a scratch, being luckier than I was at the ‘ Dogger Bank,’ though that was only a picnic compared with the Jutland Battle. As usual, we were in the thick of the fight, which is only natural, seeing that we fly the flag of Vice-Admiral Sir David Beatty and are flagship of the Battle Cruiser Fleet. It is a great pity we did not meet the enemy earlier in the day. Had we done so, I am certain there would have been annihilation for the High Seas Fleet ; but, of course, it is only a pleasure deferred. I can state with confidence that, although our losses were rather heavy, the German losses were much heavier in both material and men, but, unlike us, do not publish the whole of their losses, though we know them just the same. They were very brave at first, when they thought that our Battle Cruiser Squadron was alone, but immediately the Grand Fleet hove in sight they made of at full speed. It was a wretched day, the average visibility being only about 5,000 to 6,000 yards, so, aided by the darkness and mist, they escaped—but they had a good hammering first. All we ask now is to meet them a little further out, as this time they were on top of their own shores. I lost many friends in the ‘ Queen Mary ’ and other ships, but I have the satisfaction to know that they upheld the glorious traditions handed down to us by our ancestors.

“ I have had some rather unique experiences during the War. Some time ago I was fortunate to have a trip to Flanders with a party from the Grand Fleet. I spent four days in the first line trenches at ——,and afterwards we had a tour of the batteries, and spent some hours looking round Ypres, which is a sight never to be forgotten. Our trenches were pretty close to the Germans, so I was able to throw over a few souvenirs in the shape of bombs ; and, of course, the compliment was returned. I did not see any Rugby men out there, but I must say all the troops were very cheerful, and they wondered who we were, as we dressed in khaki, but kept our cap ribbons on.

“ All good wishes to the boys of the old school, past and present.”

ANOTHER EMPLOYEE OF MESSRS FROSTS KILLED.

News has been received that Rifleman A Pullen, of the Machine Gun Section, Rifle Brigade, has been killed in Francs during the taking of a German mine crater. Rifleman Pullen, who enlisted in September, 1914, and was drafted to the Front in July, 1915, was employed by Messrs Frost as a compositor before the War, and lodged at 117 Oxford Street. He is the eight employee of the firm to be killed in the War. A fellow-employee, Rifleman Negus, was killed at the same gun some time ago. Rifleman J Pyne (R.B), an employee of Messrs Frost & Son, is now in the London General Hospital suffering from a wound in the shoulder. He is making good progress.

THURLASTON.

PROMOTION.—Corpl C Hedgcock, son of Mrs Hedgcock, of Thurlaston, has been promoted to the rank of sergeant.

SOUTH KILWORTH.

Mr J Pickering has received the sad news that his son, W J Pickering, had perished on H.M.S. Defence at the naval battle on May 31st. A memorial service was held in the Parish Church on Sunday afternoon and a very large congregation assembled. Special Psalms and hymns were sung by the choir, of which he was a member. The Rector (the Rev R M Bryant) delivered a most impressive and touching address.

STOCKTON.

ROLL OF HONOUR.—Mr and Mrs W Maskell have this week been notified that their son George was killed when in action in France on May 30.

WOMEN’S WORK ON THE LAND.

A meeting to consider the question of the employment of women on the land was held at the Benn Buildings on Wednesday afternoon. There was a good attendance of ladies, over whom Dr A A David presided, supported by Miss Craig and Miss Day.

The Chairman said there were three difficulties before them in this matter of work upon farms. In the first place, he had found that a rather absurd difficulty had been encountered in the objection on the part of certain ladies to the work as degrading and beneath their dignity. He did not suppose there was anyone present who would sympathise with that opinion, but still there was the difficulty to be faced, although they could rise above it, and they must strive by precept, and more particularly by example, to oppose this absurd notion. The second difficulty was the farmer. The farmer had been abused a good deal lately, and they most not be offended with them if they did not display the enthusiasm some of them might be expected to show at the idea of having women to work for them. The third difficulty was that of organisation. It was obvious that if a number of people continued to get some big thing done, there must be a certain amount of machinery to give them the opportunity for combined effort. This had been solved by the network of organisations all over the country, and which in their county was represented by the Warwickshire War Agricultural Committee. Rugby was represented on that committee by a lady to whom the town owed a great debt of gratitude for the work she had already done, and to whom they would owe a greater debt before this task was over—Miss Whitelaw. A few weeks ago, when they decided at the School to allow boys to go out in squads to help the farmers as they did last year, he wrote to Miss Whitelaw, and pointed out that he was anxious not to get in the way of any organisation for similar employment of women, and the boys were quite willing to stand aside if necessary. Up to the present they had had more applications than they could possibly meet. They would try to arrange with some of the farmers to employ women, even if it came to the point of refusing to let the boys go to a village until the women were fully employed. Whatever they might do, he promised not to stand in the way of the employment of women labour. This call upon women was very clear and urgent, and he was very much impressed by hearing from the farmers of the fearful progress which the weeds were making. He hoped that as the result of that meeting some organisation would be brought nearer, if it was not finally decided upon. There was a considerable danger of a thing like that being taken up warmly at first, and then the people getting tired of it, but, he pointed out, that in this case the work must be kept up until the end of the harvest.

