15th Jun 1918. Selling Ham Without Taking Coupons

FOOD PROSECUTIONS.

SELLING HAM WITHOUT TAKING COUPONS.
Samuel C Duval, grocer, Gipsy Lane, Leicester, was summoned by F Burton for selling uncooked bacon and ham to Evan Evans without detaching the necessary coupons, at Rugby, on May 25th. A second charge was also brought of selling uncooked ham and bacon to the same individual, who was not one of his registered customers.—Evan Evans, 9 Melling Street, Longsight, Manchester, was also summoned by F Burton for unlawfully obtaining for a retailer named Duval a ham, and not producing his meat card to allow the retailer to detach the appropriate coupons on May 25th.—Mr Worthington prosecuted, and Mr Eaden defended ; and, on the suggestion of Mr Eaden, this was taken in conjunction with the charges against Duval.—Defendants pleaded guilty to all three charges.—Mr Worthington said that on the morning in question Mr Purchase saw Evans standing near a stall belonging to Duval in the Market Place. He heard Evans tell Duval that he could not get a supply of bacon where he was registered, and from what he saw he spoke to Duval, who admitted that he had sold some ham to Evans without a coupon.—Mr Worthington said the seriousness of the case lay in an entire stranger coming into the town and taking food away which might be required by someone who was registered in the town.—Mr Eaden said the case was not nearly so serious as his friend tried to make it. There was a distinction between a picnic ham and an ordinary one, the shank end of the former being allowed to be sold without coupons and to an unregistered customer.—Evans was a fireman on the L & N-W Railway, and arrived on a goods train at 9.30 a.m on Saturday. He had nothing with him to eat except bread. He was not due back home until 12.30 Sunday morning, and it was obvious he could not go all that time on bread. He asked Duval to sell him some ham, and Duval cut him the shank end of a picnic ham, which he was perfectly entitled to sell to him. Unfortunately, when Evans saw the amount of bone in it he said he should prefer the other end, and Duval, feeling sorry for Evans, did cut some from that end. With regard to his friend’s statement that food was being taken out of the town, he might state that some three hours later Duval was allowed to sell some 60lbs of bacon without coupons by permission of Mr Burton, so that anyone from Coventry, &c, could have taken it away if they wished.—The Chairman said that Duval knew he was doing wrong, and he would be fined 19s 6d in each case ; and Evans, knowing that he would be away for that length of time, should have brought his coupon with him, and he would also be fined 19s 6d.

THE PRICE OF WHISKY.
William Flint, wine merchant, Church Street, Rugby, was summoned for selling whisky at a price exceeding the maximum price allowed by the Spirits Order, 1918, on May 7th.—Mr Worthington appeared for the Food Control Committee, and Mr Eaden pleaded guilty on behalf of the defendant.—Mr Worthington said on May 7th a man named Richardson, a discharged soldier, went to Mr Flint’s Stores in Church Street, and asked for a bottle of whisky. He was supplied by the assistant, and was told the price was 11s. A few minutes afterwards, in consequence of what he was told or thought he went for a second bottle, and was charged 11s. He asked the assistant if she had not made a mistake. She replied that she could charge the old price, because the Government had not released the whisky in respect of the new prices from bond. He asked for a receipt, and received one for £1 2s. A day or two afterwards Mr Purchase (Enforcement Officer) saw Mr Flint, who said that the whisky was 35 per cent under proof. The whisky should have been sold at 8s instead of 11s.—Mr Flint told the Enforcement Officer that he went to London, but could not get any information. He could easily have gone to the Food Office at Rugby and received all information required.—Mr Eaden, for the defence, said Mr Flint wished to make perfectly clear that what was done was done in absolute ignorance and without any intention of profiteering or charging above the price. If they considered Glenlivet whisky was a proprietary article, then 9s 6d could have been charged under the new Order. Mr Eaden pointed out that the Order only came into force on May 1st, and though Mr Flint went to an advisory meeting in London, he heard nothing about the new prices.—The Chairman said the Bench felt there was some mitigation in that case, as proceedings were taken so soon after the Order came into force. Those orders were coming so frequently that the public could not very often get hold of them. They would only inflict a fine of £5, including costs.

RABBITS FROM WALES.—Edith J Hardy, 45 Church Street, Rugby, was summoned by F Burton Executive Officer of the Food Control Committee, for unlawfully obtaining two rabbits, and not detaching from her meat card the coupons.—Defendant did not appear.—Mr Worthington, for the prosecution, said that from information received Mr Purchase visited defendant’s house, and she informed him that she was receiving a couple of rabbits per week from an uncle in Wales. He examined her meat card, and found that the coupons which should have been sent for these had not been forwarded. She thus obtained these rabbits and a meat ration with the coupons which should have been used for the former.—The Chairman : She “ received ” them, not “ obtained ” them ?—Mr Worthington : Quite so, and if it had been an isolated case perhaps nothing would have been said, but she had them for three consecutive weeks.—The Chairman : I did not know that if anyone sent me a couple of rabbits that I should have to send two coupons.—Mr Worthington said that probably he should have been the same himself. He believed Mrs Hardy had no idea of committing an offence, and the case was brought simply that the public should know of the Order.—The Chairman said there was no doubt an offence had been committed, but it might be taken as a first case, because the public did not know the law sufficiently, and they would dismiss the summons under the first Offenders’ Act. The public must understand that they could not receive presents of this kind from their friends without giving up the corresponding coupons.

THE NEW RATION BOOKS.

Ration books for the national system of rationing, which comes into operation on July 13th, are now being issued to local Food Control Committees. They contain vouchers for articles of food which are already rationed, with extra pages for commodities which it may be found necessary to ration, either generally or locally, at a later date.

The book is available for 16 weeks, after which a new volume will be distributed. Coupons will require to be surrendered for all rations, four being apportioned as at present to a week’s supply of meat and bacon, and one weekly to other articles. The pages are in distinctive colours for the various rationed foods. The coupons for sugar are yellow, for fats (i.e, butter, margarine and lard) blue, and for meat red. A page of spare coupons is coloured brown, and a page of spare spaces is printed in blue ink on white paper. There is a reference leaf coloured green, while the front and back covers are white. The pages are printed on specially engraved paper. The child’s ration book will be generally similar, except that it will contain two pages of meat coupons instead of four. Thus the meat coupon in the child’s book will be of the same value as is the meat coupon in the ordinary adult’s book.

Full instructions will be found upon the front and back covers of the book.

All applications for the rationing books must be sent to the Food Controller by to-day (June 15th).

SUGAR FOR JAM.
METHODS OF ALLOCATION CRITICISED AT RUGBY.

The methods adopted in allocating the supplies of sugar for jam-making were criticised by Mr W A Stevenson at a meeting of the Rugby Food Control Committee on Thursday last week. In many instances, he said, people had anticipated that the quantity asked for would be reduced, and, acting on this assumption, they had asked for more than they required. Others had played fair, and only asked for their bare requirements, but all had been cut down alike. He thought the basis on which they had worked was not a fair one. The sugar should have been allotted according to the number of persons in the household, irrespective of how much was asked for.—The Executive Officer (Mr Burton) pointed out that the allocation was made in accordance with a schedule issued by the Ministry of Food. They did not take into consideration the amount of sugar asked for, but simply the amount of fruit available. If there was any dissatisfaction it was the fault of the Food Ministry, and not of his office, because he only had to carry out the provisions of the schedule.

