16th Sep 1916. Round-up for Shirkers at Rugby

ROUND-UP FOR SHIRKERS AT RUGBY.

On Friday evening last week, and again on Saturday, the local police, in conjunction with the Military Authorities, had a round-up for the purpose of ascertaining how many men are shirking their obligations under the Military Service Act. The Empire, Palace, and the railway stations were visited, and men of military age were challenged to produce their papers. Men were also accosted by police officers in the streets. So thoroughly had the Military Authorities locally done their work, however, that, although a number of men who failed to produce their papers were escorted to the Police Station, they were all able to give satisfactory explanations of their presence in civil life. Both the military and police carried out their duties in a courteous manner, and people generally cheerfully acquiesced on the request, “ Show your papers, please ! ”

RUGBY PETTY SESSIONS.
TUESDAY. Before Dr Clement Dukes (in the chair), T Hunter, T A Wise, J E Cox, and J J McKinnell, Esqrs.

WAR PENSIONS SUB-COMMITTEE IMPOSED UPON.

Grace Anderson, late of Holbrooke Avenue, Rugby, who had been arrested at Woodville, near Burton-on-Trent, was charged on remand with obtaining £2 by false pretences from Agatha Mary West, at Rugby, on August 11th.—On the date named Mrs West was acting as temporary secretary to the local War Pensions Sub-Committee. Prisoner called upon her and represented that she was the widow of Sergt Alec Anderson, of the 1st Battalion Scots Guards, who was killed in action at Loos on September 25th last year. She said she was entitled to a pension, and, believing her story to be true, Mrs West advanced her £2. When enquiries were made of the Officer commanding the 1st Scots Guards it was found that no such man as Sergt Anderson had ever belonged to the battalion. Prisoner had then left the town, and a warrant for her arrest was issued.

The Magistrates’ Clerk said he had seen a letter, in which defendant alleged it was true her husband was killed as stated. If that was so she had better plead not guilty.

Defendant said her husband was killed, and that his name was Anderson, but she gave the wrong number and the wrong battalion, she was not entitled to any more money from the War Pensions Committee.—Mr H Lupton Reddish, solicitor, Rugby, prosecuted.

Mrs West said on the 11th prox. she was acting as secretary temporarily to the local War Pensions Committee of the Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Families Association. Defendant came to see her, and from information she gave witness filled up the form produced, which defendant signed as correct. This form stated that the pension awarded to the applicant was 10s, and the date of award March 16th. Defendant requested that 10s should be advanced that day, and that the committee would help her to find her a place as cook, which they did. Witness advanced her 10s by way of loan. That afternoon or next day defendant called on witness at Bilton. She said she had got a place, and asked for an advance to get clothing. Witness then advanced her 30s, making £2 in all. She told witness that when she was in service she would not need her pension, and would pay the money back as soon as the pension became due.

Asked what she had to say, defendant said she would not have done it had she not been hard up. Her papers were at her home in Liverpool, and she had not written for them because she did not wish her friends to know of the case. Her husband was in the King’s Liverpool Regiment, and since March she had regularly received her pension. She came into the Rugby district because she thought a change would do her good.

Supt Clarke said defendant’s proper name was Grace Lester, and she had undergone one month’s hard labour in 1913 for stealing by trick two ladies’ dresses.

Defendant, whilst admitting the conviction, said she was married to Anderson in 1914.—Supt Clarke said he knew nothing of the man referred to in the letter produced, but he had refused to go bail for defendant. The police had interviewed defendant’s parents, who had not seen her for three years, and declined to have anything to do with her.

The Chairman told defendant a very serious charge was brought against her, and she seemed to have a very bad character. They sent her to Warwick Gaol for three months with hard labour.

[Messrs Hunter and McKinnell, being members of the War Pensions Sub-Committee, did not adjudicate in this case.]

THE TRIBUNALS AT WORK.
COUNTY APPEAL TRIBUNAL.

Mr W K Pridmore (Mayor of Coventry) presided at the Appeal Tribunal held at the Benn Buildings on Wednesday evening. Others present were : Messrs W Johnson, jun, K Rotherham, and W Hill. Mr M E T Wratislaw and Mr F M Burton were the Military representatives.

Frank Walding, boot and shoe dealer, living at 52 Caldecott Street, Rugby, who had been exempted by the Tribunal till September 1st, made application for a further period on business grounds, but this was refused.—Exemption till January 1st. 1917, was given to Horace William Dale, a coal carter, living at 28 Bridge Street, whose previous exemption had expired.—William Henry Smith, plasterer and fitter, Birdingbury asked for a further exemption, and was refused, as was also the application, on business grounds, of Ernest Archie Bromwich, Newton House Farm, Rugby.— Mr Bromwich : Well, I shall sell my farm up. I will see an auctioneer at once.—The Chairman : Very well ; go now. Don’t stand here.

The Military appealed against an additional exemption which had been granted to Joseph Hill, Pailton, and this was upheld, on the Military promising not to serve calling-up papers until October 15th.—Thomas Watts, Stretton-on-Dunsmore, canal labourer and puddler, appealed on business grounds, and was given conditional exemption.—The Military appealed against the conditional exemption which had been granted by the Tribunal to Arthur Williams, a charge hand and refuse destructor at the Urban Council refuse disposal works. The appeal was upheld, and exemption given till October 14th.

The Military also appealed against the additional exemption till October 1st which had been granted to Horace Walter Gilbert, electrician and wireman, living at 58 Newland Street, New Bilton, and this case was adjourned.—Hercules Castley, 22 James Street, carpenter and joiner, appealed on medical grounds, and against the decision of the Rugby Urban Tribunal. This also was adjourned for the case to again go before the Medical Authorities at Budbrooke.—Joseph George Bennett, carriage builder and wheelwright, 7 Gladstone Street, New Bilton, appealed against the withdrawal of the exemption which had been granted to him, and he was given till December 1st.—Archie Ernest Robinson, tobacconist and off-licensed retailer, living at 1 Abbey Street, appealed against the decision of the Urban District Council, but their decision was upheld.—Evan Harris Lloyd, farmer, Brownsover, appealed against the decision of the Rural District Tribunal withdrawing his conditional exemption, and the case was adjourned for the Military to find a substitute.—Ernest Tomlin, grocer, draper, etc, of Dunchurch, asked for exemption, and was given until January 17th by agreement, this to be final.—The application of Horace Basil Wane, schoolmaster, of Bilton Grange, was refused.—Walter Russell, Whitehall Farm, whose exemption had been withdrawn, appealed against this, but his application was refused, the Military promising not to serve the papers until the 15th October.

Freddie Cooper, Brinklow, labourer and haulier’s carter, whose exemption had been withdrawn, unsuccessfully appealed against the decision.-Sidney George College, bread baker and corn dealer, of Brandon, who had been given exemption till September 15th without further appeal without permission, was now given till October 14th.—William Frederick Brooks, carrier, Flecknoe, appealed for exemption, but this case was adjourned for a substitute to be found by the Military.—The appeal of Edward William Steane, jun, batcher, of Marton, was refused by the Tribunal.—Frank William Goode, shepherd and horseman, of Broadwell, was given one month exemption, final, and, as he was an unattested man, this will carry two months.

MUNITION WORKERS WASTING TIME.—Cecil Winn, apprentice, 12 Railway Terrace, Rugby, claimed through Samuel Winn, his father, a shell turner, from Harry Carter, machinist, 14 Railway Terrace, Rugby, to recover possession of a show Homer pigeon, value 5s, wrongfully detained by defendant.—The case was heard late in the afternoon, and Samuel Winn said his son had been fetched back to work.—Defendant said it was a “ blooming ” neighbour’s quarrel, and the pigeon was a stray one.—His Honor elicited the information that both men were working on munitions, and said they were wasting time by coming into Court over a pigeon worth only 2s 6d or 3s. He awarded the pigeon to plaintiff, with no reflection on anybody, and expressed the hope that this would be the end of the quarrel.

OVERSTAYING HIS LEAVE.—Lance-Corpl Harry Gilbert, who had been arrested at 6 St Matthew Street, Rugby, was charged with being an absentee without leave from the 1st Royal Warwicks. He said he came out of hospital on sick leave, and should have gone back on Tuesday night.—P.S Goodwin said a telegram was received instructing the police to arrest, and when he acted upon it the previous morning he found Gilbert fully dressed and with his bag packed ready to go away.—Defendant said he had a railway warrant to return if he was allowed to do so ; but the Magistrate decided to remand him to await an escort.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Mr L W Eadon, second son of Mr W Eadon, of Hillmorton Road, who enlisted in the H.A.C soon after the outbreak of the War, has been gazetted to a second lieutenancy in the R.F.A.