Miss Craig then addressed the gathering on the vital importance of the food supply to the nation. They had been depending too largely upon other countries for their food supply, and the farmers were now being asked to produce more, and not less, food. This was very difficult, owing to the large number of men who were being called to the colours. The land was the nation’s source of wealth, and if it failed to produce to its utmost capacity, it would mean a tremendous increase in the price of food to the well-to-do, and to the poor it would mean poverty and privation such as they had never experienced, and such as they could hardly comprehend. This was the opportunity for women to show their value to the nation. There was only one way for England to be beaten by the Germans. It was not the loss of men, because they had been told that they would fight to the last man ; it was not the loss of money, because they would fight to the last shilling ; but if their ships failed to bring in the supplies, and if the work of the farmers did not go on, if the food fell off, then indeed would their men at the front feel that they had done their bit in vain, and that alone would make them feel they could lay down their arms, having been unsuccessful.

Miss Day alluded to the fact that Lord Selborne, President of the Board of Agriculture, had asked for   400,000 women to help in the food production of the country, and there were several classes whom she thought might assist. First, there were the women who were receiving separation allowances ; they were costing the country about £30,000,000 a year ; she did not begrudge them their money, and she would be the last to suggest that the men should go away and leave their wives in want ; but if they were getting that from the nation it was their duty to do something for the nation, and she thought they could rightly demand their services (applause). They also wanted women from the towns to go out and live in the country and work on the farms regularly, not only at harvest time, but all through the year. If she could get 100 whole-time workers from Rugby she would be able to get them placed with farmers within about a week. They also desired women to undergo a course of training, either on the farms or in colleges for agricultural work, and also to obtain gangs of cyclist workers who could go out one day in each week and work for a farmer under the care of a skilled forewoman. To make this a success, they would desire six ladies to make themselves responsible for a gang one day in each week. Referring to the difficulty mentioned by the Chairman, the fact that some women thought the work was degrading, Miss Day said this could be overcome by women of education coming forward and giving a lead. This would show that whatever work was to be undertaken, provided that it was done to the best their power, was work worth doing.

Several interesting questions were asked and answered and farmers requiring workers, and women desirous of helping, were referred to Miss Whitelaw.

PRISONERS OF WAR HELP COMMITTEE.

A meeting of the Executive of the Rugby Prisoner of War Help Committee was held at the Rectory on Saturday. Mr Wm Flint, C.C, presided.

The Hon Secretary (Mr J Reginald Barker) reported that the receipts to date amounted to £472 10s 4d, the expenditure was £314 17s 1d, leaving a balance in hand of £158 2s 3d.

Mr Barker also stated that he had completed arrangements for despatching a 4lb loaf of “ Dujon ” bread to each prisoner every week. The prisoners of war spoke very highly of this broad, and letters received showed that it arrived in excellent condition. The cost of each loaf, including packing, was 1s.

In view of the fact that the committee were now looking after the welfare of 51 men from Rugby and the surrounding villages, and that the cost of the weekly parcels of food and the special parcels of bread was about £13 per week, the Executive Committee discussed various suggestions for raising funds to ensure a continuance of the weekly parcels.

Mrs Blagden, who is in charge of the parcels sub-committee, said the parcels contained food in accordance with the instructions received from London. The supplies included butter or margarine, sugar, tea, condensed milk, cafe au lait, jam or syrup, bacon or corned beef, shredded wheat or force, soup squares, sardines or herrings, and occasionally cigarettes or tobacco.

Other items were included from time to time, such as tooth-powder and brushes, shirts, socks and under-clothing, and at the special request of a prisoner of war boots were sent.

DEATHS.

DEANE.—Killed in action on June 3rd Edmund Bonar (1st Canadian Division), eldest son of Rev. C. H. Deane, M. A., 46 Church Street, Rugby (formerly Vicar of Willoughby).

GOUGH.-James Clecton Gough, 11th Royal Warwickshire Regiment killed by a shell in France, June 2nd, aged 30 years.