It was also stated that a large number of persons who had applied for sugar for jam had been refused a supply because they had failed to enclose a stamped addressed envelope for the return of the permit with their application form. The Chairman (Mr Wise) said he believed that in some cases stamped envelopes were enclosed, but owing to the great pressure under which the officials had had to work these had been lost. It would be very difficult to decide which cases were genuine, but he thought that where they were satisfied that the requirements had been complied with they should grant an allowance, if possible. The difficulty was, however, that there was not a large stock to draw from. The existing allowance had been made on the figures sent in on the application forms, and if a lot more people were to be supplied the allowances already made would have to be still further reduced. He had read that the gooseberry crop had failed, and it might be possible to get the permits granted to people for making gooseberry jam returned.—The Executive Officer said, considering the pressure under which the staff worked and the large mob of people invading the offices and the approaches daily waiting for the application forms, the wonder was that they did as well as they had done. With regard to granting fresh permits, he believed that they were helpless in the matter, because the allotment of sugar was made, and if they granted any other allowance some of the people with permits would have to go without sugar. The only way he could see out of the difficulty was to issue a circular asking people whose fruit had not come up to their expectations to return their permits, so that a reduction could be made.—It was decided to do this and also to write to the Ministry of Food asking whether, in any case in which the committee were satisfied that a stamped addressed envelope had been enclosed, they could make an allowance of sugar.

MUNITION WORKERS & THE CUP THAT CHEERS.

At their meeting on Thursday afternoon in last week the Rugby Food Control Committee considered a request from the Lodge Sparking Plug Company for permission to purchase 20lbs of tea weekly for their canteen.—Mr Stevenson reminded the committee that they had refused a request from the Railway Company, and if this was granted the two decisions would clash.—The Executive Officer (Mr F M Burton) : But this is a munition factory.—Mr Stevenson expressed the opinion that railways were as important as munition establishments, because they were the common carriers of both the raw material and the finished article.—Mrs Shelley said she thought the company were asking for an excessive quantity, because 1lb of tea was supposed to make 160 cups.—Mr Ewart : They are asking for 4lbs a day.—Mr Stevenson : A lot of ladies work there (laughter).—The question was referred to the Ration Committee with power to act, the Executive Officer being asked to get further information as to the actual requirements.

At a meeting on Thursday the committee reported that the company had since written stating that between 400 and 450 cups of would be required daily five days each week, and it was accordingly decided to allow the quantity asked for.

POTATOES IN BREAD.

The Order of the Ministry of Food requiring 10 per cent. of potatoes to be mixed with floor and other ingredients used in making bread came into force last week. Anticipating some such order, the Rugby bakers a few months ago commenced to mix potatoes with the flour, although the proportion was naturally not so great as that now made compulsory by the Order ; and they have thus gained some useful experience. A prominent local baker states that considerable additional work is entailed by the new regulation inasmuch as the potato’s have to be washed, scraped, boiled, mashed, and strained before they are fit to mix with the flour. Great care has to be taken both in the dough-making and the baking, and the difficulties are added to by the poor quality of the yeast now being supplied to the trade. When the bread is properly made, however, a distinct improvement in quality is noticeable, and the loaves are a better colour, much more moist and do not become dry so quickly.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Mrs Ingram, 21 Victoria Avenue, New Bilton, has received news that her son, Pte L Ingram, aged 20, was wounded on May 29th, and died the same day. He was an old Elborow School boy, and has been to the Army three years. Second time wounded.

Mr & Mrs Baskott, East Haddon (late of Rugby), have received news that their son, Pte E Baskott, 101st Labour Battalion, has died from gas poisoning in 1st Australian Hospital, Rouen. He was an old St Matthew’s boy. His brother, Lieut J E Baskott, was killed in action last December.

Dr R H Paramore, of this town, now in the Army, has been promoted to the rank of Major.

Mrs Rixon, Claremont Road, has received official news that her son, Second-Lieut E H Rixom, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, has been wounded in the right arm and chest.

Mrs Wilde, 5 Earl Street, has been officially notified that her husband, Pte John Wilde, 1st Royal Warwickshire Regiment, was killed in action on April 15th. He has been in the Army two years. Previous to joining up he worked for Mr F Hollowell, builder.

Mr J A Philips, St Aubyn, Hillmorton Road, received a telegram from the War Office on Sunday last, informing him that his third son, Kenneth Mc N Phillips, 2nd Lieut, Northumberland Fusiliers, attached Durham Light Infantry, has been missing since May 27th.

Mr C J Elkington, Hillmorton Road, Rugby, has received notification that his son, Lieut A J Elkington, of the North Staffordshire Regiment, has been slightly wounded in the foot, and is in hospital at Rouen.

Pte H Garner was accidentally drowned on May 22nd whilst bathing in a river in France. He was the first of the company to dive into the river, and was at once seized with cramp. His officer and comrades dived in to save him, but he was carried away by a strong current, and was drowned. Pte Garner was employed by the Rugby Co-operative Society as a motor lorry driver till he enlisted at the outbreak of the War.

Lieut Maurice V Eyden. younger son of Mr Alfred Eyden, 53 St Matthew’s Parade, Northampton, is reported missing on May 27th. He entered the Inns of Court, O.T.C, in autumn, 1915, on leaving Rugby School (where he was “ Head of the Town ”), and received his commission in the 2nd Northants Regiment in September, 1916. Two months later he went to France, where he had been twice wounded. His only brother, Corpl Clarence Eyden, R.E, was killed in action in France on May 19th.

Corpl J Norman Atkinson, M.G.C, who was officially reported wounded and missing, has written home stating that the is a prisoner of war at Altdamn, Pommern, Germany, and that his wound is not serious. He has been very kindly treated, and is quite cheerful. He is the son of Mr J H Atkinson, 37 Windsor Street, Rugby, and the second of four brothers who have joined H.M Forces.

Second-Lieut H H Metters, M.C, Leicestershire Regiment, aged 21, only son of Mr W H Metters, the Manor House, Stoneleigh, near Kenilworth, is reported missing since May 27th.

Lieut-Col H A Gray-Cheape, D.S.O, was commanded the brilliant charge of the Warwickshire and Worcestershire Yeomanry in Palestine on November 8, 1917, is reported missing, believed drowned. He was one of 13 officers and 79 other ranks who lost their lives when H.M transport “ Leasowe Castle ” was torpedoed and sunk on Mar 26th in the Mediterranean. The gallant officer was the well-known polo player. His eldest sister, who was married to Mr Albert Jaffray Cay, son of Mr & Mrs Cay, of Kenilworth, lost her life in the “ Empress of Ireland ” disaster in June, 1914. Her husband’s death has been presumed, as he has been missing ever since the reverse sustained by our arms at Katia on Easter Sunday, 1916.

LIEUT T W WALDING.
Mrs Walding, of The Limes, Rugby, has received information that her son, Lieut T W Walding, of the Machine Gun Corps, has been posted as missing since May 27th. A brother officer has written stating that Lieut Walding was with the guns in the forward area, and was completely surrounded, and the assumption was that he was made prisoner.