Mr B C Simmonds, son of Mr W T Simmonds, headmaster of the Elborow School, and Mr Everard Turner, son of Mr E Turner, of 30 Lancaster Road, Rugby, have been gazetted to second lieutenancies in the Infantry Machine Gun Corps. Mr Turner has already seen active service with the Oxford and Bucks L.I. in France.

Mr T Collins, of 37 Stephen Street, Rugby, has received a letter from his second son, Rifleman R Collins, of the Rifle Brigade, stating that he was wounded in a German trench, which had been captured three hours before. He had two wounds in the left thigh, one in the right, and one in the right shoulder. Rifleman Collins, who is now in a Military Hospital at Stockport, is an old St Matthew’s boy, and previous to the War was employed by Messrs Parnell & Son. Although he is not quite 19 years of age, this is the second time he has been wounded, the first occasion being at Ypres over twelve months ago. He enlisted on September 3, 1914.

PTE F J SUMMERS NOTIFIED AS KILLED.

Mr F H Summers, of Bridget Street, has received a notification from the War Office that his son, Pte F J Summers, Oxford & Bucks L.I, missing since September 25th of last year, is killed. Pte Summers was an old boy of St Matthew’s School, and a prominent, junior footballer and athlete.

ST MATTHEW’S OLD BOYS WOUNDED.

Amongst the casualties in the great advance are Gunner F Favell, R.G.A, Rifleman R Collins, Rifle Brigade, Pte E J Hewitt, Royal Warwickshire Regt, and Pte A Barrows, Dorset Regt, all wounded.

B.T.H CASUALITIES.

Great regret will be felt by employees at the B.T.H at the news that Corpl Frank Thistlewood, of the Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, has been killed in the recent advance. Corpl Thistlewood, who was 35 years of age, enlisted in September, 1915, prior to which date he had been employed for several years in the Cost Statistics Department. He was a native of Leamington.

Official news has been received at the B.T.H that Pte Newell, of the Royal Fusiliers, has been posted as missing since August 7th last, and his parents have received private intimation that he was killed on that date. Pte Newell enlisted early in the year, and was formerly employed in the B.T.H Drawing Office. He was a native of Nottingham, and was well known in B.T.H athletic circles.

Sergt J D Sutton and Lance-Sergt A J L Moore have been wounded—the latter seriously and the former in the stomach with shrapnel. Both were natives of Loughborough, and enlisted in the same battalion of the Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, as Corpl Thistlewood, in September, 1914. Sergt J D Sutton was employed in the Accountancy Department, and Sergt Moore, who was visited by his mother in France, in the Cost Department.

BRANDON.

MR & MRS HENRY BARNETT, of Brandon, have received news that their son, Corpl Wilfred Barnett, of the K.R.R, has been wounded. His escape from death was lucky, as the missile happened to strike a cigarette-case he had in his pocket, and deflected it on to his head. His brother Albert, some few weeks ago, was struck in 90 places by shrapnel, but is now recovering.

DUNCHURCH.

CASUALTIES.—Pte W Wilkes (Mill Street), of the Oxon and Bucks Light Infantry, has been wounded in the foot and leg, and is in hospital at Halifax, going on fairly well ; and Sergt C T Hedgcock, of the 22nd Brigade, Machine Gun Company, has been wounded in the head.

BRINKLOW.

PTE FRANCIS COMPTON, nephew of Mr W Compton, of Brinklow, has been awarded the Military Medal for bravery on the field.

CLIFTON.

Mr James Morton, the sub-postmaster here, has been called up, and it now in the Durham L.I.

WOLSTON.

WOUNDED SOLDIERS.—Pte W Barker, Royal Warwicks, has been wounded in the arm and is in hospital. He is the second son of Mr N Barker.—Pte J E Flowers, the second son of Mr John Flowers, of Brook Street, is in hospital at Newport, Mon., having had one of his fingers blown off. He has been in France about 18 months, and has been in a number of engagements at Ypres with the Rifle Brigade.
NEW ATTENDANCE OFFICER.-Mr Gumbley, of Warwick, is now school attendance officer for the district in place of Mr A J Poxon, who is in training with the Royal Naval Flying Corps. He is an old soldier, and has six sons serving their King and country, three of whom are at present in France.

THE PARCELS sent this week by the Rugby Prisoners of War Help Committee to local men who are prisoners of war in Germany contained :- ¼lb of tea, 1lb sugar, 1 tin of herrings in tomatoes, 1 tin of condensed milk, 1 tin of baked beans, ½-lb of butter, 2-lb box of biscuits and one pair of socks.

 

IN MEMORIAM.

BARNETT.—In loving memory of Lance-Corpl. Samuel George Barnett, of the 5th Oxon and Bucks, killed in action, September 25th, 1915 ; aged 21.
“ We often sit and think of him,
And tenderly breathe his name ;
Nothing left for us to look at
But his photo in the frame.
Some day our eyes shall see
That dear face still kept in memory.”

HOPKINS.—In loving memory of Frank, the beloved and youngest son of Henry Hopkins, of Long Lawford, who was killed in action in France, September 18th, 1915.
“ He sleeps, not in his native land,
But ‘neath some foreign skies,
And far from those that loved him best ;
In a hero’s grave he lies.”
—From his FATHER, BROTHERS & SISTER.

MASON.-In loving memory of Sergt. Arthur T. Mason, beloved and only son.—From his sorrowing MOTHER and SISTER, 40 Rutland Gardens, Hove, Brighton.

 

5th Aug 1916. Rugby Volunteer Training Corps, Swearing-in Ceremony

RUGBY VOLUNTEER TRAINING CORPS.

SWEARING-IN CEREMONY.

An interesting ceremony was performed by Mr J J McKinnell, chairman of the Urban District Council, at the Benn Buildings, on Saturday afternoon, when eighty-seven members of the Rugby Company of the 2nd Battalion Warwickshire Volunteer Regiment were sworn in as soldiers under the new regulations. The proceedings took place in the Assembly Room, and the Chairman was supported on the platform by Lieut-Col Johnstone, Major Glover, Messrs W Flint, T A Wise, S B Robbins, R W Barnsdale, T M Wratislaw, H N Sporborg, T Hunter, and F M Davenport. The company, under the command of Mr C H Fuller (Commandant) and Mr L G Haigh, fell in at the Drill Hall, Park Road, and marched to the Benn Buildings.

The Chairman said, in the first place, he wanted on behalf of the Council and of the town, to give them a very hearty welcome. He thought they would all agree that it was most appropriate that that most important ceremony, which was the administering of the oath to a civic force, should take place in the building which was the centre of the management of the town. He had received apologies for absence from Lieut-Col Hood, Col Lewis, Hon E Parker, Brigadier-General Little, Mr A James, and Mr W L Larke. He would now ask them a short question, to which he wished them to answer “ Yes.” It was : “ Do you fully understand all the questions put to you on the official form of enrolment ? ” The men answered “ Yes ” ; whereupon Mr McKinnell requested them to take their hats off and to answer a longer question, which was in effect the declaration : “ Do you solemnly declare that the answers made by you to the questions set out on page 1 of the form of enrolment are true, and that you are willing, to be enrolled as members of the Volunteer Force of the Warwickshire Volunteer Regiment under the conditions laid down by the Army Council under the regulations for the Volunteer Force framed by them in accordance with the Statute Law relating to that Force ?” An affirmative answer was made, whereupon the Chairman administered the oath as under :-

“ I (–—) do sincerely promise and swear that I will be faithful and bear true allegiance to his Majesty King George V, and that I will faithfully serve his Majesty in Great Britain for the defence of the same against all his enemies and opposers whatsoever, according to the conditions of my service.”