IN MEMORIAM.

GREER.—In loving memory of Pte. Robert Greer, 1st Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, who was killed in action at Gallipoli, June 18, 1915.—Dearly loved and mourned by all at 12 Argyle Street, Rugby.

HANCOX.—In loving memory of our dear and only son and brother, Charles Hancox, Stretton-on-Dunsmore, who died of wounds received in action June 20, 1915.

“ One year has passed, our hearts still sore,
Day by day we miss him more ;
His welcome smile, his dear, sweet face,
Never on earth can we replace.
We often sit and think of him,
And think of how he died ;
To think he could not say “ Good-bye ”
Before he closed his eyes.”
Deeply mourned by his loving MOTHER, FATHER and SISTERS.

HUGHES.—In loving memory of our son Jack, killed in France, 18th June, 1915.

“ He sleeps not in his native land,
But neath some foreign skies ;
And far from those who loved him best,
In a hero’s grave he lies.”
—From his loving MOTHER and FATHER.

 

18th Sep 1915. Warwickshire Yeomanry at the Dardanelles.

WARWICKSHIRE YEOMANRY AT THE DARDANELLES.

In a recent account of the fighting at the Dardenelles, when the new landing was effected at Sulva Bay, and an attack was made on Hill 70, Mr Ashmead Bartlett gave a vivid description of the valiant work of the Yeomanry. There was nothing in it, however, to connect any particular regiment with it ; but news of some of the casualties which came to hand private seemed to indicate that the Warwickshire Yeomanry, which includes the Rugby troop, took part in the attack. It is now known that they were in the splendid charge which took place on August 21st—only one day after their arrival at Gallipoli from Egypt. This being so, it may be interesting to repeat Mr Ashmead Bartlett’s,description :-

“ For about an hour there was no change in the situation, and then the Yeomanry again moved forward in a solid mass, forming up under the lower western and northern slopes.

“ It was now almost dark, and the attack seemed to hang fire, when suddenly the Yeomanry leapt to their feet, and, as a single men, charged right up the hill. They were met by a withering fire, which rose to a crescendo as they neared the northern crest, but nothing could stop them.

“ They charged at amazing speed, without a single halt, from the bottom to the top, losing many men, and many of their chosen leaders, including gallant Sir John Milbanke.

“ It was a stirring sight, watched by thousands in the over-gathering gloom. At one moment they were below the crest ; the next on top. A moment afterwards many had disappeared inside the Turkish trenches, bayoneting all the defenders who had not fled in time, whilst others never stopped at the trench line, but dashed in pursuit down the reverse slopes.

“ From a thousand lips a shout went up that Hill 70 was won. But night was now rapidly falling, the figures became blurred, then lost all shape, and finally disappeared from view. The battlefield had vanished completely, and as one left Chocolate Hill one looked back on a vista of rolling clouds of smoke and huge fires, from the midst of which the incessant roar of the rifle fire never for a moment ceased.

“ This was ominous, for, although Hill 70 was in our hands, the question arose : Could we hold it throughout the night in the face of determined counter-attacks ? In fact, all through the night the battle raged incessantly, and when morning broke Hill 70 was no longer in our possession. Apparently the Turks, were never driven off a knoll on the northern crest, from which they enfiladed us with machine-guns and artillery fire, whilst those of the Yeomanry who had dashed down the reverse slopes in pursuit were counter-attacked and lost heavily, and were obliged to retire.

“ During the night it was decided that it would be impossible to hold the hill in daylight, and the order was given for the troops to withdraw to their original positions. Nothing, however, will lessen the glory of that final charge of England’s Yeomen. Thus ended this great fight.”

OLD ST. MATTHEW’S BOYS WITH THE FORCES.

A large number of old scholars of St Matthew’s Boys’ School are serving with the Forces, and Mr R H Myers, the popular headmaster, has received many letters from the firing line, all breathing the same optimistic, quietly determined spirit which characterises the British Jack and Tommy. Two letters which Mr Myers has received lately are typical specimens, and give interesting details of use in both the Grand Fleet and the trenches of Flanders, and a few extracts may be welcomed.

ANXIOUS FOR THE DAY.