MILITARY FUNERAL AT RUGBY.
The death occurred, at the 1st Southern General Hospital, Birmingham (Dudley Road Section), on June 5th, of Pte W Lee, 1st Royal Warwicks, who was wounded on April 15th. Pte Lee, who was 41 years of age, was the son of the late Mr John Lee, of Rugby. He had served 3½ years in the War. The interment took place at Rugby Cemetery on Monday, when a firing party from Budbroke Barracks attended. The mourners included deceased’s two brother, Sergt R Lee and Sergt-Major Harry Lee, both of the Warwicks ; his sisters, Mrs Cements, Mrs Lisamer, Mrs Colledge, and Mrs Abbott ; his brothers-in-law, Sergt Arthur Clements, R.E (who had just arrived in England from Sierra Leone), and Mr Clements and Mr Lisamer (both of whom had served in the Boer War), Mrs R Lee (sister-in-law), Mr Jack Burns (cousin), &c.

AWARDS FOR GALLANTRY & DISTINGUISHED SERVICE.

Major P W Nickalls, Yeomanry, the well-known polo player, has been awarded the D.S.O.

The following have received the Meritorious Service Medal in connection with military operations in Salonika:—Sergt-Major D G Kinden, A.S.C (Rugby), and Staff Sergt-Major G H Sutton, A.S.C (Churchover, near Rugby).

The Military Medal has been awarded for gallantry and devotion to duty on April 30th to Driver F Calloway, R.F.A, son of Mr W Calloway, Sandown Road, Rugby.

The following men are included in the latest list of awards of the Distinguished Conduct Medal :—840139 Sergt H Battson, R.F.A, Rugby, and 22681 Sergt F H Marriott. M.G.C, Rugby.

AMPUTATION DURING RAID.—Miss Marian A Butler, a radiographer of the Scottish Women’s Hospitals, who has just returned from France, telling of experiences at the Hospital at Villers-Cotterets, said that during a German air raid Miss Frances Ivens, the chief medical officer, performed several operations, including amputations, by the light of two candles and with the instruments jumping about through the vibration caused by the explosions. Miss Ivens is a daughter of the late Mr W Ivens. of Harborough Parva.

RUGBY PETTY SESSIONS.

ABSENTEES.—Arthur Hill, painter, no fixed abode, was brought up in custody charged with being an absentee from the Army.—He pleaded not guilty.—Sergt Percival stated that he arrested prisoner in West Street, and asked him if he had any exemption from military service or any other documents ? He replied, “It is all right; I have been down to the Drill Hall.” Witness told him that he should take him to the Drill Hall, and on the way he said, “I have sent all my papers to the Minister of Munitions, Hay Lane, Coventry. I had exemption from military service while I was at work at Willans.” Witness telephoned to Coventry, and found that prisoner was an absentee. He also found that he was discharged from Willans & Robinson’s on July 2nd, 1917. Then he would be given 14 days to get other work.—Col Johnstone produced a copy of notice sent to Hill on June 28th, 1917, calling him up on July 12th. The notice was returned marked “ Unknown.” Witness also sent an absentee report.—Defendant claimed that no papers could be sent within eight weeks after his discharge from munitions. He said in June he registered at the Labour Exchange, and they advised him to get a note from the Drill Hall. At the latter place they said they could not help him ; he must paddle his own canoe. So he had paddled his own canoe since. If he was a wilful absentee he should not have remained in the town where he was known at the same address. He had written to the Ministry of Munitions at Coventry, giving his temporary address and all his papers.—Sergt Percival, in reply to the Bench, said no trace could be found of these papers at Coventry.—Col Johnstone said no notification had been received of any change of address.—The case was adjourned for a short time to enable the sergeant to make enquiries at the Labour Exchange.—On their return Sergt Percival said he had ascertained that prisoner last went to the Labour Exchange on June 27th, but his name was crossed off, as it was not renewed within seven days.—Fined £2, and handed over as a deserter.— Samuel Winfield, no fixed abode, was similarly charged.—Defendant pleaded guilty.—Sergt Hawkes deposed that he saw defendant in Gas Street, and asked him why he was not in the Army ? Defendant said he had dodged it. He had not been registered or medically examined.—Defendant had nothing to say.—Fined £2, and handed over to an escort.—Sergt Hawkes was complimented and awarded 10s.

RUGBY URBAN DISTRICT COUNCIL
WASTE OF WATER.

Notice is hereby given that no consumer is permitted to use WATER BY HOSE PIPE, without the permission of the Council, except when the supply is by meter.

Consumers are urgently requested to co-operate with the Council, in reducing waste of water as much as possible.

Consumer are requested to report all cases of waste at the Surveyor’s Office.

Persons taking and using water in contravention of the Water Regulations of this Council are liable to a penalty not exceeding five pounds for every such offence.

JNO. H. SHARP,
Water Engineer & Surveyor.
Benn Buildings, Hight Street, Rugby.
May 29th, 1918.

DEATHS.

INGRAM.—In ever loving memory of my dearest and youngest son, Pte. LEONARD INGRAM, 15th Royal Warwickshire Regiment, who died from wounds in France on May 29th ; son of the late Joseph and Mary Ingram, 61 Victoria Avenue, New Bilton ; aged 20 years
“ His sufferings here are ended,
His work on earth is done ;
He fought the fight with patience,
And now the victory’s won.
I loved him, oh, no tongue can tell
How much we loved him and how well.
God loved him, too, and thought it best
To take him home with Him to rest.”
“ Though lost from sight, to memory ever dear.”

IN MEMORIAM.

BAUM.—In ever-loving memory of Sergt. G. BAUM, 8th Leicesters, of Claybrook-Magna ; killed in action on June 11, 1917 ; aged 22 years.—Not forgotten by his, friends at Churchover.

WOOD.—In loving memory of Pte. ARTHUR WILLIAM WOOD, son of the late J. Wood, of 153 Grosvenor Road, Rugby ; killed in action on June 10, 1917, in France.—From Madge and Ernest.

WOOD.—In loving memory of Pte. ARTHUR WOOD, M.G.C, who was killed in action in France on June 10 1917.—From George and Ellen.

1st Jun 1918. Airmen’s Practical Joke

AIRMEN’S PRACTICAL JOKE.

A practical joke was perpetuated on Monday afternoon, when an airman, flying over the town, dropped a dummy man, which fell at the back of some premises in Church Street. The object was recovered and taken away by other airmen, who came along Church Street at the time in a motor-car. It is stated that it bore the inscription: “This man does not wish to be buried at Rugby”—evidently a reference to the controversy between the flying officers and the Urban Council concerning the charge for the burial of an officer recently killed near the town. The falling dummy caused a fright to those who saw it, and many people feared that another fatal accident had occurred. A woman in the Market Place fainted, and had to be conveyed into a neighbouring shop.

RUGBY PRISONERS OF WAR COMMITTEE.

The monthly meeting of the Rugby Prisoners of War Help Committee was held at Benn Buildings on Monday evening, the chairman (Mr Wm Flint) presiding. There were also present : Mrs Blagden, Mrs J H Lees, Mrs Anderson, Mr G W Walton, Mr R P Mason, Mr A E Donkin, J.P., Mr J H Mellor, and the Hon Secretary, Mr J Reginald Barker.