This ceremony over, the Chairman said they were now soldiers, and he was proud to be the first one to congratulate them on behalf of their fellow-citizens. They had joined a very gallant and very noble army. The Volunteers had been unrecognised for months and months past, and at last the Government had thought well to take some notice of them, and to allow that, after all, they might possibly be of some use. Personally, he thought that a great mistake was made right at the very beginning in the nervousness and apprehensiveness of the War Office, who feared that if this Force was made too much of recruiting would suffer. He believed that the contrary would have been the effect. They honoured the Volunteers for plugging away (applause). Despite a great deal of very cheap wit on the subject of their age, despite the Government lukewarmness, and despite thousand and one more hindrances, they had gone steadily on making themselves efficient. He had heard what they had been doing, and he believed they put in a great deal of hard work, and he was sure there was not one among them who was not very glad he had done that hard work.

This question of the Volunteer movement was a very deep and vital one, because the men could, when they were fairly well trained, if the need arose, as it might possibly now arise, take the places of members of the Regular Forces, who would then be able to go and fight in France, Flanders, and elsewhere. In all probability things would get very critical before they had won the War. They were going to win, but it might be a bit of a squeeze, and heaven knew what was going to happen to anyone of them during the next twelve months.

Addressing those who had been ordered by the Tribunal, as a condition of exemption, to join that body, the Chairman said they must not think they were different from any other member of that Force. They were honoured just as much as the others. Those on the Tribunal knew, but others did not, all the reasons which stopped them from joining in the past ; and therefore, he did want to impress upon them that there was no distinction between them and other members of the Force (applause). This Force could do a most extraordinary good work in training those men who might have to be sent for soldiers, and who would then be three-parts trained when they went up. The oath they had taken only bound them to fight the enemy in the case of invasion of this country ; and this recognition by the Government ought to put a new life into their ranks. That swearing-in ceremony ought to be the starting point of fresh vigour both in men and efficiency. There ought to be a lot more men in their ranks, not only men of over military age, but the young men of 17 and 18 years who were employed in the town, and he earnestly hoped they would have a large influx of recruits in the near future.

Now they were enrolled as soldiers they must have some sort of uniform, arms, and equipment, and he understood they had certain sums in hand. However he would appeal to the public to support their funds with rather more liberality than they had done in the past. He was told they wanted £600. He hoped they would get it ; he thought they would, because they certainly ought to. They were extremely lucky to have such extraordinarily zealous and efficient officers, who worked very hard and also knew their job, and there was no man whom he would rather see as Commandant than Mr C H Fuller.

Major Glover said he hoped the enthusiasm that had been shown that day would not be allowed to evaporate ; but that they would induce others to follow their example. He thought that in a town of the size of Rugby there should be a large number of eligible men who could come forward. He was now Acting Commandant and Regimental and Battalion Adjutant ; and with regard to the first position, he was acting as a warming-pan for Col Johnstone, who, he knew, had received an invitation from the proper authorities to accept that post. He hoped Col Johnstone would accept that post, and then he (the speaker) would step back into the position that he could fill with greater credit to himself-that of Adjutant to the Battalion. In conclusion, he urged them to form a detachment of 250 in the town, so that they could have a company of their own. Hitherto they had been connected with Southam and Harbury, but it was now proposed to get these detachments affiliated to another corps.

Mr C H Fuller, on behalf of the Company, expressed thanks to the Chairman for the part he had played in that day’s ceremony, and to the other gentlemen who had attended. Their requirements could be expressed in two words, “ men ” and “ money.” He understood that men disqualified from service in the Army, who had to remain at home, had great difficulties to contend with, but they must have a certain amount of spare time, and he felt that in the crisis they were now in it was their duty to spend part of that spare time by joining their Corps. They must remember the men at the Front-that vast number that had given up money and everything. They must remember, also, that vast number who would never return, and that probably those present would live to see the final victory and to enjoy the triumphal peace. They had been given clearly to understand that they must not look upon the question of invasion as impossible even now ; and, therefore, it seemed to him that it behoved every man to do what he could to prepare himself for that event. It would very much strengthen their position ; and he hoped it could come about, if they could form a company of their own. He would ask each of them within the next fortnight to get one man who for some reason was unable to join the Regular Forces to join their Corps. There object would then be attained as regarded numbers ; and with regard to funds, he thought they could rely on the public to assist them if they showed they were willing to assist themselves, but could not do so to the full extent required. Eighty-seven men had taken the oath that day, and forms had been completed for 155 men to enrol who for various reasons were unable to be present. There had been a lamentable amount of apathy in that neighbourhood with regard to the Corps, more than in other places. Those eligible people who said the Force was not wanted were seeking an excuse for not joining, and he begged of everyone who was able to do his bit in this position-and it was a serious position they found themselves in—to do his best and join them and prepare to be ready. If they did that no man who was disqualified for active service would have anything to regret at the end of the War. To those who were preparing themselves he would commend as a motto the well-known lines :—

“ He also serves who only stands and waits.

Lieut-Col Johnstone then addressed the detachment, and said it was a great regret to him that, shortly after raising the second Battalion, he had to give up the command because of the other duties which were placed upon him. He had now been asked to take over the command of it again. After considering the matter, he really found that his duties were so heavy at the present time that, although he took the greatest interest in them, he felt he could not do justice to them. But he was going to his best. He accepted it (applause), and he would be glad to be with them again. all he asked was that they would put their backs into it, because if he found any slackers he would not want them. He wanted men who were going to try to do their work and to become soldiers in earnest. They did not know when they would be required. They might be required at any moment, and they must fit themselves for that moment. He thanked them for the kind manner in which they had received his return to the Company (loud applause).

The Chairman : Col Johnstone must be gratified by the way his return has been received.

Cheers for the King concluded the proceedings.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Second-Lieut B B Salmon, Manchester Regiment, killed, was in the football XV at Rugby School.

The numerous friends of Pte W T Satchell (Kilsby) of the Royal Warwicks, will be sorry to hear that he is lying seriously ill in the Canadian Hospital, near Maidenhead. There are every prospects of a final recovery, but it will be a long time before he regains health and strength completely.

SECOND-LIEUT F HUNTER HAS NARROW ESCAPES.

The name of Second-Lieut F Hunter, of the Gordon Highlanders, son of Mr T Hunter, J.P, Elmhurst, Hillmorton Road, appeared in the list of officers suffering from shell shock. The losses of the Battalion were heavy, and Second-Lieut Hunter had a remarkably narrow escape. A shell dropped at his feet and burst outwards, killing the men on either side of him and blowing him for some yards, but happily he was not touched by any of the fragments. He lost the use of his legs through shell shock, and was brought to London, and afterwards sent home to Rugby. Two days before this Second-Lieut Hunter had another narrow escape. He was standing talking to another officer, when they were espied by a German sniper, who shot the officer dead. Mr Hunter stooped to pick his friend up, and a bullet, evidently intended for him, passed through his pack, smashing his hair brush, &c.

LOCAL CASUALTIES.

The following young mm connected with the Rugby Baptist Church have been wounded in the great offensive : Will Spaggett (Manchester), Frank Burberry (Netley), Percy Harris (Rawtenstall), Bob Mayes (Leeds), and Corpl Horly (Birmingham).

Pte George Clarke, E Co, R.W.R, has written to his parents, who live at 98 Avenue Road, New Bilton, informing them that he is now in hospital suffering from a bullet wound in the left thigh. He adds that the bullet has not yet been extracted, but that he is going on well.

Mrs Rixom, 108 Claremont Road, has received intimation in letters from the War Office and Major C P Nickalls that her son. Bombardier F W Rixom, Rugby Howitzer Battery, was wounded at the back of the head, with shrapnel on July 29th. He is now in St George’s Hospital, Stockport, and is progressing favourably. This is the second time Bombardier Rixom has been wounded.

Rifleman H G King, of 16 Pinfold Street, New Bilton, who was wounded by shrapnel in the foot on June 26th, as reported in this paper three weeks ago, and was in hospital in France, has had his leg amputated below the knee, the bones being smashed and also poisoned. He is now in hospital at Liverpool, where he has been visited by his friends, who found him going on very well indeed.

TWO B.T.H MEN KILLED.

News was received at the B.T.H this week that Pte Arthur Hipwell, Leicestershire Regiment, son of Mr Arthur Hipwell, of Catthorpe, and Corpl Richards, of the R.W.R, have been killed during the recent fighting. Before the War Pte Hipwell was employed in the Turbine Department, and Corpl Richards was a draughtsman in the Drawing Office for several years.

CAPT C E ANDERSON.