Petty Officer Telegraphist E W Penney, H.M.S Lion, in a letter says :—“ Unfortunately we in the Grand Fleet are not in the limelight like some of our more fortunate brothers, in the Dardanelles ; but although we envy them, we are proud to think that they are upholding the traditions of the Navy. We in the battle, cruisers, under Sir David Beatty, himself an Old Rugby man, have had two brushes with the Huns, at Heligoland and last January at the Dogger Bank ; but what we are all looking forward to is the glorious day (Der Tag) when we meet the High Sea Fleet for the first and last time. Many old scores will be paid on that day, and the murderers of the Lusitania, Scarboro’, and later the E 15, will get the punishment they so richly deserve. Although we have been engaged on the most dreary and monotonous work that a fleet is called upon to perform, i.e, a blockade, it has not damped the spirits of the men in the least. On the contrary, we have no pessimists, and everyone is as keen as mustard. I won’t describe a modern naval engagement, but it is exciting, especially during the chase which one always gets on meeting the Huns, as they are past-masters at running. Referring to one of the engagements, the writer says: ‘ We had several large shells aboard, and they wrecked everything near, but we got off very lightly, and only the Lion and Tiger were hit, and neither seriously damaged. I had a rather nasty cut an the head, caused by a bursting shell, but I made a speedy recovery, and am now anxious to get my own back. Of course, unlike the Huns, we have no ‘ Hymn of Hate’ ; but, to tell the truth, I don’t think the man is born who could put ours on paper. Unlike Dr Lyttleton, we do not love the Huns. Oh I dear no ; nor would he if he had witnessed a Zeppelin dropping bombs on our destroyers while they were trying to pick up survivors from the Bluecher. I hope before long we shall have come to grips with them again, and you can rely on the Grand Fleet winning the Modern Trafalgar, and I hope I am privileged to be present on Der Tag.”

GERMANS USE LIQUID FIRE.

Pte F J Summers, of the 5th Oxon and Bucks Light Infantry, in a letter to his old schoolmaster says :- “ We have had some very hard and exciting times lately. Our last turn in the trenches was one of eleven days in the firing line and three in support. All the time we were in we were subjected to very severe artillery bombardments, being the recipients of some very heavy shells. Our artillery near us proved superior in the exchanges, blowing the German trenches flat. The part of the ground that we held was protected somewhat from their smaller guns, as it was just behind the rise of a hill. The Germans send over a shell which we have nick-named ‘ whizz-bang ’; but so far they have gone over our parapet. Rather lucky for us. You will have read in the newspapers that the advance which followed the bombardment was entirely successful. The part we have been holding has always been one of the hottest in the line, and the enemy has tried every dirty method of attack there. Thanks to a kindly Providence, the direction of the wind protected us from gas during our time in. They tried gas shells though, but they were not very effective. An attack was made on our right with their liquid fire, but our counter-attack regained the small portion of line evacuated, and soon after our regular troops pushed them back farther still. The prisoners taken did not seem very keen : they were completely cowed by our shells, and in some cases gave themselves up. We find it rather trying in the trenches with so many alarms, often having to stand to arms just as we have got down to rest. I have often thought of the old school motto, ‘ Think of rest, but work on.’ I little thought when sitting beneath it that it would be recalled to my mind under such out of the usual circumstances.”

TWO HEROIC BRITISH SOLDIERS.

ONE OF THEM A RUGBEIAN.

Pte Swainsford, of the 1st Royal Warwickshire Regiment, writing to a Birmingham contemporary, says :—

Sir,—I have read in your paper on several occasions accounts of doings and happenings from the front, and so I am writing this to bring to your notice one of the most courageous acts during this campaign—at least it is so in my estimation. It was at the second battle at Ypres. We had just come out of the trenches for a short rest when we received the information that the Rifle Brigade ware to make an attack end that we should be in support. Well, the attack was successful, and two lines of trenches were taken. After the attack the Germ-Huns bombarded us terribly, thousands of shells being fired during the three days following. While the bombardment was at its hottest, our C.O sent an order that a machine-gun was to attempt to get up into the line. This seemed an almost impossible feat, considering the shells that were falling about ; but for all that, and despite all the advice received on the way up that it was impossible (I was in the reserve trench and heard the remarks), the officer, sergeant, and a private succeeded in reaching their goal. But no sooner did they get there than the officer was wounded, leaving the sergeant to take charge.

New follows information received from some of the Rifle Brigade who were there :

The Warwick machine-gun section succeeded in getting up to our position—in itself a most wonderful piece of work. They right away got their gun in action. After 15 minutes’ continual firing they had the misfortune to be buried, also the gun. Another 15 minutes and they were in action again. They had been in action, as near as I can say, about 2½ hours when the sergeant, looking through his glasses, spotted the place where the German reinforcements, gathered together, were waiting to advance to what was now their firing line ; but, unfortunately, owing to an advanced trench of ours, he was unable to fire on them. As soon as he realised this he explained the position to the private who was with him, and then, without the least sign of fear, they both caught up the gun and, despite a terrible fire, ran forward to the right flank, put the gun in position, and opened fire. The enemy dropped just as though they had been struck from above, very few escaping. They then picked up their gun and dashed back to their lines without injury ; but for all that it was the bravest thing I have seen in this war. The same night I was relieved, and so had to part from them, but in my opinion no praise is too good for those two heroes. Their names were Sergeant J Cresswell and Private King, Machine Gun Section, 1st Royal Warwickshire Regiment, 4th Division, 10th Brigade, British Expeditionary Force.—Yours, etc,

PRIVATE SWAIWSFORD.