The Chairman reminded the committee that at the last meeting the Hon Secretary warned them that there was every reason to expect a big increase in the number of prisoners and in consequence a large increase in the financial burden. His forecast had, unfortunately come true, and they were now faced with a very great expense every month. Thanks to their Hon Secretary and the foresight of the committee in looking ahead in the manner they had done, they were at the moment able to face these additional responsibilities, but it was very necessary that renewed and continued support be given to the fund.

Mr Barker stated that during May the receipts from all sources amounted to £102 16s 9d, whilst the cost of food panels was £218 11s, a deficit for the first time for seven months. The committee would remember that he mentioned at a recent meeting that he was enquiring into the bona-fides of all the prisoners on their list. He found there were a few men, who, whilst they had relatives living in the town, were themselves quite strangers, having lived in other parts of the country before joining up. In one case the man’s wife had only come to Rugby since her husband had been a prisoner. He had proved to the Regimental Care Committees concerned that these men in question, about a dozen in all, had no claim in the Rugby Fund, and they had therefore been transferred to the committees of their own districts. In addition they had been fortunate in having several of their prisoners transferred to Holland or Switzerland, and the numbers were thereby reduced to 60. During the present month, however, 35 men from Rugby and district had become prisoners of war, bringing the total to 95, whilst there were still a number reported missing, some of whom in all probability being prisoners of war. They were now fated with an expenditure of nearly £300 per month, and he regretted to say the Central Committee found it necessary, owing to the increase in the cost of foodstuffs and materials, to raise the price of the standard parcels from 8s to 10s each as from July 11th ; that was six weeks hence, so they had a little breathing space. It would mean that instead of £2 15s 6d per man every four weeks, or £3 per calendar month, they would have to provide £3 7s 6d per man every four weeks, or £3 13s per calendar month. Mr Barker also informed the committee that arrangements had been made to speed up the delivery of the first parcel for newly-captured men. It took at the earliest two months from the time a man was captured until his first parcel reached him from this country, and often as long as three months. In order to bridge over the interval the Central Committee had recently established a large depot in Rotterdam, where a supply is kept of 28,000 emergency parcels, each of which is sufficient to keep two prisoners for a week. The British Help Committees which now exist in all prison camps in Germany, are empowered to draw upon the Rotterdam depot for such parcels as are required for new prisoners until the arrival of the parcels from England.

It was satisfactory to be able to state that although a certain amount of miscarriage was unavoidable, from 80 to 90 per cent of the parcels eventually reached their destination. This, said Mr Barker, was not over-estimated. He kept a careful register of the acknowledgements received from the men on the Rugby list ; the acknowledgements being filed under each men’s initial.

The Chairman said the proof they had that the parcels reached the men would do much to encourage all concerned in their efforts on behalf of their unfortunate townsmen in captivity. With regard to the expense to which they were now committed, he asked the committee to carefully consider the question of additional expense caused by the proposed increase in the price of the standard food parcels.— Mrs Blagden said they had always in the past met the demands and she trusted they would continue to do so without having to ask the Red Cross Society to make good any deficit. She felt sure that Rugby and district would continue its support, and proposed that the committee should, as and when required, provide the funds necessary to maintain in full the value of the parcels.—This was seconded by Mr Walton and unanimously carried.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Capt P W le Gros, Royal Warwicks, who is reported wounded, was in the Cricket XI and the XV at Rugby. In 1919 he was the most effective bowler in the School and afterwards he played for Buckinghamshire.

Major-General Sir F C Shaw, K.C.B, who commanded the 29th Division during their stay in Warwickshire, has just been appointed Commander-in-Chief of the Forces in Ireland.

Sergt F Turner, 220th Army Troops Company (Rugby Fortress Company), Royal Engineers, has been mentioned in General Allenby’s despatches. He is native of Easenhall.

Rifeman W Griffin, of the Rife Brigade, who before the War was employed in the Illuminating Engineers’ Department at the B.T. H, has been reported killed in action about April 23rd.

Pte H W Fallen, Wiltshire Regiment, son of Mr & Mrs Fallen, 7 Adam Street, and Pte Horace Horsley, Manchester Regiment, son of Mrs McKie, 33 Albert Street, are reported missing. Pte Horsley is a B.T.H employee.

Rifleman Albert Walters, Post Office Rifles, London Regiment, son of Mr & Mrs R Walters, 12 Bennett Street, has written to his friends stating that he has been wounded and taken prisoner. He was an old St Matthew’s boy, and before joining the Army he was employed as a postman at Rugby.

News has been received that Pte E Martin, R M.L.I, son of Mr & Mrs Martin, 103 Wood Street, was killed in action on May 8th. He was formerly employed by Messrs Linnell & Son. He joined the Army two and a half years ago, and had been in France two years. He leaves a widow and two children.

Lieut C W Peyton, formerly of the B.T.H Test Department, has been promoted Captain.

Corpl Joseph Branston, Marine Division, fourth son of Mr & Mrs F Branston, 38 Chester Street, has been severely wounded in the arm and thigh by shrapnel, but is progressing well. He has been in the forces for 9 ½ years, and this is the second time he has been wounded.

Corpl Clarence A Eyden, Royal Engineers, elder son of Mr Alfred Eyden, acting district goods manager, L & N-W Railway, Northampton, was killed in France (where he had been on active service for over three years) on Whit-Sunday. Corpl Eyden was educated at Rugby, where his parents were well-known residents for some years ; and at the time of his enlistment, shortly after the outbreak of war, he occupied the position of private clerk to the present Acting General Manager of the L & N-W Railway. He was 27 years of age, and his great musical abilities, always so readily given in aid of charitable movements, will be long remembered in this town. His brother, Lieut Maurice Eyden, of the 2nd Northants Regiment, is actively engaged with his regiment abroad.

The record of casualties among Old Rugbians in the War up to May 4th was as follows :—Killed 542, wounded 872, prisoners 62, missing 22—total, 1,498.

The following local men, some of whom have already been reported missing, are now known to be prisoners of war :—Pte J C Harris, Royal Scots, son of Mr Samuel Harris, 18 Adam Street, New Bilton. He presented himself for enlistment at the Drill Hall in the early days of the War, and as he was only 16 years of age, he was claimed by his father. He subsequently walked to Coventry, and enlisted in the R.W.R. Before he was 17 years of age he was wounded and claimed by his mother, being transferred to the Reserves. He joined up again on his 18th birthday. His father, Lance Corpl Harris, is serving in Italy.—Pte F Lenton, Oxon and Bucks L.I, 64 Wood Street, Rugby, employed in the Assembly Department at the B.T.H.— Pte W A Bland, Somersetshire L.I, 1 Pinders Lane.—Pte J W Wood, Oxon and Bucks L.I, 28 Chester Street, an employee in the B.T.H Tool Room.—Lance Corpl R G Salmon, M.G.C, son of Mr & Mrs G H Salmon, 17 Lower Hillmorton Road.—Pte J Hart, Wiltshire Regiment, The Green, Hillmorton, formerly employed by Mr S Robbins.—Pte A G Shilvock, Gloucester Regiment, 42 Abbey Street.

SECOND-LIEUT F MOLONEY.