Captain Charles Edward Anderson, the Gordon Highlanders, who was killed in action on July 21st, was the second son of the late William Henry Anderson and Mrs Anderson, of Rokeby House, rugby. He was born in December, 1890, and entered the Gordon Highlanders from Sandhurst in October, 1910, getting his first step in promotion in June, 1912, and his captaincy in April, 1915. He was wounded at the first battle of Ypres in October, 1914, and again slightly on July 14th last, but remained on duty, and was killed by a shell on the early morning of July 21st. Captain Anderson was a keen follower to hounds, and when on leave hunted with the Atherstone and North Warwickshire Hounds.
[Captain Anderson is listed on the Rugby Memorial Gates. His biography will be published at a later date]

SERGT J GILBERT, of BILTON.

Another respected member of the Warwickshire Territorials, Sergt John Gilbert, eldest son of Mr T Gilbert, of Bilton, died from wounds in a Brighton hospital on Tuesday. Sergt Gilbert, who was 32 years of age, was wounded while engaged with a Trench mortar battery on or about July 20th ; and in order, probably, to avoid causing alarm to his wife, who only a fortnight ago gave birth to a child, he wrote home minimising his injuries. On July 26th he was brought to England, and sent to a hospital at Brighton. Unfortunately blood poisoning set in, and developed so rapidly that Sergt Gilbert died before his relatives, who had been summoned by telegraph, could reach the hospital. Before the War he was employed by Messrs Hands, china dealers, Sheep Street. He was a member of the Bilton Working Men’s Club and the Bilton Brass Band. He leaves a wife and four children, to whom, and also his parents, much sympathy is extended in their sad loss.

The interment took place at the Parish Church, Bilton, on Thursday afternoon, the remains having been brought from Brighton on the preceding day. A large number of parishioners assembled at the church to show respect to the deceased and his family ; and although it was not possible to arrange for a military funeral, the wounded soldiers at Bilton Hall Red Cross Hospital supplied, as far as they could, the honours due to a departed comrade. A detachment of about 35 preceded the cortege from deceased’s former home at Bilton Hill. They lined the path to the church, and additional pathos was imparted to the scene when each one saluted, as well as wounds would permit, the coffin, covered with a Union Jack and the cap, tunic, and belt of the deceased, as it passed by. The Burial Service was read by the Rector, the Rev W O Assheton, R.D. Among those who assembled in the church and at the grave-side were : Mr T A Wise, J.P, Mrs West (Bawnmore, Mrs W Barnett, Mrs Assheton, Mrs F E Hands and Mr J Lee (Rugby), Miss Wilson (Bournemouth), Messrs G Wilson and W Wilson, Mr and Mrs F Betts and Mrs Elsom, Mrs Yates, Mr and Mrs H Freeman. Mrs E Smith, Mr and Mrs Manning, Messrs H J Hughes (representing the Working Men’s Club), G Evans, J Cripps, sen, G Birch, J Burton, and others. A number of beautiful floral tributes were sent by relatives and friends, including the members of the Working Men’s Club ; Mr Bedford’ ; Brass Band, of which deceased was formerly a member ; the Bilton Brass Band ; and the wounded soldiers who had collected flowers and made up a handsome cross, upon which they placed the inscription, “ From Wounded Comrades at Bilton Hall.”

DEATH.

HAYES.—On July 19th (killed in action). Signaller Frank Hinde Hayes, aged 19 years, youngest son of Mrs. Hayes, 86 York Street, Rugby.
“ The Lord gave, the Lord hath taken away ;
Even so His servants are tried.
Blessed be the Name of the Lord.”

BOUCHER.—On the 25th July, in hospital, of wounds received in action on 14th July, Captain Alan Estaeurt Boacher, Leicestershire Regiment, dearly loved younger surviving son of the Rev. Canon and Mrs. Boucher, of Frolesworth Rectory, Lutterworth, aged 21.

DICKEN.—July 20th, died of wounds in France, Lance-Corporal Signaller Sidney Harold Dicken, youngest dearly loved son of St. and Mrs. W. Dicken, Claremont Road, Rugby. Aged 22 years. Deeply mourned.

GILBERT.—Died from wounds received in France, Sergt. John T. Gilbert, the beloved Husband of Edie Gilbert, and eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. T. Gilbert, Bilton. Aged 32 years.

HIPWELL.—On July 23, 1916, Pte. John Henry Hipwell, No. 10,816, 6th Leicester Regt. (died of wounds), eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Hipwell, of Lilbourne, aged 23 years.
“ He gravely answered duty’s call,
His-life he gave for one and all.
But the unknown grave is the bitterest blow :
None but aching hearts can know.”
— From his loving father, mother, sister, & brother.

SMITH.—Killed in action on July 22nd, 1916, Eric-Arthur Rae Smith, Second Lieutenant, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, aged twenty-seven years. Youngest son of Arthur E. Smith, Pencarrow, Enfield, Middlesex, and late of Clifton-on-Dunsmore.

WHITE.—On the 19th or 20th July, killed in action, Sergt. W. H. White, 2nd 7th Batt. Royal Warwickshire Regiment, aged 19. Dearly beloved son of Mr. and Mrs. George White, of Dunchurch.

WHITE.—Killed in action in France, July 3, 1916, William Samuel, second son of Thomas and Many Sophie White, of 46 Manor Road, Rugby and grandson of the late Thomas Clarke, of Glencoonera, Irviaestown, Co. Fermanagh, Ireland, who was for 31 years, a well-known member of the Royal Irish Constabulary.
“ No useless coffin endowed his breast,
Nor in sheet nor in shroud they wound him ;
But he lies like a warrior taking his rest,
With no martial cloak around him.”

IN MEMORIAM.

ARIS.—In loving remembrance of Lance-Corpl Mark Aris, killed in action August 6, 1915.
“ Some day we hope to meet him ;
We know not when.
We shall clasp his hands in the Betterland,
Never to part again.”
—Ever in thoughts of his loving SISTERS & BROTHERS, (SID in France).

HOLLIS(Frankton).—In loving Memory of our dear son and brother “ Bert,” who was killed in action at the Battle of Chunuk Bair, August 10, 1915—Sadly missed.
“ For still for him high service waits,
Tho’ earth’s last fight is fought;
God did not give that martial soul
To end at last in nought
That stedfast soldier-heart was not
For this brief life alone;
‘Tis as a soldier he will stand
Before the Great White Throne.”

WOODWARD.—In loving memory of Lance-Corpl. A. Woodward, 7th S. Stafford Regiment, killed in action at Chocolate Hill, Gallipoli, August 7th, 1915.
“ He bravely answered duty’s call,
His life he gave for one and all,
But the unknown grave it the bitterest blow ;
None but aching hearts can know.”
-From his loving wife ; also father and mother.

4th Dec 1915. Interesting Letter from an Old Murrayian

INTERESTING LETTER FROM AN OLD MURRAYIAN.

AN INSPIRING PICTURE FOR SLACKERS.

The following letter has been received by a young lady in Rugby, whose brother, an Old Murrayian, is at the front :—

“ I am in a dug-out about 15 feet under the ground, and the only illumination available is a novel one. It is a piece of rag dipped in vaseline ; but tomorrow our fresh supply of candles arrive, so I shall look forward to a ‘ bright ‘ future. I will try and describe to you what my vision of the scenery is like. To do that I shall have to gain a point of prominence ; but there are plenty of them here—namely, brickstacks—as at present my home is in the trenches which are situated in the brickfields. This district has figured in General French’s despatches a good many times, and has been the scene of some severe fighting. Evidence of this is still scattered around. It is noted for being a hot quarter, and it lives up to its name. The first thing you notice is the maze of trenches as far as the eye can reach. Some of them were demolished, and others intact, having stood the brunt of it all. The intervening ground between the firing lines, called “ No Man’s Land,” is completely ploughed up by the enormous number of shells that have burst there. One would think it impossible to get through the barbed wire entanglements. Certainly now they are intact, but you should see them after the high explosive shells have played their part and blown them to bits, and the case is altered. The chasm that one can just discern is a blown-up mine crater, and whichever side holds these craters, makes strong efforts to retain them. This is where bomb throwers shine, as parties are organised at night to try and capture them. It is very dangerous work, as there is generally a maxim gun in the crater. In the distance one can see ruined chateaux and buildings, which have tasted the power of a “ Jack Johnson,” also the coal mines (called ‘ Fosses ‘ here), which mark the vicinity of some desperate fighting. These brickstacks are the delight of the sniper, as concealment is so easy, and such a commanding view can be obtained of the surrounding country. Eleven are in our possession, and two are in the hands of the Huns, so we have a great advantage over them. The stacks, being so conspicuous, get their full share of shells, and one is very lucky if, when looking from them, he does not get a greeting of shrapnel. This is the place where Mick O’Leary won his V.C, when the Guards captured the trenches from the Huns. There are plenty of graves which contain dead Germans ; also broken rifles and equipment which once belonged to them lying about. It gets very cold at night, but we have plenty of clothes. We had a bit of sun this morning. It was the signal for the aeroplanes to make their appearance, and what a reception they had from the anti-aircraft guns. We have had a good bombardment, and I think the Huns sent over everything that Krupps manufacture. . . .“ As we pass down the road to —-, we pass several graveyards, with hundreds of wooden crosses. What an inspiring picture to place before the slackers at home. One lives and learns, and I would not exchange positions with anyone in England at the present moment. With all the hardships, everything is so jolly, and when the war is over I hope to be able to take you all for a nice trip round here and act as your guide, because I pride myself upon knowing a little bit of France now from Ypres to Arras.”