1st Royal Warwickshire Regiment,

British Expeditionary Force, France.

The Private King referred to is the son of Mr and Mrs G King, 46 Pinfold Street, New Bilton. He resided with his parents till the outbreak of the war ; and he went to France on August 22nd, 1914.

GAVE HIS LIFE FOR A WOUNDED COMRADE.

A SPLENDID N.C.O.

Captain Conway, commanding B Company of the 7th South Staffordshire Regiment, has written to Mrs Woodward, now residing at Daventry Road, Kilsby, describing the noble way in which her husband, Lce-Corpl A Woodward, sacrificed himself for the sake of a wounded comrade. The writer says :-” I am forwarding you a bundle of letters and photo found in the Turkish trenches after our occupation of Chocolate Hill, on the Sunday after landing at Suvla Bay. I also thought perhaps you would be pleased to know what a noble death your husband died. The morning (Saturday, 7th August) alter landing, your husband was one of a patrol sent out to reconnoitre the hill now known as Chocolate Hill, about 1,500 yards to our front. About 200 yards from the hill the Turks opened a heavy fire on them, wounding several. The patrol than fell back on our lines, leaving one man (Pte Butler) badly wounded behind. It was not till later in the day that I learned that your husband had volunteered to stay with the wounded man where he fell. Sergt Evans, of my Company, volunteered to go out with a party and bring them in, but as it would have been certain death to anyone attempting this during the day-time, I had it postponed till darkness set in.

“ Unfortunately, during the afternoon, it was reported to me that your husband and Butler had been brought in by the R.N.D stretcher party. This report I afterwards found out to be untrue, as when we advanced on to Chocolate Hill on Sunday morning we passed the bodies of both, and I had them buried where they fell.

“ I am sure, dear Mrs Woodward, it will be some little satisfaction to you to know that he could not have died a more noble death, for he gave his life trying to save his wounded comrade. He was a splendid N.C.O, always ready and willing to do anything he was called upon to do.

“ Unfortunately, I was wounded the same evening, and was taken on board the hospital ship, but I took the first opportunity of bringing his gallant conduct to the notice of his Commanding Officer.—With deepest sympathy from Yours,

W I COWAP, Captain.

“ It would appear that the Turks had rifled your husband’s pockets and dropped the letters on retreating from Chocolate Hill.”

Lce-Corpl A Woodward was a nephew of Mrs Woodward, 73 Jubilee Street, New Bilton, with whom he and his wife resided at the time of joining the forces in September, 1914. He was 23 years of age, and had only been married two months before he joined to Miss E Worcester, of Kilsby. He was employed at the B.T.H Works.

RECRUITING AT RUGBY.

There has been a slight falling off in the number of recruits at the Rugby Drill Hall this week. The following have been accepted :—S Butler, R.F.A ; T Kirby, R.A.M.C ; H Brookes and A H Lorriman, A.S.C ; J H Hall, A S Smith, F Kirby, G H Chapman, and W Skeet, 220th Fortress Company, R.E ; W G Chater, R.W.R ; T Kenny, Leicester Regiment.

TALE OF DISASTER TO THE WARWICKSHIRE YEOMANRY.

CONVICTED FOR SPREADING FALSE NEWS.

At Stratford-on-Avon, on Wednesday, Albert Henry Brooks, chauffeur in the employ of Lieutenant Tate, Billesley Manor, was charged under the Defence of the Realm Act with spreading false reports as to disaster to the Warwickshire Yeomanry in the Dardanelles.

It was stated that defendant, on August 30th, came into Stratford and told several persons that Mrs Tate had that morning received a cablegram from her husband stating that the Warwickshire Yeomanry had been in action, that all the officers had been killed or wounded, and about 200 men put out of action.—Police-Sergeant Lee Instituted enquiries and found that the report was false. He was directed by the military authorities to prosecute. No cablegram had been received. The report had caused much distress, as a number of Stratford men are serving in the Warwickshire Yeomanry.

Defendant was fined £5, with the alternative of one month’s imprisonment.