Second-Lieut F Moloney, whose parents live at Kilsby was killed in action on April 9th in Egypt. He was employed in the Winding Department at the BT.H, and joined Kitchener’s Army as a private in 1914 at the age of 17, and by his excellent work he soon earned promotion, and was eventually granted a commission. His father, although over military age and recently discharged, joined the Army to be with his son, and Lieut Moloney for a time enjoyed the somewhat unique position of being his father’s sergeant in France. He possessed to a marked degree the typical British traits of restraint and determination, and was described by his Commanding Officer as one of the steadiest and most reliable of his junior officers. He was killed by a high explosive shell while returning from clearing out enemy nests in a captured village. He had previously been wounded in France, where his father is still serving.

DUNCHURCH.
MR & MRS J BROWN, of the Windmill Houses, Dunchurch, have received news that their eldest son, Pte W Brown, of the Warwicks, is a prisoner of war. Mr & Mrs A Gillings, The Heath, Dunchurch, have also been notified that their second son, Pte C Gillings, is a prisoner.—Another son of Mr W D Barnwell, farmer, Daventry Road, Dunchurch, was called up on Thursday. This makes the fourth son Mr Barnwell has in the Army.

BRAUNSTON.
MISSING.—Pte R G Green, Cheshire Regt, has been officially reported missing on April 16th. He is the second son of Sergeant and Mrs Green, Yeomanry House, Braunston. He joined the Northants Yeomanry at the age of 17, in the spring of 1915 ; then transferred to the R.F.C., and went to France, where he remained for over two years. He was then sent to England, transferred to the infantry early this year and returned to France a few months ago.

LONG ITCHINGTON.
MISSING.—Official information is to hand that Pte Arthur Whitehead (R.W.R.) to missing. He is only son of the late Mr and Mrs William Whitehead.

CHURCH LAWFORD.
MR & MRS BEERS, whose only son, Pte C Beers, was reported missing on April 11th, have since heard that he is a prisoner of war in Germany.

A DESERTER.—At the Rugby Police Court on Monday—before Mr J E Cox—Pte John Nolan pleaded guilty to being a deserter from the 1st Border Regiment since March 11th, and was remanded to await an escort.

THE GERMAN ATTACK.
To the Editor of the Rugby Advertiser.

Sir,—I shall be greatly obliged if you will spare me a little of your valuable space, in order to place before your readers a few facts with regard to the situation arising from the recent German attacks.

Since March 21st (the date of the first great German advance) it has been apparent to every British subject that the German Army has been enormously augmented by the collapse of Russia. Great Armies of trained German soldiers, and thousands of guns with ammunition, were transferred to the West for use against the Allied armies. The Military situation was immediately altered and the need for men became and is now urgent.

The County of Warwickshire has already sent thousands of young men to the Army and Navy, but still there remains much to be done.

Two thousand men are needed for the month of June from Warwickshire.

To supply this requirement, there must be a revival of the Voluntary spirit. There are many thousands of men who must necessarily be retained to provide munitions of war, there are, however, many young men who can possibly be spared for service in the field. To these young men this communication is principally addressed, and at the same time there is a need for older and less fit men for service behind the line.

One Volunteer at once may easily prove to be worth two “ called up ” men in three mouths hence, and I appeal for the revival of the time when men freely surrendered their exemption and joined up to fight the enemy in the field.

I shall be glad to give information and advice to anyone desiring it. A railway warrant will be sent to a man living at a distance to Coventry who wishes to Volunteer.

Yours truly, J. W. E. TINGLE,
Assistant Director of National Service,
Ministry of National Service, Warwickshire Area, Union Street, Coventry.

RUGBY AND DISTRICT FOOD CONTROL COMMITTEE.
NATIONAL RATIONING.

Application Forms will shortly be distributed by the Postal Authorities to every Householder to make application for Ration Books, which are to take the place of the Ration Cards which expire on the 13th July next.

The Committee are endeavouring to make arrangements with the School Managers of all the Elementary Schools in the Rugby District for the Schools to be open to the Public, and the Teachers to be available to instruct the Public how to fill up the Forms of Application.

Enquiry must be made locally as to the day and hours the Teachers will be in attendance.

APPLICATION FORMS MUST BE RETURNED TO THE FOOD OFFICE NOT LATER THAN SATURDAY, 15th JUNE NEXT.

F. M. BURTON, Executive Officer.
Local Food Office,
6 Market Place, Rugby.

MARGARINE RATION TO BE INCREASED.

At a meeting of the Rugby Food Control Committee on Thursday it was decided to increase the ration of margarine to 5ozs per coupon. The butter ration will remain at 4ozs, as heretofore.

THE SUPPLEMENTARY MEAT RATION.

The work in connection with the supplementary meat rationing scheme locally has now been completed, and practically everyone entitled to the extra ration has received the necessary card. About 6,000 such cards have been distributed, including 300 for women employed on heavy manual labour. The work involved has occupied five weeks, and was very successfully carried out by the Rationing Offier, who received valuable voluntary assistance from a number of ladies.

NEWBOLD-ON-AVON.
DISPOSAL OF SURPLUS VEGETABLES.—At a recent meeting of the Food Economy Committee a proposal was made that a weekly collection of surplus vegetables and garden produce grown in the village should be sold to the Warwickshire Vegetable and Food Collecting Society. This proposal was enthusiastically received by the villagers ; a dumping station was decided upon, and on Wednesday last the first consignment, including spring cabbages, mint, parsley, sage, 416 lbs rhubarb, and eggs were dispatched.

THE PAPER SUPPLY.
No Newspaper Returns.

The effect of a new Order which will come into force early this month will be that no newspapers, &c., may be supplied to newsagents on “ Sale or Return ” ; consequently there will be no copies for sale casually, and only regular customers can be supplied.

Those who desire to have the Rugby Advertiser regularly, and all new subscribers, should therefore place their orders with a newsagent, and when extra copies are required for any purpose, notification should be given in time to enable the Agent to send the order to the head office.

We should like to thank our readers for the loyal and effective help they have given us in meeting the difficulties due to the paper restrictions by adopting our suggestion to pass copies of the Advertiser on to their friends. The result has been that, notwithstanding the necessary reduction in the number of papers printed, the Advertiser is read by as many people as before, and the paper stands pre-eminently the best medium in the district for all classes of advertisements.

DEATHS.

EYDEN.—Killed on active service in France on Whit-Sunday, May 19, 1918, Corpl CLARENCE ALFRED EYDEN, R.E., dearly beloved elder son of Mr. & Mrs. Alfred Eyden, 53 St. Matthew’s Parade, Northampton ; aged 27 years.

IN MEMORIAM.

CONOPO.—In memory of W. D. Conopo, of Kilsby, who lost his life on H.M.S. Queen Mary in the Battle of Jutland, May 31, 1916.—At rest.
“ Two years have passed, Oh, how we miss him,
Never will his memory fade ;
Loving thoughts will ever linger
Around his ocean grave.”
Oh ; for a touch of that vanished hand ;
Oh, for a voice that is still.”
—From his loving Father, Mother, Brothers and Sisters.

MASKELL.—In loving memory of our dear son, Pte. A. G. MASKELL, killed in action in France on May 30, 1916.
“ days of sadness still come o’er us,
Tears in silence often flow,
Thinking of the day we lost you,
Just two years ago.
Too far away thy grave to see,
But not too far to think of thee.”
—Sadly missed by all at home.