In another letter to his old schoolmaster, Mr W T Coles Hodges, F.E.I.S, the same writer, after describing the scenery near where he is stationed, says:—

“ The intervening ground between the firing trenches, called ‘ No Man’s Land,’ is dotted with dead bodies, and here friend and foe lie side by side. The rain makes everything so miserable and muddy, and it is a picture to see the men come out of the trenches, covered with mud, and knowing what it is to be strangers to a wash for a couple of days ; but still one can always bet upon having an accompaniment on the mouth organ to march with.” The writer describes the cemeteries on the La Basse-Bethune Road, and says: “ Each contains many trim little crosses, and in some cases evergreens and flowers have been planted among the graves by comrades who cherish the memory of a chum so much. Large crosses are generally erected when a considerable body of men belonging to the regiment get killed. For instance, there is one here which has the following inscription : ‘ To a platoon of Guards,’and as a platoon is from 50 to 60 strong, this goes to show what severe fighting has taken place in this vicinity. Sometimes I come across an old school chum, and then the conversation generally drifts to what is a memory to me, and a very pleasant one at that—our schooldays at Murray Road School.

NARROW ESCAPE OF AN OLD MURRAYIAN.

Pte Horace Anderson, of the 2nd Warwicks, son of Mr W Anderson, 102 Winfield Street, Rugby, is in hospital at Torquay with a shattered thumb and slight wound in the side. He was also gassed, and for a time he was in a critical condition. His mother has been to Torquay to see him, and he gave her a Testament which he was carrying in his breast pocket at the time he was acting as bomb carrier at the battle of Loos. A bullet had struck the Testament, smashing away a portion of one corner, but the missile was evidently diverted by contact with the book, otherwise it would have passed through, or dangerously near, his heart. His cap also had a bullet-hole, which entered just over the right temple, passed along the side, and out at the back, so that he evidently had two very narrow escapes from direct rifle fire ; and after being gassed he was lying in the trenches for come hours.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

The third son (William Harry) of Mr Chas Packwood, of, Warwick Street, Rugby, has joined the 2nd Battalion of the Honourable Artillery Company (Infantry). Mr Packwood now has three sons serving with the Colours.

A LUCKY BATTALION.

Driver Philip Strongitharm, of the 25th Battalion R.F.A. has this week been on leave to his home at 8 Fasy Lane, New Bilton. after about 16 months at the front. The battalion to which he belongs has seen a lot of fighting, having been at the war since August last year, but they have come through so far with comparatively few casualties amongst the men. The loss of horses has been rather serious, and in the engagement at Ypres, when taking part in the withdrawing of guns from an untenable position, Driver Strongitharm had three horses shot under him in quick succession. He has had a number of hairbreadth escapes, but has not sustained the slightest injury, and appears none the worse for his spell of active service. Like so many others who have had personal knowledge of the actual fighting in France, he believes that the German resistance is weakening and that circumstances will in time compel them to evacuate Belgium, though they have got such a firm footing in the country that it will not be an easy matter now to expel them.

TEN DAYS’ LEAVE.

Sapper T Lord, of the Royal Engineers, whose home is at 28 Bennett Street, came to Rugby on Tuesday for 10 days’ leave, after being for a while at Leicester Hospital. He was wounded in the thigh, and retains the bullet as a souvenir. He has also undergone an operation for varicose veins, so may not be fit for work in the trenches for some time. When he leaves Rugby next week he has to report himself at Newark.

Sapper T Lord was attached to the 15th Scottish (New Army) Division, which played such a distinguished part in the advance at Loos, and when Lieut Johnson of that company gained the Victoria Cross for rallying the Scottish detachment at a critical moment at Hill 70. Most of the other officers in his company were either killed or wounded. On the Thursday following the advance, Sapper Lord, with a party of ten men, under Corporal Overill, of the B.T.H, were burying the dead between the old lines, when the enemy threw over a couple of shrapnel shells, a bullet from one of which wounded Sapper Lord in the thigh. Corporal Overill also sustained a slight scalp wound. While Sapper Lord was on a hospital barge on the canal at Bethune, a German aeroplane bombed the railway station, and during the unwelcome visitor’s stay our informant says he spent the most uncomfortable minutes of any he experienced in France, Sapper Lord was conveyed to England in the Hospital ship Anglia, which has since been sunk in the channel, and is full of praise for the excellent treatment which the wounded receive from the R A.M.C, the Red Cross, and Hospital workers generally.

ANOTHER RUGBY MAN AWARDED THE D.C.M.

Amongst those who have recently been awarded the D.C.M is Bombardier J R Handyside, D Battery, 71st Brigade Royal Field Artillery. He received the distinction for conspicuous gallantry from the 26th September to the 14th October, 1915, during which time his battery was in the open and constantly under a very heavy fire. He frequently volunteered to mend telephone wires under heavy fire, thereby successfully maintaining communications. Bombardier Handyside had been previously brought to notice for coolness and bravery on the 25th September near Loos, when he repeatedly volunteered to repair wires under very heavy fire, although he was suffering from the effect of gas fumes at the time.

Bombr Handyside hails from Newcastle, but when war broke out he was working at Messrs Willans & Robinson’s, and lodged at the house of Mrs Hayward, 43 Lodge Road. Rugby. He enlisted as a gunner on September 3rd, 1914, and has now been promoted to the rank of Corporal. In addition to the D.C.M he has been awarded the French Medal Militaire.

RUGBY MAGISTERIAL,

SATURDAY.—Before T Hunter, Esq.

AN ABSENTEE.—James Crosier, 27 Newbold Road, Rugby, of the 3rd Lancashire Fusiliers, pleaded guilty to being an absentee from his regiment.—Supt Clarke stated that he had received a communication from the commanding officer of the Battalion, asking him to arrest defendant.—Remanded to await the arrival of an escort.

COVENTRY MUNITIONS TRIBUNAL

MONDAY.

LOST IN A FIELD.—Walter Crofts, a Rugby crane driver, explained that during a night walk he got lost in a field, encountered some barbed wire, and tore his hand. This was in answer to a summons by Willans and Robinson, Ltd., Rugby, alleging that he absented himself without leave.

“ Were you practising for the front ?” asked the Chairman, “ No, I was walking with my brother,” he replied. He explained other losses of time by stating that he attended a wedding on one occasion, and at another time he had his jaw fractured by a man in the shop. The Chairman said defendant seemed to find a good deal of trouble, and should be a little more careful at week-ends. He would be fined 15s.

A WORKER’S PROTEST.—That he refused to do work he was engaged upon, and stood by his bench for four and a half hours, were the complaints against Leonard J Hopkins, 99 Victoria Street, New Bilton, by the B.T.H, Coventry. His reply was that he went to enlist, and after that was put on assembling instead of his proper job as a driller. He could not earn a living, and stood idle as a protest. He was fined 2s 6d.

CHURCH LAWFORD.

THE WHITE FEATHER.—Some little stir has been caused during the last week in this village. It would seem that quite recently a young man residing in the village was the recipient of a white feather, which came to him through the post, and of course made him very angry. Being a Territorial, he at once wrote a long letter to his commanding officer expressing his willingness and readiness to fight for his country, etc, and also accusing a tradesman’s wife (whose son has been in the trenches for twelve months) in the village of sending the obnoxious article and of insulting him in various ways. As a result of this letter, the lady in question has had a visit from the local police officer on the subject, and as she and her family are, absolutely and entirely innocent of the charges made against them, they in their turn are highly indignant, and are making inquiries which may possibly result in an action for slander.

BOOKS & PERIODICALS WANTED FOR SOLDIERS & SAILORS.

SINGLE COPIES GRATEFULLY ACCEPTED AT THE POST OFFICE.

As is now generally known, there has been for some months past a scheme in operation under which magazines and books which have been given by the public for the use of soldiers and sailors, have been forwarded by the Post Office to the men free of charge.

The scheme so far has proved a great success, but with the growth of the Army the demand for literature has increased, and the Agencies recognized by the War Office and Admiralty for the distribution of literature have to face a demand to satisfy which a supply of over 100,000 items every week is required from the Post Office.

At present only about half that amount is being sent, owing to a recent falling off in the supplies handed in by the public.

It is possible that it is not known to everyone who may have books or magazines for which they have no further use that by merely handing them in loose at any Post Office, they will be at once forwarded to the distributing centre in London.

This is a good work in which almost everyone can participate with the pleasant thought that, at little or no cost or trouble, every article so given will afford much pleasure to many of the soldiers and sailors who are sacrificing so much for the nation and the common cause.

It is difficult, of course, to make this fact fully known, so that anyone will be doing a good service by merely talking about the matter to their friends.

Throughout the Rugby district during the Christmas season there will no doubt be a very large number of magazines and light literature purchased, to be lightly thrown aside when read. These are the books the soldiers and sailors are eager to get, to help them to lighten the monotonous periods of their present kind of life, so that it is earnestly hoped every person who becomes acquainted with this scheme will do all he or she can to assist.

If you have only one book or magazine you can spare, hand it in at any Post Office in the town or country district just as it is. The Post Office will tie the articles in bundles and despatch them without delay.

WHAT AN ENEMY NEWSPAPER THE SAYS OF US.

“ We see that the Englishman—unlike the good business man he is so persistently deemed—upon noting that his Eastern ally is being slowly but surely driven back, will, instead of making the best of it, do his utmost to settle down for a three year war, or four year war, working with bull dog tenacity to crush his enemy in the end. When the end will be is no concern, of his. He began the business. He will see it through. In this strange phase of the English character there is enormous strength. We may be sure that if all the belligerents are beaten into insensibility, he will still hammer away with bleeding fists, tired and exhausted. England, in her persistence, will never stop, even if she knows that the longer the war lasts the more she will bleed—even if she knows that all possible gains at the finish will not make good half of what she has lost. . . .

“ Those Germans who look forward to an early peace in this world with longing hearts must turn their eyes on England hopelessly, for as long as the sun of peace is not rising in the isles to the west of us, there is no hope of peace. And England, secure in her citadel, behind the bulwark of her fleet, can go on and on and on.”— AZ EST, (Budapest) “ Sphere.”

GRAMOPHONE NOT GONE ASTRAY.

In the Advertiser of November 20 we inserted a paragraph under the heading “ Gramophone Gone Astray,” asking for the name and address of the person who left a letter at our Office purporting to be sent from the boys at the front with reference to a gramophone which had been sent out to them. There was no response to that invitation, but Miss M Evans, of James Street, Rugby, who collected subscriptions and sent out an instrument of this kind about a month ago has received a letter from a member of E Company, stating that it came duly to hand. It sustained some damage in transit, but was put in order again, and has since been used by each platoon of C Company (in which E Company is now merged) in turn, when off duty, and, he adds, “ I can assure you many happy hours have already been passed away with it.” Each platoon can use it as often as possible, but those in the firing line do not have it, because that is impossible.

RUGBY TOWN V.A.D. AUXILIARY WAR HOSPITAL.

The Hospital is now almost completely furnished and is expected to be opened on Wednesday, the 8th December.

17 Apr 1915. Rugby Territorials Ready For Anything

LETTER FROM THE FRONT.

T Wallace, who is with the Rugby Howitzer Battery at the front, writing to his mother, says they had a lovely passage across the Channel, and then a 24-hours’ journey by rail—after which he made up his mind never to say anything against English railways. He adds : “ We have not seen any Germans yet—only a few prisoners ; but we can hear the guns quite plain. We are in a place where the Germans have been over once and were driven out at the point of the bayonet. . . . I am looking forward to taking my clothes off to-night for the first time since Sunday, and getting some sleep. Don’t forget to send the Advertiser out. There is nothing else I want. We were well served out with clothing before leaving England. We are living in an old chapel—fairly comfortable—for the present. We don’t know how long it will be before our battery has a packet at the Germans—but I don’t think it will be long.”

RUGBY TERRITORIALS READY FOR ANYTHING.

Four old Murrayians attached to the machine gun section of the 1st-7th Royal Warwicks, at present “ somewhere in France,” have written to their old schoolmaster, in which they say :—“ So far we are all feeling fit and ready for anything. After leaving our training quarters in England we had a very pleasant voyage across the water, except for the fact that we were rather overcrowded in the boat. On landing we spent the first night under canvas, and left the following day for some unknown destination. We were 24 hours in the train, which unfortunately was not quite as luxurious as the old L & N-W Railway. They packed us in cattle trucks ; but still, we made it an enjoyable journey. Since leaving the train we have had various billets, such as barns and empty houses, which have plenty of ventilation, thanks to the German shells. During our short stay in one of the base towns we had plenty of trench digging, which served to keep us fit. We had our first spell in the trenches about five days ago, and spent the best part of Easter there. The Germans evidently did not forget that it was Easter, for they sent, us one or two nice eggs over in the shape of shrapnel. At present we are billeted in a town which is used for resting troops, a few miles behind the firing line. Taking it on the whole, under the present conditions we are enjoying ourselves and getting plenty of good food.”

RIFLEMAN DODSON.

Rifleman Dodson, of the Rifle Brigade, son of Mr Edward Dodson, of Newbold-on-Avon, who, as reported in the Advertiser last week, was killed on March 24th. Deceased, who was 22 years of age, was working at the Cement Works at the time he enlisted in September. He went to France about six weeks ago. He fell in a battle during which a friend from Cosford, who went out with him, was bayonetted and killed. He was a member of the Newbold II football team, of which he was vice-captain for two years, and he sometimes played for the first team.

RUGBY TOWN PLAYER KILLED IN ACTION.
PRIVATE GEORGE RICE.

Followers of Association football in Rugby and district will hear with regret that George Rice, one of the half-backs of the Rugby Town Club, has been killed in action. Pte Rice, who was a reservist in the Royal Welsh Fusiliers, and who, previous to being called to the colours, was employed as a polisher at the B.T.H, Coventry, was 28 years of age, and leaves a wife and three children. Rice was a popular player, and a clever half-back, and before, signing on for the Rugby Club he did good service for Lord Street Juniors and Longford, and possessed a handsome set at medals, comprising Winners ; Two “ Midland Daily Telegraph,” one Birmingham Junior, four Coventry and Warwickshire League Championship, two Bedworth Nursing Cup, two Rugby Hospital Cup. Runners up: One Coventry and Warwickshire League, two “ Midland Daily Telegraph,” two Foleshill Nursing Cup, and the Coventry Nursing Cup.

RUGBY TERRITORIAL INJURED.

Bombardier A J Vingoe, of the Rugby Howitzer Battery, has written to his wife, residing at 10 Kimberley Road, Rugby, stating that he has been invalided to England and is now in hospital at Southend, as the result of injuries received “ somewhere in France ” on Easter Monday. Bombardier Vingoe was with the advance party of the battery, which was expecting to go into action on the following day, when he fell down some steps in a barn and fractured his arm. Previous to the war, Bombardier Vingoe, who is believed to be the first local Territorial to sustain injuries, was employed as an instrument maker at the B.T.H.

RECRUITING AT RUGBY.

The following have been accepted at the Rugby Drill Hall during the past week :—Royal Warwick Regiment, J Varney, A Farmer, and V G Paremain ; A.S.C, E H Blinco, E Badby, J Bansfield, H S Pemberton, and C Hart. Butchers and bakers are required for the Army Service Corps, and also men for the Royal Warwickshire Regiment.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Dr WHEELER, North Street, Rugby, is serving with the Royal Army Medical Corps, and Dr Grant, of Albert Street, is serving with the Highland Light Infantry.