Eyden, Clarence Alfred. Died 18th May 1918

Alfred Eyden and Sarah Eleanor Mewis, the parents of Clarence were married on New Year’s Eve 1889. The Reverend John Murray Rector of St Andrews parish church Rugby, conducted the ceremony, and unusually eight witnesses appear to have witnessed and signed the Register.

Clarence was born on the 4th November 1890. He was baptized at St Andrews parish church Rugby on the 31st December 1890. December was an unusually warm month that year, with the average temperature being four and a half degrees Celsius or forty degrees Fahrenheit. If the day was indeed fairly mild the whole family must have been in good spirits as they walked to church from their home in Clifton Road.

Having qualified for the Lawrence Sheriff Grammar School for boys Clarence was obviously a boy of above average intelligence. The Census for 1911, on which he can be found, reveals that he was twenty years of age and lived at 165, Clifton Road, Rugby. This was most likely a house provided by the London North Western Railway. The other people also in residence were his Grandfather Richard Mewis aged sixty eight, who worked as a Railway engine driver and his wife Sarah, aged seventy, his father Alfred Eyden aged forty nine, Chief Rates Clerk LNWR Rugby, and his wife Sarah, aged forty four. Clarence was next, and worked as an apprentice for the LNWR at Leamington Spa. Maurice, the younger brother of Clarence was aged fourteen and a scholar at Lawrence Sheriff School. Edith Hughes, age eighteen, a general domestic servant, was also living in the house.

Clarence commenced his apprenticeship on May 29th 1905 at Rugby his salary being £20 per annum. From Rugby he moved on to Brandon, Long Buckby and Leamington Spa. His salary in March 1911 was £50 per annum. His employment at Leamington Spa ceased at the end of March, and on April 3rd 1911 he was transferred to the General Manager’s office Euston where he was employed as the private Clerk to the LNWR General Manager.

The family appears to have been musical: on 23 January 1915, at a ‘Concert for soldiers in the Church House’, arranged by the Entertainment Committee of the Conservative Club, songs were given by Mr. Clarence Eyden.  On the next Sunday, 31 January 1915, his mother sang, and was the soloist at a meeting of the Rugby Brotherhood at the Cooperative Hall with the notice, ‘Soldiers heartily welcomed’.[3]

His parents would later move to Northampton, meanwhile, presumably after his concert appearance in early 1915, Clarence joined up in London, as a Sapper, No.88204 in the Royal Engineers.  It was not long before he was sent to France and his Medal Card gives that date as 8 June 1915.  He was later promoted to be an Acting 2nd Corporal, and it was possibly then that he was renumbered, WR/252025 [possibly standing for War Reserve], and with his ten year’s railway experience, it is perhaps not surprising that he became a member of the ‘Railway Traffic [or Transportation] Establishment RE’.

The Establishment for the Railway Traffic Section, R.E. was 25 Officers and 174 Other Ranks.  3 Officers were Deputy Assistant Directors of Railway Traffic and the other 22 Railway Traffic Officers.  The Other Ranks were made up of 1 CSM, 30 Clerks & 56 Checkers (1 Staff Sgt, 4 Sgts & 81 Rank and File), 74 to act as Porters, Goods Guards, Loaders and Train Conductors (1 Sgt with 73 Rank and File).  The remainder of the unit comprised 13 batmen, 4 cooks and 4 men for general duties.[4]

So crucial was transportation that in the last months of the war, despite a shortage of front line soldiers, men with railway experience were being transferred from infantry units to railway operating companies.

Clarence died of wounds, but it is not known when or where he was working when he was wounded.  Because of his burial in St. Omer, he was possibly working in the St. Omer area, dealing with some aspect of railway organisation.

St. Omer had suffered a severe air raid on the night of 18/19 May 1918 when among other damage, a German air raid caused an explosion at an ammunition dump at Arque – some five miles south-east of St. Omer.  Indeed, recovering the wounded took five hours and 18 Military Medals were subsequently awarded to the female medical and transport staff.  On that occasion a number of men from the Chinese Labour Corps were also killed.  ‘A certain number of houses had been hit and some ammunition dumps and petrol stores and part of the railway line, so it was considered the Germans would think they had had a good night.’[5]

Various records state that Clarence both ‘Died in Action’ and ‘Died of Wounds’, however, his Medal Card notes that he ‘Died’ rather than stating ‘KinA’ or ‘DofW’.  This may imply that …

… some time had passed between … being wounded and dying – the next-of-kin were informed that he had ‘died’, rather than ‘died of wounds’.  Exactly how much time had to pass before this distinction was made is not clear.’[6]

From the dates, it is possible that Clarence was one of the casualties of the bombing of St. Omer, possibly when the ‘part of the railway line’ was hit and had reached hospital in St. Omer where he died that night, 18 May 1918, or possibly the following day.[7]  He was 27 year old.

He was buried in Plot: V. B. 9., at the Longuenesse (St. Omer) Souvenir Cemetery.  On his gravestone his family had arranged to be inscribed: ‘In Proudest Memory of One “Who Greatly Loved, Who Greatly Lived and Died Right Mightily”

St. Omer is 45 kilometres south-east of Calais and the cemetery at Longuenesse is on the southern outskirts of St. Omer.  St. Omer was the General Headquarters of the British Expeditionary Force from October 1914 to March 1916.  The town was a considerable hospital centre with the 4th, 10th, 7th Canadian, 9th Canadian and New Zealand Stationary Hospitals, the 7th, 58th (Scottish) and 59th (Northern) General Hospitals, and the 17th, 18th and 1st and 2nd Australian Casualty Clearing Stations all stationed there at some time during the war.  St. Omer suffered air raids in November 1917 and May 1918, with serious loss of life.  The cemetery takes its names from the triangular cemetery of the St. Omer garrison, properly called the Souvenir Cemetery (Cimetiere du Souvenir Francais) which is located next to the War Cemetery.

Clarence Alfred EYDEN is also remembered on the Rugby Memorial Gates; and on the WWI Lawrence Sheriff School Plaque,[8] which reads,

‘In Commemoration of our Brother Laurentians who Fell in The Great War, 1914-1918, Orando Laborando.

His Medal Card and the Medal Roll showed that he was awarded the British War Medal and the Victory Medal, and also the 1914-1915 Star.

His father received his back-pay of £5-11-2d on 16 October 1918 and later his War Gratuity of £15 on 2 December 1919.  Clarences’s parents appear to have left Rugby before 1918, and later in the CWGC record, Clarence is noted as the son of Mr A. Eyden, of 1 St. Pauls Terrace Northampton.

In the year 1921 the following memorial notice appeared in the Rugby Advertiser:
EYDEN. —- To the ever precious memory of Clarence, the dearly beloved and elder son of Alfred and Eleanor Eyden, who fell in the Great War on Whit Sunday, May 18th 1918. —- And the World passeth away, but he that doeth the will of God abideth forever.                                                                                                                                            

Clarence’s younger brother Maurice Eyden also joined up.  Reports in the Rugby Advertiser noted.