Harry Douglas, son of Mr and Mrs Douglas, of 87 Cambridge Street, also late of the Rugby Town Fire Brigade, has been invalided home through injuries received while serving in the Royal Field Artillery.

The 9th (Service) Battalion of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment, quartered at Blackdown, Surrey, did an exceptionally good performance in the recent musketry course, coming out top of the 13th Division of Lord Kitchener’s New Army. The weather was not conducive to good shooting, and the men had to use the new service rifle, to which they were not well acquainted. In the “ A ” Company of the Battalion, who scored most points in the course, there are a good many Rugbeians.

Pte Clifford, 2nd Grenadier Guards, attached to the 1st Irish Guards, who was serving in the Rugby Police Force when be was recalled to the Colours last August, has been shot through the left hand. Pte Clifford, who has been at the front from the commencement of the war, is the third member of the Rugby Police Force who has been wounded, the others being Pte Higginson, of the 2nd life Guards, and Pte Nicholls, Gloucesters. Pte Clifford, who had resolved to enlist in the army, had only a few days to serve in the Police Force when he was called up.

G P Rathbone, youngest son of Mr W T Rathbone, Hillmorton, who enlisted in the 3rd Birmingham City Battalion in October, has received a commission as second lieutenant in the 11th North Staffordshire Regiment. He is at present undergoing a course of instruction at Leeds University previous to joining the regiment.

NEW BILTON MAN WOUNDED A SECOND TIME.

Mrs H Anderson, 39 Pinfold Street, has received news that her son, Pte John Elson, of the Northumberland Fusiliers, was wounded by a bullet in the arm, on April 3rd, in the field, and is at present in hospital at Guildford. Pte Elson, who is a reservist, and was employed by a local builder before the war, has himself written to his mother stating that he is progressing well. This is the second time he has been wounded in this war, the first occasion being several months ago, when he sustained a rather serious gunshot wound in the back and side.

MORE SOLDIERS AND MILITARY WORKERS BADLY NEEDED.

The Chairman of the Urban District Council has received a letter from Colonel Browne, commanding the sixth recruiting area, urging that more men for the Royal Warwickshire Regiment are badly needed, and stating that if we are to carry this war through successfully and quickly every man of eligible age ought either to be under arms, making munitions of war, or serving their country in some capacity.

Colonel Browne appeals through the Chairman of the Urban District Council to the small employers of labour to release every available man, and expresses the opinion that if these employers realised the very critical position of the very existence of their business owing to the war they would co-operate in every way.

Colonel Browne acknowledges how splendidly Rugby has done, but urges that more men are still wanted.

RUGBY VOLUNTEER TRAINING CORPS.

There are now upwards of 250 members of this organisation in Rugby, and it is hoped that all the other men who are eligible will come forward and join the Corps. The duties the Corps is now asked to undertake, which were outlined in a recent issue, make it extremely urgent in the national interests that a strong and efficient force should be raised. However urgent a man’s private business is it is desirable that all should recognise that the existence of that business depends upon the safety of the country, and that they should be prepared to devote a small portion of their time in assisting to preserve this safety.

RUGBY YEOMEN ON THE WAYFARER.

The “ C ” Squadron of the Warwickshire Yeomanry have left their war station for a foreign destination and sailed last week-end.

The Squadron, which includes the Rugby Troop, passed through Rugby Station on Thursday midnight en route for the port of embarkation.

Amongst those on board the Wayfarer, which is supposed to have been torpedoed or mined when off the Scilly Isles, and was subsequently beached at Queenstown, were at least three members of the Rugby Yeomanry Troop-Troopers Farndon, Ellis Reeve, and Biddle. Mr A H Reeve, butcher, of North Street, had a telegram from his son on Monday to say he was safe.

A Falmouth contemporary states that the Wayfarer left Avonmouth with equipment and some men on board. Interviewing one of the rescued yeomen, a correspondent states that at 2.15 on Sunday afternoon a frightful explosion was heard. Steam and smoke rose to a tremendous height, and there was big smashing of glass. The hay which was on board for the horses was blown everywhere. The men took to the boats—one of which contained nearly 50—and rowed about until they were picked up. The men had to get away from the Vessel in what they stood up in and for the rest all was lost, including in some instances a fair amount of money.

The main body of yeomen sailed on another vessel.

SWINFORD YEOMAN REPORTED DROWNED.

A report has reached Swinford that Trooper E R I Powell, son of the Rev J G Powell, vicar of Swinford, has been drowned. It is stated that the boat in which he and others were making their escape from the Wayfarer after the explosion capsized.

CASUALTIES AMONG L & N-W RAILWAYMEN.

According to the April number of the “ L & N-W Railway Gazette,” there were 1,058 casualties reported among L & N-W Railway men with the Forces between February 19th and March 15th. The list includes the following :—Killed: H R Barwick, East Anglian Engineers (Wolverton). Died from wounds: T C Tooth, Bucks Territorials (Wolverton); C Manning, Northamptonshire Regiment (Rugby). Wounded or sick: J W Windsor, 1st Worcester Regiment (Rugby) : F White; 3rd Worcester Regiment (Northampton) ; C J Houghton, 1st Bedford Regiment (Bletchley) ; W Rawlins, Duke of Cornwall’s L.I (Northampton) ; J Taylor, Middlesex Regiment (Wolverton) ; C Rose, Royal Field Artillery (Wolverton) ; W J Cooke, Oxford and Bucks L.I (Wolverton) ; J H Busson, Army Service Corps (Rugby).

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR.

THE DRINK QUESTION.

SIR,—It is gratifying to read in your last issues Mr R Dumas’ opinion that drinking habits have not interfered with the work of the B.T.H Company. I would claim for the Rugby Land Society a large share in bringing about so satisfactory a result. That society in all their conveyances have prohibited any buildings erected on their plots being used as public-houses, with the result that in all the streets they have laid out the residents are freed from the temptations that are so frequent in the central and older part of Rugby,

It is somewhat curious that in the older parts the licensed houses are to be found in groups of three, and here and there two adjoin one another.

The site of the licensed house in Oxford Street was obtained independently of the Land Society.

April 14th.            J W KENNING.

SHOP ASSISTANTS AND THE WAR.

DEAR SIR,—As a shop-assistant (and grocer, too), may I write in defence of myself and assistants generally and try to show to a certain class of people who are never tired of throwing out silly sarcastic remarks, devoid of all humour, as to why we shop-assistants are not supposed to be enlisting in the numbers that we might. Let me refute that statement, for I know grocery firms in Rugby who have sent 20% and over of their employees to the colours. This means a very serious handicap to the carrying on of “ Business as usual.”

No doubt more could be spared, if certain section of the so-called “ patriotic ” public would be patriotic enough to have a little more consideration for the short-handed tradesman, who, and justly too, is obliged to keep up, if possible, a full staff to deal competently with his customers—the patriotic (?) section, who wave flags, and shout “ Enlist! enlist ! ” to the man who calls for orders ; and then telephones three and four times a day for goods to be “ sent at once ! ” or “ I shall go elsewhere ! ” Is it likely that master men are going to release their trained assistants when they are open to such competition as this ? And do these particularity patriotic persons stop to think if they are giving up themselves half so much as they are expecting these shop assistants to give up ?

How many shop-assistants are being dealt with in the same manner as are the recruits from the Works here in Rugby, who, I believe, receive a third pay (or half-pay, if married), and an open place when they return ?

This is a matter purely for the master-men I know, but it make a vast difference in the quality of our patriotism, and it eases the road to the Drill Hall. Not that I maintain that shop-assistants should be treated in the same liberal manner, but it is, just a point in my argument that should not be lost sight of when sneering at shop-assistants for not enlisting.

I and others often get sneered at by the very people who are keeping us here, who spend enough on one dinner of the week to pay a dozen of we assistants a part of our pay while fighting our battles, and their’s.

Let these people help to send us, we are ready and eager to go, ready to give up not only our positions, but, maybe, our lives. Let us go as their “ special ” soldiers, as they cannot go themselves. If this is too much for them to do, if this is too “ real ” a way for them to show their patriotism for our dear old country, then do not sneer at the shop-assistant, if he also puts self first. Give him a little more encouragement, a little more real help, and show him that you are really patriotic, then you will be surprised at the vast number of shop assistants who are willing to join the army and do their “ little bit.”— Believe me, Dear Sir, Yours faithfully,

B. L. H. (THE GROCER’S MAN).

 

7th Nov 1914. War Casualties

Scout J Farn, 2nd Worcesters, has been wounded at the front. His brother, Driver W J Farn, was wounded at the Battle of the Aisne.