October 1916 – Maurice Victor Eyden (O.R), younger son of Mr Alfred Eyden, of Northampton, formerly residing in the Clifton Road, Rugby, has been gazetted 2nd Lieutenant, 3rd Battalion, Northamptonshire Regiment (Steelbacks), after a course of training in the Inns of Court O.T.C.[9]

July 1917 – Second Lieutenant Maurice V Eyden (son of Mr Alfred Eyden), 2nd Northants Regiment, has been promoted to the rank of First-Lieutenant.[10]

July 1918 – Mr. & Mrs. Alfred Eyden, ‘Denaby’, St. Matthew’s Parade, Northampton, have been advised that their younger son, Lieut Maurice V Eyden, 2nd Northants Regiment, reported missing on May 27th, is a prisoner of war in Germany and quite well.  His only brother (Royal Engineers) was killed in France on May 19, 1918’.[11]

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

– – – – – –

 

This article on Clarence Alfred EYDEN was researched and written for a Rugby Family History Group [RFHG] project, by John P H Frearson and is © John P H Frearson and the RFHG, February 2018. Other information by Charles Partington-Tierney

[1]      London and North Western Railway, Salaried staff register [No 2, pages 1613-2092] – Goods Department.

[2]      London and North Western Railway, Salaried staff register [No 2, pages 1613-2092] – Goods Department.

[3]      Rugby Advertiser, Saturday, 30 January 1915.

[4]      Ivor Lee, 8 August 2003, http://1914-1918.invisionzone.com/forums/topic/4011-railway-transport-establishment/.

[5]      Diary of the Matron in Chief in France and Flanders, TNA, WO95/3990, http://www.scarletfinders.co.uk/91.html.

[6]      http://www.epitaphsofthegreatwar.com/killed-in-action/.

[7]      The item on his brother in the Rugby Advertiser, 6 July 1918, gave the date of Clarence’s death as 19 May 1918 – the day following the bombing of St. Omer.

[8]      Information from https://www.rugbyfhg.co.uk/lawrence-sheriff-school-plaques.

[9]      Rugby Remembers, https://rugbyremembers.wordpress.com/2016/10/28/28th-oct-1916-the-boy-scouts-a-record-of-useful-work/, and Rugby Advertiser, 28 October 1916.

[10]     Rugby Advertiser, 14 July 1917, and Rugby Remembers, https://rugbyremembers.wordpress.com/2017/07/14/14th-jul-1917-the-rugby-baking-trade-no-more-men-can-be-spared/.

[11]     Rugby Advertiser, 6 July 1918.

28th Oct 1916. The Boy Scouts – A Record of Useful Work

THE BOY SCOUTS’ ASSOCIATION.
(RUGBY DIVISION) — A RECORD OF USEFUL WORK.

The annual general meeting of the above Association will be held at the Benn Buildings, High Street, Rugby, on Saturday, November 4th, at 3 p.m. when all those interested in the Boy Scout movement are invited to attend.

After the business—approval of balance sheet, election of officers, etc—the President, Mr Arthur James, will present the Divisional Colours to the 2nd (Laurentian) troop. These colours are awarded quarterly to the troop which has made the greatest progress during the quarter. The Patrol Competition Cup, given by Mr W T Coles Hodges, will also be presented to the winning patrol.

The meeting will terminate with a short display by the winning troop and patrol.

That the Division has been active will be evident from a perusal of the following report prepared by the Assistant District Commissioner :-

GENERAL PROGRESS.—It is encouraging to be able to report that the Division has maintained its strength, in spite of various adverse circumstances. A number of the boys were only waiting to attain the necessary age before joining the Forces, but the loss to the Division has been made up by the additional recruits. The corps of officers has suffered further depletion, due to its members joining the colours, and several troops are in abeyance, or have been badly handicapped from this cause, or due to the remaining officers being so much occupied with some form of war work as to be unable to devote the necessary time to the troops. The 1st (Town) Troop, which has been without a scoutmaster for some time, has been disbanded, but, on the other hand, the 16th (Elborow) Troop has been restarted under the scoutmastership of one of the Clergy ; and the Wolf Cub Pack, composed of boys too young to be scouts, has also been re-started, two ladies having kindly undertaken the office of Cubmaster. The 17th (Frankton) Troop, which had become very small in numbers, has had to be disbanded owing to the Lady Scoutmaster having to resign on account of her health. A satisfactory feature of the year’s work is the increasing efficiency of the Patrol System, under which the boys work together in teams of about eight, under a leader and a second, who are encouraged to take full responsibility for the leadership and instruction of their patrols. The Division now comprises 230 scouts and 18 wolf cubs, 120 of the scouts having passed their second class tests, and 31 being first close scouts. The total number of badges held for proficiency in various subjects is 744, as against 500 last year, and this increase is in spite of the fact that it is the senior boys who have been lost to the Division.

ROLL OF HONOUR.—The total number of members of the Division who have joined His Majesty’s Forces is now 152, 117 of these being scouts, and 35 officers. Three have died in their country’s service.

NATIONAL SERVICE.—The scouts have continued to distribute circulars and notices for various organisations, particularly for the Red Cross Society (V.A.D) and the St Cross Hospital. They have collected some 1,300 eggs for the wounded in the Rugby Town (V.A.D) Hospital. They have also collected waste paper and bottles for various funds, including 2 tons of old newspapers (which realise £8 per ton) for the National Relief Fund, and bottles which have realised about £2, to be given to the St John’s Ambulance Association. Owing to the shortage of labour, the 5th (B.T.H) Troop have provided a squad of boys each Saturday during the summer to assist the Bath Superintendent in cleaning out the Public Baths.

MOBILISATION IN CASE OF AIR RAID.—Although the scouts have been mobilised several times according to the scheme outlined in my last report, there has happily been no occasion for the practical application of their services.

DIVISIONAL COLOURS.—The new system of awarding these Colours according to the marks earned during the quarter, has proved satisfactory in that the Colours have passed from troop to troop, thereby stimulating the interest. Since my last report they have been won for the three quarters as follows :—1st quarter, 9th (Hillmorton) Troop, 2nd quarter, 3rd (St George’s) Troop , 3rd quarter, 2nd (Laurentian) Troop.

CAMP.—Preliminary arrangements were made for the holding of a Divisional summer camp, but owing to various adverse circumstances, and particularly to the inadequate number of Scoutmasters available to take charge, it was reluctantly decided by the Scoutmasters’ Committee, and with the approval of the Executive Committee, that it was impossible to hold such a camp this year. Some troops, however, held successful Troop camps in the neighbourhood, and one or two troops kept weekend camps going during the summer, thereby affording opportunities for the camp training, which is so desirable a feature of the scout movement.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Maurice Victor Eyden (O,R), younger son of Mr Alfred Eyden, of Northampton, formerly residing in the Clifton Road, Rugby, has been gazetted 2nd Lieutenant 3rd Battalion Northamptonshire Regiment (Steelbacks), after a course of training in the Inns of Court O.T.C.

Second Lieut Percy W Ivens, son of Mr W Ivens, of Harborough Parva, has recently been gazetted to Suffolk regiment. He joined the army in September, 1914, did six months’ service in France and four months’ training at a Cadet School prior to receiving his commission.

LOCAL CASUALTIES.

Pte Cooke, of the Royal Warwicks, has been invalided from France, and is now in hospital at Carrington, suffering from bullet wound in the left hand. Pte Cooke, who was an apprentice at Messrs Frost & Sons, went out in November, 1914, and has been through most of the fighting out there in which the Warwicks have been engaged.

SECOND-LIEUT H E BRITTON (R.F.A) KILLED.

Second-Lieut H E Britton, R.F.A, who has died of wounds in France, was employed in the Controller Engineers’ Department at the B.T.H for about twelve years. He was the son of the Rev J Willis Britton, and several years ago he did useful service as a forward for the Rugby Football Club, and he was later a playing member of the Hockey Club. In August, 1914, he joined the Howitzer Battery, and proceeded with them to the front. About twelve months ago he was granted a commission. He was about 34 years of age.

B.T.H CASUALTIES.

Amongst B.T.H men who have been killed in France during the past month are : Sergt M P O Brown, of the Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, and Lance-Corpl E P Kittle, of the same regiment. Before the War Sergt, Brown was employed in the Foundry Department, and Lance-Corpl Kittle in the Punch Shop.

NEWBOLD-ON-AVON.

PTE A J SMITH KILLED.—Mrs Anderson, Worcester Street, has received official news that her son, Pte A J Smith, was killed in action in France on August 24th last. Pte Smith was a native of Newbold, and belonged to the Oxford and Bucks Light. Infantry. He enlisted soon after the war commenced, and previously was working at the B.T.H. He was a good footballer, and played with the Newbold 2nd Team for several years. Afterwards be joined the New Bilton St Oswald’s team.

WOLSTON.

SERGT F C VINCENT.—Great satisfaction was felt in Wolston when the local Press announced that he had been awarded the D.C.M. This makes the second honour to a member of the Wolston Football Club. Recently Mr Silas Poxon was awarded the Military Medal, and both were members of the Brandon and Wolston Football Club. Sergt Vincent resided in Wolston for a number of years, and attended the Wolston School. He finished his education at Bablake School, Coventry.

BOURTON-ON-DUNSMORE.

Mr and Mrs White have received news that their son, Corpl W F C White, has been wounded in the thigh, and is now in hospital in Newcastle-on-Tyne. He joined the Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry on August 31, 1914, was sent out to France July, 1915, and was promoted Corporal in September last.

LONG ITCHINGTON.

REECE BULL HONOURED.—Amongst the names selected for honours in the Service Battalion of the Royal Warwicks in connection with the effort to relieve the Kut Garrison occurs that of Corpl Reece Bull (No. 4022). He is the son of Mr and Mrs Jim Bull, of this village, and has partaken in many actions. He was seriously wounded in France by shrapnel on June 17, 1915, and also injured by falling debris. His many friends offer him their sincere congratulations in the distinction he has attained.

COVENTRY MUNITIONS TRIBUNAL.
At the Coventry Munitions Tribunal on Thursday in last week the following Rugby cases were dealt with :-

W G Tasker, Rugby, was fined 10s for being absent without leave on Monday night, October 9th.-For losing 50 hours in the nine weeks ending September 30th, Miss P Burton, of Bilton Hill, was fined 10s, to be paid in two weekly instalments.-A similar penalty was imposed on Miss M Sparkes, New Bilton, who had lost 50¾ hours in the same period.

Miss E Rhead, Rugby, was charged with being absent without permission on the afternoon of Monday, October 2nd, and the morning of the following day.—The girl stated that she had taken a friend home in the mid-day interval on Monday, and by the time she had been to the chemist for her it was four o’clock.—The Chairman asked why she did not go back to the factory then ; and she said it was no use going back for two hours. On the Tuesday morning she was expecting a soldier friend from the front, and the train aid not arrive until after the starting time.-The case was declared proven ; but, in view of the expense of going to Coventry and the loss of time, it was dismissed, and she was warned not to come before them again.

C Morbery, Rugby, for being on the premises worse for liquor on the night of October 9th, was fined 10s.——F J Marchant was fined 10s for being absent on October 3rd ; and E R Harratt, Rugby ; A J Pitts, Badby ; and G Dexter, Rugby, were fined £1 each for similar offences.

At the Thursday sitting, A Harrison, Rugby, was fined 30s, to be paid in three weekly instalments, for being absent from the 3rd to the 10th October, both dates inclusive.—In view of the man’s excellent record, the case against E Hall, of Rugby, who was charged with absenting himself on October 3rd, was dismissed.- A Alcock, Rugby, was similarly summoned ; but in view of his previous good record, the case was adjourned for one month.—R H Masters, Newbold, was charged with a like offence. He claimed that he was entitled to these days, as he had worked during the “ rest period ” ; but the firm replied that he asked for Tuesday, and took Tuesday and Wednesday.—The case was dismissed.-J Ireson, Rugby, was summoned in respect of October 3rd ; but wrote stating that he had 14 teeth extracted during the “ rest period.”—Fined 2s 6d for failing to notify the firm.

WOMEN ON THE LAND.

The Warwickshire War Agricultural Committee have reported to the Warwickshire County Council that 1,479 women had now been registered by the District Sub-Committees, of which number 786 are, or have been working on the land. Of the women registered, a large proportion, owing to domestic ties, are only able to undertake casual work. It was anticipated there will be an increased demand for this class of labour next spring. The Committee add :- Although women undertaking temporary war work in agriculture are able to obtain exemption in almost every case from the employed person’s share of the contributions payable under the National Health Insurance Act, 1911, such exemptions do not relieve the employers of their share the contributions. Farmers do not object to paying the contributions, if the women in respect of whom they are paid can obtain some benefits in return, but having regard to the temporary nature of their employment it is impossible for these women to obtain any benefits, as the periods of their employment are not of sufficient duration to permit of the payment of the number of contributions necessary to qualify for the benefits. Claiming contributions from farmers under such circumstances is an injustice, against which we have protested to the Board of Agriculture, but we regret to say the Government are unwilling to move in the matter.

FARMER : “ Can you cure bacon ?” New Hand (a girl help) : “I’m afraid I can’t. You see, I came as a farm hand—not as a vet.”—From “ Punch.”

HEARD IN THE CHILDREN’S COURT.

A BAD BOY.-The wife of a soldier stationed in Egypt asked for an order for her son to be sent to an industrial school. He was quite beyond her control.-Mr P A Crofts said he knew the case. The boy was quite un-manageable. His mother had flogged him severely, but he only turned round and laughed. He was always stealing.-Supt Clarke : Perhaps she does not flog him right. They don’t laugh when I flog them.—An order was made.

DEATHS.

EMERY.—In glorious memory of BDR. ERNEST H. EMERY, who was accidentally killed, whilst on active service somewhere in Greece, October 1st, 1916, aged 19 years.
“ Thou hast done thy life’s work ; enter into rest.”

WILSON.—Killed in action in France on September 3rd 1916, Lance-Corpl S. W. WILSON, Oxford and Bucks L.I., the dearly loved husband of Louisa Wilson, Swinford.
“ Now the labourers task is o’er ;
Now the battle day is past ;
Father, in Thy gracious keeping,
Leave we now thy servant sleeping.”

IN MEMORIAM.

CATER.—In loving memory of ERNEST CATER, youngest son of the late Francis and Annie Cater, of Watford. Reported missing March 15, 1915. Now presumed to have been killed on that date.