George Lines, a reservist in the Coldstream Guards, living at Newbold, has been wounded, and is reported to be in Sheffield Hospital. Lines was also wounded in the Boer War.

Lieut O’Connor, of the Cameronians, son of Mrs O’Connor, Overslade Manor, arrived home yesterday (Friday) with an injured ankle. He has a staff appointment in the 7th Division, and hopes in a few days to return to his duties.

The parents of Pte Harry Hales, 1st R.W.R, of Pinfold Street, New Bilton, have received official intimation that their son was killed in action on October 13th. Last week we reported that they had already received intimation, from a comrade of their son’s, of his death.

The death took place on October 31st, at Plymouth, of enteric fever, contracted on voyage whilst crossing with Canadian Contingent, of Aubrey, aged 20, younger son of Percy Ridley-Thompson, of Park Close, Bloxham, Banbury, and formerly of The Croft, Dunchurch. Deceased was an old pupil of Mr T Arnold Wise, of “ Oakfield,” Rugby.

Pte Harry Nash, of the 1st Northamptonshire, Regiment, son of Mr C Nash, the cemetery-keeper at Rugby, arrived home on Thursday. He looks very well, although he is still lame.

RUGBY OFFICERS WOUNDED.

The two sons of Mrs Anderson, of Rokeby Farm, Rugby, who have been in the fighting line, have been wounded, and as a result are now back in England. Lieut C E Anderson, of the Gordon Highlanders, was shot through the knee, and is now under treatment at the Empire Hospital, Vincent Square, London. His brother, Second Lieutenant R G F Anderson, of the Royal Welsh Fusiliers, was wounded in the head by shrapnel, and has been brought to his home at Rugby, where for the present he has to be kept very quiet, and is not allowed to see visitors. Mrs Anderson has another son in the army, Lieut W R W Anderson, 4th South Midland Howitzer Brigade, who is in camp at Great Baddow, Essex.

A WOUNDED RUGBY SOLDIER.

News reached Mr George Cook, of 13 Temple Street, Rugby, on Monday evening that his son, Ernest, who is a private in the Oxford and Bucks light Infantry, has been wounded, and is now in hospital at Tidworth, Wilts. Pte Cook went to the front with his regiment early in September, and on October 21st was wounded in the left leg and the right cheek. “ I hope to be on sick leave in Rugby before very long,” he says, and adds: “It is so different here to what it is in the trenches, for I am so comfortable.”—Before enlisting, Pte Cook assisted for a time at the School Armoury, and then worked at the locomotive engine sheds at Rugby. He was also in the Territorial Army before joining the Regulars.

B.T.H EMPLOYEE WOUNDED.

News has been received that Pte A J Vineall, of 65 Winfield Street, Rugby, has been rather badly wounded in the foot, and is at present in hospital at Leeds. On Tuesday he had several toes amputated, and on Wednesday, when visited by his wife, was still suffering from the effects of this, but appeared to be going on well. Pte Vineall, who was attached to the East Surrey Regiment, is a reservist, and has served 12 years with the colours, eight of which were spent in India. He also went through the South African War. Before being called up he was a fitter in the B.T.H foundry.

“ MISSING.”

Mrs H Flavell, of 14 Newbold Road, recently received intimation from the War Office that her husband, a reservist in the Coldstream Guards, was missing. She has, however, since received a post card from her husband, dated after the day mentioned in the War Office message, and the assumption is that he has become detached from his unit. Pte Flavell was an employee of the B.T.H Co.

WOUNDED WARWICKS FROM RUGBY HOMES.

In the fighting in the neighbourhood of Ypres, France, the 2nd Royal Warwickshire Regiment has taken a gallant part, and several men, whose homes are in Rugby and district, have been wounded.

Pte Wm B Wheeler, youngest son of Mr and Mrs J Wheeler, of 135 Abbey Street, Rugby, was wounded at Menin, near Ypres, on Trafalgar Day (October 21st), and is now in hospital at Portsmouth. He has a bullet ground in his right fore-arm, and says he received it where the heaviest and hardest fighting was going on. He adds in a letter to his parents :

“ It is hard fighting, I can tell you with those “ Jack Johnsons ” and shrapnel flying about in all directions. It’s a treat to be clear of them for a time. Whilst we were in a hospital in France, the German aeroplanes dropped two bombs just outside.” Describing the battle, he states: ” We were under heavy fire of big guns and so we retired for a short distance. Then we advanced still under the heavy firing, and moved so rapidly that we got within fifty yards of the German guns, thinking we were going to capture them, this being our intention, but as our artillery was giving a flanking fire, the officers would not take them. I was on the extreme right when I got hit.” Pte Wheeler mentions a number of comrades who were also wounded, and considers it is a wonder there are any of his Company left to tell the tale.

Lce-Sergt Wm Harper, whose home is at 20 Old Station, Rugby, is also wounded, being under treatment at a hospital at Aldershot. His parents went to see him on Thursday last week, and have a souvenir in the shape of a crumpled up whistle, which was struck by shrapnel and is considered to have saved their son’s life. His chief wound is in the arm, which was broken, and the flesh lacerated by a shell. Sergt Harper was ordered to the front with his regiment from Malta. Within six weeks of leaving Southampton for France he was back again wounded in the leg and arm. During the whole of the time from his embarkation at Malta until he was treated for wounds, he had not removed his clothes nor slept in a bed, and he has passed days without food and water, so strenuous and fierce has been the conflict in the trenches.

Pte F Batchelor, whose parents live at 35 Worcester Street, Rugby, is another soldier from the same regiment who has been wounded, he having been shot through the muscle of the right arm, on October 27th. He has this week been recuperating at Rugby, and told an Advertiser representative some of his experiences. He landed with his regiment at Zeeburghe, in Belgium, and first got into touch with the enemy near Ghent. He was one of a patrol party of 28 sent out to ascertain what force the enemy had in the neighbourhood, and that got to within 1½ miles of the German headquarters. The party was billeted in two houses, and then learnt with surprise that two doors away was a house occupied by 32 Uhlans. “We are in for a warm time,” remarked the officer, adding that each man was thenceforth to shift for himself. Refugees provided the soldiers with civilian clothing and walking sticks, and with their military dress tied up in bundles, the men mingled with the fugitives, and took train with them to Bruges, where they re-joined the column and marched to Ostend. The water here had been poisoned, and many dead fish floated on the surface. The troops entrained, intending to proceed to Antwerp, but news came of the fall of that city, and the column journeyed instead towards Ypres, and there joined the main French and Belgian armies.

“ C ” Company, to which Pte Batchelor belongs, was billetted in Zonnebeke, which place was left at 8.0 a.m, without a German in sight, but on returning at 1.45 p.m there was a large number of the enemy in the vicinity. The infantry took up a position behind a church, in which a number of wounded lay, and the position was vigorously shelled. Pte Batchelor was included in a patrol consisting of a lance-corporal and three men, who came upon a Uhlan in a tree, with platform and signalling equipment complete, his duty being to indicate what effect the German artillery was having upon the Allies positions. The patrol might have overlooked him had he not shouted out excitedly, “ English, mercy,” but he omitted to throw down his arms, and the patrol opened fire, and killed him.

Pte Batchelor had several narrow escapes. Although wounded, he was crawling along to the aid of a comrade shot in the abdomen, when the lance-corporal told him to go back for treatment, and went himself to the assistance of the man calling out, and promptly received five bullet wounds in his right arm. Having had his own wound dressed at the field station, Pte Batchelor proceeded with other wounded soldiers to Ypres, where 400 of them were looked after by the Sisters of a Convent. Subsequently he reached Boulogne, and crossed the Channel to Southampton. He was for a short time in Chatham Hospital, and in the next bed was lying Pte Osborne, of Hillmorton, who was shot in the cheek and ear, which has resulted in partial deafness. Pte Batchelor has seen some terrible sights, the most sickening being that of a comrade who received the full force of a shell, which blew away completely his head and left arm—a spectacle which filled all who witnessed it with a thirst for revenge. Lieut-Col Loring, though wounded in the foot, still continued to direct operations. He has since been killed in action. Pte Batchelor is now quite convalescent, and had orders to report himself at headquarters at Warwick yesterday (Friday).